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Annual Report 2012-2013

United Way Brasil


United Way Brasil

United Way Brasil www.unitedwaybrasil.org.br Executive Board Andres Lopez, Owens-Illinois América Latina (Chairman) Miguel Alvarez, Owens-Illinois Brasil (Vice-Chairman) Alberto Carvalho, P&G; Anna Penido, Inspirare; Eduardo Queiroz, Fundação Maria Cecilia Souto Vidigal; Fábio Cornibert, Consultant; Fernando Paiva, Otima; Gabriela Onofre, P&G; John Julio Jansen, Dupont; José Magalhães Fernandes, Dover; José Varela, 3M; Marcelo Tambascia, 3M; Marcos Panassol, PwC; Marília S.Meneghisse, Ecolab; Mark Vogt, PwC Audit Committee Haroldo Leite, Morgan Stanley Dean Witter; Raphael de Cunto, Pinheiro Neto Advogados Director of United Way Brasil: Silvia Zanotti Magalhães Institutional Manager: Paula Crenn Pisaneschi Communication and Resource Mobilization Analyst: Camila Pinheiro Voluntary Service Analyst: Flávia Bellaguarda Project Coordinator: Cristiane Kanashiro Interns: Alex Julio da Silva Simão and Carolina Alves Drafted and Edited by: P&B Comunicação Photos: Publicity Files/UWB Graphic Design and Layout: Patricia Benigno Girotto


Contents

Introduction Letter

to the Readers

2012 Activities

Beneficiary, Volunteer 2013 Activities

Beneficiary, Volunteer Balance Sheets

pg.

04

pg.

06

pg.

08

pg.

13

pg.

14

and Investor Comments

pg.

19

pg.

20

and Investor Comments

Organizations benefited from UWB’s and Projects - 2012-2013 Participating Companies

programs

pg.

23

pg.

24


Executives dedicate their talent to improving the education of children and young people in Brazil


Introduction Dear all, At the end of 2011, I was invited to join the Board of United Way in Latin America, where, together with executives of large companies, I formulated the institution’s growth strategy in Latin America. In 2012, I initiated a partnership between the company I run, Owens-Illinois, and United Way Brasil (UWB) and, finally, in 2013, I became Chairman of its Executive Board. During these years, I engaged with numerous executives who dedicate their experience to growing and developing United Way in the communities in which their companies are based, and I realized how simple it is to use my leadership to improve the areas in which we operate. The guiding principle of United Way, which is to unite business leaders, their employees, volunteers, and third sector specialists, has the ability to bring about sustainable changes among the most disadvantaged groups. My experience allowed me to see how proud the employees of my company are to be a part of the solution to the problems associated with early childhood and youth in the city of São Paulo. Together, we all contribute with our time and a proportion of our salaries to facilitating the improvement of education in the district of Ermelino Matarazzo, on the eastern edge of the capital. This experience, systematized by United Way, is already being extended to other municipalities across the country, with the support of other corporations. My involvement in the Board allowed me to exercise leadership collaboratively, managing by example and adapting solutions from the corporate environment to the development of communities, as well as gaining a better understanding of the problems and solutions to educational issues in Brazil. Close contact with specialists in the area, nursery teachers, youths from deprived areas, small children and O-I employees themselves in a situation not directly related to day-to-day work activities exposed me to new perspectives and opened the way for new solutions. This report gives a succinct description of the ground covered by UWB in 2012 and 2013. It is a first step towards understanding some of what we do. We still face significant challenges. We need to find local solutions to issues faced throughout Brazil,

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from Rio Grande do Sul to Manaus. We encourage increased voluntary participation and individual donations from Brazilians, a complex issue in a country where the reputation of the non-profit sector is still very delicate. To face such challenges, we need to grow in Brazil. I would therefore like to issue an invitation to those interested in joining this global movement for the search for solutions to social problems in over 43 countries. If you are prepared to make a difference to the most vulnerable, using some of your talents to support a cause, UWB is a good place to start.

