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The Spirit of Giving Committed and engaged, the Pace Community gives back in myriad ways

An Alumnus Returns Page 20

Pace, Technologically Speaking Page 22

The Power of Positive Page 28

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Pace University

Become an Engaged Alumnus A guide to staying connected to Pace Your college network brings a lifetime of value. Looking for a job? Relocating? Want discounts? Connect to the Pace alumni network today!

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JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Stay on top of the latest University news, share your memories, and connect with classmates, all from the comfort of your home or your local coffee shop!

ATTEND AN ALUMNI EVENT Network with your peers. Cheer on the Setters at Homecoming. Pick up pointers at a Career Services workshop. Visit www.pace.edu/alumni for a full list of our upcoming events.

youtube.com/PaceUniversity

SPIRIT OF PACE AWARDS instagram.com/ PaceUAlumni

JUNE 10, 2015

facebook.com/ PaceAlumni

A Guide to

Staying CONNECTED

@PaceUAlumni

flickr.com/PaceAlumni

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to Pace

GIVE BACK TO PACE STUDENTS

Volunteer to speak to a student group. Represent Pace at a college fair. Make a gift to the Annual Fund to support student initiatives and scholarships. Every gift helps take Pace to the next level! Give online at: www.pace.edu/givetopace Volunteer by e-mailing: pacealum@pace.edu

Visit www.pace.edu/alumni for additional details and information about alumni benefits and services, or contact us at pacealum@pace.edu or 1 (877) 8ALUMNI

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RECRUIT FROM THE PACE TALENT POOL

Do you need an intern or have a job opening? Keep it in the family! To hire a Pace student or alumnus, visit www.pace.edu/careers.

New York City Area Alumni: Development and Alumni Relations 156 William Street 5th Floor New York, NY 10038

HOMECOMING OCTOBER 15–18, 2015 (PLV) OCTOBER 22–24, 2015 (NYC)

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UPDATE US AND SHARE YOUR STORIES

Keep your Pace contacts current by joining our Online Alumni Community where you can create a lifelong network. You can even use your LinkedIn account for easy access. Share your stories and news by visiting www.pace.edu/alumnicommunity.

Westchester Area Alumni: Development and Alumni Relations 861 Bedford Road Vineyard, 1st Floor Pleasantville, NY 10570


Letter from the

President

Giving Back and Moving Forward As I watch the physical and academic renewal of our Westchester and New York City campuses, I sometimes think about a wonderful line from The Wizard of Oz. Dorothy, Scarecrow, Tin Man, and the Cowardly Lion finally reach the great and powerful Wizard. When Toto pulls back the curtain to reveal that the Wizard is a man who pulls levers and uses a microphone to sound powerful, the man says into the microphone, “Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain!” I think the reality of the campus renewal is the opposite. Pay attention to those men and women behind the curtain, because so many of the astounding changes are due to generous donors, to the faculty’s creation of innovative new programs, and to the administrators and students reshaping Pace as a modern university. Like the man behind the curtain in The Wizard of Oz, there would be no magic without them. The cover story in this issue of Pace Magazine celebrates Pace alumni, supporters, faculty, and students who make magic happen at Pace and in their communities. We are proud of these individuals and their wonderful deeds, and together with our generous

supporters who are helping create campus environments that match the aspirations of our students, they are creating the Pace University of the future. We named our newly renovated science laboratories at One Pace Plaza in honor of Trustee Emeritus Alfred R. Goldstein. His gift helps our science students ride the exciting wave of STEM education with cutting-edge classrooms and learning environments. We renamed the newly renovated dining hall on our Westchester Campus in Pleasantville the Fern Dining Hall in honor of a generous gift from Pace alumnus James Fernandez ’78 and his wife Dolores. The new Donald and Susan Boudreau Student Lounge in Pleasantville’s Kessel Student Center also has been named to honor a gift from alumnus Donald Boudreau ’70 and his wife. Another alumnus, William Janetschek ’93, generously established the William J. Janetschek Scholarship Fund to help students in the Lubin School of Business; and alumni Charles Mak ’77, ’80 and Audy Mak ’77 established the Mak Family Scholarship to benefit students in Lubin’s Business Honors program. We are also grateful for the support of friends who discovered Pace later in life. Rabbi Joel Zion had strong connections in the music and performing arts communities in New York.

President Friedman

“[ THOSE WHO] SUPPORT PACE...ARE HELPING STUDENTS WHO ARE OFTEN MIRROR IMAGES OF THEIR YOUNGER SELVES—STUDENTS FROM SIMILAR BACKGROUNDS WHO POSSESS THE SAME CAPACITY FOR HARD WORK AND DRIVE TO SUCCEED.”

Before he passed away in 2008, he was aware of the growing reputation of Pace’s performing arts program. His widow Harriett believed a gift to Pace was the perfect way to honor her late husband’s work; and last year the Zion family established the Joel and Harriett Zion Endowed Scholarship for Performing Arts at Pace. Actor Kevin Spacey also supports Pace students enrolled in our School of Performing Arts through The Kevin Spacey Foundation: America. Those who support Pace create an entirely new connection to the University. That is because when they support Pace, they are helping students who are often mirror images of their younger selves—students from similar backgrounds who possess the same capacity for hard work and drive to succeed. Their gifts help open our students to opportunities that stretch the boundaries of their imaginations and their potential. When people see what Pace students accomplish with their help, they return to a time when they were young, bright, hardworking, and driven. They remember what it feels like to receive the support they needed to embark on successful futures. That feeling is worth more than Dorothy’s ruby slippers in The Wizard of Oz. Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman President

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WHAT WILL YOUR LEGACY BE? Leave your mark on the future by including Pace University in your estate and gift plans. Your gift will leave a lasting legacy for your family and friends while also giving you the satisfaction of helping future generations of Pace students achieve success in their lives.

Pace Magazine PRESIDENT

Stephen J. Friedman VICE PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY RELATIONS AND CMO

Frederica N. Wald

Do you have a favorite Pace story? Is there a teacher who inspired you? Do you want to suggest an article or feature? If so, we’d love to hear from you. Please send correspondence to: Pace Magazine One Pace Plaza New York, NY 10038 or e-mail us at URnews@pace.edu

For more information on recommended language for your will or additional planned giving options, please contact Director of Planned Giving Marc Potolsky at (212) 346-1619 or mpotolsky@pace.edu.

CHIEF OF CONTENT AND CREATIVE, GENERAL MANAGER

Peter Sikowitz

ART DIRECTOR

Maria Taffera Lewis DIRECTOR, CONTENT

Tiffany Lopes

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, SOCIAL MEDIA AND EDITORIAL

Alyssa Cressotti

WRITER/EDITOR

Kaitie O’Hare

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Gregory Daugherty, Michelle Lodge, Magaly Olivero, and Caitlin Ultimo ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR

Cicero Clamor

ART DIRECTION ASSISTANT

Morgan Jordan

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Maria De La Cruz

PRINT PROJECT COORDINATOR

Marcelina Moreno

DIRECTOR, MARKETING/ACCOUNT SERVICES

Did You Know? Without a will, state law will determine the beneficiaries of your estate. Plan ahead and leave your own legacy.

Vo lu me XXX I N o. 3 Sp r in g 2015

ON THE COVER

Photograph: Jayne Wexler Model: Alessandra Guarnera ’16 Applied Psychology and Human Relations, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences

Leila Franchi

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, MARKETING/ACCOUNT SERVICES

Wendy Metzger

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, BUDGET

Ivy Riddick

Pace Magazine is a publication of the Department of Marketing and Communications, Office of University Relations, published twice a year, and distributed free to alumni and friends of Pace University. The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily represent those of its staff or of Pace University. Copyright © 2015 Pace University

EDITORIAL OFFICE

Pace Magazine Department of Marketing and Communications One Pace Plaza, New York, NY 10038 E-mail: URnews@pace.edu

SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO:

Office of Alumni Relations Pace University One Pace Plaza, New York, NY 10038 Phone: (212) 346-1489 Fax: (212) 346-1210 E-mail: pacealum@pace.edu

Pace University is committed to achieving full equal opportunity in all aspects of University life. Pursuant to this commitment, the University does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, age, ethnicity, marital status, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, disability, or veteran status.


Pace University

| Spring 2015

Departments

THE FUTURE IS NOW

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01 Letter from the President 05 Keeping Pace

•U  nveiling the new Kessel Student Center and Environmental Center

• The Pace Path takes route

•A  thletics Hall of Fame gets five new faces

• Student interns at the White House

•L  ubin connects top execs to students

• Moot court is in session

•P  ace Performing Arts goes to Hollywood

• Meet the acting dean of the SOE

30 Research at Pace 34 Bookshelf

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35 Class Notes

Making a World of Difference

From campus to Colombia, the Pace Community’s generous spirit of giving is felt around the world in myriad ways.

43 Initiative 44 Flashback

Barry Klarberg's Got Game

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Klarberg, an Executive in Residence and a Lecturer in Residence for the Lubin School of Business, jokes about bleeding blue and gold, but his reasons are genuine and deeply felt.

22 The Future Is Now

Flipped classrooms, simulated patients, digital avatar students, and Star Trek science labs. Technology at Pace puts students on the cutting edge of their fields.

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28 A Positive Reinforcement

Dianne Aroh ’92 is doing good for her patients while seeing the good in all.

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Change a student's life— and your own.

Become a mentor.

Research has shown that mentors: ■■ Build valuable leadership and management skills ■■ Enjoy more salary increases ■■ Leverage a powerful network ■■ Create success stories Learn more about becoming an alumni mentor at Pace University. The next mentoring cycle begins in fall 2015. For more information, visit

www.pace.edu/mentoring.


KeepingPace

Joe Peoples

Pace University

KESSEL STUDENT

CENTER OPENING

Members of the Pace Community joined President Stephen J. Friedman and generous alumni donor James Fernandez ’78 on April 23 for the official ribbon cutting ceremony of the newly renovated Kessel Student Center. The new Kessel boasts floor-toceiling windows overlooking Choate Pond, expanded dining space, room for student activities and meetings, and new student lounges like the Boudreau Lounge. Fernandez and wife Dolores cut the ribbon in the new Fern Dining Hall, named in their honor. Ribbon cutters (from left to right) Adelia Willams, PhD, associate provost for Academic Affairs; Clare van den Blink, vice president for Information Technology Services and Chief Information Officer; Nira Herrmann, PhD, dean, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences; Dolores Fernandez; James Fernandez ’78, retired Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer, Tiffany & Co.; Stephen J. Friedman, president; William McGrath, senior vice president and Chief Operating Officer for Westchester; and Jennifer Bernstein, vice president for Development and Alumni Relations.

