292 JULY 2022

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RECREATION WALKING and CYCLING TRAILS

JULY 2022 ISSUE NO 292

New Zealand Walk:

Autumn walks in McClaren Falls Park

New Zealand Walks:

Tantalizing

Taranaki

Need2Know:

How to use a Distress Beacon

New Zealand Walk:

Photo Contest winners

Queen Charlotte Track Not all who wander are lost

NZ $8.50 inc GST

New Zealand Walk:

River Road to Clive walk or ride over a great Hawkes Bay landscape www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

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Banks Track Akaroa

bankstrack.co.nz

A multi day walk over the volcanic hills of Banks Peninsula. Cliff tops, secluded ocean bays, lush forest, tree ferns, waterfalls and birdsong. Penguins and NZ fur seals. Gaze into our magnificent night skies.

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www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


CONTENTS

Issue 292 - 2022

2 Banks Track 3 Contents 6 New Zealand Walks: Tantalizing Taranaki 10 New Zealand Walk: Autumn walks in McClaren Falls Park 13 New Zealand Guided Walks: Not all who wander are lost 18 Walking New Zealand Monthly Photo Contest 20 New Zealand Walking Access Commission: Call to protect access on stewardship land 21 Tour: Walk the Queen Charlotte Track staying on the ship Sweet Georgia 22 New Zealand Walks: Oxford Forest walking tracks 24 My Favourite Walk: Coopers Creek to Ryde Falls 26 Overseas Walks: Walking through history in Ireland 33 Books: I will make you Passionate about Exercise - Build your Immunity Day by Day - Grape Expectations 34 High Achiever: Celia Wade -Brown the outdoor explorer 36 New Zealand Walk/Cycle Trail: River Road to Clive over a great Hawkes Bay landscape 40 Need to Know: How to use a distress beacon 42 Shared Pathway: Lake Dinstan Cycle Trail awarded Great Ride status 44 High Achiever: Bridging the gaps up in the North 43 Index of previous 14 issues 45 Coming Events: New Zealand 47 Coming Events: Australia 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 48 New Zealand Country Breaks 51 Pak A Roo Jackets 52 Real Meals Cover: A beautiful summers day having a lunch break at the tarns on the Key Summit Track, Fiordland. Photo by Jenny Tod, Christchurch.

WALKING New Zealand

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Published Monthly

PUBLISHER/EDITOR: Frank Goldingham: Phone 06-358-6863, 027-274-0726 CONTRIBUTORS: Juliet Gibbons, Olivia Murray, Phillip Donnell, Barbz Lowther and Ruth McKie ADVERTISING MANAGER: Frank Goldingham 0800 walking (925-546) 027-274-0726 Email: walkingnz@xtra.co.nz COMING EVENTS ADVERTISING: Frank Goldingham 0800-walking (925-546) Email walkingnz@xtra.co.nz SUBSCRIPTIONS: Phone 0800-925-546 SUBSCRIPTION RATES: New Zealand Residents; (from 1 July 2022) 12 issues $99.00 posted, 24 issues $179.00 posted, 6 issues $59.00 posted DIGITAL $29.00, 12 issues Australia: 12 issues: $122.00 Rest of World: $138.00 NEWSAGENT DISTRIBUTION: Are Direct NZ Limited WALKING NEW ZEALAND LTD, P O Box 1922, Palmerston North Telephone 06-358-6863 - Fax 06-358-6864 E-Mail: walkingnz@xtra.co.nz

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The information and views expressed by contributors are not necessarily agreed to by the editor or publisher,

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Luxury Kimberley Walk

Celebrating 30 years of Great Walks

The 2022/23 season marks the 30th anniversary of New Zealand’s Great Walks. Formed in 1992, the Great Walks were established as a means of managing and conserving the most popular tracks in New Zealand. While some tracks continue to be immensely popular with visitors, there are many ways to enjoy them if you have a bit of flexibility around where and when you go. So get out there and hike or bike, walk or run, or even paddle around our most treasured parts of the country – the choice is yours. Above: Image by Miles Holden

Walk into Luxury’s new Kimberley Walk is a luxurylodge based adventure allowing guests to discover the Kimberley by air and on foot over four days. It features day hikes and swimming oppor tunities at Mitchell Falls to the gorges of the El Questro Wilderness Area. Guests return each day to the luxury comfor t of El Questro Homestead on this all-inclusive experience. The Kimberley Walk is the fourth in Walk into Luxury’s collection of Signature Walks, which includes the Cape to Cape Walk in Margaret River (one of the Great Walks of Australia). The Kimberley Walk combines accommodation, food and wine and luxury touches with the best day walks in the remote Kimberley region.

Streets for People update

New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) are currently working with 15 councils across the motu to plan and scope projects as part of the Streets for People programme 2021-24, that aims to help create healthier futures by putting people and place at the heart of New Zealand streets. Throughout May and June 2022, the 15 successful councils will work with the NZTA team to build capability so they are better prepared to partner with their communities to move quickly and easily to accelerate street-changes for walking and cycling. In June and July, each council will present their proposal to NZTA. The final leading cohort of councils and the successful projects will be announced later this year. Streets for People builds on the solid learnings and experiences from the Innovating Streets for People programme, established by NZTA in 2018.

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225kms of urban cycleways delivered

The Urban Cycleway Programme ran from 2015 – 2019 delivering 225km of urban cycleways, accounting for 60% of the total kms built in New Zealand since 2014. In total 50 projects were completed across the country including Te Rewa Rewa Bridge, Coast walkway and cycleway, New Plymouth, the Heathcote Expressway, Christchurch and the Northwestern Cycleway in Auckland. The recently released Urban Cycleway Programme Review has pulled together all the lessons learnt throughout the programme and provides details of what is needed for an optimal infrastructure investment programme including a network level approach and national and local leadership. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


Walk talk

Three cycle projects approved in Christchurch

Christchurch City Council has approved three projects that will make it easier and safer for people to get into the central city by bike. The first project involves creating a separated cycle lane on each side of Antigua Street, from St Asaph Street to Moorhouse Avenue, where it will link into the Quarryman’s Trail major cycleway route. There is already a two-way cycle lane on Antigua Street between Tuam and St Asaph streets. New traffic calming measures and a 30km per hour speed limit will also be put in place on Antigua Street. The second project involves making changes to the Antigua Street footbridge to ease the existing bottleneck that constrains the flow of pedestrians and cyclists, creating safety issues. The third project will see changes made to Worcester Street, between Fitzgerald Avenue and Manchester Street, so that people using the Rapanui Shag Rock major cycleway route can get in and out of the central city easier. That section of Worcester Street will become a 30km per hour shared-road, with sharrows, and a speed hump to slow-down motorists. Council Head of Transport and Waste Management Lynette Ellis says the three projects are part of the Council’s push to improve the safety and accessibility of cycle connections within the central city. Work on the Antigua Street cycle lanes and footbridge will begin in late 2022, while work on the Worcester Street changes will begin in September 2022.

Designing excellent urban streets for New Zealand

Urban streets play a big role in supporting vibrant, safe, healthy and inclusive city life by creating safe, attractive spaces for people. NZ Transport Agency is developing an Aotearoa Urban Street Guide to provide a national framework and high-level principles for excellence in multi-modal street design for urban spaces. The guide will provide an overarching direction for New Zealand by supporting existing good practice internationally; complementing best practice design guidelines for walking, cycling and public transport; and supporting work already underway by local authorities. NZ Transport Agency is working with the transport sector and national/local government to develop content One of the key actions within the Road to Zero road safety strategy’s road infrastructure and speed focus area is a review of infrastructure standards and guidelines, updating them to reflect current best practice and filling gaps where they exist. This guide is an important part of supporting this action.

Signage to be improved

After the article written by Judy Eva on the Waikanae River Loop Walk, the Kapiti District Council is now in the process on increasing the signage there.

You can now view and enjoy the latest issue of Walking New Zealand magazine online for only $2.50 at http://www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

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Mt Favourite Walk

Tantalizing Taranaki The famous Ruahumoko Tarn with Mt Taranaki in the background. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

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New Zealand Walks

Tantalizing Taranaki By Phillip Donnell

M

aunga Taranaki (2518m) stands like a lonely sentinel defiantly guarding the region to which he gives his name (meaning “barren mountain”). Mao-

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ri say he was banished from the company of his fellows in the centre of the North Island for having an illicit affair with the graceful Pihanga, wife of the proud and jealous Tongariro. This distinctive symmetrical andesite cone dominates the countryside. He’s the latest of a series of volcanoes in a single line from Moturoa south to Kaitake and Pouakai, both now much-eroded remnants of much larger peaks. Since Mount Taranaki’s most recent activity happened as late as 1620, he is more correctly deemed a dormant rather than extinct volcano, and is well-known for rapidly-changing moods and weather conditions. Egmont National Park covers a circular area of 33,527ha extending for a radius of 10km from the summit. It is the obvious and unavoidable focus of any walking excursion into the region. However, Taranaki also boasts three marine reserves, iron sand beaches fringed with great surf, wonderful lakes, spectacular parks and gardens, and fantastic museums and galleries. A network of walking tracks links these features and offers

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a unique perspective of Taranaki’s legendary landscape. Footsteps Walking Club’s Tantalizing Taranaki day-walks excursion (27 November – 3 December 2022) is an opportunity to go and enjoy much of what Taranaki has to offer, including all the key points of historical interest and natural beauty. Whether exploring the alpine splendour of the mountain tracks, imbibing the emerald swards of rolling farmland, or meandering a path along the dynamic littoral, discovering Taranaki by foot will give you an experience like no other. Begin with the best of New Plymouth, including tooth-like Paritutu Rock, the award-winning coastal walkway (with the unusual Rewa Rewa Bridge), reflections in Lake Mangamahoe, the famous Pukekura Park (beautifully floodlit at night), and the Te Henui, Tupare or Huatoki trails through picturesque urban valleys. Venture northwards to the Whitecliffs Walkway, where the ebony sand contrasts with its pristine ivory backdrop. The Three Sisters play with their Elephant at Tongaporatu. At 74m, Mount Damper Falls is the highest single-drop waterfall in the North Island and has become a “must see” for travellers. You are now ready to “hit the mountain” in four bite-size sections – first its northern flank, then eastern, southern and western slopes. From the North Egmont Visitor Centre, the very fit and adventurous could attempt a summit climb. An out-and-back jaunt from Mangorei Road to the famous Ruahumoko Tarn is another demanding workout. Most, however, will settle for less strenuous options such as one of the Ngatoro, Veronica, Maketawa or Tahurangi loops, perhaps combined with the Connett Walk or Holly Hut Track Lookout. Eastern delights emanate from the Stratford Plateau. Mangonui Gorge channels you inexorably to the mountain’s sole skifield. Above: Mt Taranaki in all her glory. from the north Below left: Paratutu Rock. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


New Zealand Walks

The Enchanted - Waingongoro combo crosses one of the deepest fern-lined canyons in the park. Kamahi, Patea and York Loops can all be traversed in a day, and in the evening you can climb through the predator-proof fence at Lake Rotokare to spot kiwi. The southern slopes of Egmont have a somewhat different origin. When the volcano was active, material thrown up from the crater fell back into it, blocking the main outlet. The forces within, lacking the power to blow out the plug, es-

caped through the side to form the subsidiary Fantham’s Peak (1968m), named after Fanny Fantham, who in 1887 was the first woman to climb it. You can do the same in five to six hours return. Alternatively, shorter walks from the Dawson Falls roadend are equally breath-taking. Konini Dell, Hooker Shelter, Hasties Hill and Kapuni Circuit are worthwhile, but the pick of the bunch is the Wilkies Pool Loop. Several towns dot the South Taranaki Bight: Patea, Hawera, Manaia, Opunake, Okato and Oakura, These afford convenient café pauses as you explore the western periphery. Long and challenging trails trend upwards from the park boundary to Waiaua Gorge, Kahui Hut and Bell’s Falls. Alternatively, the dramatic coastline is best sampled via the Ohawe to Waihi Beach Coastal Walkway, taking you past the fortified pa where Maori first lived, cliffs made of 3-million-year old soft papa rock, a wide range of sea life in numerous rock pools, Rangatapu Marae, and the remnants of a pioneer tram trail. Cape Egmont lighthouse and Parihaka are worth a visit.

