NURSING Magazine | 2022 | Volume 1

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NURSING

2022 . VOLUME 1

UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER SCHOOL OF NURSING

AN EVERLASTING FOOTPRINT Kathy Rideout's empathy, humility, and authenticity touched thousands of lives, leaving an indelible impact on the school and the profession of nursing


PICTURE THIS

School of Nursing Celebrates the Life of Harriet Kitzman The University of Rochester School of Nursing bid a final farewell and celebrated the life of longtime researcher Harriet Kitzman at a ceremony in Evarts Lounge on Nov. 12. Kitzman, who spent the bulk of her long career at the UR School of Nursing and was renowned for her research that led to the creation of the Nurse-Family Partnership, died at age 82 in March 2020 just days before COVID-related lockdowns and restrictions prevented any large gatherings. About 50 family members, friends, and former colleagues attended the ceremony, with more watching remotely from a livestream. Professor Emerita Mary Dombeck, PhD, DMin, LMFT, LMHC, served as the emcee of the event, which featured music, photos, readings, and more than a dozen speakers. Prior to the celebration, Dean Kathy Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP, and Associate Dean for Research Sally Norton, PhD, RN, FNAP, FPCN, FAAN joined Kitzman’s husband, Dennis, on the 2nd floor of Helen Wood Hall to officially dedicate the newly renamed Harriet J. Kitzman Center for Research Support.

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 Dennis Kitzman and Dean Kathy Rideout cut the ribbon dedicating the Harriet J. Kitzman Center for Research Support.  Kitzman, Rideout, and Associate Dean Sally Norton in front of a plaque on the 2nd floor of Helen Wood Hall commemorating the legendary career of nurse researcher Harriet Kitzman.  Norton shares a few memories and thoughts during the celebration of Kitzman’s life, held in Evarts Lounge. NURSING 2022 Volume 1 1


A Message from the Dean Dear Friends, As I write to you today, I am completing the final year of my second five-year contract as dean of what I believe is the greatest nursing school in the world. As you are all probably aware, I met with UR Medical Center CEO Mark B. Taubman, MD, about a year ago and informed him that I will not be pursuing a third term. A nationwide search for a new dean has begun and several outstanding candidates have been identified. The plan is for a new dean to be selected and in place by the time my term ends on June 30, 2022.

Kathy H. Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP Vice President, University of Rochester Medical Center Dean and Professor of Clinical Nursing and Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Nursing

While it was a difficult decision to step away after what will be 11 years as dean (including my one year as interim dean), I recognize that it is time. The school is strong, healthy, and continuing to innovate and reimagine nursing education for the 21st century. Our building expansion is now complete, and we’re preparing to renew our CCNE accreditation. The timing is right for new leadership to continue what our founding dean Loretta Ford and past directors such as Helen Wood and Eleanor Hall started and make their own mark on this wonderful school. I am extremely proud of the progress we have made over the past decade. We have a dedicated, brilliant, and robust faculty and staff, as well as a talented and resilient student body. Our research, education, and clinical missions are thriving despite the current challenges caused by the pandemic. We are in a strong financial position. In short, we have, I believe, created an environment in which our people are more welcomed, more challenged, better prepared, and more fulfilled than ever before. None of these advances are the result of a single individual, but rather they are the product of the initiative, collaboration, and hard work of many. Each of us – from deans to donors, students to staff, faculty and friends – have played a role in making this school what it was, what it is today, and what we imagine it can be in the future. For that, I thank you deeply. Serving as your dean has been an extraordinary honor and I am humbled and grateful for the opportunity to partner with you all to advance the mission of this school together. I truly believe that my time at the UR School of Nursing has been one of the greatest blessings of my life. For the past 35 years, this has been my home, and it will remain so long after new leadership comes on board. In the meantime, I will continue to do my best to keep our momentum going and carry on the tradition of excellence that has defined what it means to be a nurse or a health care leader at the University of Rochester. Meliora!

On the Cover… Immensely popular with students, Kathy Rideout popped in during the class photo and posed with members of the graduating August 2021 cohort of Accelerated Bachelor’s Program for Non-Nurses. Rideout will be stepping down as dean of the UR School of Nursing on June 30, 2022.

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NURSING UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER SCHOOL OF NURSING

FEATURES

2022 . VOLUME 1

20 Running Into the Fire As COVID rages, two cohorts of new nurses join the fight 22 A Family Affair Fate (and a global pandemic) bring sisters and mother to UR School of Nursing at same time 23 Envisioning the Future of the School of Nursing A look at the school’s next strategic plan 24 An Everlasting Footprint Kathy Rideout's empathy, humility, and authenticity touched thousands of lives, leaving an indelible impact on the school and the profession of nursing

29 Breaking Barriers UR Nursing professor inspires incarcerated individuals through spirituality course

34 An Unbreakable Bond Forged by a desire to help others, a special friendship between nursing classmates has endured nearly 70 years of love and loss

32 A Worthy Faux Newer simulation activities allow students to confront discomfort in a low-stakes, but powerful, learning environment page 20 page 32

DEPARTMENTS 4

Nursing News

16 Publications, Presentations, and Awards

36 Alumni Relations & Advancement 45 Class Notes

NURSING Magazine Credits University of Rochester School of Nursing Kathy H. Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP

Vice President, University of Rochester Medical Center Dean and Professor of Clinical Nursing and Pediatrics

University of Rochester Medical Center B. Chip Partner

Assistant Vice President, URMC Communications University of Rochester Medical Center

Melissa L. Head ’99W (MS)

Executive Director of URMC Academic Programs and Alumni Relations Advancement

Editor Patrick Broadwater

Senior Associate, Public Relations Director, Strategic Communications University of Rochester School of Nursing

Contributing Writers Ivy Burruto Kristine Kappel Thompson Art Director/Designer Brittany Colton

Graphic Designer University of Rochester Medical Center Marketing

NURSING Magazine is a biannual publication of the University of Rochester School of Nursing in conjunction with the University of Rochester Medical Center Departments of Nursing, Alumni Relations, Advancement, and Public Relations and Communications. We welcome your letters and feedback concerning stories in the magazine or issues related to the University of Rochester School of Nursing. Send your comments to Editor, NURSING Magazine, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box SON, Rochester, NY 14642 or via email to Patrick_Broadwater@urmc.rochester.edu.

Andrea J. Allen

Senior Director of Advancement and Alumni Relations University of Rochester School of Nursing

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www.son.rochester.edu facebook.com/UofRSchoolofNursing twitter.com/UofRSON instagram.com/urnursing urson.us/LinkedInURSON

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UR Nursing in the News What’s new in the School of Nursing? Here are some recent media reports involving UR Nursing faculty, staff, and alumni.

The School of Nursing was featured prominently in a WXXI/NPR story delving into how the COVID-19 pandemic had inspired a new generation of future nurses. The in-depth multimedia package examined how and why nursing school enrollments were trending upward amid a nursing shortage exacerbated by a worldwide pandemic. Reporter Beth Adams interviewed two UR Nursing Accelerated Bachelor’s Program for Non-Nurses (APNN) students, Andrew Pierle and Christian Tarantola (seated at right), as well as Dean Kathy Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP, and URMC Chief Nursing Executive Karen (Davis) Keady, PhD, RN, NEA-BC. The story was later highlighted on WXXI’s Connections radio show, with Keady appearing as a guest. To listen to the original radio story or view the entire package, including a video of UR Nursing students in action, visit: https://www.wxxinews.org/ health/2021-11-09/covid-19-fueled-nursing-shortage-but-also-inspired-new-generation-of-nurses Photo courtesy of Max Schulte and WXXI Public Media

Rideout was also the subject of a feature story in the Rochester Beacon after announcing she would be stepping down as dean in 2022. The story, titled “A Strong Voice for the Nursing Profession,” focused on Rideout’s many accomplishments as dean as well as her full-throated advocacy for the field of nursing.

Instructor of clinical nursing Jennifer Zugnoni, MNE, RN, BSN, and APNN student Shauna Topian were featured in two TV local news stories in November showcasing how nursing students were preparing to begin their careers amid a global pandemic and a national nursing shortage.

Associate Dean for Education and Student Affairs Lydia Rotondo, DNP, RN, CNS, FNAP, was interviewed for a Spectrum News story in December about a generous $1 million gift made to the School of Nursing. The anonymous donor earmarked the gift to support the expansion of Helen Wood Hall (see story, page 8).

Erin Baylor, ’97N, ’98N (MS), DNP, RN, PNP-BC, ONP, an assistant professor of clinical nursing and director of simulation at the UR School of Nursing, was interviewed in July for a pair of local TV news stories covering the school’s first-ever poverty simulation event. The simulation allowed APNN students to experience what it is like to live as part of a low-income family and gain a greater understanding of the daily challenges and barriers faced by residents living in poverty. APNN student Rabia Cav was also interviewed for the stories.

Kathy Mulholland Parrinello ’75N, ’83N (MS), ’90 (PhD), chief operating officer and executive vice president of URMC and Strong Memorial Hospital, was quoted in a pair of stories in the New York Times: an October article on health care workers getting vaccinated ahead of a state deadline, and a December story about hospitals in the state being overwhelmed by a surge in COVID cases.

Loretta Ford, EdD, RN, PNP, NP-C, CRNP, FAAN, FAANP, founding dean of the UR School of Nursing, was featured in December on the PBS program, Growing Bolder, celebrating the inspirational stories of men and women who are redefining the possibilities of life after 50. Ford, who discussed her role in the creation of the nurse practitioner role in the 1960s, celebrated her 101st birthday on Dec. 28.

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University of Rochester School of Nursing Honored as Apple Distinguished School  The University of Rochester School of Nursing has been recognized as an Apple Distinguished School for its innovations in teaching, learning, and creating a digital learning environment to better prepare the nursing workforce of tomorrow. Apple Distinguished Schools are centers for innovation, leadership, and educational excellence. They use Apple technology to connect students to the world, fuel creativity, deepen collaboration, and make learning personal. After completing a rigorous application process, the UR School of Nursing was notified in August that it had earned the distinction for a three-year period: 2021 to 2024. The school, only the fourth school of nursing in the country to receive the distinction, was formally presented with the award by an Apple representative in an on-campus ceremony in October. “We’re thrilled to have received this acknowledgement from Apple,” said Kathy Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP, dean of the UR School of Nursing. “Our school has a long history of cutting-edge nursing education, and the work of our faculty and education innovation team have done to transform the delivery and transfer of knowledge to future nurses is just the latest extension of that proud legacy.” In December, State Sen. Edward Rath presented the school with an official proclamation on behalf of the New York State Senate, recognizing the School of Nursing for the honor. “The community thanks you for the hard work, vision and leadership, and quite honestly, the outcomes that you’re going to be creating right here at the U of R School of Nursing,” Rath said. The school’s iROC (Redefining Our Classroom) initiative leverages technology to shift the traditional classroom into a dynamic learning environment. Across the spectrum of UR Nursing programs, the school’s academic leadership team has succeeded in integrating active learning strategies with the use of tablet technology, as well as other experiential learning activities, such as simulation, to give students new tools in preparation for a rapidly changing profession. The initiative aims to revitalize the way we teach and better prepares students for a successful career in health care, honing their critical-thinking and clinical judgement skills. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the UR School of Nursing drew upon its years of work with educational technology to create a seamless transition to remote learning. The school first piloted its iROC initiative with the RN to BS program in 2018, using tablets to expand the reach of its program and provide adult learners with a high-tech, high-touch experience. The initiative later expanded to the Accelerated Bachelor’s Program for Non-Nurses (APNN) and master’s level programs.

 The UR School of Nursing has been recognized as an Apple Distinguished School for its innovations in teaching, learning, and creating a digital learning environment. A representative from Apple visited the school in October to officially present the distinction to School of Nursing leadership and members of the education innovation team. Pictured from left to right: Instructional designer Joseph Gomulak-Cavicchio, Education Innovation Team coordinator Tara Serwetnyk, instructional designer Kaitlyn Burke, Apple representative Ian Camera, Dean Kathy Rideout, and Associate Dean for Education and Student Affairs Lydia Rotondo.  & State Sen. Edward Rath presented a proclamation to the School of Nursing on behalf of the New York State Senate, recognizing the school on its status as an Apple Distinguished School. Rath was joined by Patrick Hopkins, co-director of the Accelerated Program for Non-Nurses; Lisa Brophy, assistant dean for education; Serwetnyk, Rotondo, Rideout. NURSING 2022 Volume 1 5


NEWS

University of Rochester School of Nursing Receives Fifth Consecutive Health Professions HEED Award The University of Rochester School of Nursing has received the 2021 Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. This marks the fifth consecutive year that the UR School of Nursing has been chosen for this honor. The UR School of Nursing is among 51 health professions schools from around the country selected to receive the only national award recognizing medical, dental, pharmacy, nursing, osteopathic, and allied health schools that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion. This year’s recipients were featured in the December 2021 issue of INSIGHT Into Diversity, the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education. “We’re grateful for the opportunity to be acknowledged among our peers as an institution that values diversity in all its forms and stands committed to fostering a community of inclusiveness and respect,” said Mitchell Wharton, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CNS, the school’s associate dean for equity and inclusion. The UR School of Nursing, which has been at the forefront of diversity, inclusion, and equity issues for nearly two decades, is one of 13 nursing schools to receive the HEED Health Professions Award in 2021. Its academic programs attract scientists, clinicians, researchers, and future nurses of varying ages, backgrounds, and talents, and its incoming fall class of students in the Accelerated Bachelor’s Program for Non-Nurses (ABPNN) includes students from across the U.S.

and countries such as Ecuador, Rwanda, Iceland, and China. Thirty-three percent of the new ABPNN students were from groups underrepresented in nursing, and 26 percent were male, approximately three times higher than the percentage of men in the nursing workforce. “The Health Professions HEED Award process consists of a comprehensive and rigorous application that includes questions relating to the recruitment and retention of students and employees – and best practices for both – continued leadership support for diversity, and other aspects of campus diversity and inclusion,” said Lenore Pearlstein, publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. “We take a detailed approach to reviewing each application in deciding who will be named a Health Professions HEED Award recipient. Our standards are high, and we look for schools where diversity and inclusion are woven into the work being done every day across their campus.” “I’m so pleased that the UR School of Nursing has been recognized with a HEED Award for a fifth time,” said Kathy Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP, dean of the School of Nursing and vice president of the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC). “We know that this a competitive process, so for our school to consistently appear on this list is a testament to our investment in creating a welcoming learning environment that embraces and reflects the diversity of our faculty, staff, and students.”

UR School of Nursing Cracks Top 25 in U.S. News Rankings The University of Rochester School of Nursing cracked the Top 25 of the nation’s best master’s nursing programs, jumping five places to No. 21, according to the 2023 Best Graduate Schools guide produced by U.S. News and World Report. The UR School of Nursing’s master’s programs have ranked consistently in the top 40 for the past two decades, but this is the school’s best showing in its history. The UR School of Nursing also tied for 27th among Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs, its highest ranking since the category debuted in 2017 and up 17 places from the 2022 report. 6 NURSING 2022 Volume 1

Nationally, UR Nursing is one of a group of 23 select schools to rank among the Top 30 in both categories. Among its regional competitors, the UR School of Nursing is the only New York school outside of New York City to rank among the Top 50 in either category. Altogether, U.S. News surveyed 601 nursing schools with master's or doctoral programs accredited by either the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education or the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing. In total, 254 nursing programs responded to the U.S. News nursing statistical data collection survey sent in fall 2021 and early 2022.

“I am beyond proud of the faculty, staff, and students whose efforts have helped the School of Nursing be recognized once again on a national and local level,” said Kathy Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP, dean of the UR School of Nursing. “The rankings reaffirm what we already know, which is that our students are getting the best preparation for future clinical, education, and research opportunities from one of the top institutions in the country.” Additional information on the nursing program rankings can be found at www. usnews.com.


Underhill-Blazey Chosen as American Academy of Nursing Fellow Meghan Underhill-Blazey, PhD, APRN, FAAN, an assistant professor at the University of Rochester School of Nursing was selected to join the American Academy of Nursing’s 2021 class of fellows. Underhill-Blazey was among 225 distinguished nurses, representing 38 states and 17 countries, chosen to join the academy. She was one of just 13 fellows selected from New York State. All of the inductees were recognized at the AAN’s annual Health Policy Conference in October. The American Academy of Nursing comprises more than 2,900 nursing leaders who are experts in policy, research, administration, practice, and academia who champion health and wellness, locally and globally. The academy's fellow selection committee reviews hundreds of applications each year and selects applicants based on their contributions to advance the public’s health. Induction into the academy is a significant milestone in a nurse leader’s career, in which their accomplishments are revered by their colleagues within Underhill-Blazey and outside the profession. In addition to her appointment at the UR School of Nursing, Underhill-Blazey is a member of Cancer Control and Prevention at the Wilmot Cancer Institute and a nurse practitioner in the hereditary cancer program. She has dedicated her career to understanding and improving care for individuals and families living with inherited cancer risk.

Underhill-Blazey has widely disseminated research findings both through publications and presentations and has served as the nurse scientist on multidisciplinary teams. In addition to clinical practice, research, and mentorship, UnderhillBlazey has worked in multiple capacities as an oncology nursing science leader both locally and nationally within the Oncology Nursing Society. Based on her research impact and leadership she was awarded the Oncology Nursing Society Victoria Mock New Investigator Award in 2018. “It is such a privilege to be inducted as a fellow alongside such distinguished nursing colleagues, and I am humbled by the recognition. I am particularly grateful to the sponsors, Drs. Donna Berry and Anne Gross, who supported my application as well as the support from my UR colleagues“, said UnderhillBlazey, “I look forward to transforming health care delivery and improving health outcomes as a member of this distinguished institution, and for the opportunity to serve nursing in a greater capacity.” Underhill-Blazey joined the UR Nursing faculty in 2020. She previously served as an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and as interim director of the Phyllis F. Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She earned her bachelor’s degree, master’s degree as a family nurse practitioner, and her Ph.D. from the University at Buffalo.