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KeepingPace

Unveiling the Environmental Center

Kessel wasn’t the only building transformed on the Westchester Campus in Pleasantville this semester. In addition to the expansion of the Kessel Student Center (see page 5), the University also unveiled renovations to the Environmental Center, which serves as a destination and educational resource for students, faculty, staff, the local community, and even animals. The new, state-of-the-art facilities at the Environmental Center include a classroom building, rebuilt farmhouse, hawk cages, barns, and open outdoor classroom and event space. The Center serves as a resource and home for the newlylaunched Environmental Studies and Science Department, headed by Chair and Professor Melanie DuPuis, PhD, with a new Master of Arts in Environmental Policy set to launch in fall 2015. The Center is also home to the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. A ribbon cutting ceremony is planned for this fall.

A Landmark Partnership The Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) USA and Pace University’s Lubin School of Business announced the first ACCA accreditation program at a US-based higher education institution. Starting this fall, accounting students will be able to complete coursework that will qualify them for specific exemptions from ACCA’s 14 exams. “Pace and ACCA USA share common and strong interests in education and the sustainable development of the accounting profession, regionally and internationally, in particular concerning the maintenance and promotion of professional, educational, and ethical standards, the opportunity for individuals of ability to pursue globally relevant qualifications to enhance their career prospects and ultimately to maintain and develop the profession and the wider economy,” said Neil Braun, dean of the Lubin School of Business.

PACE PATH TAKES ROUTE School of Education Associate Professor Brian Evans, EdD, has been appointed the first coordinator of the Pace Path by President Stephen J. Friedman, effective January 2015. Evans will coordinate the formal implementation of the Pace Path as a co-curricular program for all firstyear students. An innovative, four-year program launched in the fall of 2014, the Pace Path helps each student become successful in college, career, and life. Each student develops strengths in managing oneself, interpersonal relations, and organizational awareness through co-curricular activities within an academic program and through collaboration with Pace faculty, advisers, staff, coaches, and mentors. Students will design four-year plans that contain personal and professional goals, which will guide and evolve with them during their time at Pace. “This is a unique opportunity to really differentiate Pace. Pace already gives its students a phenomenal experience, but this will take it another level up. Being a part of that is very meaningful work,” says Evans.

Nursing Students Commit to Compassion Westchester students in the Lienhard School of Nursing’s Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing program and sophomores in the four-year nursing program joined together in February to commit themselves to the nursing profession’s foundation—compassionate care. Students recited an oath and received pins and graduation cords at a ceremony on Pace’s Westchester Campus. The project was made possible with a grant from the Arnold P. Gold Foundation.

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Creating a Safer Pace Sexual assault on college campuses continues to be a national concern. Pace University recently reaffirmed its commitment to protecting students, faculty, and staff by taking the White House’s “It’s On Us” pledge to stop sexual assault; establishing new policies and procedures; creating a website

and printed guide; and more. The Board of Trustees approved the new Sex-Based Misconduct Policy and Procedure on March 11, 2015, which can be found on the University’s website that centralizes sexual assault information, including the Policy, resources, ways to get involved on campus, and more at www.pace.edu/ sexual-assault.

Picture Perfect Partnership Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ Art Department is pleased to announce a new partnership with New York City’s renowned School of the International Center of Photography (ICP). Pace students may now enroll in innovative threecredit courses in photography at ICP that complement the curriculum in photography offered on Pace’s New York City Campus.

EMPOWERING TOMORROW’S LEADERS Pace University partnered with One Hundred Black Men of New York for the 2015 Junior 100/ Pathways to Success program, a world-class program that helps prepare high school students to become intellectually sophisticated citizens with a vigor for learning. Sessions are held at Pace and TD Bank from February to June, with a rigorous curriculum aimed at enhancing life, leadership, and teambuilding skills, while expanding awareness of college academia,

entrepreneurship, and careers. “We are incredibly excited for this opportunity to partner with Pace University. This level of engagement will allow us an opportunity to up-level our offerings during this year’s program while catalyzing new opportunities for our scholars,” said Kaliv Parker, co-chair of One Hundred Black Men of New York. “We are very confident that our scholars will be immensely prepared not only for college academia but for all of their next stages of life.”

Moot Court Is in Session This past February, law students from around the country assembled at Pace Law School to compete in the 27th Annual Jeffrey G. Miller Pace National Environmental Law Moot Court Competition (NELMCC). Conceived by Pace Law students in 1989 with just 22 participating schools, NELMCC is now the largest interschool moot court competition of any kind under one roof. This year’s event hosted 62 teams and more than 400 people in the competition. Retired Chief Judge Patricia Wald of the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit, EPA Administrative Law Judge Barbara Gunning, and Judge Malachy E. Mannion of the US District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania served as the final-round judges.

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Making the Documentary While most faculty and students were enjoying spring break, Dyson Professor and Program Director for the MA in Media and Communication Arts (MCA) program Maria Luskay, EdD, and The New York Times “Dot Earth” blogger and Pace Academy Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding Andrew Revkin worked diligently with MCA students at the CARMABI Research Institute in Curaçao, where marine scientists monitor the island’s surrounding coral reefs and work with local communities to preserve this important ocean beauty. This fifth installment of their award-winning environmental anthology premiered on May 12 at the Jacob Burns Film Center in Pleasantville, New York.

Included as part of Westchester County Executive Robert P. Astorino’s “smart” initiatives designed to promote economic growth, more than 25 high schools and eight colleges from Westchester County entered the Westchester Smart Mobile App Development Bowl. The competition challenged young people to develop mobile applications to improve life for underserved communities and people who are in need. This year’s competition focused on the development of apps that can assist in managing the effects of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Sponsored in part by Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, winners were announced on April 17 and prizes included cash awards up to $2,000 and paid internships in Westchester County.

DOCTORS WITHOUT BORDERS Special thanks to:

Stephen J. Friedman Pace University President

Paris Hansen President of the Pace University Rotaract Chapter

Pace University hosted a panel discussion and photo exhibit in March to mark the launch of Because Tomorrow Needs Her, a multimedia project about the efforts The Fight for Women’s undertaken by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières Health (MSF) to improve the access to This event is co-sponsored by Student Government Association and the Pace University Rotaract Chapter and quality of women’s health care worldwide. Because Tomorrow Needs PANEL Her is aDISCUSSION collection ofAND PHOTO EXHIBITION first-hand accounts from MSF aid workers—midwives, OBGYNs, Wednesday, March 4 physicians, nurses, and counselors—who have treated women and girls in a host of different countries and contexts over the past two decades. Jason Gonzalez Founder of the Pace University Rotaract Chapter Pace University Center for Student Development and Campus Activities Professor Nancy Reagin Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Professor Emily Welty Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Pace University Office of University Relations

Schimmel Center for the Arts Chartwells Catering

Cover photo: Burundi © Martina Bacigalupo

Dr without Forders Program.indd 1

STEM Gets STEAM

SA PRO, Inc.

Middle school students from the Educational Alliance at MS 188 were engaged by the Koresh Dance Company in February as part of Pace STEAM. The interactive dance workshop, led by Assistant Professor Lauren Birney, EdD, and Associate Dean Jonathan Hill, DPS, illustrated math and science topics through the lens of the arts to an audience of more than 100 students. Pace STEAM was made possible with a grant from Time Warner Cable.

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Martina Bacigalupo

Apps for a Cause

2/24/15 12:12 PM


KeepingPace

MEET THE ACTING DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION XIAO-LEI WANG, PHD Newly appointed by President Friedman as the Acting Dean of the School of Education, Xiao-lei Wang, PhD, brings global perspectives and extensive research and educational experience to the position. Wang received her doctoral degree in Educational Psychology from the University of Chicago. Her research covers a wide range of topics such as cultural parenting styles, effects of nonverbal communication on teaching and learning, multilingual development, and moral development. She has published these topics at length in academic journals and she is also frequently invited to speak on these topics internationally. To read a full Q&A with the new acting dean, please visit www.pace.edu/SOEActingDean.

“As our faculty members continue to push

forward into new realms of understanding about the process of education, the School of Education is able to provide our students with the most current and relevant foundation for teaching.” —Xiao-lei Wang, PhD

A WEEK FOR WOMEN Pace’s Women’s Leadership Initiative hosted a week of engaging events in Westchester as part of Women’s

Getting Down to Business

DeBevoise

For more than 25 years, Pace’s Lubin School of Business has welcomed CEOs, chairs, presidents, and other top executives to both the New York City and Westchester campuses for a day of interaction with students through the Executive in Residence (EIR) program. This spring, Lubin hosted Marc DeBevoise, executive vice president and general manager, Entertainment, News and Sports at CBS Interactive, as NYC’s EIR; while Barry Klarberg ’81, ’85, CEO and founder of Monarch Wealth and Business Management, visited as Westchester’s EIR. For more information on Klarberg’s work and connection to Pace, see page 20.

Klarberg

The Next Storm In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences hosted leaders from key industries, divisions of government, and research institutions at the Summit on Resilience II: The Next Storm in October 2014, which tackled the issue of urban resiliency and the role of public-private partnerships when disaster strikes. Supported by the Rockefeller Foundation; sponsored by PricewaterhouseCoopers,

the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce, and Verizon; and with additional support from American Express, the conference featured an interview with President Stephen J. Friedman and Executive Director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Patrick Foye on the City’s preparedness for future disasters, followed by panel discussions on policy and the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy.

Patrick Foye (left) discusses urban resilience with President Friedman.

Empowerment Week in February to educate, inspire, and empower the Pace Community. Students, faculty, and staff participated in panel discussions, film screenings, and more throughout the week, which concluded with the Women’s Leadership Conference: Redefining Womanhood. Participants heard “PACE Talks,” modeled after TED Talks, and contributed to sessions about self-value, the “glass ceiling,” and more. The Eileen Fisher Leadership Institute held a “World Café” activity to close the conference.