Andres Lopez Chairman of the Executive Board of United Way Brasil

Annual Report 2012 | 2013

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Letter

to the Readers

Dear all, The 2012-2013 biennium was a period of significant progress for UWB. We saw the total number of direct beneficiaries increase from 5,733 in 2012, in 17 municipalities, to over 10,402 in 2013, in 20 municipalities. We mobilized R$ 1.6 million in resources through a network of 3,000 private individual social investors and 14 companies in 2012. In the following year we recorded R$ 1.5 million, with 3,100 investors and 26 companies. Through our programs, we began to fill an important gap in the country’s early childhood agenda, qualifying families and teachers to look after and educate small children, thereby enabling them to achieve their full potential. While scientific research indicates that the period up to 6 years of age is vitally important, significantly impacting adult life, the percentage of teachers in Brazil in nurseries and pre-school with university qualifications is still small. At the same time, after mentoring hundreds of young people for over a decade, we clearly see that it is fundamental for the young to have contact with the business world, as it helps them to better understand the labor market, what awaits them in the future and the purpose of schooling and the theoretical knowledge to which they have access. In order for this to have a greater impact, we will focus in coming years on developing the Employability Network project, made up of companies that will offer job opportunities to participants. We have also confirmed that, in addition to the volunteers, UWB’s power lies in its admirable network of executives and companies motivated to improve their communities. That’s way we have increasingly established ourselves as an organizer of volunteers within corporations, and this is our strength. We still face the future challenge of maturing and systematizing our program methodologies, to enable us to carry out impact assessments more expressively and precisely. We will also need to give greater attention to the views of communities: listening more closely to their key players gives us a greater understanding of the changes they actually want to see in their regions. This is what close contact with different groups

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in towns in the states of Amazonas, Paraná, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Sul and São Paulo has taught us. In conclusion, we are committed to growing UWB in the coming years, given the extensive needs of the children and young people of Brazil, and the importance and respect which United Way commands globally. In light of this scenario, we will double our efforts to bring more businessmen and executives together in this great benevolent network that connects people by creating inspiring stories.

Silvia Zanotti Magalhães Director of United Way Brasil

Annual Report 2012 | 2013

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2012

Activities

INVESTMENT IN EDUCATION Youth 15 to 21 years Skills for Life Program

Early Childhood 0 to 6 years Grow Up Learning Program

VOLUNTEERS

Where UWB Operated 3 AMAZONAS (Manaus) 3 PARANÁ (Curitiba) 3 RIO GRANDE DO SUL (Porto Alegre) 3 RIO DE JANEIRO (Queimados, Itatiaia, Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro) 3 SÃO PAULO (Campinas, Sorocaba, Ribeirão Preto, São José dos Campos, Jacareí, Barueri, Itapetininga, Louveira, Suzano, Vinhedo)

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The Grow Up Learning Program, inspired by Born Learning, was launched in 2011 in Brazil as a mobilization campaign in the media, with an emphasis on child development. Based on the positive results obtained, it became a long-term program in 2012, with more supporters.

Over the course of the year, under UWB’s initiatives in relation to early childhood, the Grow Up Learning Program trained teachers, parents and volunteers on the subject and promoted educational and recreational activities for children as well as physical improvements in CEI (Centros de Educação Infantil [Child Education Centers]) facilities and those of EMEIs (Escolas Municipais de Educação Infantil [Municipal Schools for Child Education]). At organized meetings, teachers discussed the development of children’s physical and motor skills, formation of cognitive and emotional structures, the role of schools and carers, the importance of play and organizational culture in families. Parents were encouraged to combine care and education on a day-to-day basis in order to enhance children’s psychosocial development. They received an information kit with practical advice and a CD of stories to use at home. Volunteers built parks, libraries and organic vegetable gardens at the same beneficiary social institutions and participated in recreational and educational activities with children. Young people on the job In the area of investment in young people, under the Skills for Life Program, which includes the UWB Mentoring project, both young people and volunteers had lessons in financial and professional education, the English language, accounting, citizenship awareness and personnel. The aim is for Brazilians aged 15 to 21 to develop