UR School of Nursing Jumps to 23RD in Latest NIH Research Rankings The University of Rochester School of Nursing jumped six spots, landing at No. 23 in the annual ranking of research funding received from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The UR School of Nursing has now ranked in the top 25 among all nursing schools five times in the past seven years, according to historical data compiled by the Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research. For the fiscal year 2021, the UR School of Nursing received more than $3.1 million in research support from the NIH, its highest single-year total since 2009 when the school ranked seventh in the

nation with $4.3 million in NIH funding. “The University of Rochester School of Nursing has a rich tradition of groundbreaking research that has advanced the science of nursing and made a substantial impact on patient care,” said Dean Kathy Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP. “Consistently ranking among the best nursing schools in the country for NIH funding is a recognition of the important work being done at our school and a testament to the contributions made across the research enterprise.” “The jump in the NIH rankings is wonderful, though it only addresses a portion of the research being conduct-

ed in the school,” said Associate Dean for Research Sally Norton, PhD, RN, FNAP, FPCN, FAAN. “The growth of our research mission is attributable to a strong commitment to a vibrant research culture within the School of Nursing and made possible through the hard work and cutting-edge science of our terrific faculty, research teams, post-docs, students, and our team in the Harriet J. Kitzman Center for Research Support.” The NIH is the largest public funding source for biomedical research in the world, investing more than $32 billion annually to enhance health, increase life spans, and reduce illness and disability. NURSING 2022 Volume 1 7


NEWS

Anonymous Donor Gifts $1 Million to UR School of Nursing Expansion Project An anonymous donor recently made a $1 million gift to the University of Rochester School of Nursing to support generations of future nurses. The donation has been given to support the expansion of Helen Wood Hall, the home of the UR School of Nursing, which is currently undergoing a $15 million renovation to include more technologically enhanced experiential and collaborative learning spaces. The $1 million gift, provided by a prominent member of the Rochester business community, is one of several large anonymous donations the school has received in recent years to support its operations. The donor had benefited from nursing care at home in the past and wanted to make a gift to recognize nurses for their selfless care and compassion for others. “We are extremely grateful for this donor’s generosity, which will help us provide transformative nursing education for years to come,” said Kathy Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP, dean of the UR School of Nursing. “Our shared commitment to providing a cutting-edge learning environment to improve upon the science and art of nursing will have an immeasurable impact on the health care providers and leaders of tomorrow, as well as the Rochester community who will benefit from

2nd Floor Breakout Area

Renderings of a 2nd floor reception area (top) and a 4th floor student lounge (bottom) to be included in the $15M renovation of Helen Wood Hall. Three new floors will be added above the Loretta Ford Education Wing to build on the school’s increasing need for technologically advanced and more synergistic learning areas while accommodating its continued growth.

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4th Floor Lounge

their advanced education.” Built in 1925, Helen Wood Hall is the original home of the University of Rochester’s nursing program. The building served as a dormitory in its early years, with its residential space later converted to classrooms, clinical learning spaces, and private offices. The need for larger and “smarter” classrooms as well as other student gathering spaces led to the 26,000-square-foot addition in 2006 of the Loretta C. Ford Education Wing, named for the school’s founding dean and the co-creator of the nurse practitioner role. The current vertical expansion project builds on the increasing need for technologically advanced and more synergistic learning while accommodating the school’s continued growth. UR Nursing enrollment has increased by more than 50 percent since 2016 to an all-time high of nearly 800 students. The new addition adds three floors above the Ford Education Wing, allowing for larger, more sophisticated skills and simulation labs, additional classrooms, and dozens of collaborative learning spaces, which will be vital to prepare students for a rapidly changing profession. The new addition is slated to officially open for student use in the Summer 2022 semester.


Brophy, DeLucia Tabbed as New Assistant Deans The University of Rochester School of Nursing has added two assistant deans to its leadership team. Lisa Brophy, EdD, RN, MSBA, CNE, and Carla DeLucia, EdD, have been named assistant deans for education and student affairs, respectively. Both report directly to Lydia Rotondo, DNP, RN, CNS, FNAP, associate dean for education and student affairs. Brophy, an assistant professor of clinical nursing, has been a nurse for three decades and has held numerous positions in practice, education, and leadership. A member of the UR School of Nursing faculty since 2013, she previously served as co-director of the Accelerated Bachelor’s Program for Non-Nurses (ABPNN). She is a member of the Finger Lakes Organization of Nurse Executives and Leaders and Sigma Theta Tau International, and was recently accepted to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing Elevating Leaders in Academic

Nursing fellowship program. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the UR School of Nursing, her MSBA from the University of Rochester’s Simon School of Business, a master’s degree in nursing education from Roberts Wesleyan College, and her doctorate in education leadership from the University of Rochester’s Warner School of Education. Replacing Brophy, Luis Rosario-McCabe, DNP, RN, CNE, CNL, WHNP-BC, has been named interim APNN co-director. Rosario-McCabe has more than 30 years of experience in nursing with a focus on women’s health and improving access to health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals. A four-time graduate of the UR School of Nursing, he earned his bachelor’s degree in 1993, his master’s as a women’s health care nurse practitioner in 1995, and his Doctor of Nursing Practice degree in 2017. He also received

a post-master’s certificate from the Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) program in 2015. He joined the UR Nursing faculty in 2003 and formerly served as the CNL specialty program director. DeLucia came to the UR School of Nursing in November with 14 years of higher education administrative experience and a strong background in predictive analytics modeling and academic advising, as well as student financial services. She most recently served as associate director in the University Advising Office at RIT. Previously she served as an associate dean for academic affairs at Fisher College in Boston and assistant director of student financial services at Babson College. She earned her doctorate in higher education administration from Northeastern University, a master’s in math education from Boston University, and a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

Brophy

Rosario-McCabe

DeLucia

Standing with New York Leadership in Support of Black Maternal Health Associate Dean Mitchell Wharton, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CNS, represented the UR School of Nursing at a press conference at the Anthony Jordan Center in September, joining U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer and New York State Attorney General Letitia James pushing for the passage of the Black Maternal Health Momnibus Act to address maternal health disparities in the U.S.

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Rochester Academy of Medicine Recognizes UR Nursing Professor and Student Two members of the University of Rochester School of Nursing were honored at the Rochester Academy of Medicine’s annual awards ceremony on Oct. 19. Julie Gottfried, DNP, RN, CNS, CPNP-PC, assistant professor of clinical nursing at the UR School of Nursing, and Mary Starks ’17N, a student in the Family Nurse Practitioner to Doctor of Nursing Practice program, were among several colleagues and organizations, including the Rochester Black Nurses Association, who were recognized for their accomplishments and contributions to health care within the Rochester community. Gottfried received the Madeline H. Schmitt, PhD, RN, FAAN Award for Interprofessional Education. The award identifies a health care professional who has most demonstrably “broken barriers in health care” and continues to change the landscape of health care education and practice through relaying the importance of collaborative teamwork and

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inclusion of patients, families, health care providers, and community partners in the delivery of the highest quality of care. For over 21 years, Gottfried has worked in a spectrum of clinical and academic roles in inpatient and outpatient settings. She has spent the majority of her career at Golisano Children’s Hospital, where she has practiced as a bedside nurse, a clinical nurse specialist, and most recently, a pediatric nurse practitioner within the pediatric advanced practice providers inpatient team. Gottfried is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Nurse Practitioner Association of New York State. She is currently the vice president of the UR School of Nursing’s Epsilon Xi chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International. Starks was honored with the Distinguished Service Early Career award. The distinction honors a health care professional that is within five years of obtaining their professional degree and has already provided distinguished service in their specialty area. At Strong Memorial Hospital, Starks works in the adult operating room as a staff nurse and preceptor, helping new nurses and nursing students develop skills and confidence in a clinical setting. Earlier in 2021, Starks was selected as Nurse Practitioner Association Student of the Year for her exemplary educational excellence both academically and clinically. She

is also the inaugural recipient of the UR School of Nursing’s Student Diversity Engagement Award, which celebrates a nursing student’s work related to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Starks is also one of the founding members of the Rochester Black Nurses Association, an organization honored this year with the Rochester Academy of Medicine’s Distinguished Service in the Community award. The award honors a community-based organization with exceptional service to the community. Sponsored by the School of Nursing, RBNA has worked throughout Rochester to help nurses succeed through mentorship and networking opportunities. The organization also provides education on various health topics, including racial disparities in the health care system.


Wharton Assumes Leadership Roles for National Nursing Organizations Mitchell J. Wharton, PhD, RN, FNPBC, CNS, ACRN, associate dean for equity and inclusion at the University of Rochester School of Nursing, has been elevated to leadership positions within two national nursing organizations. In November, Wharton was named president-elect of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (ANAC) board of directors. Wharton, who has been a member of ANAC since 2004 and previously served as treasurer of the board, will remain president-elect until November 2023 and then serve as president for two years. Wharton is a member of ANAC’s Diversity Committee, whose mission is to address cultural and ethnic diversity in HIV/AIDS disease, treatment, and care and implement ANAC's core values of advocacy, collaboration, diversity, knowledge, and support while embracing cultural diversity and cultural competency. “Over the years ANAC has been a source of guidance and empowerment for making substantive changes in my life, the lives of my patients, students, research participants, and throughout the communities I represent,” said Wharton. “I wish to serve as pres-

ident-elect to further carry out the mission of ANAC by working to ensure the organization remains at the forefront of educating and empowering health professionals for the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS and co-morbid conditions.” Wharton had also previously served as guest editor of a special edition of the Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care in August. The issue focused on racism, discrimination, and health inequities associated with HIV and sexual and gender diversity. Wharton co-authored an editorial for the issue titled, “The More Things Change, the More Things Remain the Same: It’s time to dismantle structural inequalities of racism, discrimination, and health disparities.” One of four guest editors for the issue, Wharton also hosted a podcast interview with Amelia Knopf of Indiana University, one of the authors of an article examining the position statements offered by nursing schools on racism following the murder of George Floyd and other Black Americans. In October, Wharton was elected to serve as secretary

of an American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) network focused on diversity issues. Wharton serves as one of the members of the steering committee of AACN’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Leadership Network (DEILN). The DEILN acts as a convening body to unite expertise, experience, and guidance and works collectively to explore innovative approaches to enhancing diversity, equity, and inclusion in academic nursing and the nursing workforce. Its efforts include sharing evidence-based practices, engaging with membership, providing consultative services, and convening networking forums. An associate professor of clinical nursing and 2013 graduate of the UR Nursing PhD program, Wharton also serves as a faculty advisor for the school’s Council for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (CoDEI), and the student-led Leading with Integrity for Tomorrow (LIFT) program, and is an active member of the Interdisciplinary Sexual Health and HIV Research (INSHHR) group.

The Wharton File Mitchell J. Wharton, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CNS, ACRN • Associate Professor of Clinical Nursing • Associate Dean for Equity and Inclusion Association of Nurses in AIDS Care • President-Elect, 2021-2023 • President, 2023-2025 • Guest editor, Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care American Association of Colleges of Nursing • Secretary, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Leadership Network (DEILN) • Member, DEILN Steering Committee

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NEWS

Alcéna-Stiner Co-Investigator on Grant to Combat Vaccine Hesitancy in Adolescents Researchers at the University of Rochester received an award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences to address vaccine hesitancy and improve health literacy among middle and high school students. Danielle C. Alcéna-Stiner, PhD, RN, assistant professor at the University of Rochester School of Nursing, is co-investigator on the project. She is also an assistant director of the Life Sciences Learning Center (LSLC). The LSLC, located at the University of Rochester Medical Center, offers outreach programs for students and community members and gives them opportunities to participate in hands-on science activities. Alcéna-Stiner and principal investigator Dina Markowitz, PhD, professor of environmental medicine and director of the LSLC, will create lessons and handson activities to teach students about how COVID-19 spreads, how COVID testing works, what RNA is, and how the vaccine works. Alcéna-Stiner said

the new grant will help adolescents find reliable information and help them make informed decisions about their health. “The driving force behind the project is this passion to start incorporating health literacy and behavior change into the educational material that we're offering for our outreach programs,” said Alcéna-Stiner. “There's a lot of confusion in the community about what RNA is, what mRNA is and how it works with the vaccines. And a lot of hesitancy about taking vaccines, because there's a misunderstanding about what that is and how to understand the science.” Rochester-area teachers, students, and health professionals, including nurses, physicians, and health educators, will be involved in every step of the way as the project develops, beginning with assessments to find out what students already know about infectious diseases and how they learn about them. After testing and tweaking the mate-

rials, Alcéna-Stiner and Markowitz will release the materials online so teachers across the country have resources to teach their students about health literacy.

Alcéna-Stiner

UR Nursing Researcher Receives Grant to Study Home Health Care Disparities Jinjiao Wang, PhD, RN, postdoctoral program director and assistant professor at the University of Rochester School of Nursing, received an award from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to improve infection control in home health care. The study, “Disparities in infection in home health and patients/caregivers’ perceptions (Dis-Infection in HHC),” is a five-year, RO1 award totaling more than $2 million. Wang and the study's principal investigator, Jingjing Shang, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor of nursing at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, will examine socioeconomic disparities in COVID-19 cases and other infection events in home health care patients before and during the pan-

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demic. Wang will serve as site principal investigator to oversee study activities at the University of Rochester. Findings from the study will help develop a home-based infection prevention and control program. Wang’s career as a nursing scientist has been focused on improving homebased health care services for older adults and health outcomes of older adults with complex medical conditions and geriatric syndromes. In June, she received a pilot award from the U.S. Deprescribing Research Network to improve the quality of post-acute care and home health care for older adults with complex medical conditions who take multiple medications. Wang


PhD Student Receives Grant to Explore Sexual Health Motivations What motivates our decision-making? That question was first asked to Martez Smith, LMSW, a doctoral candidate at the University of Rochester School of Nursing, in a lecture about the Self-Determination Theory (SDT) at the University of Rochester’s Warner School of Education. The theory, developed by University of Rochester professors Richard Ryan and Edward Deci in 1985, theorized that people’s motivation influences their ability to act on behalf of their own goals. In June, Smith received an F31 grant award from the National Institutes of Health titled, "Exploring associations of autonomy supportive

health communication, needs satisfaction, and sexual health behaviors for Black MSM in the House Ball community." The grant supports Smith’s exploration of the implications of the theory among Black and Latinx men who have sex with men (MSM) who are participants in the House Ball Community (HBC), a subculture comprised primarily of Black and Latinx sexual and gender minorities who “walk” or compete in events that mix performance, dance, lip-syncing, and modeling. The study investigates characteristics of sexual health communication embedded within social and sexual networks, and expands the

understanding of how social networks and sexual health communication impact sexual health behaviors in the MSM House Ball community. Smith hopes the data collected from the study will help improve current HIV prevention and inform the development of future interventions tailored to MSM and House Ball communities, as well as the larger health population. The sponsoring team on Smith’s grant is UR School of Nursing’s James McMahon, PhD, associate professor, Natalie Leblanc, PhD, MPH, RN, BSN, an assistant professor and Harriet Kitzman Endowed Fellow in Health Disparities, and LaRon Nel-

Smith

son, ‘02N, ’04N (MS) and ’09N (PhD), associate dean and associate professor of nursing at Yale School of Nursing and former associate director of international research in the University of Rochester Center for AIDS Research.

PhD Student Faith Lambert Recognized with Diversity Fellowship Faith Lambert, MS, RN, FNP-BC, a student in the University of Rochester School of Nursing's MS-PhD program, was recognized for her interest and advocacy in HIV care. Lambert received the Diversity Equity and Inclusion Student Fellowship from the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (ANAC). The fellowship recognizes a student from a diverse racial or ethnic

background who has a genuine interest in HIV care across the HIV care continuum. Lambert's research interests include health disparities, pediatric to adult care transition, adolescent and adult health, and HIV care management. Her dissertation will explore autonomy supportive relationships in HIV positive young adults and its impact on HIV self-

care management. The fellowship also established a mentorship with Natalie Leblanc, PhD, MPH, RN, BSN, assistant professor and Harriet J. Kitzman Endowed Fellow in Health Disparities at the UR School of Nursing. Lambert formally accepted the fellowship at the ANAC 2021 annual conference in November.

Lambert

Dembrow Steps into New Role as Senior Administrator for Research Kyle Dembrow assumed a new position as the senior administrator for research at the University of Rochester School of Nursing’s Harriet J. Kitzman Center for Research Support. In his new role, Dembrow oversees research operations, including resource allocation, financial management, and grants and contracts administration. He brings a wealth of experience in grant management and accounting from his previous position as senior accountant at the UR School of Nursing. Dembrow first joined the UR School of Nursing in 2016. Dembrow NURSING 2022 Volume 1 13


NEWS

Recent DNP Grad Named URMC’s Nursing Equity and Inclusion Leader A recent graduate of the University of Rochester School of Nursing’s Doctor of Nursing Practice program, Sheniece Griffin ’21N (DNP), ’19N (MS), RN, CNL has been appointed as the University of Rochester Medical Center's first-ever director for equity and inclusion in nursing practice. The role may be brand new to her and to the system, but Griffin has valuable professional and personal experiences to draw on. She knows URMC and its people well: Griffin has been a nurse for 11 years, all of it within the system. She began her career as a student nurse patient care technician at Highland Hospital; most recently, she has been a clinical care manager for Primary Care Network. And she was born, raised, and educated in the Rochester area, so she knows the wider community well.