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KeepingPace

Hall of Fame: Class of 2015

Pace Athletics inducted five new members into its Hall of Fame. MEN’S BASKETBALL

Ronald Focazio ’64

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Elizabeth Hernandez ’83

• First 1,000-point scorer in program history •G  raduated as the all-time leader in assists (618), all-time leader in steals (493), single-season record holder for steals (160), and 21st in career points (1,063)

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Kerri Kaylor ’06

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Jeffrey Kelly ’69

• 26th all-time leading scorer in program history (1,126 points); graduated as the all-time leading scorer • Awarded the ECAC 1964 Medal of Honor

• First Women’s Soccer player to be inducted • Two-time Northeast-10 All-Conference Second Team selection (2003 and 2004) • Named to the NSCAA All-East Region team twice (2003 and 2004)

• Led the team in points scored for three seasons played (1966–69) • 18th all-time points scorer in school history (1,239) • Scored 512 points in his senior season, with 24.4 points per game • Led the team in rebounds as a junior (217) and senior (191) FOOTBALL

George Pinkham, DVM ’86

• All-time leader in interceptions in school history (16); set an NCAA record for two interceptions for touchdowns in one game • Tied for third on the single-season interception list (six in 1985) • Holds the single-season record for punting average (38.6 yards in 1984), longest punt of 60 yards ranked top-10 all-time • 1985 CoSIDA Second Team Academic All-American

Remembering George Maier Remembering (1926–2015) George Maier

Pace mourns the loss of longtime Football Head(1926–2015) Coach and Pace Athletics Hall of mourns Fame member Maier, Pace the lossGeorge of longtime who passed away at the of 88. Football Head Coach andage Pace Athletics Share memories Maier Maier, at Hall ofyour Fame memberofGeorge who www.pace.edu/CoachMaier. passed away at the age of 88.

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T-Bone: Our Top Dog The first-ever World Dog Awards, hosted by comedian George Lopez and aired on The CW, picked Pace University mascot T-Bone as a finalist for Best Team Mascot. T-Bone faced “ruff” competition: “Bully” the bulldog from Mississippi State, “Jonathan” the husky from the University of Connecticut, “Hairy Dawg” the bulldog from the University of Georgia, and “Junior Smokey” the bluetick coonhound from the University of Tennessee, who came out victorious.

Win or lose, T-Bone’s still top dog to us.

1985 BASEBALL TEAM RECEIVES 2015 TEAM OF DISTINCTION As part of the 2015 Hall of Fame ceremony, Pace announced the winner of its second-ever Team of Distinction Award: the 1985 Pace Baseball team. One of the most successful in the program’s history, they finished their season with a 30–8 record; had a 14-game winning streak; won the Knickerbocker Conference Regular Season title and the Knickerbocker Conference Tournament; and, thanks to their efforts, Pace was sent to their first NCAA Division II Tournament. Four members of the team—Ted Lawrence, Chris Bayer, Joe Nannariello, and Howie Manzon—were even drafted into the MLB in 1985, while Pete Capello and Joe Kesselmark were taken in the 1986 draft and Brian Emmert in the 1987 draft. 1985 BASEBALL ROSTER Chris Bayer, P/DH Bob Gregory, P Pete Capello, SS Pat Jermyn, 2B Vin Carlesi, P Joe Kesselmark, OF/P Frank Contreras, 3B Ted Lawrence, C Alan DeMattia, OF Steve Maier, OF Steve Dragos, OF Howie Manzon, OF Steve Dwyer, 3B/C Joe Nannariello, P Brian Emmert, 1B Stuart Parsons, P John Ferracuti, C John Passarelli, P Bill Findlay, P Joe Ruchalski, IF Frank Sicignano, OF


KeepingPace

PPA Goes West The Pace School of Performing Arts (PPA) launched a first-of-its-kind bicoastal program in January that provides undergraduate students the opportunity to enroll in three-week intensive courses in Los Angeles. PPA now offers Acting for Film as well as Dance and Choreography for Film each year in the City of Angels as part of the School’s regular program. “At the School of Performing Arts, the goal has always been to make sure that our students are ready for the profession,” said Jorge Cacheiro, executive director of the Pace School of Performing Arts. “Our Los Angeles Intensive is another major step in this direction. The Intensive will empower young performing artists to hit the ground running in Los Angeles and seamlessly integrate into the industry. We are collaborating with some of the top names

in the film and dance business to provide Pace students a leg up in their careers.” The Los Angeles Acting for Film Intensive is operated in collaboration with College To Career Acting, while the Los Angeles Dance and Choreography for Film Intensive is run by PPA Artistin-Residence Mandy Moore. In its inaugural year, the Intensive saw 20 acting students and 20 commercial dance students travel west to gain an “insider’s look” and learn from guest teachers, lecturers, and leading professionals in film’s entertainment and dance industries.

Becoming Her American Dream The College Opportunity Summit to improve education affordability and access. Pardoning of the national turkey. The “It’s On Us” campaign to end sexual assault. For most of us, these are topics that we’ve read about in newspapers, watched on TV, and tweeted about. For Pace communication studies student Opal Vadhan ’15, they are just a few of the projects she worked on during her fall internship at the White House, where she even got the chance to meet President Obama. “Many people assume that White House interns are from Ivy League schools or have connections to the US government,” she says. “I am not either of those things—I pay for my college education, I have worked and interned for as long as I remember, and I have always believed in paying it forward. But what I do have in common with these people is that I am proud of my college. I am so proud that I attend Pace University, because its education is equal to any Ivy League institution.” Read Vadhan’s full story at www.pace.edu/opalvadhan.

Walking the Red Carpet Pace School of Performing Arts Adjunct Professor Alexandra Silber and the cast of West Side Story were nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Musical Theater Album. Silber played the role of Maria. She and her co-nominee Cheyenne Jackson performed live at the 57th Annual Grammy Award pre-telecast on February 8, 2015, at the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

CELEBRATING DIFFERENCE Members of the Pace Community learned about the growing movement for disability rights through the positive and powerful Third Annual Celebration of Individuals with Disabilities in Film, a film festival marathon sponsored by the Dean for Students and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information THIRD ANNUAL CELEBRATION Systems, in partnership of INDIVIDUALS with DISABILITIES with AHRC New York City in FILM and the ReelAbilities: NY Wednesday, March 25, 2015 4:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m. Disabilities Film Festival. For more than a week in March, movie-goers enjoyed films focusing on respect for autonomy and empowerment of individuals with developmental, intellectual, and other disabilities. The film festival marathon concluded with a distinguished panel of advocates for disabilities rights. The film festival is a collaboration of the Dean for Students and the Outreach Programs of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information

Systems of Pace University, in close partnership with AHRC New York City,

an agency for helping people with developmental and intellectual disabilities, and with the ReelAbilities: New York Disabilities Film Festival. The festival encourages Pace students to inquire about

Area of Knowledge (AOK) CIS 102W community engagement courses and disability outreach programs of the Seidenberg School of Pace University,

including paid internship and mentoring projects with people with disabilities in

New York City, by e-mailing James P. Lawler, DPS, professor of disability studies and service-learning, at (212) 346-1013 or lawlerj@aol.com. Thank you for attending the festival!

New York City Campus

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Feature — Giving Back

Pace University students helped pack and distribute nutritious and free groceries to low-income families at the New York Common Pantry. 12

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Feature — Giving Back

Making a

W rld of

Difference From campus to Colombia, the Pace Community’s generous spirit of giving is felt around the world in myriad ways. By Magaly Olivero

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Feature — Giving Back

D

elivering midnight meals to the homeless in Colombia. Providing justice and free legal services to US immigrants. Fundraising and

dancing the night away for children who can’t. Investing time and guidance in current Pace students to ensure their success. These are just a few of the thoughtful ways in which Pace students, faculty, and alumni are giving back to the University and community-at-large. While the inspiration behind their generosity varies—gratitude for the opportunities Pace has provided, a social responsibility to help those who are less fortunate, etc.—one factor is consistent through all the ways in which Setters give back: their efforts make a world of difference.

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HOW PACE CARES

New York Common Pantry

Dyson College’s Center for Community Action and Research makes it easy for the Pace Community to volunteer, get involved, and make a difference by coordinating events and partnerships with local organizations such as the New York Common Pantry, pictured above.

T

he idea of community engagement is woven into the fabric of the Pace experience from the start. In fact, each Pace student takes a three-credit, servicelearning course to fulfill Core Curriculum requirements in civic engagement and public values. Last year alone, 583 Pleasantville students provided 8,745 hours of service through these courses, and many of those students exceeded the requirement by volunteering an extra 12,000 hours. Pace offers its students dozens of these courses each semester to enrich the lives of its students and the surrounding community. With so many dedicated to service, it’s not surprising that in 2015, Pace University was honored with the Carnegie Foundation’s Community Engagement Classification for the ninth year in a

row. Pace was one of only 14 schools in New York to receive the designation, which recognizes campuses that have demonstrated their commitment to being a community-engaged institution. Pace also made the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll with Distinction in 2014, one of only 121 colleges and universities selected to receive the honor. The award highlights the role universities play in solving community problems and placing more students on a lifelong path of civic engagement.

Where It All Begins

F

aculty members are the cornerstone of giving here at Pace, dedicating their time and knowledge to each student that enters their

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Feature — Giving Back

classroom. But for some students, those classrooms expand well beyond the walls of Pace and into the larger community, thanks to their professor’s commitment to service. “The impact you can have on others is much greater in a University,” says James Lawler, DPS, ’74, ’02, an information technology professor at the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. Lawler enriches the lives of his Pace students and individuals with developmental disabilities through the use of technology in his course Community Empowerment through Information Systems. A collaborative effort between Pace University and AHRC New York City, a nonprofit organization that serves developmentally disabled people, the

course pairs Pace students with young adults to create “person-centered planning presentations” for self-development and growth. Together, the pairs craft visual storyboards using a variety of state-ofthe-art multimedia tools, including communicationassisted technology to help those who cannot speak. Nearly 70 students assist individuals from a variety of AHRC facilities each semester and conclude the course by presenting their work to families, friends, and staff with their partner. “The presentations are a festive highlight of the semesters,” says Lawler. A former business executive at Merrill Lynch, Lawler created the course because he wanted to introduce Pace students to a “community of people who have been traditionally neglected in society.” He hopes the experience will impact students well

HOW PACE CARES

Hoops for Troops Pace welcomed the New York Knicks as part of the Hoops for Troops Commitment to Service event, a basketball clinic and food and coat drive in support of US veterans and the homeless population. Members of Pace’s Student Veterans of America collected donations alongside Knicks legends Walt Frazier and Earl Monroe.