life skills, allowing them to take advantage of professional opportunities, career development, entrepreneurial and citizenship activities, effectively fulfilling their potential in the labor market and in their domestic environments. Entrepreneurial skills were also developed in 119 young people. Through the partnership between UWB and Ashoka and their GMM (Programa Geração MudaMundo [World Changing Generation Program]), which encourages a role for young people and leadership in solving domestic problems, 36 volunteers from Bombardier took part. Employees of Hershey's do Brasil used the methodology of the Intel Learning course to promote the digital inclusion of young people. A new survey on the mentorships, conducted by Move – a consultancy that specializes in assessment, strategy and social development – between April and July 2012, involving 127 young people, showed that 88% of those interviewed were helped by the courses to launch their professional lives and, according to 80%, participation in the project improved their interest in studying. These percentages indicate the importance of UWB’s efforts in stimulating young people’s interest in a relevant professional and academic life. From 2012, UWB began to hire young people from the mentorships as “focal points”. They are chosen based on their commitment to the course, and their duties involve monitoring the classes and undertaking administrative activities, such as keeping attendance lists, overseeing food and transport subsidies and submitting a monthly activity report. They also produce content for the UWB website.

In 2012, 4,312

children aged 0 to 6, 800 parents and 554 teachers and coordinators in 21 teaching institutions benefited. The 230 volunteers came from the companies Avery Dennison, P&G and Ecolab. The technical partnership was the responsibility of the Fundação Abrinq [Abrinq Foundation] - Save the Children. Annual Report 2012 | 2013

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In 2012,

353 employees of the

companies 3M, Hershey's, Intel, Monsanto, Morgan Stanley, P&G and PwC acted as

benefiting 502 young people connected with around 15 partner NGOs. Other 119 youths mentors,

took part in entrepreneurship projects. All of them received certificates of participation.

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How the Funds are Managed Funding from the various companies investing in UWB, grants from foundations and foreign companies and the amounts donated by employees of participating companies make up the Common Fund. This covers the cost of all child or youth programs and, during the course of each year, UWB undertakes its projects in the regions close to where the investing companies are based. This funding logic results in one grand total made up of the various investments, applied to the same cause, that of the education of children and young people, enhancing the impact of the various activities and simultaneously involving investors in initiatives in their own communities. This allows investors to closely monitor how their money is being used, both by the company and by its own volunteers.

Grants and Social Investor Campaign

In 2012, UWB received, through United Way Worldwide, grants from foundations and companies based abroad, and the amounts were used to implement programs in Brazil, above all pilot projects, testing social methodologies or technologies which could then be replicated. Contributions were made by the head offices of Avery Dennison, Bombardier, GE, Halliburton and Metlife. Through the Social Investor Campaign, dozens of company employees from the offices of DuPont, Ecolab, Morgan Stanley, Owens-Illinois, Pinheiro Neto Advogados, PwC and P&G were invited by UWB in 2012 to become social investors. The purpose of this campaign is to awaken employees to the idea that they can individually make a difference, as investors and volunteers, and that by working together, they will succeed in changing their communities. For every R$ 10 (around US$ 4.25) donated by employees, the company contributes an extra

R$ 10, and the amounts are discounted from the salaries or current accounts of donators. Funds from grants and from private individual investors, together with the amounts from companies, make up the Common Fund. This finances the various projects, which are carried out in the vicinities of the investor company offices. In 2012, volunteers from the companies also undertook activities on special dates, such as Live United Day (Ecolab, Morgan Stanley and PwC) and Children’s Month (Owens-Illinois and P&G). The program included gift-giving, performances by clowns and theatre performances for children, and workshops on potential professions for young people held at state schools or social organizations in partnership with UWB. Also in 2012, UWB became part of the RNPI (Rede Nacional Primeira Infância [National Network for Early Childhood]), comprising 147 governmental and non-governmental institutions that promote and defend the rights of Brazilians aged 0 to 6. The RNPI created the National Early Childhood Plan, used by UWB as a reference for its initiatives in this area. Annual Report 2012 | 2013