In her new role, Griffin will working with colleagues across the Medical Center to help diversify the nursing workforce and build a more inclusive atmosphere where everyone feels valued and respected. “The goal is to be sure that everyone’s voice is heard,” she said. Griffin graduated from the School of Nursing's DNP program last May after successfully defending her scholarly project, “Evaluating and Improving Complex Care Management for HighRisk Patients in a Patient-Centered Medical Home Primary Care Practice.” Her project focused on evaluating and improving the existing complex care management program in a patient-centered medical home primary care practice for adult patients. She previously graduated from the School of Nursing’s Clinical Nurse Leader program in 2019.

Griffin

Swantz Named URMC's Chief Advanced Practice Officer Anne Swantz, '88N (MS), RN, MSN, C-PNP, a University of Rochester School of Nursing graduate, was tapped to lead the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Department of Advanced Practice, which includes the Margaret D. Sovie Center for Advanced Practice. Swantz was named the new chief advanced practice officer, leading nearly 1,000 physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and some midwives working throughout UR Medicine. "The new department brings advanced practice providers (APPs) together to enhance understanding of how APPs are essential to providing high-quality, cost-effective patient care," Swantz said. In her new role, Swantz works closely with Chief Medical Officer Michael Apostolakos, MD, and Chief Nursing Officer Karen (Davis) Keady, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, to grow the voice of APPs across UR Medicine. "The APPs are respected and important members of the health care team where everyone's contribution is vital to a patient's successful outcome," Swantz said. 14 NURSING 2022 Volume 1

"We've created this department to reflect the importance of the roles of these two professional groups," said Kathy Mulholland Parrinello ’75N, ’83N (MS), ’90 (PhD), chief operating officer and executive vice president of URMC and Strong Memorial Hospital. The Sovie Center was established in 2006 to support the education, research, and professional development for APPs. It was the first APP-focused center in the country and this move to have it serve as a department is another progressive step for the institution. Keady says this new structure is another way URMC demonstrates its leadership, because few academic medical centers have established a department for PAs and NPs. "We'll be able to attract top talent because we have a unique and sophisticated system that will support their career advancement." Swantz has been with URMC for 41 years, starting as a staff nurse, then manager in Pediatrics becoming a pediatric nurse practitioner in 1988. She continues to practice in the Pediatric

Primary Care clinic. "Anne has demonstrated excellence in clinical practice and leadership. She is a great choice to lead our APPs," said Apostolakos.

Swantz


UR School of Nursing’s Epsilon Xi Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau Celebrates 40th Anniversary of Charter The University of Rochester School of Nursing’s Epsilon Xi Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International celebrated a significant milestone this February. The chapter commemorated the 40th anniversary of its official charter, which occurred on Feb. 7, 1982, when 260 members comprised the newly-formed chapter. That pivotal event, however, took place a few years after the honor society was originally established at the school. Maureen Friedman, PhD, RN, former instructor of community health at the UR School of Nursing, was one of the founding officers who led the pursuit of establishing a nursing honor society in 1979 and was named its first president. She and other officers and members of the steering committee: Carol Anderson, Jo Ann Belle-Isle, Lisa Jeffery, Kay Melnyk, Sue Nickoley-Colquitt, Carol Smith, Joyce Wiedrich, Thelma Wells, and Judith Sullivan, thought it was important to institute a convening body to recognize and promote nursing scholarship, leadership, and service. Loretta Ford, EdD, RN, PNP, FAAN, FAANP, co-developer of the nurse practitioner model and founding dean of the UR School of Nursing, gave her blessing and assured the officers that becoming a chapter of Sigma Theta Tau was worth pursuing. In its first year, the honor society established the Clare Dennison Lecture in honor of Clare Dennison, director of the School of Nursing and superintendent of nurses at Strong Memorial Hospital from 1931 to 1951. The Clare Dennison Lecture remains a tradition at the UR School of Nursing as an integral part of Meliora Weekend to commemorate a new academic year. The honor society also presented a research symposium, where members gathered to share evidence-based research to improve and further their skills in nursing practice. The honor society held its first induction ceremony in March 1979, welcoming more than 160 members. But to be considered an official chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the honor society would need a much larger membership base. The honor society added an additional 87 members in November 1980, and

soon after, was officially chartered with 260 total members. “We celebrate a decade of highly productive activity as a full-fledged, autonomous professional school,” Ford said at the time. “It is fitting and proper that a nursing honorary society be inaugurated at this time to advance one of our goals: scientific inquiry to improve the care of people in the 1980s. The faculty, students, and alumni deserve high praise for their efforts over the past two years to qualify for chapter membership in Sigma Theta Tau” Today, Epsilon Xi, with more than 320 active members, remains true to its original mission of improving the health of people worldwide through increasing the scientific base of nursing practice. The 40th anniversary of the charter establishment was celebrated virtually on Feb. 7. Chapter members convened to hear welcoming remarks from Dean Kathy Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP, and highlights of the contributions and accomplishments of members from current chapter president Luis A. Rosario-McCabe, DNP, RN, CNE, CNL, WHNP-BC, and other select members. In celebration of the chapter’s milestone, Epsilon Xi has also launched a “$40 for 40 years” fundraising initiative to further its support in nursing scholarships through grants, co-sponsorship of conferences and partnerships with UR School of Nursing-based and community organizations. “This chapter has made the reputation of the School of Nursing one of the best in the country for research production and for the unification of practice, education, research, and administrative leadership, which put Rochester on the map. Now, we’re celebrating our 40th anniversary and we ask you to support the efforts of this wonderful organization. I hope you’ll join me in contributing what you can,” said Ford. Donations can be made with a smartphone by scanning the barcode at right, which leads to the campaign's PayPal account for safe and secure payments. Alternatively, payments can be made by visiting urson.us/stt-epsilonxi-40th-anniversary.

NURSING 2022 Volume 1 15


PUBLICATIONS, PRESENTATIONS, HONORS, AND AWARDS

Scholarly Publications The following is a listing of research findings published by School of Nursing faculty from October 2020 to September 2021.

Danielle C. Alcena-Stiner, PhD, RN Alcena-Stiner, D.C., & Markowitz, D.G. (2020). The Life Sciences Learning Center: An evolving model for a sustainable STEM outreach program. Journal of STEM Outreach, 3, 10.15695/jstem/v3i2.08. Opara, I., Chandler, C.J., Alcena-Stiner, D.C., Nnawulezi, N.A., & Kershaw, T.S. (2020). When pandemics call: Community-based research considerations for HIV scholars. AIDS and Behavior, 24, 2265-2267. Mary G. Carey, PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN Carey, M.G., & McMullen, S.L. (2020). The value of using an acuity score for neonatal nursing research. Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing, 34, 352-356. Alden, L.E., Matthews, L.R., Wagner, S., Fyfe, T., Randall, C., Regehr, C., White, M., Buys, N., Carey, M.G., Corneil, W., White, N., Fraess-Phillips, A., & Krutop, E. (2020). Systematic literature review of psychological interventions for first responders. Work and Stress, 35, 193-215. Wagner, S.L., White, N., Buys, N., Carey, M.G., Corneil, W., Fyfe, T., Matthews, L.R., Randall, C., Regehr, C., White, M., Alden, L.E., Krutop, E., Fraess-Phillips, A., & Fleischmann, M.H. (2021). Systematic review of mental health symptoms in firefighters exposed to routine duty-related critical incidents. Traumatology, 27, 285-302. Wagner, S.L., White, N., Regehr, C., White, M., Alden, L.E., Buys, N., Carey, M.G., Corneil, W., Fyfe, T., Matthews, L.R., Randall, C., Krutop, E., & Fraess-Phillips, A. (2020). Ambulance personnel: Systematic review of mental health symptoms. Traumatology, 26, 370-387. Dzikowicz, D.J., Schmitt, L.A., Gastle, K., Skermont, A., & Carey, M.G. (2020). Comparing an all-RN unit to a mixed-skill unit at a hospital. JONA, The Journal of Nursing Administration, 50, e14-e22.

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Dzikowicz, D.J., & Carey, M.G. (2021). Severity of myocardial ischemia is related to career length rather than age among professional firefighters. Workplace Health & Safety, 69, 168-173. Algase, D., Stein, K., Arslanian-Engoren, C., Corte, C., Sawyer Sommers, M., & Carey, M.G. (2021). An eye toward the future: Let the dialogue proceed. Nursing Outlook, 69, 534-535. Carey, M.G., Regehr, C., Wagner, S., White, M., Alden, L.E., Buys, N., Corneil, W., Fyfe, T., Matthews, L.R., Randall, C., Fraess-Phillips, A., & Krutop, E. (2021). The prevalence of PTSD, major depression and anxiety symptoms among high-risk public transportation workers. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 94, 867-875. Margaret A. Carno, PhD, MBA, MJ, RN, CPNP, D,ABSM, FNAP, FAAN George, M., Hernandez, C., Smith, S., Narsavage, G., Kapella, M.C., Carno, M., Guttormson, J., Disler, R.T., Heart, D.E., Chlan, L.L., Happ, M.B., Chen, Z., Hetland, B., Hutchinson A.F., Jonsdottir, H., Redeker, N.S., Schell-Chaple, H., Fletcher, M., & Yorke, J. (2020). Nursing research priorities in critical care, pulmonary and sleep: International Delphi survey of nurses, patients and caregivers: An official American Thoracic Society workshop report. Annals of the American Thoracic Society, 17, 1-10. Bauldoff, G., Gubrud, P., & Carno, M.A. (2020). LeMone & Burke’s medical surgical nursing: Clinical reasoning in patient care. 7th ed. Pearson. Marianne C. Chiafery, DNP, PNP-BC Chiafery, M. (2020). Ethicists offer much needed support to clinicians with moral distress. Medical Ethics Advisor, 36, 61-72. Susan M. Ciurzynski, PhD, RN-BC, PNP, VCE, FNAP Lapinski, J., & Ciurzynski, S. (2020). Enhancing the sustainability of a Dedicated Education Unit: Overcoming obstacles and strengthening partnerships. Journal of Professional Nursing, 36, 659-665. Hugh F. Crean, PhD Leblanc, N.M, Alexander, K., Carter, S., Crean, H., Ingram, L., Kobie, J., & McMahon, J. M. (2020). The effects of trauma, violence, and stress on sexual health outcomes among female clinic clients in a small Northeastern U.S. urban center. Women's Health Reports (New Rochelle, N.Y.), 1, 132-142.

Leblanc, N.M., Crean, H.F., Dyer, T.P., Zhang, C., Turpin, R., Zhang, N., Smith, M., McMahon, J., & Nelson, L. (2021). Ecological and syndemic predictors of drug use during sex and transactional sex among U.S. Black men who have sex with men: A secondary data analysis from the HPTN 061 study. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 50, 2031-2047. Hou, F.S., Cerulli, C., Crean, H.F., Wittink, M.N., Caine, E.D., Chan, K.L., & Qiu, P.Y. (2021). Implementing a new tool to predict the risk of intimate partner violence in rural China. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 36, 1588-1606. Heffner, K.L., Quiñones, M.M., Gallegos, A.M., Crean, H.F., Lin, F.V., & Suhr, J.A. (2021). Subjective memory in adults over 50 years of age: Associations with affective and physiological markers of emotion regulation. Aging and Mental Health, 30, 1-9. Marie Flannery, PhD, RN, AOCN Kadambi, S., Loh, K.P., Dunne, R., Magnuson, A., Maggiore, R., Zittel, J., Flannery, M., Inglis, J., Gilmore, N., Mohamed, M., Ramsdale, E., & Mohile, S.G. (2020). Older adults with cancer and their caregivers — current landscape and future directions for clinical care. Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, 17, 742-755. Mohile, S.G., Epstein, R.M., Hurria, A., Heckler, C.E., Canin, B., Culakova, E., Duberstein, P., Gilmore, N., Xu, H., Plumb, S., Wells, M., Lowenstein, L. M., Flannery, M.A., Janelsins, M., Magnuson, A., Loh, K.P., Kleckner, A.S., Mustian, K.M., Hopkins, J.O., Liu, J.J., Ger, J., Gorawara-Bhat, R., Morrow, G.R., & Dale, W. (2020). Communication with older patients with cancer using geriatric assessment: A cluster-randomized clinical trial from the National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program. JAMA Oncology, 6, 196-204. Flannery, M.A., Culakova, E., Canin, B., Peppone, L., Ramsdale, E., & Mohile, S. (2021). Understanding treatment tolerability in older adults with cancer. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 39, 2150-2163. Susan W. Groth, PhD, WHNP-BC, FAANP Meng, Y., Groth, S.W., Hodgkinson, C.A., & Mariani, T.J. (2021). Serotonin system genes contribute to the susceptibility to obesity in Black adolescents. Obesity Science and Practice, 7, 441-449. Yu, Y., Kalarchian, M.A., Ma, Q., & Groth, S.W. (2021). Eating pat-

terns and unhealthy weight control behaviors are associated with loss of control eating following bariatric surgery. Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, 17, 976-985. Barrett, E.S., Groth, S.W., Preston, E.V., Kinkade, C., & James-Todd, T. (2021). Endocrine disrupting chemical exposures in pregnancy: A sensitive window for later-life cardiometabolic health in women. Current Epidemiology Reports, 8, 130-142. Groth, S.W., Fernandez, I.D., Block, R.C., Thurston, S.W., Wong, E., Brunner, J., Mayo, N., Kapula, N., Yu, Y., Meng, Y., Yeh, K-L., Kinkade, C.W., Thornburg, L.L., O’Connor, T.G., & Barrett, E.S. (2021). Biological changes in the pregnancy-postpartum period and subsequent cardiometabolic risk--UPSIDE MOMS: A research protocol. Research in Nursing & Health, 44, 608-619. Dye, T.D.V., Quinones Tavarez, Z., Pérez Ramos,J.G., Fernandez, I.D., Vélez Vega, C., Vega Ocasio, D., Avendaño, E., Cardona Cordero, N.R., DiMare Hering, C., Dozier, A.M., & Groth, S.W. (2021). Participation in genetic research among Latinx populations by Latin America birth-residency concordance: A global study. Journal of Community Genetics, 12, 603-615. Yeh, K.L., Kautz, A., Lohse, B., & Groth, S.W. (2021). Associations between dietary patterns and inflammatory markers during pregnancy: A systematic review. Nutrients, 13, 834. Kathi L. Heffner, PhD Quinones, M.M., Gallegos, A.M., Lin, F.V., & Heffner, K.L. (2020). Dysregulation of inflammation, neurobiology, and cognitive function in PTSD: An integrative review. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 20, 455-480. Anderson, A., McDermott, K., Rooks, B., Heffner, K.L., Dodell-Feder, D., & Lin, F.V. (2020). Decoding individual identity from brain activity elicited in imagining common experiences. Nature Communications, 11, 5916. Chen, Q., Yang, H., Rooks, B., Anthony, M., Zhang, Z., Tadin, D., Heffner, K.L., & Lin, F.V. (2020). Autonomic flexibility reflects learning and associated neuroplasticity in old age. Human Brain Mapping, 41, 3608-3619. Gallegos, A.M., Heffner, K.L., Cerulli, C., Luck, P., McGuiness, S., & Pigeon, W.R. (2020). Effects of mindfulness training on posttraumatic stress symptoms from a community-based pilot clinical trial


among survivors of intimate partner violence. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 12, 859-868. Heffner, K.L., Quiñones, M.M., Gallegos, A.M., Crean, H.F., Lin, F.V., & Suhr, J.A. (2021). Subjective memory in adults over 50 years of age: Associations with affective and physiological markers of emotion regulation. Aging and Mental Health, 30, 1-9. Jessica M. Lapinski, MNE, RN Lapinski, J., & Ciurzynski, S. (2020). Enhancing the sustainability of a Dedicated Education Unit: Overcoming obstacles and strengthening partnerships. Journal of Professional Nursing, 36, 659-665. Natalie M. Leblanc, PhD, MPH, RN, BSN Zhang, C., Wharton, M., Xue, Y., Leblanc, N., & Liu, Y. (2020). Understanding the role of nurse practitioners, physician assistants and other nursing staff in HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis care in the United States: A systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Nursing, 19, 117. De Santis, J.P., Quidley-Rodriguez, N., Mathurin, E.P., Valdes, B., Leblanc, N.M., Provencio-Vasquez, E., & Martinez, J. (2020). Circumventing vs. guiding: A grounded theory study of sexual negotiation among Hispanic men who have sex with men. Journal of Social Service Research, 47, 167-180. Leblanc, N.M, Alexander, K., Carter, S., Crean, H., Ingram, L., Kobie, J., & McMahon, J. M. (2020). The effects of trauma, violence, and stress on sexual health outcomes among female clinic clients in a small Northeastern U.S. urban center. Women's Health Reports (New Rochelle, N.Y.), 1, 132-142. Leblanc, N.M., Crean, H.F., Dyer, T.P., Zhang, C., Turpin, R., Zhang, N., Smith, M., McMahon, J. & Nelson, L. (2021). Ecological and syndemic predictors of drug use during sex and transactional sex among U.S. Black men who have sex with men: A secondary data analysis from the HPTN 061 study. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 50, 2031-2047. McMahon, J.M., Simmons, J., Haberer, J.E., Mannheimer, S., Leblanc, N., Torres, L., Quiles, R., Aedo, G., Javier, A., Braksmajer, A., Harriman, G., Trabold, N., Pouget, E.R., Kurth, A., Smith, M., Brasch, J., Podsiadly, E.J., & Anderson, P.L. (2021). The magnetic cou-

ples study: Protocol for a mixed methods prospective cohort study of HIV-serodifferent heterosexual couples’ perspectives and use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). BMJ Open, 11, e048993. F. Vankee Lin, PhD, RN Quinones, M.M., Gallegos, A.M., Lin, F.V., & Heffner, K.L. (2020). Dysregulation of inflammation, neurobiology, and cognitive function in PTSD: An integrative review. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 20, 455-480. Anderson, A., McDermott, K., Rooks, B., Heffner, K.L., Dodell-Feder, D., & Lin, F.V. (2020). Decoding individual identity from brain activity elicited in imagining common experiences. Nature Communications, 11, 5916. Chen, Q., Yang, H., Rooks, B., Anthony, M., Zhang, Z., Tadin, D., Heffner, K.L., & Lin, F.V. (2020). Autonomic flexibility reflects learning and associated neuroplasticity in old age. Human Brain Mapping, 41, 3608-3619. Heffner, K.L., Quiñones, M.M., Gallegos, A.M., Crean, H.F., Lin, F.V., & Suhr, J.A. (2021). Subjective memory in adults over 50 years of age: Associations with affective and physiological markers of emotion regulation. Aging and Mental Health, 30, 1-9. James M. McMahon, PhD Trabold, N., Swogger, M., McMahon, J., Cerulli, C., & Poleshuck, E. (2020). A brief motivational intervention to address intimate partner violence victimization: A pilot study. Research on Social Work Practice, 30, 104973151990065. Leblanc, N.M, Alexander, K., Carter, S., Crean, H., Ingram, L., Kobie, J., & McMahon, J.M. (2020). The effects of trauma, violence, and stress on sexual health outcomes among female clinic clients in a small Northeastern U.S. urban center. Women's Health Reports (New Rochelle, N.Y.), 1, 132-142. Leblanc, N.M., Crean, H.F., Dyer, T.P., Zhang, C., Turpin, R., Zhang, N., Smith, M., McMahon, J., & Nelson, L. (2021). Ecological and syndemic predictors of drug use during sex and transactional sex among U.S. Black men who have sex with men: A secondary data analysis from the HPTN 061 study. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 50, 2031-2047. Adams, J.W., Khan, M.R., Bessey, S.E., Friedman, S.R., McMahon, J.M., Lurie, M.N., Galea, M.D., &