In 2017 Taranaki was voted by “Lonely Planet” as the second best region in the entire world to visit. They were impressed by the huge variety of attractions in what is a relatively compact area. You will be impressed too. Why not come and join us next summer for a week of walking which is not only good for body, soul and spirit but also surprisingly kind to the pocket. For details please visit our website www.footstepswalkingclub.com or contact us at 021 172 3244/ footstepsanz@gmail.com.

Above right: The Coastal Walkway is popular with walkers, runners and cyclists. Below left: Mt Dampier Falls. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

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My Favourite Walk

Autumn walks Hikers Wool is 100% New Zealand wool. Cushion your feet to prevent pain, rubbing and blisters. Buy online or at selected stockists For more info visit www.hikerswool.co.nz

10 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292

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Above: Reflections from the lakeside track at McClaren Falls Park.

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My Favourite Walk

in McClaren Falls Park Walking New Zealand magazine is available at all

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My Favourite Walk

T

Autumn walks in McClaren Falls Park

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By Barbz Lowther

he walks in Mcclaren Falls Park are lovely at any time of the year, but stunning in Autumn, when all the exotic trees show their colours. Lake Mcclaren was created in 1925 after the construction of a dam and power station; and 190 hectares of land beside the lake, was set aside for a park. Planting began in the 1960’s to create one of the best collections of trees in the North Island, which is now home to many native birds. We spotted several kereru, and saw lots of fantails and tuis flitting around. Mcclaren Falls park is only 15 minAbove left: Along the Lakeside Track. Above right: One of the many Keruru in the park. Below left: At the waterfall where glow worms can be seen at dusk. Below right: In the shade on the Lakeside Track.

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My Favourite Walk

utes drive from Tauranga. The falls can be viewed from a bridge at the park entrance. They are fascinating, ranging from a gentle flow to a stunning display of raging white water, depending on the amount of rain in the area. Not far from here, is a car park and visitor centre, with displays of trees and birds in the park. There are a variety of walks, ranging from 15 minutes to a couple of hours in length, offering something for all levels of ability. One of the most popular walks, is the lakeside track, which follows the lake edge to the top of the lake. It is flat and easy and offers lovely views of trees reflected in the water, and swans and ducks are never far away - magic photo opportunities. Another option, is the waterfall track, a short loop through native bush to a small waterfall. This is fun to walk at dusk, when glow worms can be seen. An interesting loop from the waterfall car park, takes you up the Nikau Track to the top paddocks, over Pin Oak campsite, where camping is permitted, and on to top flat. In amongst the trails is a disc golf course for family fun. A left turn takes you through Punga Grove to Pine Tree Knoll, with its beautiful views over the park. You can then follow Sunrise Track back down to the lake, and walk past Cherry Bay, a pretty picnic spot, and back to your car, in just over an hour. Another interesting walk takes you beyond the equestrian area, through native bush to ‘the 3 sisters’ - three large Rimu trees. Maps are available at the Visitor centre. You can walk as long or as little as you like, and end your ramble with a coffee in a tranquil outdoor setting, at the cafe. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

Above left: Swan and cygnet at the lake edge. Above right: Crossing the bridge at Cherry Bay. Middle right: Signs to remind walkers to consider the 300 sheep grazing in the park.

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NZ Guided Walk

By Juliet Gibbons

Not all who wander are lost

N

ew Zealanders have always been great travellers. The ‘OE’ has been a rite of passage for many, drawing Kiwis to explore far flung corners of the globe. But these days a new phenomenon, the ‘DE’ seems to have taken on greater appeal. Otherwise known as the ‘domestic experience’, this emerging tradition is more than likely due in no small part to a global pandemic, conflict in Europe and a climate conversation which has some thinking twice about international travel. It is also a renaissance to a simpler time and a great chance for people to reconnect with nature, says Juliet Gibbons, the co-owner of Wilderness Guides based in Picton. “I think a lot of New Zealanders have fallen in love with their own

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country during what has been a difficult couple of years. That saying has become true – not all who wander are really lost,” she says. “Kiwis have got out and about, when they could, explored their backyard, done something new and realised what a great country we live in.” Juliet and her husband Steve have operated Wilderness Guides for 23 years this October and she says prior to Covid, life was going along very well. “We had just celebrated the 20th anniversary of the business with our staff and life could not have been better. A few months on and we were wondering where to from here.” The couple had had tough years before. In their first year of business, there was a severe drought that af-

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fected many parts of Marlborough including the Marlborough Sounds. Parts of the Queen Charlotte Track were forced to close due to fire risk and being their first year, it was a financial disaster and almost forced them out of business. “Somehow we managed to survive back then and now, with support of family, staff and New Zealanders who have continued to travel and explore their backyard, we have come through,” she said. “We have welcomed more New Zealanders than ever through our doors to experience the Queen Charlotte Track. It has been humbling to have this support and exciting Above: Covid has created an opportunity for us to do something new. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


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NZ Guided Walk

Not all who wander are lost

to be showing fellow Kiwis what a fantastic place the Marlborough Sounds is.” Juliet is confident Kiwis will continue to travel domestically despite the opening of New Zealand’s borders to the rest of the world and international travel resuming. “It is going to take a while for us all to feel relaxed about travel – and perhaps we won’t ever see that same scale of travel again. Perhaps that’s not a bad thing,” she says. Ranging from one day to many days in length a trip on the spectacular Queen Charlotte Track with Wil-

derness Guides is about good times, relaxation, exploration, conservation, and great local food. Moreover, Juliet says, the setting, in the geologically unique Sounds, a labyrinth of drowned river valleys and sheltered peninsulas, waterways and islands which stretch over 1500km, is unique in the world. “Meretoto/Ship Cove, where the Queen Charlotte Track begins, is a site of both national and international significance where the first sustained contact between the New Zealand Māori and the European took place,” she says. It was here at this snug cove in the outer Queen Charlotte Sound he replenished water supplies, rested his men, and repaired his ships on five different visits between 1770 and 1777. Despite the Queen Charlotte Track not being part of the Great Walk network, its popularity has remained strong with New Zealanders. “We just do what we do here in the Marlborough Sounds. Great walks really are in the hearts and minds of those who experience them and

without a doubt, the Queen Charlotte Track is one of the best,” Juliet says. The couple have spent more than two decades sharing their backyard with thousands of visitors to the region every year and sending them home with fond memories of the Marlborough Sounds. “We have made life-long friends with so many customers, staff, and business colleagues along the way. Tourism is a rewarding and positive industry to work in.” “Our kayak, bike and walk tours totally immerse people in the Marlborough Sounds environment, be it walking or biking along the Queen Charlotte Track or The Link Pathway or kayaking around the beautiful

Above left: Go for a wander, you never know what you may find – perhaps even yourself. Below right: Reconnecting with nature has never been so important.

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NZ Guided Walk

bays and coves of Queen Charlotte Sound. Our staff are our biggest asset – they love their job, and it shows as they share this place with our guests, be they locals or visitors to the region,” said Juliet. “I guess the unique thing about Wilderness Guides Marlborough Sounds is us and the positive work environment we create for our team to ensure we give the best possible experience to all the holidaymakers that come through our doors. We have always been completely dedicated to the concept of customer first.” The couple’s children Ben (15) and Lizzie (12) are now helping in the business as well and Juliet says the couple have a keen sense of responsibility to leave a positive legacy in the Marlborough Sounds for future generations. “We feel that our industry can be leaders in this, and it is something we are working on to find the right way to do so. Overseas visitors see in a heartbeat what a special place the Marlborough Sounds is – we as locals have the responsibility to ensure it stays that way and is sensitively managed while constantly balancing the various competing interests including tourism,” she said. There are a lot of great conservation initiatives already underway in the Sounds such as Kaipupu Point, Sounds Restoration Trust, Picton Dawn Chorus, and the Endeavour Inlet Conservation Group. “This is a unique opportunity that we all have as New Zealanders to reconnect with nature – and to reshape our visitor industry with protection and enhancement of our unique environment at its core. We are working on some important initiatives with like-minded others to see this happen,” says Juliet.

Above top: A new dawn for New Zealanders’ and their love affair with travel. Above left: Leaving a positive legacy in the Marlborough Sounds motivates Steve and Juliet Gibbons, with their children Ben and Lizzie.

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Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

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Photo Contest

We are looking for the best digital photos each month depicting walking Now the time to get your digital camera out or look through your digital images and enter the

Walking New Zealand Digital Photo Contest

PHOTO CONTEST

The image could be a scenic scene, a walk on the beach with the dog, a bush walk, a street walk or anything walking that takes your fancy. The rules are simply: there must be a person or persons walking in the picture either front, side or back on, and can be in the distance. We require an emailed image in high resolution mode, in jpeg format as an attachment, and NOT embedded in Word or in the email, and NOT a link to a website to be downloaded. The subject line must have the words “Walking New Zealand Photo Contest” and the email must include the NAME, POSTAL ADDRESS and phone number of the person who took the photo and a small caption. In this contest ONLY ONE emailed photo accepted per month. Entry in the contest automatically allows us to print the image. The person who has their photo published will receive a six month subscription or a renewal to Walking New Zealand magazine of six months. If a picture is chosen for the cover page the person will receive a 12 month subscription or renewal.

PHOTO CONTEST

Email your entries to: walkingnz@xtra.co.nz with s u b j e c t l i n e “ Wa l k i n g N e w Z e a l a n d P h o t o C o n t e s t ” Only EMAILED entries will be accepted.