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Lifelong connections In a child’s early years, a large number of neural connections are made every second. They occur through the interaction of genes, the environment and experiences resulting from close contact with adults. These connections form the “structure” of the brain and, according to scientists, have an effect on health, learning and behavior in an individual’s adult life. Children who face adversity in their first three years, such as poverty, abuse and mothers with low educational levels, experience delayed linguistic, cognitive and emotional development. To address this issue, the initiatives of United Way Worldwide in various countries are already in line with such scientific discoveries regarding the early stages of life, which are fundamental to later development. This form of social investment therefore has the highest return as it supports beneficiaries for the rest of their lives. In Latin America, UW focuses on infancy and education, and Early Childhood has become a major regional platform. Here, under the Grow Up Learning Program, UWB accepted the challenge of creating new educational solutions for this age group, with the direct involvement of parents, teachers or carers and other employees of nurseries and state schools. This improved quality of care increases a child’s chances of learning and developing at a healthy rate, with future benefits.

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Annual Report 2012 | 2013


Beneficiary, volunteer and investor comments

‘‘

The 3M-United Way partnership, which focuses on young people, is totally in line with the mission of the Instituto 3M [3M Institute]. I have viewed it positively since 2012, as I can see the quality and consistency of the projects, such as in Riberão Preto (SP), where the involvement of our employees in the proposed volunteer initiatives and the benefits to the community are evident. So much so that we expanded the partnership in 2013 and 2014, adding more activities.

José Varela, CEO of 3M do Brasil

” ‘‘

Maria Clarice do Amaral Salari, Director of the CEI Jardim São Joaquim [Jardim São Joaquim Child Education Center], in São Paulo (SP)

The two-year results exceeded expectations. We noticed a great improvement in the self-esteem of the teachers. And the advice given in relation to care, education and loving affection were essential to the young mothers. We still continue to educate families using materials from the Grow Up Learning Program. The involvement of volunteers from Intel and P&G gave the study areas a new lease of life and provided the children with memorable experiences. UWB connected with the soul of our school, highlighting what we already did well and reinforcing our practices with joint activities.

‘‘

I had a very productive two years as a UWB volunteer, as I had the opportunity to translate, adapt and implement two projects: the Student United Way and Earn Your Future. I was involved in organizing and mobilizing other volunteers, creating budgets, partnering with schools and selecting young people. Most importantly, we confirmed that it is always possible to do something different to help our young and that when we truly believe in a project and take it forward, without focusing on the difficulties, the chances of success are high.

Rafael Volpe, PwC Auditor and Volunteer

Annual Report 2012 | 2013

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2013

Activities

Where UWB Operated

3 AMAZONAS (Manaus) 3 PARANÁ (Curitiba) 3 RIO DE JANEIRO (Queimados, Itatiaia, Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro) 3 RIO GRANDE DO SUL (Caxias do Sul) 3 SÃO PAULO (Campinas, Sorocaba, Ribeirão Preto, São José dos Campos, Jacareí, Barueri, Itapetininga, Louveira, Suzano, Vinhedo, Sumaré, Mairinque, Hortolândia)

Under the UWB Early Childhood initiatives, the Grow Up Learning Program continued to train teachers, parents and volunteers and to promote activities with children and physical improvements to the facilities of CEIs (Centros de Educação Infantil [Child Education Centers]) and EMEIs (Escolas Municipais de Educação Infantil [Municipal Schools for Child Education]) Directors, pedagogical coordinators and primary school teachers participated in training on educational practices which incorporated a positive connection within the CEIs between the emotional, physical and cognitive needs of children aged 0 to 3 and the cultural and social activities possible for these to be learned. Volunteers took part in child theatre, the painting of learning spaces, assembly of