Marshall, D.L. (2021). Preexposure prophylaxis strategies for African– American women affected by mass incarceration. AIDS, 35, 453-462. Gu, L., Zhang, N., Mayer, K.H., Moskow, M., Brasch, J., McMahon, J.M., Nam, S., Adu-Sarkodie, Y., Agyarko-Poku, T., Boakye, F., & Nelson, L. (2021). Autonomy-supportive healthcare climate and HIV-related stigma predict linkage to HIV care in men who have sex with men in Ghana, West Africa. Journal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care (JIAPAC), 20, 232595822097811. McMahon, J.M., Simmons, J., Haberer, J.E., Mannheimer, S., Leblanc, N., Torres, L., Quiles, R., Aedo, G., Javier, A., Braksmajer, A., Harriman, G., Trabold, N., Pouget, E.R., Kurth, A., Smith, M., Brasch, J., Podsiadly, E.J., & Anderson, P.L. (2021). The magnetic couples study: Protocol for a mixed methods prospective cohort study of HIV-serodifferent heterosexual couples’ perspectives and use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). BMJ Open, 11, e048993.

Lisa Norsen, PhD, RN, ACNP-BC Pesis-Katz, I., Smith, J.A., DeVoe, J., Norsen, L., & Singh, R. (2020). Reducing cardiovascular disease risk for employees through participation in a wellness program. Population Health Management, 23, 212-219. Irena Pesis-Katz, PhD Pesis-Katz, I., Smith, J.A., DeVoe, J., Norsen, L., & Singh, R. (2020). Reducing cardiovascular disease risk for employees through participation in a wellness program. Population Health Management, 23, 212-219. Maria Quinones-Cordero, PhD Quinones, M.M., Gallegos, A.M., Lin, F.V., & Heffner, K.L. (2020). Dysregulation of inflammation, neurobiology, and cognitive function in PTSD: An integrative review. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 20, 455-480. Heffner, K.L., Quinones, M.M., Gallegos, A.M., Crean, H.F., Lin, F.V., & Suhr, J.A. (2021). Subjective memory in adults over 50 years of age: Associations with affective and physiological markers of emotion regulation. Aging and Mental Health, 30, 1-9.

Ying Meng, PhD, RN, ACNP Meng, Y., Lohse, B., & Cunningham-Sabo, L. (2020). Sex modifies the association between the CLOCK variant rs1801260 and BMI in school-age children. PloS ONE, 15, e0236991.

Linda A. Schmitt, MS, RN, NPD-BC, CNL Dzikowicz, D.J., Schmitt, L.A., Gastle, K., Skermont, A., & Carey, M.G. (2020). Comparing an all-RN unit to a mixed-skill unit at a hospital. JONA The Journal of Nursing Administration, 50, e14-e22.

Meng, Y., Groth, S.W., Hodgkinson, C.A., & Mariani, T.J. (2021). Serotonin system genes contribute to the susceptibility to obesity in Black adolescents. Obesity Science and Practice, 7, 441-449.

Craig R. Sellers, PhD, RN, AGPCNP-BC, GNP-BC, FAANP Werner, N.E., Rutkowski, R.A., Graske, A., Finta, M.K., Seshadri, S., Sellers, C.R., & Shah, M.N. (2020). Exploring SEIPS 2.0 as a model for analyzing care transitions across work systems. Applied Ergonomics, 88, 103141.

Groth, S.W., Fernandez, I.D., Block, R.C., Thurston, S.W., Wong, E., Brunner, J., Mayo, N., Kapula, N., Yu, Y., Meng, Y., Yeh, K-L., Kinkade, C.W., Thornburg, L.L., O’Connor, T.G., & Barrett, E.S. (2021). Biological changes in the pregnancy-postpartum period and subsequent cardiometabolic risk--UPSIDE MOMS: A research protocol. Research in Nursing & Health, 44, 608-619. O'Connor, T., Best, M., Brunner, J., Ciesla, A.A., Cunning, A., Kapula, N., Kautz, A., Khoury, L., Macomber, A., Meng, Y., Miller, R.K., Murphy, H., Salafia, C.M., Vallejo Sefair, A., Serrano, J., & Barrett, E. (2021). Cohort profile: Understanding pregnancy signals and infant development (UPSIDE): A pregnancy cohort study on prenatal exposure mechanisms for child health. BMJ Open, 11, e044798.

Seshadri, S., Felsen, C., Sellers, C.R., & Dumyati, G. (2020). “There is no one to pick up the pieces”: Sustainability of antibiotic stewardship programs in nursing homes. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, 42, 440-447. Sandhya Seshadri, PhD, MS, MA Werner, N.E., Rutkowski, R.A., Graske, A., Finta, M.K., Seshadri, S., Sellers, C.R., & Shah, M.N. (2020). Exploring SEIPS 2.0 as a model for analyzing care transitions across work systems. Applied Ergonomics, 88, 103141. Seshadri, S., Felsen, C., Sellers, C.R., & Dumyati, G. (2020). “There is no one to pick up the pieces”: Sustainability of antibiotic stewardship programs in nursing homes. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, 42, 440-447. NURSING 2022 Volume 1 17


PUBLICATIONS, PRESENTATIONS, HONORS, AND AWARDS

Seshadri, S., Concannon, C., Woods, J.A., McCullough, K.M., & Dumyati, G.K. (2020). “It’s like fighting a war with rocks”: Nursing home healthcare workers’ experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, 42, 1020-1021.

Jabaley, T., Rizzo, P., Grenon, N.N., Sullivan, C., Bagley, J., Nassif, M., Siegel, R., & Underhill-Blazey, M. L. (2020). Chemotherapy education and support: A model for use in the ambulatory care setting. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 24, E43-E49.

Renu Singh, MS Pesis-Katz, I., Smith, J.A., DeVoe, J., Norsen, L., & Singh, R. (2020). Reducing cardiovascular disease risk for employees through participation in a wellness program. Population Health Management, 23, 212-219.

Amweg, L., McReynolds, J., Lansang, K., Jones, T., Snow, C., Berry, D., Partridge, A., & Underhill-Blazey, M. (2020). Hodgkin Lymphoma survivor wellness: Development of a web-based intervention. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 24, 284-289.

Joyce A. Smith, PhD, RN, ANP Pesis-Katz, I., Smith, J.A., DeVoe, J., Norsen, L., & Singh, R. (2020). Reducing cardiovascular disease risk for employees through participation in a wellness program. Population Health Management, 23, 212-219. Karen F. Stein, PhD, RN, FAAN Algase, D., Stein, K., Arslanian-Engoren, C., Corte, C., Sawyer Sommers, M., & Carey, M.G. (2021). An eye toward the future: Let the dialogue proceed. Nursing Outlook, 69, 534-535. Megan L. Underhill-Blazey, PhD, APRN, AOCNS, FAAN Chittenden, A., Harladsdottir, S., Ukaegbu, C., Underhill-Blazey, M., Gaunkar, S., Uno, H., Brais, L., Pere, K., Wolpin, B., Syngal, S., & Yurgelun, M. (2020). Implementing systematic genetic counseling and multigene germline testing for individuals with pancreatic cancer. Journal of Oncology Practice, 17, e236-e247. Pozzar, R., Hammer, M.J., Underhill-Blazey, M., Wright, A.A., Tulsky, J.A., Hong, F., Gundersen, D.A., & Berry, D.L. (2020). Threats of bots and other bad actors to data quality following research participant recruitment through social media: Cross-sectional questionnaire. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22, e23021. Underhill-Blazey, M., Blonquist, T., Chittenden, A., Pozzar, R., Nayak, M., Lansang, K., Hong, F., Garber, J., & Stopfer, J. (2020). Informing models of cancer genetics care in the era of multigene panel testing with patient-led recommendations. Journal of Genetic Counseling, 30, 268-282. Cao, C., Sullivan, S., & Underhill-Blazey, M. (2020). Hand lettering as a novel form of creative art expression for oncology patients. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 25, 97-99.

18 NURSING 2022 Volume 1

Baroutsou, V., Underhill-Blazey, M.L., Appenzeller-Herzog, C., & Katapodi, M.C. (2021). Interventions facilitating family communication of genetic testing results and cascade screening in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer or Lynch syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Cancers, 13, 925. Jones, T., Howard, H., Freeman-Costin, K., Creighton, A., Wisdom-Chambers, K., & Underhill-Blazey, M. (2021). Knowledge and perceptions of BRCA1/2 genetic testing and needs of diverse women with a personal or family history of breast cancer in South Florida. Journal of Community Genetics, 12, 415-429. Brady, J.A., Underhill-Blazey, M., Burke, P.J., Lee, C.S., Howard, E.P., & Duffy, L.V. (2021). Experiences of school nurses caring for newly arrived immigrant and refugee children. International Journal of Educational Reform, 30, 271-299. Jinjiao J. Wang, PhD, RN Wang, J., Caprio, T.V., Temkin-Greener, H., Cai, X., Simning, A., & Li, Y. (2020). Relationship of Medicare–Medicaid dual eligibility and dementia with unplanned facility admissions among Medicare home health care recipients. Journal of Aging and Health, 32, 1178-1187. Wang, J., Yu, F., Cai, X., Caprio, T.V., & Li, Y. (2020). Functional outcome in home health: Do racial and ethnic minority patients with dementia fare worse?. PLOS ONE, 15, e023365. Wang, J.J., Monroe, T.B., Simning, A., Conwell, Y., Caprio, T.V., Cai, X.Y., Temkin-Greener, H., Muench, U., Yu, F., Ge, S., & Li, Y. (2021). Pain management in home health care: Relationship with dementia and facility admissions. Pain Management Nursing, 22, 36-43.

Wang, J., Ying, M., Temkin-Greener, H., Caprio, T.V., Yu, F., Simning, A., Conwell, Y., & Li, Y. (2021). Care‐partner support and hospitalization in assisted living during transitional home health care. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 69, 1231-1239.

Yu, Y., Kalarchian, M.A., Ma, Q., & Groth, S.W. (2021). Eating patterns and unhealthy weight control behaviors are associated with loss of control eating following bariatric surgery. Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, 17, 976-985.

Wang, J., Ying, M., Temkin-Greener, H., Shang, J., Caprio, T.V., & Li, Y. (2021). Utilization and functional outcomes among Medicare home health recipients varied across living situations. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 69, 704-710.

Groth, S.W., Fernandez, I.D., Block, R.C., Thurston, S.W., Wong, E., Brunner, J., Mayo, N., Kapula, N., Yu, Y., Meng, Y., Yeh, K-L., Kinkade, C.W., Thornburg, L.L., O’Connor, T.G., & Barrett, E.S. (2021). Biological changes in the pregnancy-postpartum period and subsequent cardiometabolic risk--UPSIDE MOMS: A research protocol. Research in Nursing & Health, 44, 608-619.

Mitchell J. Wharton, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CNS Zhang, C., Wharton, M., Xue, Y., Leblanc, N., & Liu, Y. (2020). Understanding the role of nurse practitioners, physician assistants and other nursing staff in HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis care in the United States: A systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Nursing, 19, 117. Wharton, M.J., Harris, O.O., Chapman Lambert, C., & LeGrand, S. (2021). "The more things change, the more things remain the same": It's time to dismantle structural inequalities of racism, discrimination, and health disparities. Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 32, 413-417. Ying Xue, DNSc, RN Xue, Y., Mullaney, T., Smith, B., Cai, X., & Spetz, J. (2020). Scopeof-practice regulation and nurse practitioners as a usual source of care provider. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 11, 13-21. Zhang, C., Wharton, M., Xue, Y., Leblanc, N., & Liu, Y. (2020). Understanding the role of nurse practitioners, physician assistants and other nursing staff in HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis care in the United States: A systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Nursing, 19, 117. Yang Yu, PhDc, MPHc, MSN Burke, L.E., Conroy, M.B., Parmanto B., Beatrice, B., Loar, I., Pulantara, W., Wang, Y., Kariuki, J., Cajita, M., Yu, Y., Cedillo, M., & Sereika, S.M. (2020). The SMARTER Trial: Design of a trial testing tailored mHealth feedback to impact self-monitoring of diet, physical activity, and weight. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 91, 105958. Yu, Y., Sereika, S.M., Finegold, D.N., & Burke, L.E. (2020). Problem-solving, adherence to lifestyle goals, and weight loss among individuals participating in a weight loss study. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 28, 328-333.

Chen Zhang, PhD, MPH Zhang, C., Wharton, M., Xue, Y., Leblanc, N., & Liu, Y. (2020). Understanding the role of nurse practitioners, physician assistants and other nursing staff in HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis care in the United States: A systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Nursing, 19, 117. Leblanc, N.M., Crean, H.F., Dyer, T.P., Zhang, C., Turpin, R., Zhang, N., Smith, M., McMahon, J., & Nelson, L. (2021). Ecological and syndemic predictors of drug use during sex and transactional sex among U.S. Black men who have sex with men: A secondary data analysis from the HPTN 061 study. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 50, 2031-2047. Yingzi Zhang, PhD Zhang, Y., & Kwekkeboom, K. (2020). Feasibility study of an uncertainty management intervention for patient-partner dyads undergoing cancer treatment. Oncology Nursing Forum, 47, 595-608. Zhang, Y., Kwekkeboom, K., Kim, K., Loring, S., & Weiben, A. (2020). Systematic review and meta-analysis of psychosocial uncertainty management interventions. Nursing Research, 69, 3-12. Verduzco-Aguirre, H., Babu, D., Mohile, S., Bautista, J., Xu, H., Culakova, E., Canin, B., Zhang, Y., et al. (2021). Associations of uncertainty with psychological health and quality of life in older adults with advanced cancer. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 61, 369-376.e1.


Scholarly Presentations The following is a listing of presentations by School of Nursing faculty at symposiums, conferences, and meetings from October 2020 to September 2021. Susan W. Blaakman, PhD, RN, PMHNP-BC, FNAP Pediatric Academic Society Conference. (2021). “Self-determination theory (SDT) and asthma medication adherence for urban adolescents." Virtual. Kaitlyn Burke, MS, RN, CCRN, CNE-cl Apple Webinar. (2021). “Reimagining nursing education.” Virtual. Marie A. Flannery, PhD, RN, AOCN Oncology Nursing Society, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Nursing Research 2021 Scientific Colloquium. (2021). “Using Sankey flow diagrams to visualize the symptom experience in older adults with cancer.” Virtual. Susan W. Groth, PhD, WHNP-BC, FAANP Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research. (2020). “Psychosocial influences on eating behaviors in women following childbirth.” Virtual. Ann Leonhardt-Caprio, DNP, RN, ANP-BC, FAHA University of Rochester Alumni Relations Lunch and Learn Presentation. (2020). “Brain basics: Understanding stroke risks and prevention.” Rochester, NY. Lisa Norsen, PhD, RN, ACNP-BC Eastern Nursing Research Society Conference. (2021). “Improving the health of a diverse population through a nurse-driven chronic disease management program.” Virtual. Sally A. Norton, PhD, RN, FNAP, FPCN, FAAN Oncology Nursing Society, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Nursing Research 2021 Scientific Colloquium. (2021). “Symptom management after risk reduction for inherited cancer risk.” Virtual. Kathy H. Rideout, EdD, PPCNPBC, FNAP Meliora Weekend. (2020). “Women who ROC: Voices of our leaders.” Rochester, NY

Lydia Rotondo, DNP, RN, CNS, FNAP Apple Webinar. (2021). “Reimagining nursing education.” Virtual. Tara M. Serwetnyk, EdD, RN, NPD-BC Apple Webinar. (2021). “Reimagining nursing education.” Virtual. Megan L. Underhill-Blazey, PhD, APRN, AOCNS, FAAN Oncology Nursing Society, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Nursing Research 2021 Scientific Colloquium. (2021). “Perceived patient-centered communication is associated with ovarian cancer symptom burden.” Virtual. Oncology Nursing Society, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Nursing Research 2021 Scientific Colloquium. (2021). “Symptom management after risk reduction for inherited cancer risk.” Virtual. Andrew Wolf, EdD, MS, RN, ACNP-C Association for the Assessment of Learning in Higher Education Conference. (2021). “Comprehensive Learner Record: Enabling embedded assessment of competency.” Virtual. Yang Yu, PhDc, MPHc, MSN Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research. (2020). “Psychosocial influences on eating behaviors in women following childbirth.” Virtual.