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“Our wish is to empower today’s students to carve out their own piece of the American Dream.” —Philip Bleser ’81, ’84, ’94 Global Chairman of Corporate Banking, J.P. Morgan and member, Board of Trustees, Pace University

beyond their years at Pace as they become decision makers in the community and business world. “People with developmental and intellectual disabilities are often ignored,” says Lawler, who received a Jefferson Award for Public Service in 2010 for his work empowering people with special needs. “I want Pace students to notice and help those who are most in need.” And while Lawler is taking his students outside of the classroom to do good in the community, Pace Law School Professor Vanessa Merton is bringing the community right to campus for her budding attorneys. Merton directs the Law School’s Immigration Justice Clinic, which offers free legal services to immigrants who lack financial resources, including those seeking legal status through family ties, employment, asylum, or other federal categories. Her student attorneys get real-world experience representing clients who face deportation and other issues in immigration court. “People are desperate for this type of service,” she says, taking pride in the clinic’s holistic approach to assisting clients with all their legal needs. Her students have the opportunity to work with immigrants from around the world—from Central America, South America, West Africa, the Middle East, India, the Philippines, Malaysia, and China—who travel to White Plains, New York, from around the New York metropolitan area and beyond seeking their services. “Some describe the work I do as public interest

law, but I see it as law enforcement. Many people are victims of the laws that are supposed to protect them,” says Merton, who received the Pace Law Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2012 and hopes the student attorneys will come to share her passion for justice. “I’ve been doing this kind of work all my life and nothing compares to the feeling that comes with making the powerful ones in our society obey the law.”

Growing Goodness

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hile faculty members like Lawler and Merton strive to make a difference in the lives of those they share a community with, it’s their students, like nursing major Henry Snyder ’17, who truly reap the benefits of their efforts and continue to pay it forward at the University. Originally intending to major in a performing arts program at Pace, Snyder has instead found a home for himself at the Lienhard School of Nursing, where his professors and fellow classmates share a similar lifelong passion for providing care to others. “I fell in love with nursing,” says Snyder, who works as a certified nursing assistant during the summer and as a resident assistant at Pleasantville’s Martin Hall during the academic year. “There’s something special about helping people who are most in need.” Snyder has built on his passion for nursing in recent years by helping to rally the Pace Community

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Feature — Giving Back

to support pediatric care at the local Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center through a fundraiser—the Pace 4 Kids Dance Marathon. Since its creation in 2013, Snyder and other marathon organizers have raised an impressive $59,000 for the hospital, all while challenging their fellow Setters to dance for 12 long, fun hours in support of the children at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. Listening to the families who share their stories of how the hospital and marathon changed their lives tugs at Snyder’s heartstrings. “It’s a real uplifting moment to see all of these children come in who are now healthy because of the care they received at the hospital,” says Snyder, who hopes Pace 4 Kids will become a national model for other institutions.

Coming Home

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nyder still has a few fleeting years left at the University before he crosses the stage at graduation, but when he does, he will join a distinguished population that shares his same desire to help others and boasts a rich history of generosity—Pace’s alumni community. For many alumni, the act of giving back often includes coming back to the very place where they learned to achieve their own dreams and successes. They return to their roots to guide students and to support the University in various ways. Triple

alumnus Philip Bleser ’81, ’84, ’94, for example, is a familiar alumni face around campus, having stayed connected with Pace throughout the years, serving on the Lubin School of Business’ Advisory Board before joining the Board of Trustees in 2009. In many ways, Bleser feels as though he’s living the American Dream thanks to the extraordinary faculty and experiences he encountered during his years at Pace as a first-generation college student. Now the global chairman of corporate banking at J.P Morgan, Bleser attended classes at night so that he could work by day, and credits his Lubin education for giving him the real-world business skills to flourish. “I would not have attained the success that I did without my education at Pace University,” says Bleser, who is hoping his and his wife Marianne’s philanthropic gift of $500,000 toward Pace’s New York City Master Plan will help other students succeed just as he has. “Our wish is to empower today’s students to carve out their own piece of the American Dream,” says Bleser. “To be able to give back to a university that has helped so many do well in their careers feels good. It’s the right thing to do.” The generosity behind gifts of time, financial support, and insight perfectly capture the philosophy of fellow alumna Hannah Tall ’12: ubuntu. A South African word, ubuntu means “sharing is a universal bond that connects all of humanity.”

“Pace felt like home to me the minute I walked on campus. It was a place I could develop as a leader and make things happen.” —Hannah Tall ’12 Progam Manager Stoked Mentoring, Inc

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HOW PACE CARES

Alternative Spring Break

Each spring break, students from the New York City and Westchester campuses join together during their time off to volunteer through Pace University’s Alternative Spring Break. This year’s group of students worked with Friends of Rockaway to rebuild homes damaged by Superstorm Sandy.

Tall first learned the word during a middle school trip to South Africa and has been spreading the word and paying it forward ever since. As a Pace student, she organized the first spring edition of Pace Makes a Difference Day and spearheaded many community service projects. Like Lawler, Tall was awarded a Jefferson Award for Public Service in 2011. After graduation, Tall took ubuntu on the road to Bogotá, Colombia, where she worked as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant at Universidad Militar Nueva Granada for a year. While there, she encouraged her students to become more involved with community service projects based in homelessness and partnered with a Colombian nonprofit organization that enabled her and her students to deliver midnight meals to the homeless. Her students had the chance to talk to them and get to know them as people.

“I wanted students to see homelessness from a different perspective,” she says. “I wanted them to see the homeless as people with stories, not just a social problem.” Now a program manager at Stoked Mentoring, Inc., Tall has returned ubuntu to New York City, where she helps underserved youth develop life skills through action sports. Having been around the world and back doing good for others, what originally drew Tall to Pace over any other university was its commitment to community service and many student-run service initiatives. “Pace felt like home to me the minute I walked on campus. It was a place I could develop as a leader and make things happen,” she says. n

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Feature — Alumni Profile

Barry

Klarberg’s Got

Game I

By Caitlin Ultimo

t would be understandable if Barry Klarberg felt somewhat in awe of, say, singer-songwriter and actor Justin Timberlake, actor Charlie Sheen, entrepreneur Russell Simmons, NHL Hall of Famer Mark Messier, or NASCAR driver Kyle Busch. After all, as the founder and CEO of Monarch Wealth and Business Management—a firm that provides business and wealth management services to a range of high-net-worth individuals—those are some of the impressive clients he has represented since graduating from Pace. But in Klarberg’s arena, he’s got plenty of game himself, with a broad range of skills acquired and honed early on. Born the son of a beer deliveryman in Rockaway, Queens, he entered Pace as an early admissions student and first-generation college student at age 15. He went on to earn both a BBA and MS from the University in 1981 and 1985. During an impressive career holding positions such as national director of Sports and Entertainment at Deloitte, Klarberg has accomplished at least one lifetime of success in his 30 years in the financial industry that

Illustration by Johanna Goodman

started at Touche Ross in 1981. “I was never driven solely by financial goals,” he says. “I was driven to do the right thing by clients and to establish opportunities that allow you to make a difference.” As you might expect, Klarberg spends a lot of his time giving back to the community and multiple charities. “I mix my clients into it,” he says. “I can have Kyle Busch at the National Meningitis Association and take Charlie Sheen to the USO. I love watching people’s reactions to…a professional athlete or entertainer for the first time, but the athlete or entertainer is the one who gets so much more back.” Klarberg has recently returned to Pace, after graduating 30 years ago, as an Executive in Residence and a Lecturer in Residence for the Lubin School of Business. He jokes about bleeding blue and gold, but his reasons are genuine and deeply felt. When asked for his best memory of Pace, he responds without hesitation: “Oh, wow. My acceptance letter.” n

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Feature ­— Technology

THE FUTURE IS NOW

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Feature — Technology

Flipped classrooms, simulated patients, digital avatar students, and Star Trek science labs. Technology at Pace puts students on the cutting edge of their fields.

By Michelle Lodge

One thing is certain about technology:

emerging technologies,” explains Clare van den Blink, the University’s

It never stands still. In step, Pace

CIO and vice president of Information

University has placed technology front

Technology Services.

and center to help nurture the minds of

Pace’s offerings are recognized

its students, while readying them for their

nationwide. In its latest rankings, U.S. News

chosen fields.

& World Report placed Pace tenth among

“The development of technology at

the best online bachelor’s programs,

Pace is closely aligned with academic

ninth for best online graduate computer

initiatives to support a range of teaching

information technology programs, and

modalities such as face-to-face, blended,

second for the best online graduate

and online; to enable development

criminal justice programs in the US.

of innovative strategies for student

Here, find out what’s happening,

engagement; and to facilitate faculty

technologically speaking, at Pace’s

innovation and experimentation with

six schools and colleges.

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Feature — Technology

LUBIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Flipping the Business

Life-Saving Labs

M

artha Renteria, RN ’14, runs vitals on patients,

evaluates

others

for

acute

illnesses, and assesses the overall progress of others—a pregnant woman in distress,

an elderly person with breathing problems, and a youngster with a broken limb at the Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla, New York. Renteria started training for the real world of a busy hospital at Pace’s Clinical Education Labs (CEL), which replicate a hospital’s environment with state-of-the-art equipment; supplies; patient actors (Standardized Patients); and mannequins, known as human patient simulators, programmed to exhibit symptoms of human illnesses and conditions. They include METIman, SimMan Essential, SimMom, SimJunior, and SimBaby. The CEL are also equipped with video capture and playback capabilities for selfevaluation and small-group debriefing sessions. “Simulation bridges the gap between practice and real life,” says Renteria, who is hoping to return to Pace for her MS in Nursing Education. “With simulation, if you make a mistake, you learn from it without harming a patient.”