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Annual Report 2012 | 2013

free play areas, libraries and organic vegetable gardens, among other activities. In terms of investing in youth, the Skills for Life Program, through the UWB Mentoring Project, continued to bring knowledge to volunteers and the young, with subjects including financial and professional education, the English language, accounting and citizenship awareness. In ten years of implementation in Brazil, the mentorships have served to counteract a serious issue: very high school dropout rates across the country, with pupils who abandon their studies mostly from low income families, benefiting from fewer formal employment and social advancement opportunities.


At the same time, through the Digital Media Project, UWB benefited 90 young people from the following Brazilian NGOs – Associação Cultural Comunitária Pró-Morato, Associação Programa Educar e Cepac – Associação para Proteção das Crianças e Adolescentes. As a result, five of them were hired by communications agencies or foundations in the area of online content analysis. In 2013, the Student United Way mentorship, which originated in the United States, had its twoyear anniversary in Brazil, benefiting 177 young people and 200 volunteers during this period. Its main difference in comparison to the others is that the young people, under the supervision and guidance of volunteers, are required to create and implement a useful and practical project for the benefit of their community.

To this end, they attend 12 weekly meetings that start off with a brainstorming session. They then participate in risk management, budgeting, service development, communication and project implementation. The methodology was brought to Brazil by the head volunteer, Rafael Volpe, and adapted by volunteers from PwC in Sorocaba city, where it was initially tested. Following the pilot, several companies in various municipalities put the proposal into practice, such as 3M, Bombardier, DuPont, Monsanto, PwC and Votorantim. The young proposed initiatives for improving reading areas and repairing walls, lectures on the environment, activities associated with recycling and donation of materials and food to the poor, among others.

In 2013, 6,417

children aged 0 to 6, 2,500 parents and 620 teachers and coordinators, in 49 teaching establishments and 7 health centers benefited. The 392

volunteers came from Ecolab,

GE, Hershey's, Intel, Mapfre, Morgan Stanley, Owens-Illinois and P&G. The technical partnership was the responsibility of the teams from Fundação Abrinq [Abrinq Foundation] - Save the Children and the Instituto Avisa Lá [Avisa Lá Institute].

As part of the mentorships,

612 employees

from 3M, Bombardier, Dupont, Monsanto, Morgan Stanley, P&G and PwC gave classes that

benefited 688 young people connected to around 15 partner NGOs. Other 177 youths took part in digital media, entrepreneurship and school tutoring projects. Annual Report 2012 | 2013

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Grants and Social Investor Campaign UWB also received, via United Way Worldwide, grants from companies and foundations outside the country. The amounts were used to implement programs in Brazil, mainly involving experiments with new methods or techniques that could potentially be widely applied in the future. Head Offices that remitted funds were Bombardier, Caterpillar and Hershey's. Through the Social Investor Campaign, dozens of employees from Dupont, Ecolab, Morgan Stanley, Owens-Illinois, Pinheiro Neto Advogados, PwC and P&G were encouraged by UWB in 2013 to begin investing in the development of children and young people from low income families with limited opportunities.

These efforts resulted in increased funding – the amounts generated by donations from private individuals at these companies doubled. The value of grants and funding from private individuals, together with resources from the companies, make up the Common Fund, which bears the cost of the various UWB projects. Throughout the year, volunteers from the companies continued to make efforts to benefit children and young people on special dates, such as the United Way Day of Action (Morgan Stanley), Children’s Month (Owens-Illinois, P&G and Timken) and Volunteer Day (Ecolab). Recreational activities, theatre, story-telling, renovation of physical spaces and donation of toys constituted the main activities in public schools or social organizations in partnership with UWB.