Honors and Awards The following faculty honors were received between October 2020 to September 2021.

Susan W. Blaakman, PhD, RN, PMHNP-BC, FNAP Drs. Jeremy A. Klainer and Pamela York Klainer Endowed Dean’s Discretionary Award in Nursing (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Kaitlyn Burke, MS, RN, CCRN, CNE-cl Josephine Craytor Nursing Faculty Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Patty Corbett-Dick, PPCNP-BC, PMHNP-BC Drs. Jeremy A. Klainer and Pamela York Klainer Endowed Dean’s Discretionary Award in Nursing (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY.

Mary G. Carey, PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN Josephine Craytor Nursing Faculty Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Marianne Chiafery, DNP, RN, PNP-BC Distinguished Service in Health Care Award – Individual (2020). Rochester Academy of Medicine: Rochester, NY. Joanne Clements, MS, RN, ACNP Dean’s Medal (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Joseph Gomulak-Cavicchio, EdD, MSEd Outstanding Faculty Colleague Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Julie Gottfried, DNP, RN, CNS, CPNP-BC Madeline H. Schmitt Award for Interprofessional Education (2021). Rochester Academy of Medicine: Rochester, NY. Kathy Hiltunen, MBA, RN RBJ Health Care Heroes Award in Nurse category (2021). Rochester Business Journal: Rochester, NY. Kristin Hocker, EdD Mary Dombeck Diversity Enhancement Faculty Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Karen Keady, PhD, RN, NEA-BC Dean’s Appreciation Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Ann Leonhardt-Caprio, DNP, RN, ANP-BC, FAHA Distinguished Fellow of the American Heart Association (2021). American Academy of Nursing: Washington, DC. Lynne Massaro, DNP, RN, FNP-C, ANP-BC, FAANP Josephine Craytor Nursing Faculty Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Julia Mitchell, PMHNP-BC Drs. Jeremy A. Klainer and Pamela York Klainer Endowed Dean’s Discretionary Award in Nursing (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Lisa Norsen, PhD, RN, ACNP-BC Drs. Jeremy A. Klainer and Pamela York Klainer Endowed Dean’s Discretionary Award in Nursing (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Sally A. Norton, PhD, RN, FNAP, FPCN, FAAN Distinguished Alumni Award (2020). University of Iowa College of Nursing: Iowa City, Iowa.

Dean’s Appreciation Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Tobie H. Olsan, PhD, RN, CNL, FNAP Carter & T. Franklin Williams Geriatric Prize Award (2020). Rochester Academy of Medicine: Rochester, NY. Elizabeth Palermo, DNP, RN, ANPBC, ACNP-BC Outstanding Scholarly Practitioner Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Award (2020). Rochester Academy of Medicine: Rochester, NY. Lydia Rotondo, DNP, RN, CNS, FNAP Dean’s Appreciation Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Dee Dee C. Rutigliano, MS, RN Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Tara M. Serwetnyk, EdD, RN, NPD-BC Outstanding Faculty Colleague Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Renu Singh, MS Dean’s Appreciation Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Kate Tredwell, DNP, RN, PMHNP-BC Drs. Jeremy A. Klainer and Pamela York Klainer Endowed Dean’s Discretionary Award in Nursing (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Meghan Underhill-Blazey, PhD, APRN, AOCN, FAAN Outstanding Scholarly Practitioner Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Distinguished Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing (2021). American Academy of Nursing: Washington, DC. Jinjiao J. Wang, PhD, RN Professional Advancement Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Mitchell J. Wharton, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CNS Dean’s Appreciation Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY. Chen Zhang, PhD, RN Most Promising New Investigator Award (2021). University of Rochester School of Nursing: Rochester, NY.

NURSING 2022 Volume 1 19


Running Into the Fire As COVID rages, two cohorts of new nurses join the fight The reinforcements have arrived. Nearly 130 new nurses graduated from the UR School of Nursing in the second half of 2021, providing a much-needed boost to an exhausted and beleaguered workforce. The new graduates stand apart as members of the first two cohorts to pursue nursing careers knowing they would be jumping headlong into the fight against COVID-19. “We were diverse in every way. The only thing we had in common was a passion to become a nurse at a time when we saw nurses on TV breaking down in tears from the stress of COVID, staffing shortages, and an overwhelmed health care system,” said Jim Mullin, who was chosen to be the class speaker for the graduating cohort of 68 Accelerated Bachelor’s Program for Non-Nurses (ABPNN) students who began their 11-month course of study in January 2021. “While many were fleeing from the fire, we were running to it.” A grandfather and former information technology specialist for 32 years, Mullin is a stark example of the diverse group of recruits from a wide array of educational, economic, and geographic backgrounds united by a desire to help others. “We had many options for obtaining our goal. The others were cheaper, easier, less stressful. But we decided to pursue this one, which I think speaks to the intellect, character and dedication of those 68 strangers who came

together less than a year ago.” The school did not admit a cohort of new ABPNN students in May of 2020 due to the pandemic, so its first post-COVID cohort began in September 2020 and graduated in August 2021. As they braced to enter the nursing workforce, student speaker Jill Richards urged her cohorts to remember what they’ve been taught to remain focused on the needs of their patients. “Being a nurse is a journey of constant learning and growing,” she said. “In addition to knowing and understanding the science of nursing, we must remember to carry with us and continually develop our compassion and empathy. Beyond that, we must be advocates that elicit truth and truly see through the eyes of our patients. …We must be fair, we must be just, we must be kind, and we must always use our compassion.”

"While many were fleeing from the fire, we were running to it."

August 2021 Pinning Ceremony:  Jill Richards, chosen by her peers in the cohort, delivered student remarks.  Samaria McClary poses with her pinner, Connie Leary, a Class of 1959 graduate.  Following the pinning ceremony, graduates, families, and friends gathered outside the Larry and Cindy Bloch Alumni and Advancement Center for a reception. 20 NURSING 2022 Volume 1


December 2021 Pinning Ceremony:  Members of the graduating December cohort listen intently to opening remarks from Dean Kathy Rideout.  Jim Mullin, a grandfather and former IT specialist, gave a heartwarming speech as student class speaker.  Justin Gumina celebrates with instructor Jennifer Zugnoni after the ceremony.  Alicia Hill poses with her son after receiving her pin and diploma. NURSING 2022 Volume 1 21


A Family Affair

Fate (and a global pandemic) bring sisters and mother to UR School of Nursing at same time

For a period of about 11 allow her to combine all of her months, sisters Marissa passions into one career. McFadden, RN, and Nicole Marissa also applied to the SepMcFadden, RN, were classtember 2020 start date for the mates in the University of program, which meant she and Rochester School of NursNicole were starting together. ing’s Accelerated Program for The sisters—who had never Non-Nurses while their mothbeen classmates because of their er, Lisa McFadden, RN, BSN, age gap—were now each other’s OCN, was also a student in live-in study partners since the the school’s Clinical Nurse didactic portions of the program Leader (CNL) program. were being taught virtually. Three members of the same “I was grateful to have somehousehold attending the same one to sit across from during school at the same time may lectures and study sessions at seem like an intentional family a time when most people were They didn’t plan it this way, but for nearly a full year, Lisa Mcbonding experience, but in isolated at home,” said Marissa. Fadden (center) and her daughters, Marissa (left) and Nicole reality, it was more like a “We worked well together, even (right) were all students at the University of Rochester School happy accident. though we had detested each of Nursing. Lisa, a graduate of the RN to BS program began Lisa, a single mother to other’s studying styles when we the Clinical Nurse Leader program in August 2020, just about three children, had worked as were younger. Nicole was always the same time that Marissa and Nicole started the Accelerated a registered nurse for nearly hard-working, submitting assignBachelor’s Program for Non-Nurses. 30 years before she decided ments well before the due dates to go back to school to earn and I was a perpetual procrastinaher bachelor’s degree through the UR how nurses become better nurses. tor and perfectionist.” School of Nursing’s RN to BS program. Nicole decided then to shadow a Nicole and Marissa’s graduation from She graduated from that program in friend who was a nurse in a post-anesthe program in August 2021 became 2019 and subsequently enrolled in the thesia care unit. There, Nicole saw how somewhat of a full-circle moment for school’s CNL program beginning in nursing offered an ability to bond with the family. Lisa pinned both of her August 2020. patients and learn their life stories. daughters, officially welcoming them Growing up, both Nicole and MarisExcited to embark on her new career, into the nursing profession. sa had always admired their mother’s Nicole applied to the accelerated pro“I was feeling fulfilled that I had finally hard work and love for nursing, though gram only to be deferred until Septemchosen the right career path that blendneither ever felt it was their calling. They ber 2020 due to COVID-19. ed all of my interests into one job title,” did, however, share their mother’s interMarissa—only a couple of years said Nicole, who works as a Level I est in science and medicine. younger than Nicole—had studied bionurse in the neonatal intensive care unit Nicole studied psychology and biolochemistry at Hobart and William Smith at Golisano Children's Hospital. gy at Duquesne University, where she Colleges. Later, she was a research Marissa followed a little more closely became fascinated with learning how assistant for a synthetic organic chemin her mother’s footsteps, working as an people’s life stories could influence who istry lab where she helped develop inpatient registered nurse on the adult they were. Nursing seemed like the obvianticancer compounds. hematology/oncology unit at Wilmot ous choice for a career, but Nicole was After graduation, she worked as a Cancer Institute. reluctant. She was afraid of making a mis- patient care technician at Thompson “Ultimately I feel each of them bentake and accidentally harming a patient. Health, where she realized nursing was efited from this, from both a personal It was Karen Keady, PhD, RN, NEAso much more than she had previously standpoint and educational standpoint,” BC, who changed her mind. Keady, vice thought. She saw nurses as teachers, said Lisa, an assistant nurse manager president and chief nursing executive at researchers, and patient care providers. at the Interlakes Oncology and Hemathe University of Rochester Medical CenMarissa experienced her “light bulb tology Center in Canandaigua. “Nursing ter, was the commencement speaker at moment” in the car with Nicole on their just seemed to offer them both a bit of Lisa’s RN to BS graduation in 2019. In her way to a family vacation in the Adironeverything, yet differently, for what they speech, Keady shared that mistakes are dacks. Nursing, she realized, would were looking for in life."

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Envisioning the future of the School of Nursing

With input from faculty, staff, and students in the School of Nursing, we’ve identified these four overarching priorities to focus our planning and decision-making through 2024: Emerge as a national leader in academic innovation to transform nursing education for 21st century health care.

Be the exemplar of outcome-driven wellness and preventive health services in Upstate New York.

Objectives and Strategies • Create the business plan and organizational structure of the Center for Excellence for Academic Innovation. • Build academic innovation capacity through the creation of an innovation hub consisting of interprofessional learning communities and innovation networks. • Employ transformative teaching/learning practices. • Generate opportunities to conduct educational research and pursue external funding to advance academic innovation.

Objectives and Strategies • Expand footprint of Center for Employee Wellness and Passport Health services (organizations and individuals) improving health and well-being of our community. • Build payer and employer awareness, aligning wellness vision and commitment to include coverage of comprehensive wellness services in region. • Streamline resources to maximize program benefits and optimize efficiencies. • Reduce access barriers to wellness services for at-risk vulnerable populations, reducing health disparities and improving health literacy.

Accelerate knowledge generation and dissemination in nursing and health science from discovery to implementation. Objectives and Strategies • Solidify and strengthen research teams with a critical mass of investigators in the School of Nursing sufficient to ensure competitive status for Center and Training Grants. • Enrich and sustain a robust and diverse faculty pipeline by enhancing our doctoral and postdoctoral education programs. • Integrate research, practice, and education missions through a cutting-edge health care implementation science program.

Create a culture of wellness in which our School of Nursing community functions optimally, finds joy, and thrives. Objectives and Strategies • Collect and synthesize data from internal (URSON/URMC) stakeholders and external sources (benchmark) to inform development of a wellness plan. • Develop a wellness plan for the School of Nursing, utilizing the wellness task force and future wellness office inputs and resources. • Develop an organization structure with adequate resources to advance this work.

For a more details on the UR School of Nursing plan for the future, visit son.rochester.edu/strategic-plan.

A new look at the Unification Model It was the work of Loretta Ford, founding dean of the School of Nursing, which brought together nursing services in the University of Rochester Medical Center with nursing education and research and became a national model for other nursing schools. This Unification Model is not only a philosophical approach but an organizational structure that operationalizes the interdependence among education, research, and practice, forging a critical link between scientific discovery and improved health care outcomes. Today, the School of Nursing’s missions of education, research, and practice are realized through a lens of diversity, equity, and inclusion. Our constitutional core principles of Innovate, Engage, Lead, Excel inform the creation of strategic

planning strategies, tactics, and metrics related to our four overarching goals. To reflect this new approach, we have updated our graphic of the Unification Model (at right):

NURSING 2022 Volume 1 23


AN

EVERLASTING FOOTPRINT Kathy Rideout’s empathy, humility, and authenticity touched thousands of lives, leaving an indelible impact on the school and the profession of nursing By Patrick Broadwater

“I am one of the lives transformed by Kathy Rideout.” Two decades ago, LaRon Nelson, ’02N, ’04N (MS), ’09N (PhD) felt like a fish out of water. Recently discharged from the U.S. Navy, the Georgia native enrolled in the nursing program at the University of Rochester, but from his background to his assigned gender to his assigned race, he struggled to find his place at the University and to fit in with his classmates, which he described as 90 percent white women. Until he met Kathy Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP. Then the school’s associate dean for academic affairs, Rideout stopped him in the hallway of Helen Wood Hall one day and peppered him with questions, showing genuine interest in how well he was acclimating. “I was surprised that she had taken the time to notice me, but was more surprised that she knew who I was,” said Nelson, associate dean of global affairs and planetary health and Independence Foundation Professor of Nursing at Yale University. “She was aware of my Navy service, she knew that I was a first-generation college student, and she knew that I had high pre-college academic achievement, and she described what those experiences meant for the richness of the student learn24 NURSING 2022 Volume 1

ing environment for all the students. It was the moment that I first felt that my value to the University was beyond how my dark skin ‘diversified’ the school. “Kathy helped me to realize that my intellect, drive, and life experiences were valued contributions. That moment changed my life because it set me free to act as a full member of the University community, and I have since thrived.” Yvette Conyers, ’07N, DNP, MS, RN, FNP-C, CTN-B, first met Rideout in 2008. Conyers was a recent graduate of the school’s RN to BS program and was interested in joining the faculty on a part-time basis. Part of that process involved sitting down with the associate dean leading the academic mission.


Kathy Rideout, whose humble, soft-spoken, and friendly nature belied her fierce passion for nursing, will step down on June 30 after more than a decade as dean of the University of Rochester School of Nursing. She led the school to renewed prominence during her tenure and goes out with enrollment and many of the school’s rankings at all-time highs.

A member of the UR School of Nursing faculty for more than 35 years, Rideout was officially installed as the school’s fifth dean in 2012 after serving in an interim capacity the previous year. She will return to her role on the faculty as a professor of clinical nursing and pediatrics at the conclusion of the academic year.

“From that very first interacThe UR School of Nursing has tion, it felt like home for me,” Conyers said. “Kathy was very been honored five consecutive welcoming. Her smile, her years with the Health authenticity, her true caring for Professions Higher Education you as an individual and not just Excellence in Diversity Award, as an employee, that’s something I felt immediately.” one of only six nursing schools Conyers would go on to nationwide to have been become a full-time faculty honored five times or more. member and co-director of the Accelerated Bachelor’s Program for Non-Nurses at the school. She later was elected the inaugural president of the Rochester chapter of the National Black Nurses Association, for which Rideout as dean of the UR School of Nursing would provide critical support. (This and other defining achievements of Rideout's tenure as dean are highlighted on the following pages.) The experiences of Nelson and Conyers are but two examples of the impact one individual can have on the life and career trajectory of another. And they are emblematic of the approach that Rideout brought to her role as dean, first as interim leader of the school, then when she was officially installed in the position in 2012. “She has superb personal relationships and she knows how to develop them. That creates an ambiance in the school,” The School of Nursing was said former dean Loretta recognized in 2021 as an Apple Ford, EdD, RN, PNP, NP-C, Distinguished School for its CRNP, FAAN, FAANP. “Visitinnovations in teaching, learning, ing the school, the ambiance is palpable. I was amazed and creating a digital learning at that feeling that you get environment to better prepare the when you walk through the nursing workforce of tomorrow, door. You could see that one of only four nursing schools in people were enthusiastic and to be there. Everyone the country to earn this distinction. happy – the staff, the students, the faculty – contributes to that, but it is Kathy’s leadership that spurs it on.” “There is a sense of energy, and a lot of optimism about where the School of Nursing is going in all of its missions. And it’s quite clear that people like to come to work here,” Mark B. Taubman, MD, CEO of the UR Medical Center, said when announcing Rideout’s reappointment to a five-year term as dean in 2016. “That’s probably the best thing anyone can ever say and something we all aspire to: U.S. News and World Report creating an environment where people want to be here. We ranks the UR School of Nursing heard loud and clear that people 21st among master’s nursing want to be here.” programs in its 2023 Best The very same qualities that Graduate Schools guide. The make Rideout an exceptional nurse and educator – faith, school’s DNP program ranks empathy, humility, caring – have 27th. Both are the school’s been the calling cards of her all-time best showing in their leadership style as dean. Her example has not only set the respective categories. NURSING 2022 Volume 1 25


The School of Nursing ranks No. 23 among nursing schools in research funding received from the National Institutes of Health for FY 2021. The school has placed in the top 30 of schools nationwide in eight of the last 10 years.