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Photo Contest

Opposite page above: Above: Returning from the top of the Pinnacles on one of the 2022 ECHO Walk Festival walks. Photo by Carey Reynolds, Matamata Below: A welcome lunch break for Marie-Therse, Linda and long-legged Liz on the Nydia track in the Pelorus Sound. Photo by Vicky Ross Red Beach.

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Above: Walking up Mount Maunganui after Dawn parade. Photo by Selwyn Parker, Tauranga. Below left: A fantastic weekend on the Jumbo circut, some big steps for little legs. (5year and 7year old) Photo by Kate Burgess, Wellington. Below right: Here is Warren on the track on Motuara Island in the Marlborough Sounds on a perfect day. Photo by Rebecca Bowater Atawhai, Nelson.

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Call to protect access on stewardship land By Olivia Murray

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he New Zealand Walking Access Commission wants to help the Department of Conservation (DOC) protect public access when it reclassifies stewardship land. Stewardship land is land that was allocated to DOC when it was formed in 1987. It includes former state forests and Crown land considered to have conservation value. There are over 3,000 parcels of stewardship land of varying sizes across New Zealand — over 2.7 million hectares or 9% of New Zealand’s total land area. Many of these areas are home to threatened species and high-priority ecosystems. Reclassifying stewardship land can raise the level of protection for the land where needed. The Department of Conservation has been seeking people’s views on improving the legal process for reclassifying and disposing of stewardship land. That process usually involves surveying the land, scientific analysis of the species and ecosystems present, working in partnership with tangata whenua and consulting with the public to understand and protect conservation values That’s a complex and slow task, so most stewardship land has not yet been reclassified, despite an intention to do so since 1987. Because of

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this, people can often be uncertain about the status of stewardship land. In our submission on reclassifying stewardship land, the Commission supports developing a more efficient process for reclassification. However, we expect the new process to consider future public access to the whenua. For example, the review of every parcel of stewardship land needs to consider where current public access, including tracks and trails, is needed, or may be lost if the land were to become privately owned, where rivers or coastlines may erode, where slips could occur, where new recreational activities could seek access, and so on. The reclassification process must protect conservation values, including public access and recreational enjoyment to and through the whenua, natural linkages and enduring practical access to public conservation lands and waters, rivers, lakes or the coast. T he commission believes public interest in access and links across the country, no matter how small or remote, outweighs any case for permanent loss of that access. New legislation also must not weaken New Zealand’s commitment to conservation values and purposes, now and for future generations. The Commission’s full submission is available at walkingaccess.govt.nz www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


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New Zealand Walks

Oxford Forest walking tracks

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his 11,350-hectare Oxford Forest is a remnant of the great beech and podocarp forests that once cloaked inland northern Canterbury. The forest was a source of abundant food for the local Mäori of Ngäi Tüähuriri, who travelled from Kaiapoi pä on food-gathering expeditions. Tawera is the Mäori name for the area which means ‘hot blow’ – no doubt attributed to the infamous Canterbury nor’west winds. The forest’s magnificent timber later led to the growth of the Oxford

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township, which had 11 sawmills operating in the area by the mid 1870s. Two major fires fanned by strong nor’west winds in 1898 resulted in the decline of the sawmilling industry, with the last mill of that era closing in 1912. A panel on the Coopers Creek to Ryde Falls track tells the rich sawmilling history in this area. Formed walking tracks take you through mountain beech and scattered podocarp remnants of rimu, kaikahikatea, mataï and tötara. Oxford township is about 56 km

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north-west of Christchurch via the northern motorway (SH 1) then westward on Tram Road or SH 72. From Oxford township there are four road approaches to the Oxford Forest Conservation Area. Coopers Creek car park At the western end of Oxford, turn into Woodside Road. After about 8 km turn right into Mountain Road which leads to the Coopers Creek car park. View Hill car park From Oxford drive west on SH 72 for about 2 km, then turn right into www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


New Zealand Walks

the forest edge. Lees Valley About 6 km north of Oxford, on Ashley Gorge Road is the turn-off to Lees Valley. The road winds through a steep gorge to Lees Valley. About 1.5 km after the Lees Valley Bridge, a DOC signpost marks the start of Townshend Track. This is a 4WD drive track that runs next to the Townshend River for about 7 km through farmland, until you reach the forest. For permission and information about vehicle access along this 4WD track, contact the Mt Pember Station office on (03) 312 4351 between 8 am and 2 pm, Monday to Friday. Note: This track may be closed to vehicles during lambing or other farming operations and dogs are not permitted on farmland at any time. Foot and mountain-bike access is permitted year round. There are two tracks in the area that are classed as walking tracks.

Coopers Creek to Ryde Falls Track

Walking time: three hours one way, 7 km

From Coopers Creek car park, this well-formed track initially crosses cleared private land with views of the plains and surrounding hills. It enters the beech forest and finally descends to Coopers Creek to view the five-tier Ryde Falls. A panel by the, now closed, Ryde Tramway tells of the area’s rich sawmilling history. Note: Keep to the marked track when crossing private land.

View Hill to Ryde Falls Track

Walking time: two hours one way, 3 km Take Wharfedale Track from View Hill car park. Turn off about 20 minutes into the forest from the car park. Descend to Coopers Creek to view Ryde Falls. View Hill to Coopers Creek (via link track) Walking time: three hours one way, 7 km To take this link track, turn off Wharfedale Track about 10 minutes into the forest from the car park and join Ryde Falls Track. Follow this track east to Coopers Creek carpark.

Woodstock Road. After about 10 km, turn right up Ingrams Road which turns left into Perhams Road. An AA sign indicates the turn-off to the start of the Wharfedale Track where the View Hill car park is located. In times of heavy rain two fords on Perhams Road may become impassable. Leave gates as you find them on this road. Eyre River area From Oxford drive west on SH 72 for about 3 km, then turn off along Woodstock Road. After about 14 km take the road leading right (Trig Road). This passes a small exotic pine forest before crossing a ford close to Above View from the track from Coopers Creek to Ryde Falls. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

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My Favourite Walk

By Yvonne van Eerden

Coopers Creek to Ryde Falls

Oxford Forest Conservation Area The tramping group had not been to Ryde Falls for quite a few years so we put this tramp on the program. The weather forecast was good, it was a little cloudy but this soon cleared for sunshine with no breeze at all. The area has plenty of tracks for trampers, walkers and bikers. At first we had views of the rolling hills. We soon were into our walking mode and before you knew it we had a break for a cuppa. There were patches of mud to go through or around, you could take your pick. This was not a problem to us as we all had sturdy

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tramping boots. The track was good under foot mostly. A few of the group went ahead and we always made sure if there was anyone behind that we waited at the junction to ensure that the tramper would go the correct way. We came across several black beech up rooted trees and it was unbelievable how they had been blown over in the wind. We had creeks to cross which was quite fun, because as always we tried Opposite page: above left: Morning tea time. Above right:The Ryde Falls. Below left: Time for a group photo. Above: The rolling hills from the track. Below left: The tree that wind blew over. Below right: Heading back to the car park.

to keep our boots dry. Once we reached the open area near the falls some stayed to have lunch and others continued for a few minutes to the falls to investigate and take photos. The falls were really beautiful with all the greenery surrounding the water. A really special place to see. None of us felt brave enough to try the temperature of the water. After a good lunch we started to head back. It is always much faster on the way back. We still talked to more people doing the walk, that was fantastic to see. A great day had by all even though we had muddy boots which always makes you look like a very good keen experienced tramper.

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25


Overseas Walks

26 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292

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www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


Overseas Walks

Walking through history in Ireland Coastline at Mallin Head. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

27


Overseas Walks

Walking through

By Barbz Lowther

I

n August the year before the Covid lockdown we went wandering around the tourist spots of Northern Ireland, and the North West of Ireland. Starting in Belfast we drove to Derry, where old grievances are still very much apparent. Outside the city walls, huge murals depict the everlasting controversy . Things seem Above left: Retracing steps to Donnard Wood with views over the Irish Sea. Above right: Donard Wood and the Glen River by Slieve Donard. Middle left: Dunluce Castle on the Causeway Coast. Below left: An old cottage by the famiulne village. Below right: Cairns marking the way to MacKoght.

28 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292

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www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


Overseas Walks

coast of Ireland and was used history in Ireland west during WW1, as a coastal defence. It harmonious, but underneath lots of resentment still simmers. Here, any local approached for directions, would be eager to tell us the history of the area from the time of the ‘plantations’ in the 17th century; while some wanted to retell life from 1060. We journeyed west over an invisible border to Donegal, where currency was suddenly in Euros, rather than in British pounds. Travelling north we explored villages on the Inishowen Peninsula, where roads are no wider than many of our walking tracks. The road followed the shores of Lough Swilly, which has played a significant part in Ireland’s history many fleets being intercepted at its entrance. It is also the inspiration for John Newton’s famous song ‘Amazing Grace’. When he nearly lost his ship in a violent storm in the Atlantic, he found refuge in this Lough. He wrote the song in 1773 to celebrate the ‘miracle’. On the coast of Lough Swilly, we visited the remains of Fort Dunree (An Dun Riabbach) This Fort was built during the Napoleonic period, in a strategic position,. to protect the Above right: The coast at Jordans Castle. Below right: Mussenden Temple on the Causeway Coast. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

is now a military museum. Continuing north, we wandered through the Doagh famine village, from where, over a million people emigrated to USA and Canada during the mid 1800’s. We ventured south, stopping to walk around Horn Head (Corran Binne). This headland with its wild rugged coastline, rises a sheer 600ft out of the Atlantic, giving awesome views of many islands and promon-

taries, and endless ocean. Our next stop was Corcreggan Mill Hostel - a lovely stone building, beside the old Mill House and wheel. This mill is situated midway between Dunfanaghy, where many people from Scotland have holiday houses, and Falcarragh, an area of staunch Gaelic speakers. Although only 8kms apart, they seemed like two different countries. We left here to climb Mt Errigal (An Earagail)- 751m - the highest peak in both Derryveagh Mountains

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

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Overseas Walks

Walking through history in Ireland and Donegal. Between the carpark at the base of the mountain, and the Quartzite summit was a huge bog, covered in grass and heather. Although a few dry trails traversed it, no one had thought to mark them, and we watched many people turning back after squelching through thick black ooze. We managed to find a way through to a rocky trail in about 15 minutes. It was an interesting climb over white scree and boulders, with expansive views of the surrounding countryside. It was awesome stark country. As we climbed higher, the quartzite on the upper slopes sparkled in the sunlight. About two thirds of the way up there is a huge cairn , marking a spot where you can follow another ridge to Mt Mac koght (Earagail Bheag) - wee Erigal. We reached the first peak on Erigal in about an hour and a half, and sat enjoying the solitude, before ventur-