“Simulation bridges the gap between practice and real life.” —Martha Renteria, RN ’14 Registered Nurse Westchester Medical Center

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T

he flipped classrooms at the Lubin School of Business will be a year old this summer, and both students and faculty are singing their praises. “Students become more active learners and teach themselves the basics before they get to class,” says Charles Tang, PhD, chairman of the Accounting Department and associate professor of accounting. “So the discussions in class are livelier, and the students are better prepared.” Just as the word “flipped” suggests, the method of teaching is reversed in a sense. Students learn the material remotely first by watching video lectures online, and the “homework” is typically tackled in class with students and professors resolving any questions. When students deal with professors directly, the interaction is more personalized and directed. The flipped classroom employs the massive open online course (MOOC) method, which offers a combination of filmed lectures, readings, and problem sets. The technology serves to make students accountable for the material at hand 21ST CENTURY “by having you work out BUSINESS the problems on your own,” While the marketing industry says Brian Marangoni ’18, is booming, its face is rapidly a second-semester MBA in shrinking, all the way from billboards to smartphone Information Systems student. screens. And Lubin is giving “The flipped class has students an inside look at this helped me because I can pace shift in business and technology through the first-ever comyself knowing exactly what branded program between an is expected and when,” adds AACSB-accredited school and Marangoni, who balances his a business: the Media Storm classwork and full-time job at MS in Social Media and Mobile Marketing. ConEd as a senior specialist in Corporate Accounting and Supply Chain. “It’s mostly about structure for me; the online interface is the biggest help. The class is just a refresher and a chance to ask the teacher any unique questions.” And those unique questions lead to better lessons for all. “The flipped classroom allows professors to go broader and deeper and make the class more engaging for the students,” adds Tang.


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Classrooms within Classrooms

P

arent-teacher conferences may be among the trickiest tasks on an educator’s plate. But that’s made easier for student-teachers of Pace’s School of Education TeachLivE™ Lab, because they’ve practiced, practiced, practiced beforehand. The TeachLivE™ Lab is a program developed by the University of Central Florida four years ago, that uses a combination of artificial intelligence and real-time interaction to simulate parent meetings and a variety of real-world classroom scenarios. In the lab, the student-teacher sees a screen of digital avatars that set the scene for a true-to-life interaction. Out of view, a specialist programs the scenario according to the session’s goal and modifies the program based on such cues

as the student-teacher’s voice and body movements. The specialist can direct the avatars to become disengaged or unruly, as students would in a real-life setting, and can also stop and reset the program if the student-teacher’s session calls for immediate feedback. Sessions are recorded and can be played back as a teaching tool for students, professors, and peers. For Courtney Blecker ’15, a fifth-year combined degree student pursuing a BA in Childhood Education and MSEd in Literacy Specialist, the TeachLivE™ Lab and all its perks are a godsend. “Working with technology gives you more experience,” says Blecker, “and allows you to reflect on it and respond better in real-life teaching situations.”

“Working with technology gives you more experience and allows you to reflect on it and respond better in real-life teaching situations.” —Courtney Blecker ’15 BA Childhood Education and MSEd Literacy Specialist

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Feature ­— Technology

SEIDENBERG SCHOOL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS

“We have not only terrific and helpful faculty, but a network of alumni who are experienced developers, who still help out so much with the students.” —Julie Gauthier ’15 BS Computer Science

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Creative Applications

J

ulie Gauthier ’15 is immersed in all that makes computer science exciting to her—web development and startups. The computer science student has collaborated with master’s-level students in Finland to develop an augmented reality system that improves visibility and security on ships. With fellow student Olga Bogomolova ’16, she is developing Codapillar to help people around the globe learn JavaScript easier. And she’s regularly in touch with startups and their founders. All of this is through the new Seidenberg Creative Labs, an in-house, student-run consultancy that boasts A-list clients. Undergraduate and graduate students work at the Labs each semester developing software, designing apps, and seeing projects through from A to Z. They’ve created content management systems for local businesses, designed an in-browser

video editor for Media Breaker, and more. But it’s the collaborative spirit between students and professors that makes the technology advantage work at Seidenberg. For example, one Pace professor donated grant funding for various mobile devices that students use to test their experimental apps. Pace also added students to its Apple Developer’s license, saving them the $100 fee. Students can use that license and launch apps to their phones and potentially to the Apple Store. Other resources and gadgets, such as wearable computers like Google Glass and Oculus Rift, are available for students to tinker with, study, and inspire new programs to develop. “We have not only terrific and helpful faculty,” says Gauthier, “but a network of alumni who are experienced developers, who still help out so much with the students.”


Feature — Technology

PACE LAW SCHOOL

Class Is in Session

I

t may be a while before the winter of 2015 fades from memory. But one thing the snowstorms didn’t interrupt were the studies of Eddie

Chang ’15, thanks to the digital offerings of the Law School. “With three Mondays of snow when classes were cancelled, we didn’t miss a beat,” says Chang, a thirdyear student on the litigation track, “because classes and lectures are uploaded.” In addition to Westlaw and Lexus Nexus, databases that have been around for a while, Westlaw offers courseware called The West Education Network (TWEN), which automates classes and posts the

DYSON COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

syllabus and notes from professors online. Similar to the offerings at the School of Education and College of Health Professions, the Law School also provides video playback for students to review classroom presentations. Chang received feedback from professors in his Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiation and Trial Advocacy classes, who commented on everything from how to hold his hands, to how to stand, to how to address a jury.

LIGHTS, CAMERA, PRACTICE Students at Pace Law School learn by doing, thanks to more than 20 simulation-based skill development courses offered. Each simulation course addresses a range of legal skills in various law settings while videotaping students for evaluation and critique.

Space-Age Science Labs

I

t’s not unusual for someone to pursue studies in a field where they have a personal connection. For biochemistry student Dustin Lee ’17, medicine was the natural way to go. Because Lee has a form of the autoimmune disease alopecia areata, which causes baldness (he began losing his hair at age nine), his ambitious dream is to find a cure for it. Lee is certainly poised for the training necessary, due in part to the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ Alfred R. Goldstein Laboratories funded by a $3.1 million gift from Trustee Emeritus Alfred R. Goldstein for new science labs, which opened last year. The new labs include facilities for inorganic chemistry, crime reconstruction, and biology space with a centrifuge and incubator, among many offerings. It also has a 765-square-foot general biology lab, fully stocked with digital monitors at lab tables; a 2,000-square-foot research lab; and a crime reconstruction lab for forensics and pathology students. An added plus, says Lee, are the aesthetics of the new facility, which he likens positively to a Star Trek motif. That, coupled with the brand-new equipment throughout—from gleaming beakers to powerful microscopes—make him eager to study at Pace.

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Feature — Alumni Profile

A Positive Reinforcement Dianne Aroh ’92 is doing good for her patients while seeing the good in all.

D By Caitlin Ultimo

ianne Aroh ’92 could be described as the epitome of a people person. From early on she had a desire to make an impact on others, and today, as the executive vice president and chief nursing and patient care officer at Hackensack University Medical Center, she is doing just that. Having received her bachelor’s from the Northern Caribbean University in Jamaica, West Indies, when looking for a place to continue her education, she wanted a university that would offer more than your textbook college experience. “Pace’s vision is reality-based,” explained Aroh. “It is more embracing of people who are very different, different in the experiences they bring.” While Aroh has come so far in her professional career, she didn’t always envision herself working in the healthcare sector. “There is still a small part of me today that has an interest in law, but I believe I can make more of an impact in health care.” Aside from loving to be in the city every day, Aroh found interacting with professors to be the best part of her Pace education. “I wasn’t being taught, but was engaged in an

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intellectual discussion. There wasn’t one way to get to an outcome, much like in my daily professional life.” Aroh has recently returned to her roots at Pace as a Steering Committee member of the newly established Women in Business program, an initiative she’s helping with to foster a strong community among her fellow Pace alumnae. (See page 43 for more information on the Women in Business program.) And with so many achievements and accolades acquired throughout her career, like becoming the first recipient of the HCPro Image of Nursing in Leadership Award in 2009, Aroh says her impact on others is the accomplishment she is most proud of. “Seeing people that I’ve mentored go on to bigger and better things than I have is extremely fulfilling,” she says. Never failing to meet and find new challenges, like only recently taking up the violin and learning how to play, Aroh says, “You have to be willing to take risks, willing to be unpopular. Often times we allow people to define us. We should define ourselves and never allow anyone else to decide who you can be.”

Photography by Jayne Wexler


“Not enough time is spent on the wonderful things people do, so I focus on the positive.” —Dianne Aroh ’92

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A glimpse at some of the fascinating projects

Charles A. Lawry, PhD

Getting the Goods on Luxury The study of luxury marketing has provided a rich subject for Lubin Assistant Professor Charles A. Lawry. CHARLES A. LAWRY, PhD, lives a life of luxury—at least as far as his research is concerned. Lawry joined the Lubin School of Business last fall as an assistant professor of marketing. He says he first became intrigued by luxury goods as a graduate student at Columbia University while doing a project on ballet dancers’ pointe shoes, which are often handmade and surprisingly expensive—two common traits of luxury items. By the time he went to the University of Arizona for his PhD in Retailing and Consumer Sciences, luxury and its intersection with technology had become his principal research interests.

in progress at Pace

Although the luxury sector is huge, with more than $1 trillion spent worldwide, according to Forbes, it has not drawn the academic attention long accorded to the mass market. That may be changing, however, Lawry notes, in part because spending at luxury retailers was one of the few bright spots during the recent economic gloom. Conventional wisdom attributed that to the invulnerability of the rich and their willingness to spend no matter what, but Lawry sees more complex forces at work. For one, many luxury retailers changed their strategy, introducing new, factorymade lines—sometimes referred to as “bridge” products—that were within the reach of the average consumer, or those who were willing to stretch a little. For their part, many consumers spent on luxury as a way of coping with the downturn and symbolically reinforcing their self-worth. At least that’s one explanation, rooted in a well-known psychological theory called symbolic self-completion. While that strategy helped keep the luxury makers in business, Lawry says, it created problems of its own. When every other woman on the subway is toting a “luxury” handbag, how does the brand continue to make its wares seem special? One way the luxury industry has responded to this latest challenge, Lawry says, is by forming relationships with famous artists, architects, and art museums in an attempt to cash in on their cachet. Though it may be too early to tell how successful they’ll be, it’s a shrewd move. After all, Lawry says, “What is art, but the ultimate luxury good?”