Rideout flanked by former University of Rochester President Joel Seligman (left) and former Medical Center CEO Bradford Berk after being named dean in August 2012.

tone for a welcoming and collegial environment within the school, but it has created an atmosphere in which each individual is empowered to be their best selves and reach their full potential. “Dean Rideout shaped my mindset on what leadership is,” said Jose Perpignan, ’16N, co-founder of the Greater New York City Black Nurses Association and student in the FNP/ DNP. “I remember walking by her in the hallway and she said, ‘Oh, hey Jose!’ I was amazed. How can she work in the hospital, run a nursing school, and still know everyone’s name? I pride myself on

University of Rochester School of Nursing Leadership through the Years

1925 The University of Rochester School of Nursing was established concurrently with Strong Memorial Hospital and the School of Medicine and Dentistry. Helen Wood (1925-31) appointed first superintendent of nursing

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becoming the type of leader Kathy is.” “She never has a hidden agenda, she just wants people to be successful. That’s where she comes from, you can just feel it,” said Karen Keady, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, chief nursing executive and vice president at URMC. “She’s such Though she forged her own path as a positive person and leader, Rideout maintained a close we need more of that relationship and often sought advice in today’s world. I am from the school’s founding dean, going to miss her treLoretta Ford. Retired in 1986, Ford made several trips back to campus at mendously. I haven’t Rideout’s request, including in 2019, had enough time with when she helped install Ying Xue as a her. I’ve only been Ford Professor. here four years, and that’s not fair.” “Kathy has an open-door policy. You can come to her with issues and she will make the time to listen. Most deans don’t do that,” said Conyers, noting that the policy not only applied to faculty and staff, but to students as well. She recalled a time a few years ago when a cohort of students brought forth concerns affecting students of color. Rideout hosted multiple discussions with groups and individuals to under-

1931 Clare Dennison (1931-51) led the School of Nursing, first as superintendent of nursing (1931-47) and then as director of nursing (1947-51) 1951 Ruth Miller Brody (1951-54) appointed director of School of Nursing and nursing service

1954 Beatrice Stanley (1954-57) named director of nursing service 1957 Eleanor Hall (1957-71) recruited to chair the new Department of Nursing in the School of Medicine and Dentistry


The contributed value of the School of Nursing’s endowment has grown 76% from 2012 to 2022, an increase of more than $9.6M in new gifts. The market value of the school’s endowment has more than doubled in that time to nearly $49.4 million.

stand and alleviate their concerns. Creating a welcoming and inclusive community has been a hallmark of Rideout’s career, but especially as dean. She has instituted policies and initiatives that have been at the forefront of the University’s diversity efforts. From playing a lead role in creating sustainable and permanent pieces, such as the school’s diversity council and LIFT program, to calling attention to events recognizing LGBTQ communities, to ensuring that the mannequins in the simulation labs feature a variety of skin tones and genders, she has made inclusivity an integral part of the school’s functioning. “Kathy has always been vocal The innovative Council on Diversity about being truly and Inclusiveness was formed in support of DEI,” in 2012. Consisting of an elected said Conyers. “I body recognized as essential to the think some people may have concerns school’s operations and success, it about your dean would serve as a model for other being too ‘political,’ units throughout the University in but Kathy had no barriers. She knew years to come. in the end, it was

1972 An independent School of Nursing was established. Loretta Ford (1972-86), the co-creator of the nurse practitioner role, was named the school’s inaugural dean 1971

Helen McNerney (1971-72) served as acting chair of the Department of Nursing

Well-respected and popular among the school’s faculty and staff, as well as leadership at the University and Medical Center, Rideout is particularly beloved by nursing students. Approachable and informal, she is on a first-name basis with practically every one of them and often is the first person they turn to when they have a problem or need someone to talk to.

1999 Patricia Chiverton (1999-2008) is appointed interim dean and assumes the role of dean officially in 2000 1986 Sheila Ryan (1986-99) appointed as school’s second dean

2011 Kathy Rideout (2011-22) takes over as interim dean and is officially installed as the school’s fifth dean in 2012 2008 Kathy Parker (2008-11) named School of Nursing’s fourth dean

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The School of Nursing was an early supporter and became the university sponsor of the Rochester Chapter of the Black Nurses Association. The school formally sponsored the RBNA in 2019, providing financial support for programming and initiatives.

truly the just thing to do.” The welcoming feeling extended to every corner of campus life. She was also a fixture at student events, from informal gatherings to mentoring sessions with future leaders. She appeared at every orientation, convocation, and graduation, often delivering heart-touching stories at pinning ceremonies about her ongoing work in the Golisano Children’s Hospital working with infants with ostomies. The stories were always tinged with humor and empathy and gently reinforced an important lesson for nurses Enrollment at the school about to begin their careers: it’s always about the patient. has more than doubled “Kathy was a shining light over the past decade, for us,” said Paige Steiner, hitting an all-time high ’21N. “She always had words of wisdom to share with us.” in 2021, with more than “I remember her stories 800 students across all vividly,” Conyers said. “Stayprograms. ing in clinical and practicing

A new 26,000-square-foot addition to Helen Wood Hall opened in May 2022. The new hub for collaborative and experiential learning includes state-of-the-art technology – including human patient simulators, augmented and virtual reality equipment, and a 20bed skills lab that replicates the clinical environment.

humbles her and she expresses that in her stories. If she wasn’t working clinically, she may have been a different dean. But those experiences with patients, realizing that we’re all human beings, keeps Kathy humble. Now it’s our turn to tell our stories of Kathy, remembering the trailblazer that she was and is.” As dean, Rideout instituted a cheerful message to faculty, staff, and students that she sent faithfully every Monday. It includes the highlights and successes of faculty and staff, from papers published and awards won to wedding day and newborn baby photos. All week long she takes notes and collects items to share the following week. It is beautiful in its simplicity – there are no design elements, nothing The School of Nursing formal, just a way to shine launched the Center for the light on others – and quintessentially Kathy RideEmployee Wellness in 2012 out. Although the message to provide a comprehensive came from her, it had little to wellness program to do with her. It was University of Rochester all about promoting others and elevating employees. The program the role of nursing. now serves more than “I sometimes 50,000 individuals think back on that across more than 50 day in the hallway and how different organizations in the my life would be Greater Rochester area. if Kathy had not stopped me,” said Nelson. “I am convinced that she recognized talent and promise in me that I had not yet recognized. Moreover, she made a point to intervene in my life. “My story is the story of Kathy Rideout. She has made her mark on the world by touching lives, inspiring future leaders, and creating nurses who will use their positions to change the world one patient at a time.” “Her footprint is everlasting,” Conyers said. “The Rideout with her associate deans at the Dean's Diamond Circle dinner on April fact that she allows others to work in her footprints 8, 2022. Pictured from left to right: Renu Singh, senior associate dean for finance while creating their own is priceless. I’m just glad I and operations; Sally Norton, associate dean for research; Rideout; Mitchell Wharhad her footprints to follow.” ton, associate dean for equity and inclusion; and Lydia Rotondo, associate dean for education and student affairs.

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BREAKING BARRIERS UR Nursing professor inspires incarcerated individuals through spirituality course By Ivy Burruto

E

ach week, a stuffed, plain manila envelope arrived on her porch. And each weekend, Kristin Hocker, EdD, would pull journal entries from the envelope and sit with them a while, reflecting on the experiences and perspectives of her students. Then she would grade and comment on each paper and stuff them back into the envelope to be returned to her students at Groveland Correctional Facility. Hocker, an assistant professor of clinical nursing at the University of Rochester School of Nursing, began teaching her Spirituality, Religion, and Health course to UR Nursing students in the spring of 2020. That same semester, she debuted the class to incarcerated students at Groveland, a medium-security men’s prison located in Livingston County, about 40 miles south of campus. The Spirituality, Religion and Health course explores the religious and spiritual responses to health and human suffering through a health care provider's lens. “The course is especially significant because it analyzes one’s spiritual and religious journeys, even those who aren’t aligned with spirituality can still recognize there’s more to a human being than just a body,” Hocker said. “Even if not everyone is a provider, everyone is a patient and impacted by a provider-patient relationship.” The course was offered to Groveland’s students through the University’s Rochester Education Justice Initiative (REJI). The initiative, founded in 2015, has ambitious aims, such as abolishing the prison-industrial complex and redressing the impact of its systems. But in the shorter term, it is focused on providing opportunities for currently or formerly incarcerated individuals

to pursue their education at the University and collaborating institutions. For individuals that are incarcerated or formerly incarcerated, education is a major factor in their successful reintegration into the community and their overall quality of life. A recent study from New York University’s Brennan Center for Justice revealed that people who receive some form of post-secondary education or vocational training while in prison are estimated to have a 12 percent higher chance of finding a job after release, and are less likely to be reincarcerated. That number is significant when the lifetime earning potential of incarcerated individuals is reduced by half a million dollars on average. It also disproportionately falls on the shoulders of Black and Latino populations, who make up three-quarters of the 337,000 New Yorkers who have spent time in prison at some point in their lives. Last year, REJI was awarded a $1 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to provide more academic offerings for both incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals, and bring together local higher education and community partners to build a network of advocates working to lower incarceration in the city and throughout New York. Hocker had attended several of REJI’s community events on campus. Inspired by their work, she submitted a proposal to teach a course through REJI’s college-in-prison program. Instructors involved in the program teach in an undergraduate program at Groveland as well as Attica Correctional Facility, administered by REJI in partnership with SUNY Genesee Community College (GCC). Incarcerated individuals with a NURSING 2022 Volume 1 29


high school diploma or equivalent are eligible to enroll in the college-level, credit-bearing classes in pursuit of an associate degree from GCC. Hocker proposed the idea to UR School of Nursing Dean Kathy Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP, who has developed groundbreaking diversity and inclusion initiatives throughout her tenure as dean. Their conversation led to a larger discussion with Joshua Dubler, associate professor of religion and faculty director of REJI, and Precious Bedell, assistant director of community outreach for REJI, on ways the UR School of Nursing could support REJI’s efforts. Getting approval to teach the course for Groveland students was just the beginning. Aside from the unforeseen challenges stemming from the COVID-19 outbreak, Hocker had to navigate the protocols put in place for faculty members. All faculty-student engagements were conducted through correspondence, facilitated by the asynchronous nature of the coursework and assignments. Readings, modules, project descriptions, syllabi, and texts were distributed to the students at the start of the semester. Student journals and assignments were then packed into manila envelopes, picked up from Groveland by REJI staff, and delivered to faculty at home. Once graded, the materials would be delivered back to the students. Although she didn’t get to personally engage with her stu-

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dents, Hocker says that through the structure of the course, she was still able to get to know them as students, thinkers, and scholars. “If there’s a lesson here, it’s to never underestimate someone’s funds of knowledge,” said Hocker. “It was interesting how much they could tie into the material as a patient, as a caregiver, or family member. They understood the importance of holistic connections and seeing someone in a whole different light aside from the biases, perceptions, and misperceptions that can impact care.” For Dylan Colunio, the associate degree program at Groveland Correctional Facility changed his life. Colunio chose Hocker’s class from a list of electives, assuming it was an in-depth mixture of anthropology, history, and religion. Instead, Hocker introduced Colunio and the other students to different ways to communicate and relate to others, he said. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman was one of the books that particularly resonated with Colunio. The book is a spiritual telling of a young girl born to a family of Hmong immigrants who started showing symptoms of epilepsy. The Hmong culture believes that epilepsy is a reunion between the soul and body, but doctors tried to intervene with medical care causing a cultural divide.


Dylan Colunio took Kristin Hocker’s Spirituality, Religion, and Health course while incarcerated at the Groveland Correctional Facility. He credits the education offered through the Rochester Education Justice Initiative with helping him land a job at Hyundai Mobis within days of being released.

Groveland Correctional Facility, a medium-security men’s prison located in Livingston County, about 40 miles south of campus, is one of several institutions where incarcerated individuals with a high school diploma are eligible to enroll in college-level, credit-bearing classes leading to an associate degree.

“That story stuck with me because it helped me understand expectations for how to support and communicate with one of my best friends as he grieved the loss of his mother,” said Colunio. “Sometimes the expectation when someone is grieving is to talk about it, but I learned that being there for someone doesn’t mean you have to say anything at all.” Colunio, however, struggled with his own expectations when it came to life after prison. “I lost everything. I lost my house and cars. In prison you keep thinking about all of the things you have to do when you get out. Being able to understand people who might be going through the same thing helps. Once you’re released you keep thinking—how can I get myself to the point I was before I got locked up? You have to make up for lost time. I had such bad anxiety when I was released because I didn’t know what I was going to do.” But within days of being released, Colunio landed a full-time job working at Hyundai Mobis, a manufacturing facility. In fact, his employer saw he was college educated and offered to give him money to go back to school. He was also given the opportunity to get certified in welding through Georgia Institute of Technology this January, as well as additional training and computer classes. “They saw I was trying to better myself and make the most

out of a bad situation. I wish I could go back and tell everyone at Groveland my experience and tell them to take classes because it just shows potential,” he said. “The whole experience changed my life,” he said, “That little time in the classroom goes a long way. It keeps your mind off what’s happening in there. I felt Kristin and other professors cared about me and that I could better myself and be a member of the community.” “I could’ve headed down a different path, and I didn’t. Going into a classroom takes you away from the bad. It bounces you back to what matters. It just changes your survival and perspective. If I can maintain a 4.0 in college, then I can do anything. I just have to put my mind to it.” At the end of the semester, Hocker reflected on how grateful she was to have the opportunity to support the students’ educational ventures, whether they completed a degree or enrolled in education after their release or not. She hopes to continue teaching with REJI. “Being a part of the REJI project as a faculty member meant I was constantly learning about decarceration and abolition,” she said. “You can’t help but think about the idea of the power of knowledge and education, and who we share that power with. The more opportunities that are provided to people, the more opportunities they have to thrive instead of survive.”

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A Worthy Faux

Newer simulation activities allow students to confront discomfort in a low-stakes, but powerful, learning environment On a Friday morning in July, a pawn shop opened in a corner of Evarts Lounge was doing good business. So, too, was the nearby storefront offering paycheck advance loans. Meanwhile, staff providing health care and social services in the neighborhood had comparatively little to do. The “neighborhood” in this case was the ground floor of Helen Wood Hall, which had been converted into a small city for several hours for a role-playing exercise to help Accelerated Bachelor’s Program for Non-Nurses (ABPNN) students gain a deeper awareness and better understanding of the daily challenges and barriers facing some of society’s most vulnerable members. Conducted for the first time this past summer as part of the ABPNN’s Population Health course, the poverty simulation allowed future nurses to experience what it is like to live as part of a low-income family. Faculty and staff volunteers served as bankers, social workers, retail clerks, policemen, teachers, and other community members during the exercise, following a carefully crafted script to help guide the students’ experience. In character as fathers, mothers, grandparents, and children, ABPNN students were tasked with juggling a number of responsibilities, such as getting themselves to work and their child to school without reliable transportation, despite having very limited resources. As they navigated a month’s worth of activities in a compressed two-hour timeframe, they often encountered other challenges, such as language barriers, unhelpful authority figures, and unexpected financial burdens. Hence, the flurry of activity at the simulated pawn shop and paycheck advance store. It’s also no wonder that many of the students couldn’t

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or didn’t make health care a priority. With so many other difficult factors in their lives, they either didn’t have the time or couldn’t afford to visit their health care provider. That’s an important lesson the event’s organizers hope will resonate with students for years to come. “It will help them to know how they can advocate for their patients, how they can empower vulnerable members of our community and help to allocate resources that will allow them to survive and meet the basic needs that these families have,” said Erin Baylor, DNP, RN, PNP-BC, ONP, director of simulation and experiential learning at the UR School of Nursing. “I think it also provides our students a little more empathy for the challenges that our patients are facing.” “When we have patients struggling with compliance or with showing up on time, it’s really remembering the intersectionality that poverty plays in our everyday lives, not just in health care, but in terms of discrimination, racism, and other barriers that people face,” said ABPNN student Casey Weaver. “When you take into account all of those challenges that people face, it’s almost remarkable that people show up at all.” Poverty remains a huge issue in the U.S., and in Rochester, one of the poorest cities in the country with more than 30 percent of residents below the poverty line. Before the simulation, students drove around the city for a “windshield survey,” taking note of the resources available in different neighborhoods. They also took part in a group debriefing session with all the participants after the simulation. “Many of us probably experienced a form of poverty or at least some of that poverty culture,” student Rabia Cav said.