LIVE UNITED Movement UWB believes that voluntary initiatives are essential if the social scenario in Brazil is to be transformed. It therefore encourages collective activities through the LIVE UNITED Movement, which connects people who wish to contribute to the education of children and young people through knowledge, time and financial resources. In 2012 and 2013, UWB brought together dozens of people through volunteer work and social investment – which was supported by the regular injection of funds from those involved. Gradually, the professionals involved have opted to both volunteer and invest, thereby enhancing their personal investments and the positive results of UWB’s programs. To complement employee donations, the companies partnering with UWB match the amounts, thereby doubling the cash investment of their teams.

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Annual Report 2012 | 2013

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Beneficiary, volunteer and investor comments

‘‘

I highlight the first structured evaluation of young people trained by the mentorships, Student United Way and Citizenship Awareness, which were supported by our volunteers in designing and adapting content, increasing support for mentors and improving control of indicators. The range of exchanges with company executives, young people and NGO managers, all focusing their efforts on common goals, has been always relevant and enriching.

” ‘‘

Edvaldo Gomes Magalhães, Director of the Associação Programa Educar [Educational Program Association], in São Paulo (SP)

‘‘

Board Member and UWB Social Investor

A close association with the companies and their employees, one of UWB’s strengths, is the great learning opportunity of this partnership, above all for the mentored young people, who experience the employment world for the first time. Through a relationship established since 2007, we were the pilot institution for the digital media project in 2012. It was so successful that it was adopted by us as another permanent work method and young people have been hired by large corporations to work on social networks and blogs.

We launched the O-I Volunteer Program with 41 participants in late 2012 and by the end of 2013, we had 238 volunteers contributing financially and participating in recreational or restructuring activities. I was actively involved in appointing the O-I leaders, to ensure that they motivated their teams, and in giving presents to children during the Christmas Campaign. The experience showed me that being a volunteer requires a willingness to offer what you do best to others. The most impactful activity, with long term results for beneficiaries, was the IVP (Investir Vale a Pena [Investing Pays Off ® ) course, which trained 24 young people in personal, professional and financial development, with the participation of 30 employees.

Mark Vogt, PwC Partner,

Miguel Alvarez, President of Owens-Illinois Brasil, volunteer and Vice-Chairman of the Board of UWB

Annual Report 2012 | 2013

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2012-2013 INVESTMENT REPORT BALANCE SHEETS AS AT 31ST DECEMBER 2012 AND 2013 (In Brazilian Reais – R$, cents omitted) ASSETS

12/31/2012

12/31/2013

Cash and cash equivalents

136,265

63,564

Stocks and shares

548,165

796,795

Recoverable taxes

3,034

-

Advances

2,368

3,692

689,832

864,051

Fixed assets

5,611

7,396

Total non-current assets

5,611

7,396

695,443

871,447

12/31/2012

12/31/2013

3,550

3,613

13,393

15,096

Social law contributions

6,334

11,698

Taxes payable

1,318

1,530

Advances on donations

55,060

254,901

Total current liabilities

79,655

286,838

Total non-current liabilities

144,500

187,097

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY

471,288

397,512

TOTAL OF LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY

695,443

871,447

CURRENT

Total current assets NON-CURRENT

TOTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY CURRENT Accounts payable Provision for holiday charges

NON-CURRENT

United Way Brasil's financial statements have been audited since 2001 by Deloitte, a market leader in Brazil.