30 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292

ing along One Man’s pass (a narrow ridge) to the second peak. There we had stunning views over scree, to lakes Alton, Dunlewey, and Nacung with a magnificent backdrop of mountains and coast. We retraced our steps quickly because an icy wind was blowing. Looking down on the bog, the trails were more clearly defined, so we reached the car with dry feet. The rest of the day was spent exploring Glenveagh Castle and its lovely gardens on the edge of lough Beagh.( lake of the Birch) From here we headed East to the Causeway Coast in the extreme north. A coast of high cliffs, ruined castles, and spectacular coastal scenery. We visited Downhill Demesne an 18th century mansion, and Mussenden temple, (modelled on the temple of Vesta in Italy) . Within the grounds were beautiful cliff top walks, with

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amazing views right along the coast. We explored Dunluce Castle, built in the 13th century, looked through Bushmills Distillery, found the tiniest church in Ireland, and finally reached the ‘Giants Causeway’ Here legend has it, that 40,000 hexagonal columns were built by the Irish giant, Finn McCool, during his attempt to build a bridge to Scotland. In actual fact they were a result of volcanic activity. We spent an interesting hour climbing over the rocks, and marvelling at ‘The Organ’ (a stack of vertical columns) and ’The Giants Eyes,’ two sockets, where huge boulders have fallen out of the rock face. We stopped at Ballintoy, a picturesque little harbour, where the tea-room is famous for its muffins, before venturing onto Carrick a Rede Rope bridge. Here a 45 minute walk Above left: Walking along the coast at Jordan’s Castle. Above right: The Giants Causeway. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


Overseas Walks

takes you to a narrow swing bridge spanning a chasm between the mainland cliffs and Carrick a Rede Island. It was a truly beautiful piece of coast . A short drive took us to ‘The Glens of Antrim” where nine glens radiate from the Antrim Plateau down to the east coast. We spent a morning wandering along a pretty mossy path bordered with ferns, in Glenariff - the Queen of the Glens - The Glenariff River cascades down in a series of spectacular waterfalls ,and pools, 22 within 1km. Continuing down the Antrim coast, we took a ferry from Portaferry

www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

Above lef t: Mussenden Te m p l e o n the Causeway Coast. A b ov e r i g h t : One man pad between the twin peaks of Ereigal. Below left: A waterfall in Glensriff. Below right: Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge.

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

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Overseas Walks

Walking through history in Ireland across Strangford Lough and drove down to Ardglas, a delightful little fishing village, where we tasted the best smoked haddock ever! Our aim was to climb Slieve Donard (850m) in the mountains of Mourne, the highest peak in Northern Ireland. This mountain derives its name from St Domangard, a disciple of St Patrick, who is said to have lived here as a hermit

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A very clear path led us beside the Glen River, through Donard Wood, a mixed broadleaf forest. The river splashed it’s way over waterfalls, clattered over stones and pebbles, and carved channels through enormous boulders, to create deep green pools. We soon reached open pasture land, filled with wild flowers. Near the river was a stone igloo shaped structure- ‘The Icehouse’ . This primitive fridge was built in the 1800’s, and was filled with blocks of ice, cut from the river in Winter, From here the trail climbs 3kms to

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the saddle between Donard and Conmedagh, and reaches the Mourne Wall. This is like a mini ‘Great Wall of China’. Two metres high and one metre wide and constructed of dry stone. It runs 35kms across five major summits. It was built in the early 1900’s to mark the watershed of the Silent and Annalong valleys. From here you follow the Mourne Wall up reaching the summit of Donard in half an hour. The Cairn at the top is supposedly the burial place of Slainge, the first physician in Ireland. On a clear day you have views as far as Scotland, the Isle of Man, and Snowdonia. Unfortunately mist moved in as we arrived at the top, and all we saw was a white blanket, but within half an hour we were back down to clear blue skies. We found Ireland enchanting, and it is understandable that so many have been inspired to write songs about it. Above left: On the road to Inishowen. Above right: A mural at Derry Below: middle: The Ice House. Below right: Road sign at Urris.

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32 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292

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The latest book from bestselling author and television personality Dr John Tickell has an essential message for all Kiwis heading into winter. Building immunity is vital in these Covid times and at any age. The ongoing research confirms that people with compromised immunity are at far higher risk for viral infection, hospitalisation, and death. There’s no need for negative headlines—what the world needs now is information about what WE can do for ourselves, for our workers in organisations, and for our families. Dr John Tickell—trusted medical doctor and author of The Great Australian Diet—shows you how to increase your own immune resistance against foreign invaders in Your Best Immunity. His ACE Way (Activity, Coping, and Eating) is simple, practical and effective. The book details the science about immunity and vaccines in easy to understand terms, and arms the reader with tools to build their immunity day by day with exercise, diet, stress management and more. It’s a lifestyle John lives himself as a brain cancer survivor. Now is the time to increase awareness of our personal opportunity and responsibility to self-manage and assist building immune resistance in the New Zealand population.

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Grape Expectations is a personal account of the beginnings of the Pohangina Valley Estate Yineyard in a region unknown for grape-growing. The book tells of some of the hurdles the family had to overcome in order to establish a successful business selling award-winning wines. It covers the original decision to set up the vineyard, the initial sprouting of the vines, and the development of the first wines. It takes the reader through the growth of the business to the point where major events were being hosted on the property, and some of the trials and tribulations of hosting these events. An entertaining and interesting memoir of a unique part of the Manawatū’s history. In the annual Manawatu Walking Festival the vineyard walk was one of the most popular walks in the festival. The book is 126 pages and contains 135 colour photographs.

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Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

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High Achiever

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34 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292

Celia Wade-Brown the

C

elia Wade-Brown is best known to many people as the former mayor of Wellington. But since that political adventure, she has become a different type of adventurer, first walking Te Araroa, then cycling, then Tour Aotearoa and more recently kayaking around significant parts of the motu. She’s also a member of the Walking Access Commission Board and Te Araroa Trust Board, and she founded Living Streets Aotearoa and organises the Wairarapa Walking Festival. “It was a very big challenge,” says Celia. “I called it my political detox after stopping being mayor. And it was also a really great chance to reconnect with my other half because you know, when you are both doing busy jobs you don’t see as much of each other as you might. “So going from occasionally passing at breakfast and a couple of meals

- 2022

in the evening to being 24-7 tested the relationship – and I’d say we came through stronger. We didn’t have too many debates about which way the route went. We had one or two. I was quite used to seeing the back of his legs disappearing up a hill. But that was balanced out by he usually made the coffee for me when I got there.” Not long after returning from five months of exploring the length of NZ, Celia then set off on Tour Aotearoa to cycle across the country too. “The obvious difference is in Tour Aotearoa at least some of the time you’re pedalling,” says Celia. “Actually, quite a lot of the time I found I was pushing the bike so it was like hiking, with a bike, up the steep bits or sometimes down the steep bits as well.” “Tour Aotearoa took me a total of Above: Celia Wade-Brown, at lunch on an island in Lake Manapouri. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


High Achiever

outdoor adventurer just over 30 days, so it is one month, as opposed to five months. And it was really satisfying because you could always get to somewhere you could eat and drink easily. “But you didn’t quite get that away from everything feel that you get from tramping, particularly somewhere like the Richmond Ranges or over the Takitimu Range where, you can make out the route, but there is not really even a path in some of it. So, yeah, if you want a deep wilderness experience, tramping is still the best way to go.” After that adventure, Celia moved onto the sea and has been kayaking around corners of the country. She points out that access is especially important for kayakers. “Often you want to know can you land somewhere? Or, if you desperately need to land somewhere have you got to be very apologetic to a farmer, or is it DOC land, and it will be fine?” “When you are walking to a place, there is a land connection already, whereas, when you are sea kayaking, or for that matter river kayaking, which I know less about, sometimes there is a very nice beach to land at, and potentially a campsite.

STAY SAFE IN THE OUTDOORS T Take a locator beacon with y you when you are hunting, h hiking or working anywhere re remote and make sure you w will be rescued quickly

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“One of the issues with access from kayaking is you can go to places or want to go to places that you can only get to from the sea. When you are walking obviously, there is some land access to whether it is a valley or a beach or whatever. “But if you’re kayaking, sometimes you have gone around some steep cliffs, and there is a little beach, and it would be really nice to land there, but you are not sure whether it is public or not, you’re not sure what your rights are. I don’t think any landowner will object to you landing in an emergency. But this is more for a planned lunch landing or even camping. It is really important to know whether it is public land or private land.” As a Wellington politician Celia had a close connection to access issues on the capital South Coast. “One of the areas I worked on when I was a councillor was getting better walking access along the coast from Island Bay to Lyall Bay. «There’s been a road there for, I don’t know, as long as there have been roads in Wellington probably, but there didn›t used to be any proper footpath access. “And I was very pleased that both along the Houghton Bay foreshore and further along Te Raekaihau Point we have not got quite a decent foot access. “What I would say though, is that we don’t have decent cycling access. And cycling is a good form of exercise, it is a good form of commuting. If you can manage to go through a park when you are commuting, whether you are walking or cycling, it is even better. “I was quite motivated to get walking access, and I just wish we had done some separate cycling tracks as well. “Now I am living in the Wairarapa, we’re right on the footsteps of the Tararua Forest Park, which is fantastic access from the eastern side near Carterton, where I live.

“Locally, in the Wairarapa we’ve just had a wonderful win with the help of the New Zealand Walking Access Commission. I haven’t been directly involved, but I know the people who care about this area, and it’s an area called Rewa Bush. “It is a DOC reserve with some fantastic mature podocarps in it that, until recently, was landlocked by forestry. There is a physical road, but it had had locked gates. With the help of the local regional field advisor, and some legal advice from head office, the forestry company had now opened the gates and it just means that people can cycle through there or they can walk in the bush. “Without physical access, you can’t get in there and do bat monitoring, you can’t get in there and do trapping. There are a whole lot of environmental outcomes that are supported by good, legal, physical access.” “The link between recreation access and environmental work is very interesting. I think one of the best examples locally, is Makara Peak, where the original motivation was to get some mountain bike tracks in, many of which are fine for walking too. But, the particular people involved have done a superb job of revegetation and trapping. And that combination of making a contribution to the planetary good, if you like, as well as having a lot of fun, I think it’s pure gold.” Below: Whareama Road, Rewa Bush. Photo by by Julia Ryan

WE-9025668AA

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

35


New Zealand Walk/Cycle Trail

River

Above top: There are a number of seats along the trail. At this spot it is the exit to Bivvy Cafe. Insert right: The sign post at River Road car park. Above: A walker takes her dog for a walk. Below: Sheep grazing among the vines.

T

he walk from River Road near Havelock North to Black Bridge is part of the Landscape Ride one of Hawkes Bay’s most popular cycling and walking trails. The walk starts at River Road where there is a large carpark, about 3.7km east of the Havelock CBD. The walk to Black Bridge is a distance of 7.7kms. The flat wide limestone track runs along a stop bank beside the Tukituki River and with the stopbank being raised, it gives interesting views of

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New Zealand Walk/Cycle Trail

Road to Clive walk or ride over a great Hawkes Bay landscape

the surrounding landscape. Looking back Te Mata Peak can be seen above the leafy residential area of Havelock North. The trail passes hectares of vineyards, orchards to the left, while the Tukituki River to the right is mostly hidden by trees. Sheep may be seen grazing among the vines. The track passes the Bivvy Cafe link, about 7 kms from River Road which is ideally situated amongst the vines. The cafe is open on weekends and public holidays between Oc-

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Above; A group cycling towards the River Road end. Below right: There are gates when it goes through farmland. Below left: Two cyclists on the trail.