“But given that 34 million people in the U.S. are in poverty right now, it’s definitely eye-opening. One thing I did notice, that bad luck happens to everybody, but when it happens to someone in poverty, things are harder for them than the average person.” The poverty simulation, held for the first time last July and each of the last two semesters, has quickly become an established part of the ABPNN curriculum. But it’s just one of several decidedly low-tech simulation exercises utilized across the school’s academic programs with the aim of sharpening skills in a low-stakes, yet high-impact, learning environment. The nurse practitioner program, for example, began instituting objective structured clinical examinations—OSCEs— in 2019. These structured encounters with standardized patients give NP students an opportunity to demonstrate the clinical competencies they’ve learned in class and throughout their clinical rotations. In this exercise, students enter an exam room where they meet their “patient” for the first time. They do a health history and a physical exam, while being observed by a small group of peers and instructors. After the examination, all parties debrief to talk about how the interaction could have been improved. “It is a student-centric approach with patient-centered outcomes, and we’re very committed to that,” Baylor said. “This is their time to take everything they’ve learned and assess their patients, to have that connection with patients. That’s why our students go into this field, because they’re passionate about patient care.” “I’m even more nervous for this than for clinicals,” Lee

Lande ’16N, an ICU nurse at Strong Hospital and family nurse practitioner student, said before taking part in the OSCEs last fall. “I feel like there’s more at stake here. I know it’s supposed to be a low-intensity environment, but just the fact that people are watching you do the history and do the exam makes me a little uneasy. But I’m excited, because it’s a learning experience.” Whatever nerves students may have about the OSCEs are usually mollified by the experience itself. In fact, their self-reflection on their approach and interactions with the patient, as well as the feedback from the observers, help to alleviate student fears and boost their confidence. “It was helpful having an expert in the room to identify any week points in my assessment and exam,” said Lande. “So far, it’s the most realistic education we’ve gotten in the program,” Sean Goonan, RN, BS, OCN, a 2021 adult gerontology acute care nurse practitioner graduate, said after participating in his first OSCE. “In my opinion, it’s almost the equivalent of walking into a real patient’s room for the first time.” Which is exactly the point of simulation activities, Baylor said. “Giving students opportunities to be successful, to learn from their mistakes, to be able to do some rigorous self-reflection on where they are and where they would like to be when they graduate is a real benefit of this kind of learning environment.”

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An Unbreakable Bond Forged by a desire to help others, a special friendship between nursing classmates has endured nearly 70 years of love and loss

Story by Patrick Broadwater

Delores Keefer Seward ’56N and Jane Strother Hill ’56N students have achieved some of the school’s historical have always been more alike than different. “firsts,” since many people and records from the time have They both grew up in small towns and spent significant peribeen lost to history. Clearly, Hill was one of the first, if not ods of their lives on family-owned farms southwest of Rochthe first, Black student to enroll in the nursing program. And ester. Spurred by an innate desire to help others, they enrolled just as apparent was that Hill had an overwhelmingly positive in 1953 at the University of Rochester School of Nursing, experience at the school. She said she felt like people were where they first met and later became roommates. They both rooting for her to succeed. graduated, married, got jobs, moved away, raised children and “Once I was there I don’t remember having any negative expegrandchildren, returned to their hometowns, and experienced riences,” she recalled. “I never experienced any kind of racial the unspeakable grief of losing a child. Through all the highs issues that I can think of. It was really a wonderful experience.” and lows, their friendship has endured for nearly 70 years. Approximately 120 students were enrolled in the Class It was a friendship that almost wasn’t to be. of ’56 nursing program, of whom about 75 graduated. They Reminiscing with Seward in the fall of 2021 at her home in were a tight-knit group as students, bonding over their Rochester, Hill said she was initially denied admission to the shared living quarters under the strict watchful eye of a UR nursing program. “I just got a letter saying I was not accepted. I thought no more of it until I ran into my guidance counselor and he said that there were four of us who applied from Avon and the other three were accepted,” said Hill. “He couldn’t figure it out because, academically, I was higher in my class.” Hill said the letter did not provide a reason for the denial, but she believes it was because of her race. Hill was a decorated student who was a member of the National Honor Society and a cheerleader at Avon High School. When she decided to pursue a career in nursing, she chose the University of Rochester because she thought it had the best nursing program around. Hill recalls her mother being warned by a neighbor at the time that she was making a mistake because the school did not accept Black students. “I had a wonderful life growing up and had very strong parents,” Hill said. “My dad was a farmer and my mom didn’t want to ever hear that I can’t do something. She said, ‘If that’s where you want to go, that’s where you’re going to apply.’” A short time after getting her initial letter, Hill was invited back to campus where she was subsequently admitted. Unbeknownst to her at the time, Hill’s counselor, Mr. Billies, had gone to see the school’s director of nursing, Ruth Miller Brody. “He went to see her in person. I have no idea what the conversation was. All I know is they asked me to come in for another interview after he intervened,” Hill said. "As far as I know I was the first African-American to be admitted. I never checked it out, but I was told I was the first one." Decades after the fact, it’s difficult to say definitively which

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house mother in Helen Wood Hall, and memorable moments where she met her husband, Sidney. They were married in in their education, such as the time they were called in to 1959 and stayed in Connecticut until 1974, when Hill returned provide care for sick patients at Strong Hospital during a bad to Avon and joined the Livingston County Skilled Nursing snowstorm. Many stayed close after graduation. Round robin facility. She served as the director of nursing services from letters circulated among classmates for more than 60 years, 1981 until her retirement in 1993. and dozens would occasionally gather for group vacations. “I never had any trouble getting a job,” Hill said, noting that Hill and Seward were among that group, but also shared the University of Rochester name often carried great weight their own bond. among hiring managers. “When I went in for an interview “We gravitated to each other,” said Seward. it was like, ‘When can you start? Yesterday? Can you start Like Hill, Seward grew yesterday?’” up in a small community Seward worked part outside of Rochester, time for several years where her father began at Batavia Hospital until his career as a teacher the responsibilities of the in a one-room country family and farm called her school. When she identiaway. fied nursing as her calling, “Even though my time she applied to the Unispent employed as a versity of Rochester. “It nurse was short, it was was the best school that invaluable in my life,” I knew of. I wanted to go Seward said. “I’m glad I there,” she said. had that.” By their third year, As they juggled marSeward and Hill decided ried life and burgeoning they would share a suite careers, both Hill and together. After graduatSeward started raising ing, when Hill worked at children of their own. Strong and Seward was Seward had three girls; head nurse in pediatrics Hill had a boy and girl. at Batavia Hospital, they Both suffered the heartbecame roommates breaking loss of a child again, sharing a house on Linden Street with a half dozen in their early adult years. Hill’s son was 24 when he died. other classmates. Everyone took turns cooking, cleaning, and Seward’s youngest daughter had just completed her sophogrocery shopping. more year at Cornell. Then life began in earnest, and one by one, the roommates “We share a terrible grief,” Seward said. “But our friendship went their separate ways. Seward, who married her husband helped us. I think our experiences that we went through carGordon just seven days after completing her educational ried a heavy responsibility, and we encouraged and helped requirements, followed him to Cornell, where she worked in each other.” the infirmary then in Tompkins County Hospital. When GorNow in their mid-80s, Hill and Seward remain close. They don completed his degree, the couple moved back to Bergen catch up on the lives of children, some of whom are now and the Seward family dairy farm. nearing retirement of their own, and their cherished grandchilHill, meanwhile, fielded a phone call one morning for anoth- dren. They reminisce about old classmates, bad dates, and er housemate who was out and the caller at the other end of days spent together with their families on the Seward farm. the line asked if she was a nurse, too. When she said yes, he And they think back fondly on their days at the University of offered her a spot as a nurse at a boys camp in Maine for the Rochester, where they felt blessed to have received a great summer. Hill took a leave of absence to work at the camp education and built so many important lasting relationships. and never returned to Strong. “Our friendships are very important to us,” said Seward. On the way back from Maine, she stopped in Connecti“We didn’t think about our differences then or now. We just cut to interview for a job in pediatrics at Stamford Hospital, loved each other.”

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Meliora 2021 36 NURSING 2022 Volume 1

Health and safety were top priorities during the first large event for alumni, students, and families since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic On October 1 and 2, the University of Rochester community came together in person and online for two days of reunions, celebrations, conversations, performances, and family fun, including the much-anticipated “One University” Commencement honoring the Class of 2020. Health and safety were top priorities during the array of events comprising Meliora 2021, a reimagined version of Meliora Weekend, the University’s traditional fall event combining reunion, family weekend, and homecoming activities. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic meant that last year’s in-person events, including Commencement and Meliora Weekend, had to be postponed. Although COVID-19 protocols limited this year’s in-person attendance to current students, alumni from the Classes of 2020 and 2021, and their families, Meliora 2021 programming—most of which was available via livestream—drew thousands of participants to rewind, reunite, and reconnect. The UR School of Nursing held its annual Clare Dennison Lecture virtually. Yvette Conyers ’07N, president of the Rochester Black Nurses Association, was the featured speaker. To watch a recording of the Clare Dennison Lecture and other events from Meliora 2021, visit www.rochester.edu/melioraweekend/virtual-events/recordings.

A LEAGUE OF HER OWN: Academy Award–winning actor, Olympic-level archer, United Nations special envoy, and gender equality advocate Geena Davis (left) received the Eastman Medal for achievements and service that embody the University’s highest ideals. Afterward, during her commencement address, she told the graduates, “Yours is the generation that is going to save the planet. Thank you in advance for all the good work you will do, you ferocious warriors.”

Assistant professor of clinical nursing Erin Baylor (right) prepares to read aloud the names of the 2020 UR Nursing graduates.


(Above) Lillian Riley, sharing a hug with Dean Kathy Rideout, celebrated a birthday by walking across the stage and being recognized as a 2020 graduate of the UR School of Nursing’s family nurse practitioner program.

Members of the Class of 2020, including master's pediatric nurse practitioner graduates Sydney Lee (left) and Lindsay Doyle (above), crossed the stage to cheers of support from their peers and loved ones as their names were read aloud. “Not only do we honor your academic achievement, we recognize your resilience and your perseverance,” said President Sarah Mangelsdorf during the ceremony.

Save the Date! Meliora Weekend will once again be open to all alumni, families, and friends in 2022. Mark your calendars for Sept. 29-Oct. 2!

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DONOR PROFILE

A Road Less Traveled Nancy Dianis ’85N (MS) took a non-traditional nursing career path, which allowed her to continue to make a difference in the lives of others As a child, Nancy Dianis '85N (MS) was a natural caregiver. She’d often bring home stray animals and lovingly take care of them. When she was a teenager, she signed up as a candy striper at a local hospital in a northwest suburb of Chicago, where she grew up. She also loved science, so the decision to become a nurse was an easy one. After earning her master’s degree from the University of Rochester’s School of Nursing nearly 40 years ago, Dianis worked in a variety of nursing positions. A few years into her nursing career, people started to notice her leadership and management skills. At 26 years old, Dianis became a nurse manager at a hospital in Aurora, Colorado. “Patients and their families would ask, ‘Who’s in charge?’ and they’d be sent to me, often with a look of surprise,” says Dianis. “They weren’t expecting someone so young to be in that position.” In 1988, Dianis moved to the Washington, D.C. area, where her husband had gotten a new job. Over the next few years, she served as the nursing supervisor at Church Hospital in Baltimore, a nursing service chief at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the director of medical nursing at Johns Hopkins Bayview. While at the NIH, Dianis delved into clinical research—she loved it and wanted to incorporate more of it into her career. In 2001, she joined Westat, a renowned company focused on improving lives through research. For the last five years, Dianis has served as its vice president and practice director for clinical trials. Recently, Dianis made a gift to support University of Rochester School of Nursing scholarships. Here, she elaborates on her career, her time at the school, and the reasons why she gives. You’ve taken a non-traditional path for a nurse. What have you enjoyed most about your career? I really enjoy studying pathophysiology of disease and the sociology and psychology of health and wellness through clinical research. And, although I’m not working directly with patients, our research participants are often just one or two degrees away. I also very much enjoy working with the experienced professionals around me. They are on the cutting edge of science and therapeutics that have the potential to improve patient health outcomes. My team’s job is to support the research process and to advocate for patients, which helps ensure their safety and confidentiality. Our work is quite comprehensive, too. We have expertise supporting clinical research related to tuberculosis, HIV, cardiovascular disease, and COVID-19 both domestically and internationally. We facilitate research on effective treatments for these diseases and conditions, and we work with government agencies, commercial and pharmaceutical companies, and foundations. 38 NURSING 2022 Volume 1

How did the School of Nursing prepare you for your career? I experienced—and very much appreciate—the triad of education, research, and practice at the school. I had the opportunity to work in outpatient clinics and private practices as a student. I learned from such supportive and encouraging physician and nursing faculty, too. Dean [Loretta] Ford was there, and she exemplified nursing excellence. She showed me, and every one of us, that nothing was off the table, that everything was possible. It was an exciting time to be there. You’ve maintained your nursing license. Why? Although my current position is a non-traditional one, it is still a form of nursing. Our team is made up of dedicated researchers with a variety of backgrounds, including physicians, epidemiologists, statisticians, and others. They respect the

Nancy Dianis ’85N (MS), vice president and practice director for clinical trials at Westat and co-chair of the School of Nursing's National Council.


role of nurses, our expertise, and our professional credentials. Maintaining licensure shows my commitment to the nursing practice.

reduce my hours. Financially, this was a very challenging time. I’m confident that the school can attract more qualified and deserving students—regardless of their financial background—with more scholarI’m not working ships. I’m glad I can help.

Why did you make a gift to "Although support scholarships? directly with patients, our research The School of Nursing launched me into my career, How can others make a participants are often just one or for which I am quite appreciadifference? two degrees away. I very much tive. This is why I give, and I challenge alumni to think enjoy working with the experienced it’s why I also serve as the about their career and what co-chair of the School of Nursit has afforded them. Is there professionals around me. They are ing's National Council. I have even a small way to honor on the cutting edge of science and also been involved in Univerthat value by giving back to sity’s Network Leadership the school that gave them therapeutics that have the potential Council in the D.C. area, too. their career? I encourage peoto improve patient health outcomes. I knew I wanted to give ple to get involved in whatevback to the school that gave er way they can. Make a gift, My team’s job is to support the me so much. I reached out to of any size. Volunteer, attend research process and to Dean [Kathy] Rideout and an event, talk to prospective asked her what areas needed students, offer an internship advocate for patients." the most support. I chose to or summer experience. You support scholarships to ease can make a difference in the the financial burden for students. I know what that burden is life of a future nurse and, collectively, we can do even more. like. When I was a graduate student, I received some tuition benefits, but I still needed to work full time to make ends meet. Then, when my clinical requirements came up, I had to —Kristine Kappel Thompson

Support our nurses Get involved in the School of Nursing’s “Honor Our Nurses” campaign and celebrate, honor, and support the heart of our health care teams. For more information, visit UofR.us/nurses or contact Andrea Allen, senior director of Advancement and Alumni Relations for SON, at andrea.allen@rochester.edu.

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FROM THE ARCHIVES

Forever Young This photo from the University archives features three UR School of Nursing students. The badge of the student in the center appears to identify Carol (Young) Jones ’79N. Do you recognize the students flanking her or the date/location of the photo? Let us know your thoughts by commenting on our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/UofRSchoolofNursing).

2021 Volume 1 Photo Update Elizabeth (Pittman) Keene ‘81N was the first to comment on our Facebook post and identify the students in this photo from our 2021 Vol. 1 issue. They are Margaret “Peggy” (Mould) Hanna ’81N (left) and Ann-Marie DeSantis ’81N, as confirmed by Ann-Marie herself. Gail Grammatica-Blushi ’83N also wrote in and correctly identified Ann-Marie DeSantis. 2020 Volume 2 Photo Update We also received a few submissions recently about the “54 & 56 Bus Trip” photo that originally appeared in the 2020 Vol. 2 issue. Marjorie Ann (Bush) LaBarbera ’54N wrote in and identified the pictured students as (Left to right): Carol (Joustra) Kinzly ’54N, C. Joyce (Huyett) Shutt ’54N, and Kathryn (Mitchell) Herd ’54N. Carol (Grover) Goddard ’56N recalls being a student on the bus on the way to orientation camp in the Finger Lakes. She identified the student in the middle as Patricia Mason Barkley ’56N. If you have additional information or memories sparked by either photo, please reach out and let us know! 40 NURSING 2022 Volume 1


Honor OUR Nurses As essential as it gets. Nurses are the heart of our health care teams. Every day, they’re making crucial care decisions, supporting families, and saving lives. Tell us about a nurse who’s made a difference for you.