–Gregory Daugherty

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Photography by Morgan Jordan


Research at Pace

MINDFUL ME SSAGING Dyson Professor Leora Trub, PhD, and Dyson student Jonathan O’Hadi ’16 teamed up to explore why we text compulsively and why some messages just leave us anxious and upset. DING-DING. BUZZ, BUZZ. Whatever the alert, you grab for your phone hunch-shouldered and head bent, face illuminated in digital glow just to tap out a message without so much as a second thought. Ding-ding. Buzz, buzz. “K.” And then you’re left wondering—is that an angry ‘K’? That was short. Did I do something? “Text exchanges with parents, friends, and romantic partners often provoked feelings of intense anxiety or anger, coupled with a compulsion to respond immediately,” says Professor and Clinical Psychologist Leora Trub, PhD, of the adolescents she works with in therapy who frequently mention texting. In her clinical practice, Trub asked her patients to pause after receiving or sending a text—to examine their own emotional landscape. In 2012, in conjunction with Inward Inc. and Pace’s Digital Media and Psychology Lab, Trub created Mindful Messaging, an app designed to help users gain insight into their own texting and the impact of compulsion. At Pace, she’s continuing

her research through the Undergraduate Student-Faculty Research Program with Jonathan O’Hadi ’16, a Dyson psychology student. “We want to bring the highly beneficial practice of mindfulness to the omnipresent practice of sending text messages,” writes O’Hadi in his research blog. “Texting is part of the way we interact with people.” By collaborating with students like O’Hadi, Trub was able to use their valuable insights to refine and transform Mindful Messaging into a truly innovative and useful app. “I rely heavily on the students as experts in digital technology, and over time, we’ve come to recognize the tremendous value they bring to the project,” she says. In turn, their work on the app helped shape their views on smartphones, social networking, and the Internet. The students started taking the time to think about how the messages they send and receive impact themselves and the people they correspond with. Though they are only in the preliminary data collection stage of the pilot, Trub and her team are eager to

see what the data says regarding the efficacy of Mindful Messaging on the small group of 40 pilot participants. Data collection will finish this spring. Because of the increase of and shift toward texting as a communications preference, Trub believes the app will hold some interest for organizations and agencies interested in how digital impulsivity relates to bullying, sexting, texting while driving, and drunk texting. O’Hadi is hopeful that once done collecting and processing the data, that it will spark a discussion amongst scholars and fellow researchers. “I am deeply appreciative of Pace’s commitment to supporting research mentorship through programs like the Undergraduate Student-Faculty Research Initiative,” concludes Trub. “It sends a powerful message to faculty and students alike about the importance of training students in the nuts and bolts of research in preparing them for graduate school and life outside of Pace.” –Alyssa Cressotti

Leora Trub, PhD, and Jonathan O’Hadi ’16

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Research at Pace

Body Image Subculture Dyson Assistant Professor Jason Whitesel, PhD, shares his ethnographic study on the lives and interactions of fat men within the gay community. “I STARTED MY RESEARCH as part of my dissertation,” explains Dyson Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Pace University Jason Whitesel, PhD. “I was always interested in gay men’s body image and the community hierarchy that comes with it.” But it wasn’t just body image that interested Whitesel; it was also fatphobia (i.e., the systematic oppression and devaluing of people based on their weight and body shape and size). While in grad school, Whitesel contacted a local chapter of Girth & Mirth, an international social club for large, gay men. This niche organization works to foster a fun community for members to meet and mingle for potlucks, nights out, game and movie nights, and weekend retreats. The organization also strives to create positive perceptions of fatness both in and outside the gay community. “They’re a group of big, gay men who’ve created a nurturing society for themselves, albeit in the margins of the gay community,” says Whitesel.

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Jason Whitesel, PhD After gaining entrée into a Midwestern chapter of the organization, Whitesel was able to start attending meetings and gatherings, thus launching his ethnographic study through field notes and conducting in-depth interviews with members. Through his research, he was able to write Fat Gay Men: Girth, Mirth, and the Politics of Stigma (NYU Press, 2014), an in-depth examination about what it means to be fat in a thinobsessed world. At Pace, Whitesel is teaching students in his Queer Theory course about reclaiming insulting language—words like “queer” or, in this case, “fat”—and while the reclamation is powerful and transformative, it is important to remember that these words are steeped in a history of shame. Fat shame, Whitesel believes, will never go away, but the men of Girth & Mirth do things to reduce it by reacting to the shame creatively and actively. “There was one Girth & Mirther who used to make a big deal of celebrating birthdays,” Whitesel recalls. “If you were the lucky—or unlucky—birthday boy, you were treated to a campy and queer parody performance of Marilyn Monroe’s ‘Happy Birthday, Mr. President.’ It wasn’t exactly

drag, but it was a playful sort of subjectivity, and that’s what Girth & Mirthers do, they nurture one another’s joy.” The concept of one, particular, idealized body type within the gay community is also routinely challenged by the mere presence of the big men in Girth & Mirth. When they march in Pride parades, for instance, they are often met with derision of the “herecomes-fatty” variety, or they are applauded and cheered with “here come the big daddies” for offering an alternative to the stereotypically ideal gay male body. “When I first started my study, I was very anxious and worried that I was going to come away empty-handed in terms of data and research. I thought I had a failed project because everything seemed so ordinary,” says Whitesel. Instead, what he learned over time was that what he had anticipated being a group reaction to body fascism, was actually just a group of men who were struggling to carve out an ordinary place for themselves. “There’s real joy in the group, there’s mirth in Girth & Mirth,” he says. “A lot of the time, people focus on the trauma or social injury these big men feel for being pushed to the margins of the gay community, but it is important to note that that injury or trauma is what animates the community. It is what animates their joyful disregard of shame.”

–Alyssa Cressotti


Research at Pace

A PERFECT PAIR At Pace, our undergraduate students partner with accomplished faculty members to get the research skills and experience they need—before they enter their field or attend grad school. WHAT DO FINGERPRINTS and music therapy have in common? They’re just a few of the subjects that Pace faculty and students have delved into as part of this year’s Undergraduate Student-Faculty Research Program. Now in its fourth year, the Undergraduate Student-Faculty Research Program allows faculty and undergraduate students with similar interests to work together on a research project throughout the academic year. A small stipend is granted to each pair and an end-of-year showcase on each campus recognizes all research initiatives through formal presentations and poster sessions. Two overall winning pairs are awarded funding towards national conference expenses. Under the auspices of the Division for Student Success and Provost Uday Sukhatme, ScD, 27 pairs of undergraduate students and faculty members presented their research at showcases this spring in Westchester and New York City. Want to know which pairs came out victorious or if your favorite professor participated? Visit www.pace.edu/ UGResearch.

R E S E A RC H TO P I C S I N C LU D E: Poverty Simulation Breast Cancer Cells Sustainable Rio 2016 Olympics Analysis of Antibiotics Digital Art for People with Disabilities Human Trafficking Democracy in Hong Kong Music Therapy for People with Dementia Alternative Methods of Fingerprint Analysis Health Care Services and Young Adults Mindful Messaging Mobile Apps and Improving Numeracy in Senegal Educational Advocacy through Comedy Diversity in the Judicial Pool Rise of Global Cities

Research Days This April, the University community joined together across disciplines to celebrate and recognize each other’s work at the third annual Research Days. FOR THE THIRD YEAR in a row, faculty, staff, and students have risen to the occasion by participating in Research Days on both the New York City and Westchester campuses. Organized each spring by Provost Uday Sukhatme, ScD, and the Office of Sponsored Research, the annual Research Days bring the Pace Community together for two exciting days of presentations that enable participants to learn from and celebrate each other’s research. “It is our hope that by bringing faculty and students from all the

schools [and colleges] together in one event, we will learn more of each other’s cutting-edge research and scholarship at Pace, and that the results will be greater than the sum of the individual schools,” says Associate Provost for Sponsored Research Victor Goldsmith, PhD. In the first two years, more than 548 scholarly participants showcased their work, including authors, co-authors, and students, and this year, just over 200 faculty, students, and staff presented at the third annual Research Days. Much of the

research presented at annual Research Days is supported by competitive external funding, which continues to increase each year. Researchers who receive external funding are recognized by the University on Research Days and receive 5% of the indirect costs of their awards to further their research. To learn more about the exciting research presented by the University’s talented faculty, staff, and students at Research Days, visit www.pace.edu/ ResearchDays2015.

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Lienhard alumni,

tell us your stories! New titles from alumni, faculty, staff, and students

The Organic Globalizer: Hip Hop, Political Development, and Movement Culture EDITED BY CHRISTOPHER MALONE, PHD, AND GEORGE MARTINEZ JR.

Your story is the Lienhard story! In 2016, the Lienhard School of Nursing will celebrate 50 years of innovation and leadership. We want to document 50 years of Lienhard and we need your help! Your stories, videos, and photos will bring this history to life. ■■ What is your favorite Lienhard

memory? ■■ Who were your closest friends?

Are they still in your life?

The Organic Globalizer (Bloomsbury Press) is a collection of critical essays that examines the significance of hip-hop in politics, raising awareness, and society’s focus on social and economic justice. Co-edited by Dyson College Associate Professor of Political Science Christopher Malone, PhD, and Dyson Adjunct Professor of Political Science George Martinez Jr., The Organic Globalizer contains a chapter that was co-authored by recent Pace graduate Davina Anderson ’15.

Merchant Marine Survivors of World War II: Oral Histories of Cargo Carrying Under Fire BY MICHAEL GILLEN, PHD Former merchant seaman and Dyson Professor of History Michael Gillen, PhD, recently published Merchant Marine Survivors of World War II (McFarland), an oral history of Merchant Marines during World War II. Crewed by civilian seamen in peacetime and carrying much of the nation’s ocean-borne commerce, the Merchant Marine became the “fourth arm of defense” in wartime, providing vital support for beachheads in all theaters of operation. Twenty World War II Merchant Marine veterans are featured in this oral history.