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

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New Zealand Walk/Cycle Trail

River Road to Clive walk or ride

tober and April. Snacks and cold drinks are served, as well as ■ Hawthorne coffee. Take cash as no eftpos at present). Here walkers and cyclists can have a well-earned rest and there is a toilet provided. Mobile phone coverage is available on all parts of the trail. It is recommended that walkers and cyclists carry drinking water. The trail is open year round and is suitable for families. Favourite times of the year are the flush of spring blossom, autumn colours and is especially popular during the scorching Hawke’s Bay summers when numerous big events are hosted, including Art Deco Weekend, the Mission Concert and Horse of the Year. Above left: The track on the stop bank gives great views over the vineyards Middle left After Black Bridge the trail goes to the coast and along to Clive. Cape Kidnappers can be seen in the distance. Below left: Wildlife can be seen from the trail on a lake between Black Bridge and Clive.

Fact file

The River Road to Black Bridge Section is part of the Landscape Trail, a loop trail that starts and finishes at the Havelock North i-Site and goes to River Road to Black Bridge to Clive to Te Awanga to Clifton and back by Red Bridge to Havelock North - a total of 56kms.

38 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292

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PRICES FROM JULY 1 2022

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Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

39


Need 2 Know

How to use a distress beacon By Ruth McKie, DOC Digital Channels Analyst

Keen tramper Ruth shares her experience activating a distress beacon ramping is one of my favourite things. Nothing beats the thrill of an empty weekend, great forecast and a map full of possibilities.I’ve done lots of tramping over the years to a range of places – Great Walks, day trips, remote backcountry huts through to off-track bush bashing and peak bagging. But until recently, I’ve never needed to activate a distress beacon, although I always make sure there’s at least one in the group.

T

Above: Ruth McKie holding her beacon. Photo Lucy Holyoake

40 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292

I’m very aware, and I hope you as a reader are too, of how incredibly valuable distress beacons are – they’re lifesavers. I’m sure you’ve read news stories of searches going for days because they didn’t have a beacon or stories where it was a successful rescue because the beacon made things fast and easy. I’ve read lots of stories about people activating their beacon but often it’s light on detail, just ‘we activated our beacon and the helicopter came’. Which left me with lots of unanswered questions, like how, what, why, when!? I figured I can’t be the only one, so I’ve talked to experts and gathered the research. Here is my personal beacon story, as well as some key FAQ’s that will be next month’s issue of this magazine. When I had to activate a beacon on a Great Walk It was a calm bluebird morning; the last day of an amazing trip, and I was in my own world soaking in the waterfall views, waiting for the sun to hit it to get a nice photo. I noticed a bit of activity going on off to the side of the track and

- 2022

my friends told me that there was someone who’d hurt themselves and someone was going to be activating their distress beacon. It was a busy Great Walk, and there were lots of trampers around (a fact which turned out to be both fortunate, and unfortunate). I went over too in case I could help. A lady had badly hurt her leg. Her partner had tried to bandage it up with a makeshift splint, but she was struggling to walk and the road end was still about two hours away. She did not have a beacon, but someone else had offered to activate theirs for her. The different groups of trampers wanting to help had been discussing what to do. They’d decided that the best thing was to send someone down the track to a flat area on the map where a helicopter could land, and activate the beacon there. The plan was the lady’s partner would slowly carry her down the track and someone else would carry their two packs down to where the beacon was being activated. This way the helicopter could land in a flat spot and the rescue team could bring a stretcher up the track to meet www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


Need 2 Know

Above left: Sun hitting the waterfall creating a rainbow. Photo by Ruth McKie Above right: Ruth enjoying the lake reflections on a tramp. Photo by Lo Hughes Below left: Taking a group break to check on each other, layer up in the cold wind and adjust my boots. Photo by Luke Sutton

the lady. I offered to take one of the packs and headed off to the flat spot as planned. What we didn’t realise until later, was that the flat spot was about a 45minute walk from where the woman was injured. It was too painful and not practical for her to be carried that far. So, when the helicopter landed at the flat spot only to realise the injured person wasn’t there, but miles down the track, they had to take off again, and find the lady based on verbal descriptions of her location and then winch her off the track. Long story short: after some confusion, the lady was safely rescued, her partner was reunited with their packs, and he walked out to the road to take the shuttle to go meet her at the hospital.

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What I learned from this experience While this story had a happy rescue ending, it was an important learning experience. On reflection, once the adrenaline rush faded, I realised the pack, patient, and the beacon all need to stay together. In a crisis, when lots of people are trying to be helpful, all with different ideas, it can be easy to lose sight of this important factor. The patient needs their pack – they might need warm clothes, food or shelter if help can’t arrive quickly. And the beacon needs to show the rescue team exactly where the injured person is – yes if you are near a clearing/flatter spot, then setting it off nearby could be better, but only if you’re sure it’s not too far away. It needs to stay as close as possible to the injured person, and then leave it to the rescue team to decide on the best way to get to you, as they have the tools and knowledge on how to do that safely. Getting familiar with my own distress beacon After this experience on my Great

Walk trip, when I was packing my beacon for my next trip, I thought: wait do I still know how to activate this if it was to happen to me? It’s been so long since I got it, that I hadn’t taken it out of its protective bag and actually looked at it in ages. I took it out and had a good look, remembering how the antenna unfolds and where the ‘go button’ is, and reassured myself that it would be very hard to accidentally set the button going. It was then that I noticed the test button. Test your beacon I realised I hadn’t tested the beacon since I got it! I looked up the instructions for my model to see what the recommended testing frequency is, and mine said once a year and no more than once a month. The less the better as it significantly drains the battery. I decided now was a good time to test it and I’ve put a calendar reminder in my phone to test it in one year’s time. I learned a lot from this experience. It also made me go home and dive deeper into my many beacon questions.

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

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Shared Pathway

Robertson says the vision right from the outset was to create a worldclass and accessible trail network linking the Great Rides in our area. “Joining of the trail network is a huge initiative, and The Lake Dunstan Trail’s success and indeed its new status, is testament to that vision for our community and to what the entire network will become.” Cycle trails have experienced a boom in popularity over the past couple of years, with COVID lockdowns and Kiwis staying on our shores, more have got out on their bikes to experience our beautiful landscapes. None more so than the unique Lake Dunstan Trail with its several bluff clip-ons and swingbridges traversing imposing rocky bluffs amongst other stunning features. Add to that the advent of e-bikes making our trails even more accessible and one can begin to understand the numbers through the trail Otago Community Trust chair, Diccon Sim said today is a day not only to celebrate the Lake Dunstan Trail achieving Great Ride status, and to pay tribute to the foresight of those who pushed to make this project happen, but to celebrate the benefits that cycle trails create for the communities that surround them. COQTNT have completed the first three kilometre part of the link through to the Queenstown Trails via the Kawarau Gorge and the Nevis Bluff, along Bannockburn’s Felton Road with all its wineries. The remainder of this section of trail has been consented, with detailed design work now underway. The Roxburgh Gorge trail link is also in its detailed design phase. It is expected that work will be able to start on these two projects before the end of this year. Progress has been made on the trail through to Luggate and towards Wānaka. Final negotiations are underway with landowners and an announcement of the route is planned for this year.

.

Lake Dunstan Cycle Trail

awarded Great Ride status

C

entral Otago’s newest cycle trail, the Lake Dunstan Trail has been awarded Great Ride status, along with the Whakarewarewa Forest Loop trail near Rotorua, taking the number of Great Rides of New Zealand to 23. This was announced by the Minister of Tourism, Hon. Stuart Nash. “These are the first new cycle trails to be added to the Great Rides network in a decade. The expansion of the trails comes at the perfect time as we reconnect to key international tourism markets, and will be a boost to regional economies,” says Stuart Nash. “The Lake Dunstan Trail is a fantastic addition to both the Great Rides network and the myriad of other trails in Central Otago and the lower South Island. It traverses some of the most breathtaking landscapes of the Cromwell Gorge and is a feat

42 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292

of engineering and design brilliance, with suspended boardwalks hanging off rock faces. The trail, officially opened in May 2021 by Minister Nash, has had over 80,000 people utilise the trail. Central Otago Queenstown Trail Network Trust (COQTNT) chair, Stephen Jeffery says, “Our Trust committee have been staggered by the trail user numbers. The economic benefits for Central Otago in the trail’s first year of operation is calculated to be in the millions.” A tripartite funding agreement between central government ($13.15 million), Central Lakes Trust ($11.15 million) and Otago Community Trust ($2 million) was announced in 2016 to fund the 170km network of trails joining the Great Rides of the region. The Lake Dunstan Trail is the first of five to be completed by COQTNT. Central Lakes Trust’s chair, Linda

- 2022

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CONTENTS for previous 15 issues JUNE 291 2022

2 Queen Charlotte Track 3 Contents 6 New Zealand Walks: The Abel Tasman Coastal Track - has experiences to suit you 11 New Zealand Walk: Dashing Rocks Walkway with stunning views of the bay 12 Australian Walk: Mossman Gorge in a thriving rainforest 14 News: Te Araroa needs more volunteers 14 Need 2 know: Regular walking will make you fit and healthy 17 New Zealand Walk: Wanaka Lavender Farm walk 18 Walking New Zealand Monthly Photo Contest 20 New Zealand Walks: From Capital to Kapiti and on to Castlecliff 22 News: Tracks to be built by Transmission Gully Project 24 Great Walks: The Kepler Track - a wilderness adventure above the clouds 30 New Zealand Walk: Hatea Loop Walkway links town with Pohe Island 34 New Zealand Walks: Three scenic tracks reopened in Waitakere Ranges 35 New Zealand Walks: Gibbons, Pararaha Valley Track and Muir Track 36 New Zealand Walks: Ashburton to Hakatere River Lake Hood trails 38 New Zealand Walks: Six of the best walks for bird spotting around Auckland 40 New Zealand Walk: Seaview Gardens Reserve 38 Australian Walk: Wiradjuri Trail - a track that winds around Wagga Wagga 43 Index of previous 14 issues 45 Coming Events: New Zealand 47 Coming Events: Australia 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 48 New Zealand Country Breaks 51 Pak A Roo Jackets 52 Real Meals