#honorOURnurses uofr.us/nurses

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ALUMNI PROFILE

What’s in a Name? Generations after her grandfather adopted a pseudonym in order to enroll in nursing school, Ann Marie Pettis made a name for herself as an international expert in infection prevention A quick glimpse at her CV and it may always in her DNA. A native of seem hard to believe that Ann Marie Rochester, her love of nursing Pettis, ’81N, fell into a career in infecgrew from two grandparents tion prevention. who were nurses. She was The director of ambulatory infection particularly inspired by her prevention at Highland Hospital, she is a grandfather, Frank. An immifellow and president of the Association grant from Italy and the oldest for Professionals in Infection Control of 14 children, he had always and Epidemiology (APIC), and a foundaspired to be a nurse but ing member of the organization's local feared that his ethnic-soundFinger Lakes chapter. She has been ing surname would prove published in a variety of peer review to be an unsurmountable and trade journals and has spoken obstacle to nursing school extensively about infection prevention admission. So, he ran away and control at local, state, national, and from his family’s farm in international venues over the past 35 Clyde, NY, and enrolled under years. a pseudonym. He would go During the pandemic, Pettis has on to work for many years as overseen the COVID-19 prevention and an ambulance attendant and control operations across Highland’s 29 the nurse consultant for the outpatient locations throughout WestRochester Fire Department, ern New York. where he was known as But back in the mid-1980s, she “Doc Pettis” and earned local was a head nurse at Strong Memorial legend status. Hospital’s nursery when an outbreak Seeing the impact her of staphylococcus aureus struck that grandfather had in the commuunexpectedly sent her down a new nity inspired Pettis to follow him career path. into nursing. After The bacteria is graduating from considered to SUNY Upstate “I think the future can be be the most Medical Center safer and brighter than ever dangerous in Syracuse, she but we’ve got a lot of work of the many worked at St. common to do to make that a reality.” Mary’s Medical staphylococcal Campus before bacteria, often landing at Strong causing skin infections, but it can cause and continuing her education at the more serious problems such as pneuUR School of Nursing under another monia, bone infections, or even heart legend, Loretta Ford, EdD, RN, PNP, valve infections. The outbreak required NP-C, CRNP, FAAN, FAANP. Pettis to work closely with Strong’s Pettis earned her certification in infection prevention team, and she infection control in 1986, leading to quickly built a strong rapport with them. positions as the director of infection So strong that when an opportunity prevention for both Highland Hospital came to join their team, she jumped at and the University of Rochester Medthe chance. ical Center. She also became heavily While Pettis may not have always involved in APIC at both the local and known that she would end up specializnational level. She was sitting in the ing in infection prevention, nursing was front row of an APIC conference in

42 NURSING 2022 Volume 1

Pettis

2009, when an official from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention took center stage with an urgent request from the Canadian Ministry of Public Health. Infection control practitioners and epidemiologists were needed in Toronto to assist with the battle against SARS-1. Her hand shot up, and before she knew it, her bags were packed, and she was leaving behind her husband and four children. Pettis arrived at the “ground zero” hospital where the first SARS-1 case in Canada occurred. She saw an unnerving sight, but one that would become all too familiar in the coming years—people, including staff, masked and in line to receive a temperature check before entering the hospital. She also learned that the hospital’s director of infection prevention had just gone on leave, meaning she would now oversee


Upon returning from a volunteer stint in Toronto battling the SARS-1 virus in 2009, Pettis authored an editorial warning that the U.S. wasn’t prepared for a similar outbreak on its own soil. Her chilling statement, “My hope is that we in the U.S. do not keep blinders on thinking that this or something worse can’t happen to us,” would appear prescient in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

surveillance of health care associated infections, evaluate isolation precautions for SARS-1 patients, and serve as the hospital liaison to the health ministry of Toronto. The majority of SARS-1 cases afflicted health care workers, a fact many believe stemmed from improper donning and doffing of personal protective equipment (PPE). Pettis was there when the first health care worker died from SARS-1. Many others would follow. “That was the biggest challenge and fear-generating issue for health care workers,” said Pettis. “Infection preventionists were frustrated since our number one goal is to keep patients and staff safe from infection. We felt helpless.” After several weeks, Pettis returned home, but she felt compelled to turn her experience in Canada into a cautionary tale. She penned an editorial warning readers that the United States would not be ready for a similar crisis. The country’s health care infrastructure was already stretched too thin and

a bigger boat” since they are now needed in many new areas outside of health care such as the food, entertainment, sports and travel industries. “The problem is the ‘complacency, crisis, complacency’ mindset in society in general and health care in particular,” Pettis said. “Nobody wants to spend the money when the problem seems to have gone away. We have to reconsider this model as we come out of the pandemic because we can’t afford to fall back into this mindset." “People who go into health care, in general, are selfless and do it for the true love of people and desire to serve. I think the future can be safer and brighter than ever but we’ve got a lot of work to do to make that a reality. COVID has highlighted many shortcomings and hopefully the lessons we have learned won’t be forgotten this time.”

more nurses and infection control practitioners were needed. “My hope is that we in the U.S. do not keep blinders on thinking that this or something worse can’t happen to us,” she wrote. SARS-1 introduced a “new normal” including respiratory etiquette and an emphasis on not going to work when sick. The Ebola threat several years later sparked a mandate for maintaining a 90-day emergency preparedness supply of PPE. However, by the time SARS-2 hit, much of the PPE stockpile had expired or was inadequate. COVID-19 highlighted and exacerbated the current shortage of nurses and health care workers, including infection Young Ann Marie Pettis was inspired to help others in part by her grandfather, who ran away from home and preventionists, that our country changed his name in order to pursue nursing. “Doc” faces. Pettis says it is clear that Pettis was well-known in the community for his many when it comes to addressing the years of service as an ambulance attendant and nurse consultant for the Rochester Fire Department. shortage of infection prevention specialists we need to “build

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Q&A

Yvette Conyers ’07N Yvette Conyers, DNP, RN, FNP-C, CTN-B, a visiting professor at St. John Fisher College and nurse practitioner at Signify Health, has focused her career on reducing health care disparities, ensuring that nurses incorporate culturally relevant approaches into their care, and magnifying the need for social justice in nursing education and clinical work. In 2018, she was one of the founding members of the Rochester Black Nurses Association (RBNA), sponsored by the UR School of Nursing, and serves as the organization’s president. What advice do you have for those entering the nursing field? Find a mentor and join a professional organization so that you can build your professional and personal network. How are you able to toggle so many responsibilities? I try to remember that my work is greater than me—that’s what keeps me going. I work hard for the community, for the Black population, and for the nurses who will come after me. That’s the legacy I’m trying to leave. What are you reading? The last book I read was Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Time to the Present by Harriett Washington ’76. It’s about environmental racism, public health, and injustice, a must-read for those in health care. What are you most proud of? Being able to raise my son as a single parent. He’s seen me grow through challenges and break through barriers to be where I am today. Do you have a favorite quote? It comes from the Bible (Matthew 19:26), “With God all things are possible.” – Kristine Kappel Thompson

Community action milestones Conyers has been involved in many high-impact community programs. Here are just a few from the last few years: • National Black Nurses Association and Black Hollwood Education and Resource Center (BHERC) COVID-019 grant to help community-dwelling elders at most risk for COVID in the 14605 zip code. • Received United Way’s community crisis grant and partnered with Roc City Sicklers, an advocacy group for children and families living with sickle cell disease. Together they provided food gift cards, offered COVID education, and held listening sessions in church parking lots.

Learn more about the University’s Black Alumni Network at https://www.rochester.edu/advancement/black-alumni-network

• Helped launch “Community Fighting COVID,” a collaborative effort with the University of Rochester, Rochester Regional Health, Common Ground, Ibero-American Action League, Jordan Health, the City of Rochester, Rochester Transit Authority, and volunteers. Together, they developed COVID education and outreach programs for communities of color in Rochester.

And look for the group on The Meliora Collective: https://www.rochester.edu/alumni/giving-back/ get-social/meliora-collective-groups.

• Upcoming: The 2022 rollout of an RBNA “Bridging the Youth Mental Health Gap” program funded through a Greater Rochester Foundation grant.

Connect with us

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CLASS NOTES

1970s Patricia Larrabee ’77N (MS) is one of eight founding members selected by Medable Inc. to serve on its new Site Network Council (SNC), a select group of clinicians and research leaders who will serve as influential voices in Medable product and services development and enable strong participation by research sites in decentralized clinical trials. In December 2021, Larrabee was also a recipient of the ICON Honors, presented by the Rochester Business Journal. The awards honor Rochester business leaders over the age of 60 for their notable successes. Larrabee is founder and CEO of Rochester Clinical Research, which has conducted nearly 1,000 clinical trials since the company was started in 1994. Cynthia S. Darling-Fisher ’78N (MS), clinical associate professor of nursing, retired from the University of Michigan in August 2021. Darling-Fisher received her bachelor’s in nursing from Cornell University in 1971, her master’s in nursing from the University of Rochester in 1978, and her PhD from the University of Michigan in 1987. Darling-Fisher was an assistant professor at U-M from 1979-82. She rejoined the School of Nursing as an assistant professor from 1987-2007, was transferred to clinical assistant professor in 2007, and promoted to clinical associate professor in 2016. Darling-Fisher was a family nurse practitioner with clinical experience in pediatric, internal medicine, and family practice settings. Her professional and academic career focused on ways to improve patient-provider communication to improve care delivery and patient outcomes. Darling-Fisher taught in the undergraduate and graduate programs and was known for her expertise in curriculum development, program coordination, and clinical and classroom teaching for the primary care nurse practitioner programs. She received several notable awards and honors, including being inducted as a fellow of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners and the School of Nursing’s Mae Edna Doyle Teacher of the Year Award and Sigma Theta Tau, Rho Chapter’s Excellence in Nursing Mentorship Award.

1980s Patricia Troyan ’83N (MS) was nominated for the Joe and Jean Hendricks Excellence in Teaching Award at Mercer University. Troyan is currently an associate professor at Mercer’s Georgia Baptist College of Nursing. Troyan earned her master’s degree in community health nursing from the University of Rochester School of Nursing in 1983. She joined the faculty at Georgia Baptist in 2004, and has since earned the college’s Distinguished Faculty of the Year Award twice. The Hendricks Excellence in Teaching Award recognizes a full-time teacher in one of Mercer University‘s 12 schools and colleges who is an exemplary teacher and mentor to generations of Mercer students.

Deb Zimmerman ’86N (MS) has taken on two high-profile national roles as a nurse executive. In October, she was named chief executive officer of the DAISY Foundation; weeks earlier, she was elected president-elect of the American Organization of Nurse Leaders (AONL) board of directors. Zimmerman had served on the Daisy Foundation board since 2018 and effectively ran the DAISY Award program as chief nursing officer and vice president of patient care services at Virginia Commonwealth University Health System. She moved into the CEO position on Nov. 1. Zimmerman has been active with AONL as a board member, chair of the AONL Foundation, and co-chair of the AACN-AONL Academic Practice Council. She will assume the presidency of AONL’s board on Jan. 1, 2024. Zimmerman, who served in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps, practiced as a nurse practitioner and spent 25 years as a nurse executive in New York and Virginia.

2020s Arielle Hagner ’21N (MS) has joined the pediatric care team at Lifecare Medical Associates in Seneca Falls. She recently earned her master’s degree from the University of Rochester School of Nursing and previously earned a bachelor’s degree from Keuka College. Licensed as a pediatric nurse practitioner, she is a member of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners and is a member of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society. She previously worked at Strong Memorial Hospital. Jennifer Whitmore ’21N (MS) has joined the Seneca Family Health Center as a nurse practitioner. She received her master’s degree from the University of Rochester School of Nursing and previously earned a bachelor’s degree from Roberts Wesleyan College.

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IN MEMORIAM

Professor Emerita Jean Johnson passes away Jean Johnson, PhD, RN, FAAN, a renowned nursing leader who contributed groundbreaking work on sharing information with patients to help them cope with illness, died Jan. 23. She was 96. A professor emerita at the University of Rochester School of Nursing, former associate director of nursing oncology at the University’s Cancer Center, and clinical chief of oncology nursing at Strong Memorial Hospital, she devoted her nearly 50-year career to nursing practice, education, research, and advocacy for research and professional practice. She joined the University of Rochester in 1979 and retired in 1993, though she continued to be active as a researcher and reviewer for many years. Johnson’s theory of self-regulation evolved from stress and coping models in the 1970s and from empirical data collected in both laboratory and human research. Her findings demonstrated that when patients faced a stressful health care event, providing them information that included concrete information based on sensory data from individuals who had experienced the event, such as descriptions of physical sensations or other temporal factors, decreased anxiety, aiding in coping, and improved outcomes. Established in a range of settings and populations, the findings revolutionized nursing’s patient education and transformed the standard of care. The impact of her work has been recognized by the American Academy of Nursing (AAN), which inducted her as a fellow and, in 2005, proclaimed her as one of nursing’s “Living Legends.” In 1992, Johnson was named the inaugural recipient of the Oncology Nursing Society’s Distinguished Researcher Award. At the UR School of Nursing, Johnson received the school’s highest honor, the Dean’s Medal, in 2011. Johnson received her bachelor of science degree from Kansas State University in 1948 and began her career as an instructor of nursing later the same year. She taught for 10 years in Kansas, Iowa, and Colorado, before moving into the hospital setting. In 1965, she moved on to Yale, where she would earn a master’s in nursing while serving as a research assistant. She earned her doctorate in social psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and spent eight years at Wayne State University in Detroit as an associate professor and, later, professor before joining the University of Rochester. A loyal supporter of the UR School of Nursing, she made a generous commitment toward the establishment of the Jean E. Johnson Chair in Nursing Oncology, a permanent professorship supporting scholarly research and teaching devoted to the care of individuals with cancer. A conference room on the second floor of Helen Wood Hall is also named in her honor. Johnson was the recipient of numerous awards throughout her career, including the Distinguished Contribution to Nursing Science Award from the American Nurses’ Foundation (1983) and Outstanding Contributions to Nursing and Health Psycholo-

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gy Award from the American Psychological Association (1993). She also received the William H. Riker University Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching from the University of Rochester in 1991. She was also the first nurse to join various panels, such as the National Institutes of Health’s Behavioral Medicine Study Section, the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command’s Review Committee for the Breast Cancer Research Program, and the American Cancer Society’s Advisory Committee on Psychological and Behavioral Research. Elected as a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies in 1974, Johnson was also a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, and the American Psychological Society. Memorials in Jean's name may be directed to the Jean E. Johnson Chair, School of Nursing, University of Rochester, 255 Crittenden Blvd., Rochester, NY 14642.


IN MEMORIAM

Word has reached us of the passing of the following alumni and friends. The School of Nursing expresses its sympathy to their loved ones. Eileen (Lynch) Atwood ’62N (MS) May 2, 2021, Rochester, NY

Jeanne C. Hadfield ’52N July 27, 2021, Hilton, NY

Nancy E. O’Daniels ’61N May 16, 2021, Vail, AZ

Ann Bartles, ’60N, ’61 June 2020, Mesa, AZ

Jean (Scott) Hoose ’49N June 12, 2021, Penfield, NY

Marjorie (Johnson) Paulson ’54N, ’59W May 17, 2021, Carlisle, MA

Marilyn Belli ’76N, ’83N (MS) July 19, 2021, Webster, NY

Jean Marie (Rogers) Kelly ’45N April 13, 2021, Newburyport, MA

Laura (Hickman) Pullen ’54N July 7, 2021, Mount Airy, MD

Jennie (Pilato) Bianconi ’41N Aug. 17, 2019, Maryville, TN

Mary (Wendelboe) Kissel ’52, ’53N Feb. 22, 2021, Bloomington, IN

Maybelle (Dilorenzo) Sehm ’49N June 23, 2021, Litchfield Park, AZ

Carolyn (Keith) Burr ’78N (MS) Oct. 30, 2020, Pompton Plains, NJ

Cynthia (Maier) Krutell ’59N, ’75, ’88N (MS) Oct. 28, 2020, Rochester, NY

Sally Ann Shea ’61N Oct. 23, 2020, Bradenton, FL

Phyllis L. (Mickelson) Carlberg ’47N July 14, 2021, Warren, PA

Cynthia (Grissom) Letarte ’56, ’57N June 14, 2021, Rush, NY

Phyllis Shaughnessy ’54N June 22, 2021, Penfield, NY

Margaret (Campbell) Cole ’49N April 29, 2021, Pasadena, CA

Cynthia Nalton Libby ’58N April 12, 2021, Beacon, NY

Jean (Gunn) Simmons ’44N May 28, 2021, Miami Shores, FL

Joan Damick ’56N Jan. 30, 2021, Webster, NY

Aubrey (Brown) McIntosh ’51N April 4, 2021, Leesburg, VA

Eleanor (Wallace) Terry ’41N Jan. 18, 2021, Montrose, CA

Dorothy Ann (Isaac) Gotham ’44N April 18, 2021, Honeoye, NY

Sandra Eileen Moore ’89N, ’01N (MS) Sept. 26, 2021, Brockport, NY

Joan Waldorf ’59N May 8, 2020, Hamburg, NY

Shirley (Kelly) Griggs ’49, ’50N June 26, 2021, Woodstock, VT

Patricia A. (Devine) Muirhead ’56N June 5, 2021, Bel Air, MD

Faith B. Norton ’39, ’40N Faith Norton, believed to be one of the School of Nursing’s oldest alumni, died Sept. 7, 2021, at the age of 104. Born April 14, 1917, in Centerville, N.Y., she received a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing from the University of Rochester in 1940 and later earned a master’s degree in counseling from Columbia University. She was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army Nurse Corps during World War II, receiving the American Campaign Medal and World War II Victory Medal. She finished her service in 1947 at the 109th General Hospital at Madigan General Hospital, Ft. Lewis, Washington, as charge nurse caring for returning war wounded from the Pacific. Returning to civilian life, she taught at Syracuse University, then she was school nurse and teacher for the Town of Webb School District in Old Forge, N.Y. She and her husband were active in many school, social, civic, and charitable organizations throughout their lives in Old Forge.

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Your classmates want to know your news! Did you receive a promotion? Move to a new city? Publish your research findings? Email us at sonalumni@admin.rochester.edu or visit urson.us/SONalumninews to share your news and get it published in NURSING magazine.

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Thank You. During the past year, 600+ alumni, patients, and community members gave more than $2.3 million to support COVID-19 research and care at the University.

Because of you, we helped pioneer the treatments and vaccines that are saving lives today, and every day. You gave generously and selflessly. And you made life better for our community.

Together, we made a difference.

Together for Rochester #TogetherForRochester

rochester.edu/together

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Parting Shot Cheers to a New Career Molly Drake (left) and Eliana Lande share a celebratory champagne toast after the UR School of Nursing’s August pinning ceremony. 50 NURSING 2022 Volume 1

Photo by John Schlia