■■ Did you fall in love at Pace? ■■ Is there a faculty member you think

of with admiration and gratitude? ■■ Do you have an anecdote about a

student group you were part of?

Submit your stories, memories, and photos at www.pace.edu/LSNstories.

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The Hobbit and History EDITED BY NANCY REAGIN, PHD, AND JANICE LIEDL

Dyson College Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and History Nancy Reagin, PhD, is co-editor of the book The Hobbit and History. It is the fifth book in a pop culture and history series published by Wiley & Sons. Martha Driver, PhD, distinguished professor of English at Pace, contributed a chapter. The book contains J.R.R. Tolkien’s own original watercolor drawings of Smaug the dragon, hobbits, and other characters.


Stay connected to your Pace classmates

1959

1988

EDWARD J. EDELMAN, BBA, was inducted into the

JOSEPH A. SACCOMANO, MBA/JD, has joined the

Specialty Food Association Hall of Fame. He was the president and CEO of Ideal Cheese Shop of New York City for more than 40 years.

1968 CHARLES P. KLASS, MBA,

of Klass Associates was awarded the 2015 TAPPI Gunnar Nicholson Gold Medal Award. This award is one of the highest honors in the TAPPI association.

1980 JOAN REGEN RAMIREZ, BBA, has launched a new

venture, The Professional Organizer. She is a member of the National Association of Professional Organizers. JANET RELLA, BS,

chief nursing officer and senior vice president at WESTMED Medical Group, recently joined the board of Pace’s Women in Business program. This initiative will create an infrastructure to build Pace’s alumnae community and provide a forum for alumnae to connect.

Business Council of Westchester as a board member in Westchester County, New York.

1991 SCOTT A. MATTHEWS, MBA, was promoted to

chief executive officer of CrowdTwist in New York, New York.

1992 ROBERT H. POWER, MBA,

was appointed corporate client relationship director at OTC Markets Group Inc. in New York, New York.

David Sederholt, BS ’73, (left) and Jim Duffy, BBA ’75, (right)

PAYING IT FORWARD David Sederholt, BS ’73, COO of Strategic Funding Source, Inc., and Jim Duffy, BBA ’75, managing partner at GC InfoTech, LLC, together funded fellow Pace alumnus Jon Hand’s startup business, Kustomyze.com. After seeing his pitch at Pace’s Entrepreneurship Lab, they were convinced to help

1994

Hand ’13 get started. “As alumni, we were proud to

DONALD GARDENIER, BSN, MS ’95, was recently

are challenging students to innovate and build their

inducted as a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing (AAN) in Washington, DC, at the AAN annual conference, a major recognition of his accomplishments within the nursing profession. PASQUALE PATRONE, BBA,

was appointed treasurer of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce on January 1,

see the work being done at the Lab and how they own businesses,” says Sederholt. “Making a concise pitch to potential investors is hard and Jon was compelling when he said, ‘The Entrepreneurship program at Pace is not a place where they teach us how to get a job. We are learning how to create jobs.’ With that, Jim and I instantly knew we wanted to fund his business.”

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Class Notes

AND THE WINNER IS.... Thatiana Diaz ’14 was named Miss New York USA 2015 on January 18, earning the crown over 135 other contestants. The communication and media studies graduate will compete in the Miss USA 2015 pageant this summer and, if crowned the winner, will advance to the Miss Universe pageant later this year. “It is exciting to represent a state filled with lots of dreams, different backgrounds, and endless possibilities. I love New York and would love to bring it the national crown,” she says. During her reign, she will prepare physically and mentally for Miss USA. “Along with my preparations, I will be working with organizations such as ‘I’m First’ to support first-generation college students, like myself,” she adds. During her time at Pace, Diaz was on the Dean’s List, participated in more than eight internships at companies such as Condé Nast and Sony, and worked on the student newspaper, The Pace Press, as a features editor.

MARRIAGES GABRIELLE GRACE GOETZ, BA ’09, married

Robert Francis Gannon on October 17, 2014, at St. Catharine Church in Spring Lake, New Jersey.

2015, and has been a member for more than a year. He is a senior audit manager in the New York office of CohnReznick LLP, one of the leading accounting, tax, and advisory firms in the US.

VLADIMIR LIK, BA ’02, married Raina on

September 27, 2014.

1996

MARK DAVID MAZZONE, MST ’10, married Jessica Faye

STEPHEN FERRARA, BS,

Mactas on June 28, 2014, at Tappan Hill Mansion in Tarrytown, New York. NRITYA RAMANI, MA ’11,

married Bharat Singh on August 13, 2014.

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BSN ’99, MS ’00, DNP ’11,

has been named associate dean of Clinical Affairs at Columbia University School of Nursing. He will serve as assistant professor and oversee the Columbia Advanced Practice Nurse Associates, a nurse-run primary care service.

2002 SAAR KOURSH, MBA,

has been appointed chief executive officer of Magal Security Systems Ltd. in Yahud, Israel.

2003 JAMES A. DUCKHAM, JD, has

been elected chief of police at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana.

2004 JASSEN TRENKOW, BS,

joined Barclays as director and chief of staff to the CFO of Barclays Investment Bank and Barclays in the Americas.


Class Notes

FITNESS MADE FUN During a time when children choose video games over playground games, Eric Melchor ’07 is getting America’s youth moving again. Texas native Eric Melchor ’07 was living and working in New York City after receiving his MBA from Pace. It was around the time Nike released the Nike+ FuelBand, a device that allows wearers to track their physical activity. “I immediately began to think about how it could be used in a different way to motivate kids to move more,” he says. “I couldn’t believe that nobody was doing this yet.” After returning to Texas in 2010, the seeds that had been planted took root and soon Fly-Movement was born. A “for-purpose” organization, FlyMovement helps combat childhood obesity by challenging kids to be active. Melchor received immediate buy-in from school administrators in Houston based on the concept alone. Fly-Movement’s program works by harnessing the power of friendly competition and teamwork within elementary school classrooms. Melchor and his team pit two third grade classrooms against each other to see which class could log the most movements in a six-week period. The students in each classroom were allowed to vote on the prize, which gave them more incentive to participate. There were no scales and no individual rewards; the program was completely focused on teamwork, thereby fostering team spirit. Melchor cites Pace’s Bruce Bachenheimer as an influence, recalling that he was very impressed by the first Pace Pitch Contest. The contest, organized

After Nike introduced its Nike +

annually by Bachenheimer, features concise entrepreneurial presentations of various business

FuelBand activity tracker, Eric

ideas, models, marketing strategies, competitive analyses, and financial plans.

Melchor ’07 was inspired to challenge

Also influential was a statistics class required for MBA students, which helped Melchor land a

kids to improve their fitness using

job after showing his portfolio from the class to his future employer. “I am also able to apply what I

the new device. School children in

learned about statistics to Fly-Movement when speaking with administrators and schools,” he says.

Texas, where Mechor’s anti-obesity

Fly-Movement is currently volunteer-based, although Melchor, who is the director of digital

Fly-Movement organization took root,

marketing for an energy company, is working to attain nonprofit status and ultimately hopes to have

show off their activity trackers in class.

a combination of full-time employees and volunteers who “adopt” a school.

Melchor (top left) credits the genesis of

Melchor has always had an interest in health and has been an athlete, participating in half

the idea to his experiences at Pace.

marathons, triathlons, basketball, and amateur boxing. Currently, he and a few other volunteers visit the participating classes to lead exercises and get the students moving. “This motivates me,” he says. “It’s thrilling to get the kids energized. It’s so much better than anything I’ve ever done.”

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Class Notes

L et u s h ear from you ! S h a re yo u r n ews an d j o i n t h e co n ver sati on

www.pace.edu/alumnicommunity. At our website you’ll find a set of free and secure online services that allow Pace alumni from around the world to reconnect, exchange ideas, and network.

He previously spent 10 years at Goldman Sachs, where he served as the executive director and business manager/COO of the Asset Management division in Asia.

2007 JACOB GERLITZ, BSN, MS ’09, is part of a team

that opened QualityFirst, an urgent care facility in Brooklyn, where he serves as director of the facility. Prior to that, he served as a nurse practitioner (NP) at Family Health Center of Kings Highway and an NP in the Emergency Department at Long Island College Hospital. He is also currently an instructor at Columbia University School of Nursing and has reviewed a number of medical books. MITRA JAFARY-HARIRI, MST, a litigation attorney at

Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP, was one of four attorneys from the firm honored by the Federal Bar Association Eastern District of Michigan Chapter for pro bono contributions to the US District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. ERIC MELCHOR, MBA,

founded Fly-Movement, which utilizes fitness technology to challenge 38

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IN MEMORIAM SHAMILLA A. ALI ’98

JOHN A. KENIRY ’63

HAROLD C. BARNETT ’52

RENATE KIEREY ’86

WILLIAM BEEBE ’59

CHRISTOPHER W. KITTRELL ’75

EDWARD E. BOEHME ’46

JOHN A. KLEY ’74

CARRIE B. BRYANT ’79

TERESA M. KOMOR ’45

SPURGEON E. CRAYTON ’74

PATRICK J. LEECH ’66

2009

LORRAYNE D. CUOZZO ’80

MARIE LENATO ’81

DAVID W. TRAHAN, BBA,

FRED D. DELANEY ’76

JAMES L. LINDSEY ’48

STEPHEN A. DOHERTY ’81, ’86

KATHLEEN C. LIOCE ’77, ’81

FRANK J. DONNELLY ’70

ROBERT J. LOBOSCO ’74

REGINA M. (FOX)

ANGELO M. LUCREZIA ’99

children to be more active and combat childhood obesity.

was named one of the top 15 Rising Stars in Advertising by Mashable.com. He currently works as a senior strategist for MRY in San Francisco, California.

2013 DELANEY YEAGER, BFA, is

among the youngest women to have joined the writing staff of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. Prior to that, she was a staff writer for the Sundance Channel’s The Approval Matrix with Neal Brennan. She continues to write, perfworm, and direct with Skootch Comedy, a sketch team that is part of the Funny or Die community.

2014 CHRISTA GRAY PAGE, MBA,

was one of three recipients of the Ted and Pat Levine Proof of Concept Entrepreneurship Initiative grant, established to provide competitive cash awards to Pace students and recent alumni interested in performing proof of concept work.