MAY 290 2022

2 The Banks Track 3 Contents 6 New Zealand Walks: Waikanae Estuary, lagoon and river walk 11 New Zealand Walk: Hamilton Lake Walkway a popular walking route 12 New Zealand Walk: Breathtaking views on Mt Fyffe adventure 15 New Zealand Walks: Walks and hikes in the Mt Fyffe/Seaward Kaikoura Range 18 Walking New Zealand Monthly Photo Contest 20 New Zealand Walks: Turning Points 22 New Zealand Walks: Routeburn Track an ultimate alpine adventure 28 Australian Walks: Five great walks in Australia 31 My Favourite Walks: Fascinating walks around Golden Bay and beyond 36 New Zealand Guided Walks: Going guided on the Paparoa Trail 37 New Zealand Walks: Put on your walking shoes and hit the trails 41 Subscription page 42 Little feet walk the length of New Zealand 44 Index of previous 14 issues 45 Coming Events: New Zealand 47 Coming Events: Australia 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 48 New Zealand Country Breaks 51 Pak A Roo Jackets 52 ECHO Walking Festival

APRIL 289 2022

2 The Banks Track 3 Contents 6 New Zealand Walks: Autumn ambles at the end of the golden weather 10 New Zealand Walk: Mirror Lakes world famous for beauty 12 Need2Know: DOC’S top five wildlife photography tips 14 New Zealand Walk: Spinnaker Lookout Walk

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15 New Zealand Walk: Take a walk along Waiheke Island’s Art Tail 16 Walking New Zealand Monthly Photo Contest 18 My Favourite Walk: Walks: Walking amongst the rock pillars of the Rock and Pillar Conservation Area 24 New Zealand Walks: Hikes and Walks out East 29 New Zealand Walk: Wairoa River Walk and Cycleway 30 New Zealand Walk : Walking through an Arboreal Ark 36 New Zealand Walk: An arboretum wau ot there? 37 New Zealand Walks: Put on your walking shoes and hit the trails 40 New Zealand Walk: The Greytown Trail an idyllic 5km walk 44 Index of previous 14 issues 45 Coming Events: New Zealand 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 48 New Zealand Country Breaks 51 Pak A Roo Jackets 52 ECHO Walking Festival

MARCH 288 2022

2 The Banks Track 3 Contents 6 New Zealand Walk: St James Walkway - through pastoral land, beech forest and sub-alpine regions 13 New Zealand Walk: Five days four nights on the St James Walkway 16 Walking New Zealand Monthly Photo Contest 18 Auckland Walks: Five half-day hikes around Auckland 20 My Favourite Walk: Walking around Mangere Mountain Domain 25 New Zealand Walk: Morrinsville River Walk through mature trees 26 Triple peaks 2022 - Your Summer getaway event 29 My Favourite Walk: Taking time again on Tongariro 29 New Zealand Walk: Taranaki Falls Walk with excellent mountain views 9 Subscription page 30 New Zealand Walks: Great Barrier Island Aotea Track for a bit of a challenge 35 New Zealand Short Walk: Scenic reserve for an easy short walk 36 New Zealand Walk: Discover Pelorus Sound and historic Nydia Track 42 Training: Training programme to walk a marathon 43 Index of previous 14 issues 45 Coming Events: New Zealand 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 48 New Zealand Country Breaks 51 Pak A Roo Jackets 52 Wilderness Guides

FEBRUARY 287 2022

2 Goldfields 3 Contents 6 New Zealand Walks: White sand, green forest, brown kiwi - an island holiday like nowhere else 9 Subscription page 10 New Zealand Walks: Footprints of Toi walk, Whakatane, Bay of Plenty 12 New Zealand Walks: Nga Tapuwae o Toi Walkway 14 New Zealand Walk: Awapikopiko Reserve for a picnic and a short walk 16 Walking New Zealand Monthly Photo Contest 18 High Achievers: The women that champion outdoor access 20 Shared Trails: Dunstan Trail links Cromwell with Clyde 24 New Zealand Walks: Waihi Beach to Houmanga Bay 29 New Zealand Walks: Four short walks from Waihi Beach 30 New Zealand Walks: Nowell’s Lakes Walkway where you will enjoy nature 35 Need2Know: Don’t go missing, go hiking 36 Australian Walk: Lake Hart - walking on salt 38 New Zealand Walk: Ongaonga Village - steeped in history 40 New Zealand Walks: Hacket Track a feature in Mt Richmond Forest park 43 Index of previous 14 issues

20 Walking New Zealand Monthly Photo Contest 22 High Achiever: Q&A with accommodation provider and trail legend Bill Trolove 44 Manawatu Striders Super Seven 24 High Achievers: Unlikely couple Series meet and live their dream 45 Coming Events: New Zealand 27 Need2Know: New Pocket Maps 48 New Zealand Walking Tours app helps walkers explore 48 New Zealand Country Breaks 28 New Zealand Walk: Waterfalls 51 Pak A Roo Jackets a feature of Upper Nihotupu 52 Wilderness Guides Dam Walk JANUARY 286 2022 33 New Zealand Walk: Plans for City to 2 Banks Track Sea pathway taking shape 3 Contents 34 Need2Know: Everyday planning for 6 News: YHA closes 11 hostels everyday people 6 Te Araroa Trail: Te Araroa walkers 36 Subscription page get creative to complete trail 37 My Favourite Walks: A day tramp journey in Akaroa - Curry Track/Purple 7 New Zealand Walks: Walking Peak Track through old forest in Whirinaki 40 Event: New direction for the 13 New Zealand Walks: Ohakune Front Runner Hoka Christchurch walks for all fitness types Marathon 16 Walking New Zealand Monthly 42 Index of previous 14 issues Photo Contest 43 Coming Events: New Zealand 18 New Zealand Walks: Back to the 47 Coming Events: Australia 70-Mile Bush 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 22 New Zealand Walk: A walk to 48 New Zealand Country Breaks see fascinating geology in the 51 Pak A Roo Jackets Far North 52 Goldfields Cavalcade 24 Oversesas tours: Bike, boat and OCTOBER 283 2021 barge new tours in France 2 Banks Track 26 New Zealand Walk: Beyond Motu 3 Contents Falls - a magic breathing and 6 New Zealand Walks: Queen Charconservation space lotte Track - It’s time to awaken 32 New Zealand Walks: A feast of your adventurous soul waterfall walks in the Bay of 10 New Zealand Walk: Port Ligar a Plenty truly unique experience 36 Directory of Walking Groups 14 New Zealand Walk: Nikau palms 40 New Zealand Walks: Ohakune and sea stacks at Point Elizabeth Old Coach Road steeped in 16 Walking Access Commission: Trust history to develop and support walking 42 News: West Coast commits to and cycling trails stronger focus on walkers 17 New Zealand Walks: Over 50 43 Index of previous 14 issues walks in this year’s Waiheke Walk44 Manawatu Striders Super Seven ing Festival Series 20 Walking New Zealand Monthly 45 Coming Events: New Zealand Photo Contest 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 22 Event: Tois! Whakatane’s stunning 48 New Zealand Country Breaks trail challenge 51 Pak A Roo Jackets 24 Need2Know: The faster you walk, 52 Real Meals the better for long term health DECEMBER 285 2021 especially as you age 2 Goldfields Cavalade 26 New Zealand Walks: Cobb Vally 3 Contents region - one of the most interest6 New Zealand Walks: Paparoa ing in the country for trampers Trail: with alpine tops, limestone and naturalists karst landscapes and thriving 32 New Zealand Walks: Papamoa’s rain forests two great recreational areas 13 New Zealand Walk: More to 36 Subscription page Explore in Kerikeri 37 Covid-19: What you can and con14 New Zealand Walks: Three not do in Level 3 interesting walks in Egmont 37 Book: Cheers Mate! Walkabout National Park in Australia 20 Walking New Zealand Monthly 38 New Zealand Walk: Pukeiti - a Photo Contest garden of national significance 22 High Achiever: Regeneration the 42 Index of previous 14 issues Bradley way 43 Coming Events: New Zealand 24 New Zealand Walk: Beehive Creek 47 Coming Events: Australia a zig zag through creek walk 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 26 New Zealand Walks: Summer in 48 New Zealand Country Breaks the South 51 Pak A Roo Jackets 29 New Zealand Walks: A chance to 52 Goldfields Cavalcade walk throughout New Zealand 30 High Achiever: Bringing the fun by SEPTEMBER 282 2021 2 Queen Charlotte Track - Wildergoing to work with an e-bike ness Guides 30 New Zealand Walk: Wenderholm 3 Contents Regional Park walks for a 6 New Zealand Great Walk: Great workout Walks myth busting 32 New Zealand Walk: Lighthouse 14 New Zealand Wlks: The best popular with photographers of Opotiki: 5 easy walks in the 33 New Zealand Walk: Waipapa Point eastern Bay of Plenty Coastal walk - for seabirds and 20 Walking New Zealand Monthly marine mammals Photo Contest 34 Directory of Walking Groups 22 New Zealand Walk: Sea lionsand 38 New Zealand Walks: 10 beautiful seals an attraction at Sandfly Bay. walks in Queenstown 24 Subscription page 42 Index of previous 14 issues 25 Need2Know: Indoor pathways im43 Coming Events: New Zealand prove people’s mental wellbeing 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 26 Australian Walks; Murray River Sa48 New Zealand Country Breaks fari the latest edition to Australian 51 Pak A Roo Jackets Wildlife Journeys 52 Real Meals 29 Banks Track NOVEMBER 284 2021 30 New Zealand Walk: Grovetown 2 Banks Track Lagoon - a great conservation 3 Contents effort in Marlborough 6 New Zealand Walks: Five exhilarating 32 Overseas Walk: Explore Rarowalks in the Tongariro/Kaimanawa tonga’s mountainous interior area 34 New Zealand Walk: Withering 9 High Achiever: Ronnie gets back on Heights -Tawarau the bike at age 72 Conservation area, King Country 10 New Zealand Walk: A Winter beach 39 Need2Know: New lookout for walk south of Bennetts Bay now open Waitarere 40 High Achievers: Thames Hospital 12 New Zealand Walk: The Pakihi Track staff scrub in Hauraki Ranges for total seclusion 42 Index of previous 14 issues 18 High Achievers: Three women take 43 Coming Events: New Zealand up 1000km challenge 47 Coming Events: Australia

48 New Zealand Walking Tours 48 New Zealand Country Breaks 51 Pak A Roo Jackets 52 Taupo events

AUGUST 281 2021

2 Queen Charlotte Track - Wilderness Guides 3 Contents 6 New Zealand Walk: Bannockburn Sluicings NZ’s own ‘wild west’ 8 New Zealand Walk: Cable Bay Walkway for coastal views 11 New Zealand Walk/Bike: Walking and biking around Napier 18 Walking New Zealand Monthly Photo Contest 20 New Zealand Walk: Hooker Valley Track offers awe inspiring landscapes 23 Need2Know: Asking politely will protect outdoor acccess for others 24 Subscription page 25 Need2Know: Locked gates over unformed legal roads 25 Need 2Know: Walking as a sport in 1878 26 My Favourite Walk: Taking time on the Tongariro 28 Te Araroa : Q&A withTe Araroa walker and Wellington trustee John Craig 29 Banks Track 30 New Zealand Walk: Ghosts of the past: Historic trails across the Kaimai-Mamaku Park 33 Shared Pathway: Unique boardway opened in Waitara 37 My Favourite Walk: Three tramps in the Ruahine Forest Park 40 Australian Walks: Footing it in Tassie 42 Index of previous 14 issues 43 Coming Events: New Zealand 47 Coming Events: Australia 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 48 New Zealand Country Breaks 51 Pak A Roo Jackets 52 Taupo events

24 New Zealand Walk: Gabriels Gully interpretation walk 26 Te Araroa Trail: Walking the Te Araroa Trail as a hotographer and film maker 30 New Zealand Walk: Mt Taranaki summit climb -not for the faint hearted 35 New Zealand Walk: Palliser Vineyard Walk 36 Directory of New Zealand Walking Groups 40 Subscription page 41 Index of previous 14 issues 42 Coming Events: New Zealand 47 Coming Events: Australia 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 48 New Zealand Country Breaks 51 ECHO Walking Festival 52 Taupo Marathon

MAY 278 2021

2 Pak - A - Roo Walking Jacket 4 Walk Talk 6 New Zealand Walk: Franz Josef - a must do 9 Need2Know: Health and Safety when crossing private farms 10 New Zealand Walks: Kaikoura - a popular spot for walkers 14 My Favourite Walk: Motorimu Shelter walk in the Tararuas 15 Event: Christchurch Walking Festival has many avenues for walking 16 New Zealand Walk: Tackling the Tirohanga 18 Walking New Zealand Monthly Photo Contest 20 Australian Walk: Umpherston Sinkhole 22 My Favourite Walk: Western Loop Walkway for bush, river and open farmland 26 My Favourite Walk: A walk around Mangatawhiri Reservoir 30 My Favourite Walk: Counter clockwise on the Tongariro Circuit 36 Directory of New Zealand Walking Groups 42 Coming Events: New Zealand JULY 280 2021 2 Queen Charlotte Track - Wilder- 47 Coming Events: Australia 48 New Zealand Walking Tours ness Guides 48 New Zealand Country Breaks 3 Contents 6 New Zealand Walk: Comarderie on 51 ECHO Walking Festival 52 Taupo Marathon the Whareama Coastal Walk 12 Event: Walkers see the new APRIL 277 2021 Manawatu Tararua Highway tak- 2 Pak - A - Roo Walking Jacket ing shape 4 Walk Talk 14 New Zealand Walk: Rotokawa 6 New Zealand Walk: Omarama’s Clay Scenic Reserve - now a predator Cliff spectacular landscape free area 8 New Zealand Walk: On a clear day 18 Walking New Zealand Monthly you can see forever Otawa to Photo Contest Otane-Wainuku Ridgeline 20 New Zealand Walk: Fantail Falls an 10 New Zealand Walk: Huatoki Doeasy West Coast walk main - for a delightful walk 24 Virtual field trip for school children 12 New Zealand Walk: Three coastal showcases Te Araroa walks at the bottom of the South 24 My Favourite Walk: Linderman Loop Island - in the historic Kaimais 14 Shared Pathway: Hikers and bikers 28 Around the Clubs: Clubs find advanshare the Timber Trail tage in sharing great walks 16 High Achievers: Te Araroa legends 30 New Zealand Cycle Tour: Best Dam Ceorge Mills and Rob Firmin cycling trip in the world - Busting 18 Walking New Zealand Monthly the 315km trail from Mt Cook Photo Contest to Oamaru 20 Shared Pathway: Little River Trail 38 Australian Walks: Alice Springs for Hike it, bike it like it! gorges, water holes and red desert 25 Shared Pathway: New off road landscapes shared path gathering use 42 Index of previous 14 issues 22 New Zealand Walks: Tongariro 43 Coming Events: New Zealand National Park short 47 Coming Events: Australia walks to suit all fitness types 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 32 Te Araroa Trail: New Invercargill 48 New Zealand Country Breaks to Bluff section, cyclists off road 51 Pak A Roo Jackets 32 New Zealand Walk: Rob Roy Track 52 Taupo event reopens 34My Favourite Walk: Day walks in JUNE 279 2021 West Coast’s 2 Queen Charlotte Track - WilderOparara Basin ness Guides 34 NZ Cycling Trail: The diverse 4 Walk Talk Kaikoura Trail 6 New Zealand Walk: Ship Cove walks 35 Shared Pathway: Shared Kaikoura in old swamp forests pathway connect loop 8 New Zealand Walk: Muruwai Walk 36 Directory of New Zealand Walkin Coromandel ing Groups 10 New Zealand Walks: Somes Island - The MIQ experience 149 41 Index of previous 14 issues 42 Coming Events: New Zealand years ago11 New Zealand Walk: Somes Is- 48 New Zealand Walking Tours 48 New Zealand Country Breaks land Track 12 My Favourite Walk: Banks Peninsula 52 Great Forest Events Track - an unique scenic 3 day trip 14 Need2Know: Egmont National Park tracks upgraded 16 High Achiever: Havelock man’s marathon dream of link to Picton 18 Walking New Zealand Monthly Photo Contest 20 Australian Walks: Ten best walks and hikes in Tasmania

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

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High Achiever

Bridging the gaps up in the North

By Olivia Murray

“It’s only a matter of time before the roads are too busy, and after COVID, we’ve all realised how important it is to be within commuting distance. It’s good for everything, your health, your work-life balance, your wellbeing,” says Shelley’s partner, Gary Heaven. Shelley Trotter, owner of Solway Deer Farm has a goal to connect Snells Beach and Warkworth with public access trails. Solway Deer Farm will potentially host up to 4 km of trail. Providing important off-road connections between Warkworth, Snells Beach and Matakana. But Shelley and Gary aren’t just connecting towns, they’re connecting communities. There are 7.8km between Snells Beach and Warkworth but “we’re only 3 to 4 km either side, so we’re in the best place,” says Shelley. Shelley

Foldable Hiking Sticks

* * * *

and Gary have been nestled in rural North Auckland for a while, “but time moves fast around here.” Shelley’s uncle Roger lives just down the road and her son, the next house over. The family have periodically farmed in the Duck Creek subcatchment of the Mahurangi River for five generations. Five, to be exact. Shelley can remember growing up in the house Roger now occupies before she moved just across the paddock. The roads that lead between Matakana, Warkworth and Snells Beach are becoming increasingly busy with commuters, visitors and recreationalists. Shelley and Gary are working with Auckland Council, the Matakana Coastal Trails Trust and the Walking Access Commission to turn their idea into reality. Once they get funding, this project could take two years to complete and be an asset for North Aucklanders.

Chris Charles, regional field advisor and Pūhoi to Pakiri programme manager, explains, “we know that locals really value amenities on trails, so we plan to provide everything from coffee to freshwater stops and restrooms.” Creating more public access trails will also take cars off the road and onto two wheels or foot. This will help connect people to their jobs, their communities and their neighbours. This project is already in motion. Another 1.3km is the Farm-Forest Trail off Sandspit Road and on Uncle Roger’s farm. It’s already formed and the easement in place. The trail passes through farm forestry, managed tōtara regrowth, four bridges and hidden fairy doors. Above: The start of the trail. Below: A newly constructed bridge.

51cm-110cm Folds into 4 sections Comes with handy bag Made from Aviation Aluminium

$34.95 plus $7 Shipping Available now from:

Walking New Zealand Shop

P O Box 1922, Palmerston North Phone 0800-925-546 or email walkingnz@xtra.co.nz. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

44 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292

- 2022

www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


Coming Events

Please note that because of Covid-19 some events advertised in New Zealand may be rescheduled, postponed or cancelled.

NEW ZEALAND JUNE 2022

5 Ōrewa Half Marathon, Orewa 5 Aurora Handicap Marathon, Uppert Hutt 5 Selwyn Marathon, Lincoln 11 Rustic Run and Walk, Bannockburn, near Cromwell 11 Mount Difficulty Ascent, Bannockburn, near Cromwell 11 The Possum Night Run, Wairakei Resort, Taupo 11 Scarecrow Scamper Cross Country, Tapawera, near Nelson 12 Bay of Islands Run / Walk Festival, Paihia 12 The Mount Vernon Grand Traverse, Bkenheim 18 Rabbit Island Trails, Rabbit Island 18 Bridge to Bridge Ultra Marathon, Waimakariri 19 Gazley Volkswagen Wellington Marathon, Wellington 24 Te Wero o Te Houtaewa, Ninety Mile Beach 25 Oparara Wilderness Trail Run, Karamea 26 Onehunga Half Marathon, Onehunga 26 Monaco Mid Winter Marathon, Monaco, Nelson

6 Mitre 10 Te Anau 10km, Manapouri 6 Hamilton City Hawks Sweeney Cup, Hamilton 6 Dovedale Hill Race, Wakefield 7 South Island Half Marathon, Lake Hood, Ashburton 7 Summit Forests Kaitaia Trail Run/ Walk, Kaitaia 14 Mukamuka & Mega Munter, Catchpool Visitor Centre, Rimukaka Forest Park 14 XTERRA Auckland: Waiuku Forest, Auckland 20 Sprig & Fern 10K: Brightwater 20 Queenstown Vertical Challenge, Queenstown 21 Craters Trail Run, Taupo 21 Seddon School Tussock Run, Seddon 21 Wild Auckland: Tawharanui 24 The Great Naseby Water Race Ul-

tramarathon, Nasby 27 Mount Maunganui Half Marathon Mount Maunganui 27 Fullers Great Sights Bay of Islands Beast, Haruru, Northland 27 The Dun Run, Nelson 28 Heart and Sole Women’s Run Series #3, Papamoa

SEPTEMBER 2022

3 Motueka to Mapua Relay, Tasman District 4 North Shore Marathon, Milford, Auckland 10 Kaikoura Whale Run, Kaikoura 11 Emerson’s Dunedin Marathon, Dunedin 11 Whangarei Run/Walk Festival, Whangarei 17 58th Rotorua Marathon, Rotorua 17 Race Tekapo, Lake Tekapo 18 Shoe Science Tauranga Marathon,

JULY 2022

9 Captain Cook’s Landing Trail Run, Ships Cove, Marlborough 9 Cougar Trail Run, Tokoroa 9 Wakefield Trail Pack Run, Wakefield 10 Forest Run Fest: Autumn Edition, Bottle Lake Forest Christchurch 16 WUU-2K Marathon & Ultramarathon, Wellinghton 17 Tāmaki River Half Marathon, Farm Cove, Auckland 17 Cape Egmont Half Marathon, Okato, Taranagi 17 Tāmaki River Half Marathon, Farm Cove, Auckland 23 Mackenzie Half Marathon, Fairley