DOYLE, GCC ’48

JOHN F. MANDLER ’55

FRANK J. DUNN ’54

JOSEPH MANHEIM ’69

HAROLD M. DUQUESNEL ’76 NORMAN J. EHRGOTT SR. ’49

MARY C. (FERRANTE) MANNING ’90

LINDA D. (MISEK) FALKOFF ’91

BERNARD MEHL ’82

ROBERT J. FAMULARO ’64

ROBERT J. MCCLOSKEY ’75

MARLENE (WELTE)

RAYMOND E. NEIDL ’74

FRAEHMKE ’93

CARLTON A. PRINCE

ANTHONY R. GALLIGANO ’86

ROBERT L. QUINTANO ’96

ALVIN M. GLASSER ’53

EUGENE V. RAGGIO ’47

HARVEY H. GREENE ’51 DOUGLAS GREENWOOD ’60

ANGELA (IAMMATTEO) ROBINS ’87

ANTHONY G. GULINO ’56

JOHN F. SCHULTZ ’50

EDWARD T. HAGGERTY ’77

JOSEPH S. SIEGEL ’71

JAMES R. HAWARDEN ’85

HERMAN TARTAZKY ’48

ERNEST W. HILDEBRAND ’52

JOHN P. TUZZOLINO ’67

JEAN P. HOLT ’71 THOMAS J. HYNES ’65 FERDINAND J.

GEORGE A. UHLMAN ’71 KAROL L. (MCNEIL) VOGL ’93 KLAUS W. WEISBRICH ’69

JACOBSEN JR. ’55

ARNOLD I. WEISS ’64

GARY W. JOHNSON ’82

JAMES WRIGHT III ’76

GEORGE KAZANTZIS ’64

ROBERT WYSS ’52


Visit this year’s Honor Roll website to see a list of those who gave to the University in 2014 as well as stories that highlight the unique way in which our supporters make the future of Pace brighter. Visit the Honor Roll page by going to www.pace.edu/thankyou.

PACE UNIVERSITY DEVELOPMENT AND ALUMNI RELATIONS www.pace.edu/alumni

|

1 (877) 8ALUMNI

|

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Class Notes — Gallery

ALUMNI HOLIDAY PARTY

WESTCHESTER ALUMNI REUNION

ATHLETICS HALL OF FAME AWARDS

SCHOLARSHIP DINNER

CELEBRATE LUBIN!

KESSEL RIBBON CUTTING To see more event photos, visit www.pace.edu/alumniphotos. 40

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UPCOMING EVENTS

May 17

Law School Commencement Ceremony (WP)

May 19

Westchester Undergraduate Commencement Ceremony (PLV)

May 20

New York City Undergraduate Commencement Ceremony (NYC)

May 20

Graduate Level Commencement Ceremony (NYC)

May 26 Leslie Seidman Executive Director Center for Excellence in Financial Reporting

Pace-IMA Women’s Accounting Leadership Series Lubin’s Center for Excellence in Financial Reporting (CEFR) and the Institute of Management Accountants (IMA) invite Pace alumnae, IMA members, and other business women to attend a free, half-day program featuring expert-led sessions on current accounting issues, women’s leadership skills, and career issues. The series will qualify for four CPE credits. For more information, contact the CEFR’s Executive Director Leslie Seidman at lseidman@pace.edu.

Lubin School of Business Seventeenth Annual Golf Classic

September 1

Eighth Annual Convocation

September 14

2015 Pace Athletics Golf Classic

October 3

Pace Law School Reunion (WP)

October 9

Pace-IMA Women’s Accounting Leadership Series (NYC)

October 15–18

Westchester Homecoming and Family Weekend (PLV)

October 22–24

New York City Homecoming (NYC)

May 26

Summer Session I begins

May 30

Ben Vereen in Concert (NYC)

June 10

Spirit of Pace Awards Dinner at the American Museum of Natural History (NYC)

June 22

20th Annual Leadership and Service in Technology Award Reception honoring Thomas Gentile, president and chief operating officer of GE Capital, and Surya Kant, president of Tata Consultancy Services Limited (NYC)

July 6

Summer Session II begins

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GIVING BACK BY THE NUMBERS Pace prides itself on the generosity of its students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends who not only give back to the University in many ways, but also to their local communities, charities, and more. Here are just a few of the ways the Pace Community is doing good for others:

375 + Number of federal and state tax returns prepared in 2014, free of charge, by students in Beta Alpha Psi, the professional business and financial information honor society, through the IRS’ Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program

9

Number of Civic Engagement and Public Values courses offered to foster participatory citizenship among students

Number of years as a recipient of the Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement and on the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, this year with distinction

$101,700 Number of Pace alumni who currently work at or hold positions in nongovernmental organizations and nonprofits

12,386 42

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52,000+ Number of hours Pace students volunteered in 2014

Number of participants on Pace University’s team at the 2014 Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, which earned Pace the title of the largest university or college team for the 24th year in a row

139

The record-breaking amount Pace raised on Giving Tuesday to support curriculum development, scholarships, and student activities, thanks to the spirit and generosity of alumni, friends, and supporters

Bronze Medal Jefferson Awards for Public Service awarded by the University to honor those at Pace who give back to their communities, including two national winners

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Pace Women Mean Business

Women in Business Steering Committee

What if you had a network of women to help you navigate your way through your career journey? At Pace, we’re making it happen. PACE HAS A RICH HISTORY of inclusion in the classroom and career preparation for women. Since admitting its first cohort of students—ten of which were men, three women—the then Pace Institute understood the necessity of women in the workplace and the importance of educating them to become a major force in industry and business. While times have changed since Pace opened its doors, the University’s stance on teaching and supporting women has not. Even in the early days of World War I, for example, Pace was a pioneer for setting women and the nation up for success. Just one

“If you can help one person in their career, get them in the door, and give them the opportunity, it’s worth the effort we’ll put in. Hopefully, 10 years down the line the women we help will recognize the impact it made and want to do something similar.” —Valerie Reardon ’88 Chief Compliance Officer EmblemHealth

“The relationships I made at Pace and Deloitte were critical to my development and advancement. The importance of relationships carry on long after graduation and remain throughout your career. A committee like this helps to forge and create those relationships among students and alumni.” —Kathy Shoztic ’91, ’94 Director, Foundation and University Relations Deloitte Services LP

month after the US entered the war, the Institute welcomed dozens of women sent from outside organizations to take a newly-created course at Pace that taught them the necessary skills to fill gaps in the labor force created by the draft. Today, Pace’s commitment to developing programming and initiatives for women is still going strong on campus. A new endeavor conceived by Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations Jennifer Bernstein, Pace’s new Women in Business program, seeks to link alumnae and current students together in a way that

will serve the up-and-coming young professionals and strengthen Pace’s commitment to women of industry. Though still early in its development, the Women in Business Steering Committee, composed of 13 Pace alumnae, believes that through mentoring, networking opportunities, and special events, this new program will serve recent Pace graduates as they enter the workforce. Stay tuned this year as the Steering Committee rolls out events and programming for recent alumnae, current students, and alumnae who are well established in the business world.

—Caitlin Ultimo

“It’s always good to be connected. Pace gave me an excellent education that opened up my doors and offered a great pool of resources. I don’t know where my career would have been without Pace because that’s where it all started.” —Frances M. Llano ’91 Vice President, Cost Management and Analytics Nomura Holding America, Inc.

Helen Altshuler ’97 PeerIQ Dianne Aroh ’92 Hackensack University Medical Center Deirdre A. Cherry ’89 Merrill Lynch Nancy Jaye Keane ’90 Allscripts Kathleen P. Kettles ’74, ’87 Law and Mediation Practice Gloria W. Lio ’96 Goldman Sachs Frances M. Llano ’91 Nomura Holding America, Inc. Josephine C. Lume ’88 Henry Street Settlement Lori Pitta ’83, ’86 CIFG Valerie Reardon ’88 EmblemHealth Lorraine Sileo ’82 Phocuswright Kathleen E. Shoztic ’91, ’94 Deloitte Services LP Board Liaison: Marie Toulantis ’81 Pace University Board of Trustees

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Flashback HAPPY 40TH, DYSON!

Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Dean Nira Herrmann, PhD, does the honors and cuts the cake at Dyson’s 40th anniversary celebration and holiday party in New York City.

“In today’s world, the arts and sciences are at the core of all programs of study, and are becoming more important in every aspect of our living.” —Charles H. Dyson ’30

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D

yson College of Arts and Sciences celebrated 40 years under the name “Dyson” on October 8, in honor of alumnus and former Chairman of the Board of Trustees Charles H. Dyson ’30. Previously known as the School of Arts and Sciences, the College was renamed after a unanimous agreement by the Pace University Board of Trustees in 1974. “In naming the School of Arts and Sciences for Dr. Dyson,” said then-President Edward J. Mortola, “the trustees have acknowledged the tremendous support that he has extended to Pace in his years

of association with it. To count the ways he has provided that support is to cover the gamut from bricks and mortar and scholarships for deserving students to an extraordinary willingness to be available to administration, faculty, and students.” Dyson’s legacy of giving back lives on as his family continues to provide support to the University. The College has come a long way since its renaming years ago, graduating more than 22,000 students from nearly 70 different undergraduate and graduate programs housed within the College.


MARK

2015

YOUR CALENDARS

ALUMNI

Homecoming and Family Weekend Westchester October 15–18

New York City October 22–24

Watch for details at

www.pace.edu/homecoming.


NONPROFIT ORG. U. S. P O S T A G E

PA I D PA C E U N I V E R S I T Y

Pace Magazine Marketing and Communications One Pace Plaza New York, NY 10038

www.pace.edu

www.pace.edu/pacemagazine

PRESIDENT STEPHEN J. FRIEDMAN AND THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES CORDIALLY INVITE YOU

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10, 2015

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY CENTRAL PARK WEST AT 79TH STREET NEW YORK, NY 10024 RECEPTION: 6:00 P.M. DINNER: 7:00 P.M. WWW.PACE.EDU/SPIRITAWARDS

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Pace Magazine – Spring 2015  

Pace University Alumni Magazine, Spring 2015 issue

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