AUGUST 2022

6 Meridian Hydro Half Marathon, Te Anau 6 Taupō Marathon, Taupo www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

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Coming Events

Tauranga

22 Twizel Hard Labour Weekend, Ohau Station, Canterbury 1 Whangamata Run/Walk Festival, 30 Auckland Marathon, Auckland Whangamata NOVEMBER 2022 1 Trek the Forest, Rotorua 5-6 Rotorua Walking Festival, Rotorua 1 Aoraki Mt Cook Marathon, Half 10-20 Waiheke Walking Festival, WaiMarathon, 10K and 5K, Mt Cook heke Island Village APRIL 2023 2 4 Paws Marathon, Bottle lake For16 Christchurch Marathon, Christerst, Christchurch church 8 Sun to Surf Run & Walk, Ohope 9 3 Lakes Trail Run, Taharoa Domain, Kai Iwi Lakes, Northland JUNE 2022 16 Ronhill Huntly Half Marathon, 5 Wollongong Running Festival, WoHuntly olongong, NSW 16 Cambridge Half Marathon, Cam5 Makay Marina Run Half Marathon, bridge Mackay, Qld 16 Crater Rim Ultra 2022, Christchurch 19 Cooks River Fun Run 10km & 5km, 22 Kaikoura Mountains to the Sea, Strathfield, NSW Kaikoura 26 Pichi Richi Marathon, Port Augusta, SA

OCTOBER 2022

AUSTRALIA

JULY 2022

10-24 Weipa Running Festival, Weipa, Qld 31 WestlinkM7 Blacktown Running Festival, Blacktown, NSW

Norway

SEPTEMBER 2022

10-11 IML Walking Festival, Arenzano, Italy 16-18 IML Walking Festival, Seefeld, Austria 24-25 IML Walking Festival, Brno, Czeck, Republic

OCTOBER 2022

1-2 IML Walking Festival, Fulda, Germany 6-9 IML Walking Festival, Marbella, Spain 15-16 IML Walking Festival, Arlington, USA 29-30 IML Walking Festival, Wonju, South Korea

NOVEMBER 2022

4-6 IML Walking Festival, Higasimatsuyama, Japan 12-13 IML Walking Festival, Taipei, Tiawan 19-20 IML Walking Festival, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

AUGUST 2022

14 Sun-Herald City 2 Sirf 14km, Sydney, NSW 28 Christmas Island Marathon,, Half Marathon, 5km & 2km, Christmas Island

SEPTEMBER 2022

11 Sandy Point Half Marathon, Brighton, Vic

PROTEIN BARS

OCTOBER 2022 4 4 4 4 4 4

Upper body workout while walking Burn 40% more calories Less impact on joints Release tension in neck and shoulders Improve posture and breathing Fun to do, easy to learn, for all ages

Classes in Greater Auckland, Hamilton, Tauranga, Whakatane, Hawkes Bay, New Plymouth, Wellington, Kapiti and Christchurch

46 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292

2 Beach to Brother,Marathon, Half Marathom, 10km & 5km, Port Macquarie, NSW 16 Harvest Run, 13.5km & 5km, Yarra Valley SA

OCTOBER 2022

6 The Canberra Times Fun Run, Half Marathon, 10km & 5km, Canberra, ACT

REST OF WORLD JULY 2022

19-22 IML Walking Festival, Nijmegen, Netherlands

AUGUST 2022

6-7 IML Walking Festival, Jurbarbas Lithuania 12-14 IML Walking Festival,Vaasa, Finland 27-28 IML Walking Festival, Verdal, - 2022

Lightly 40g bar coated in chocolate, these gluten free protein bars are well textured and full of flavour. Combining high protein content with great taste, they will keep you fuller for longer. The 12 pack contains an assortment of 7 flavours Caramel, Espresso, Fudge, Mint, Pineapple, Raspberry, Vanilla Bean.

$29.95 plus $7

Shipping Available now from:

Walking New Zealand Shop

P O Box 1922, Palmerston North Phone 0800-925-546 or email walkingnz@xtra.co.nz. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


GRAB YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS AND GET READY FOR TAUPO AT ITS VERY BEST!

SATURDAY 6 AUGUST

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Fun for the whole whanau

Beautiful medal for all finishers

ENTER TODAY AT TAUPOMARATHON.CO.NZ www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

47


GISBORNE

GREAT COUNTRY BREAKS NORTHLAND Removes bacteria and protozoa (Giardia, Crytosporidium, etc) Filters 1,000 litres to 0.2 microns Drink directly from a water source, or from your bottle Ultralight, easy to use, no pumping, nom chemicals Perfect for hiking, camping and emergency preparedness

$42.99 plus $7 Shipping Available now from:

Walking New Zealand Shop

P O Box 1922, Palmerston North Phone 0800-925-546 or email walkingnz@xtra.co.nz. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

You can now view back issues of Walking New Zealand magazine,

two issues back from the latest, FREE at : http://issuu.com/walkingnewzealand.

WAIRARAPA

Whareama Coastal Walk Fully catered 2 Day Walking Adventure over private farmland with isolated Wairarapa coastline views.

Phone (06) 372 3722

www.whareamawalk.co.nz

HAWKES BAY

HAWKES BAY

Country Breaks

the place to promote for more customers contact Frank Goldingham walkingnz@xtra.co.nz 0800-925-546 (walking) HAWKES BAY

SPECIAL OFFER for all Walking NZ readers

FREE E-BIKE HIRE Cycling the Hawke’s Bay Trails is the closest you can get to a European cycling holiday without travelling overseas. You will see valleys of vines, winding rivers, estuary wetlands and the majestic coastline beside the turquoise-blue Pacific Ocean. Experience our tracks over 2, 3 or 4 days cycling flat, easy trails knowing you are never more than 30 minutes away from your next stop at a winery restaurant, cellar door or fresh fruit stall!

for group bookings* on all multiday cycling tours Save up to $160pp! *Group - min of 4ppl, on tours prior to 24 December 2021.

Cycle Hawke’s Bay - the best trails, food & wine!

Talk to us today p: 06 835 9030 | Ahuriri, Napier | info@takarotrails.co.nz

You can now view and enjoy the latest issue of Walking New Zealand magazine online for only $2.50 at http://www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

48 NewNew Zealand, issue no issue 292 - 2022 48Walking Walking Zealand, no 292 - 2022

www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


ROTORUA

NEW ZEALAND WALKS

GREAT COUNTRY BREAKS NELSON * Heaphy Track * Abel Tasman * Cobb Valley * Old Ghost Road

ROTORUA

‘Carry less, enjoy more’ Come explore with us! www.kahurangiwalks.co.nz

Phone 03 391 4120 BOOKS

MARLBOROUGH

Price

$40

Available at some Northland and North Shore Bookshops or contact Jean at: goldschmidt@farmside.co.nz

Kiwi on the Camino by Vivianne Flintoff

MARLBOROUGH

MARLBOROUGH

900kms along an ancient pilgrimage trail in Northern Spain Available from independent book sellers or directly from author E-mail : vivianneflintoffbooks@gmail.com Web: http://www.vivianneflintoffbooks.com/

You can now view back issues of Walking New Zealand magazine,

two issues back from the latest, FREE at : http://issuu.com/walkingnewzealand.

Your favourite walk could win you a free subscription

We are looking for readers’ favourite New Zealand walks. Many of us go out regularly walking on a route which we class as our favourite, for a number of reasons. Perhaps because for it’s scenery, it’s safe, it’s challenging, it’s flat, it’s hilly, it’s varied, or for whatever reason. We would like you to tell us in your own words what is you favourite walk and why. Email us a story from say 250 up to 1200 words including a photo or photos. We will now give you a FREE subscription (six months or more, depending on the article), or extension to Walking New Zealand magazine for walks published. www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

You can also post an article to Walking New Zealand, Freepost 78863, P O Box 1922, Palmerston North, or fax 06-358-6864. If sending a photo by email please make sure photos are in high resolution.

Our email address is: walkingnz@xtra.co.nz. Please put “My Favourite Walk” in the subject line and include your name and postal address.

Walking New Zealand, no 292 2022 49 49 Walking New Zealand, issueissue no 292 - 2022


SOUTHLAND

GREAT COUNTRY BREAKS

PORTABLE LOCATOR BEACONS

STAY SAFE IN THE OUTDOORS T Take a locator beacon with you when you are hunting, y h hiking or working anywhere re remote and make sure you w will be rescued quickly

MACKENZIE/South Canterbury

SPECIAL ACR ResQLink PLB - 400

Only $485

A unique four days walk or mountain bike ride in idyllic South Canterbury

Including P&P Comes with heavy duty pouch

Available for sale or hire

Phone 03-685-4848 Email: info@walkfourpeaks.co.nz

* Freedom $245 * Prime $545 * Guided $1695

$15 - 1 day $30 - 3 days $40 - 7 days

$30 for every week after your first week of hire

Locator Beacons New Zealand 03 226 6341 or 027 412 2925

www.locatorbeacons.co.nz

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BOOKS

STEWART ISLAND

Kiwi on the Camino

NEW ZEALAND HIKES

by Vivianne Flintoff 900kms along an ancient pilgrimage trail in Northern Spain

Please tell our advertisers you saw it in Walking New Zealand magazine.

Available from independent book sellers or directly from author E-mail : vivianneflintoffbooks@gmail.com Web: http://www.vivianneflintoffbooks.com/

NORTH CANTERBURY

NORTH CANTERBURY OXIMETERS

Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

A fingertip Pulse/Oximeter can be used to measure oxygen saturation and heart pulse rate through the finger. Monitor respiratory conditions, pre and post exercise, and pre and post operative conditions.

Only

$39.95

Self guided private walking track * Choose between 3 or 2 day options. * Lodge style accommodation with fully serviced kitchens, BBQ, hot showers, comfortable bunk-beds and pillows. * Dogs welcome, kennels available at lodgings. * Pack transport each day makes for a stress free adventure.

Check our availability calendar online www.islandhillsstation.com Walking New Zealand, issue no 292- no 2022 50 Walking 50 New Zealand, issue 292

- 2022

plus $7.00 P&P

Available now from:

Walking New Zealand Shop P O Box 1922, Palmerston North Phone 0800-925-546 Order online:

www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz


PAK - A - ROO

Walking Hiking Jacket Wicking Lining

Only

$129.00 plus $7.00 P&P

To order:

www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz Freephone 0800 925-546- walking THE

WALKING NEW ZEALAND MAIL ORDER

www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz

SHOP

WALKING NEW ZEALAND Ltd, P O Box 1922, Palmerston North, 4440 Phone 06-358-6863: fax 06-358-6864 or freephone 0800-925-546

Colours: Red, Navy, Dark Olive, Brown Sizes XS - S - M - L - XL - XXL Weight approximately 800gms

Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

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A new range of chef-made meals for New Zealand adventurers

COO

We hope you enjoy this exciting range of real meals.

Nathan Fa’avae: six time Adventure Racing World Champion

Cooked in Nelson, New Zealand www.realmeals.co.nz 52 Walking New Zealand, issue no 292 - 2022

www.walkingnewzealand.co.nz