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STATEMENT OF (DEFICIT) SURPLUS FOR FINANCIAL YEARS ENDING 31ST DECEMBER 2012 AND 2013 (In Brazilian Reais – R$, cents omitted)

INCOME

12/31/2012

12/31/2013

Donations for volunteer and mentorship programs

846,933

801,143

United Way Worldwide donations

567,373

276,731

Donations for specific use

130,004

245,196

54,563

54,361

1,598,873

1,377,431

Mentorship and volunteer programs

(252,088)

(698,525)

United Way Worldwide

(567,373)

(276,731)

Specific use

(130,004)

(245,196)

General expenses

(242,600)

(230,755)

(1,192,065)

(1,451,207)

(406,808)

(73,776)

Financial income Total income EXPENSES

Total expenses

(DEFICIT) SURPLUS FOR THE PERIOD

Annual Report 2012 | 2013

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CASH FLOW STATEMENTS FOR FINANCIAL YEARS ENDING 31ST DECEMBER 2012 AND 2013 (In Brazilian Reais – R$, cents omitted)

CASH FLOW FOR OPERATING ACTIVITIES

12/31/2012

12/31/2013

(73,776)

406,808

3,344

4,977

(53,412)

(54,473)

(521,927)

(697,377)

Provision for risks

(42,597)

(30,646)

Recoverable taxes

3,034

(1,077)

(1,324)

38,085

63

3,550

Provision for holiday charges

1,703

(11,209)

Social law contributions

5,364

(3,053)

212

(3,454)

721,768

189,051

127,646

(97,526)

(195,218)

157,497

(5,129)

-

(200,347)

157,497

(REDUCTION) INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

(72,701)

59,971

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the period

136,265

76,294

63,564

136,265

NET INCREASE (REDUCTION) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

(72,701)

59,971

Net cash (invested in) generated by investment activities

(72,701)

59,971

(REDUCTION) INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

(72,701)

59,971

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the period

136,265

76,294

63,564

136,265

(72,701)

59,971

(Deficit) or surplus for the period Adjustments for: Depreciations Financial income from stocks and shares Allocation to the account balance of donation advances

Advances Variations in operating liabilities: Accounts payable

Taxes payable Advances for projects Net cash generated by (invested in) operating activities CASH FLOW FOR INVESTMENT ACTIVITIES

Stocks and Shares Acquisition of fixed assets Net cash (invested in) generated by investment activities

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the period

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the period NET INCREASE (REDUCTION) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

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Annual Report 2012 | 2013


Organizations benefited from UWB’s programs and projects - 2012-2013 Early Childhood Abrigo Anália Franco Abrigo Infantil Monte Salém CCA Palmares CECI Pica-Pau Amarelo CEI Casa da Criança CEI Iracema Garcia CEI Jardim Bryan Biguinati CEI Jardim Catanduva CEI Jardim Dionísio CEI Jardim Dom José CEI Jardim Rebouças CEI Jardim São Bento Velho CEI Jardim São Joaquim CEI Jardim São Luiz I CEI Jardim São Luiz II CEI Jardim Souza CEI Jardim Umarizal CEI José Bonifácio CEI José Lourenço de Lima CEI Mina CEI Parque Figueira Grande CEI Parque Santo Antônio CEI Paulinoeva CEI Paulo e Admar CEI Profª Albertina Rodrigues Simon CEI Profª Leontina Lourenço CEI São Norberto CEI Ver. Cid Franco CEI Ver. Gumercindo de Padua Fleury CEI Verbo Divino CEI Vila Silvia Centro Pastoral Santa Clara CEU CEI Profª Yolanda de Souza Santalucia Clubinho Capela CMEI Alice de Souza Bruno

Creche Municipal Sandra Maria Ferreira Cotrim Creche N. Sra. das Graças Creche Sagrada Família Creche Santa Terezinha EDI Sra. Perciliana Pereira de Alvarenga EMEIF José Francisco Alves EMEIF Maria Aparecida Fraternidade Irmã Clara Fundação Abrinq - Save the Children Grupo Primavera Grupo Raios de Sol Instituto Avisa Lá Lar Batista Janell Doyle Lar Escola Cairbar Schutel

Youth Ashoka Brasil Associação Cultural Comunitária Pró-Morato Associação Luta pela Paz Associação Obra do Berço Associação para Proteção das Crianças e Adolescentes - CEPAC Associação Programa Educar Casa Anjos Voluntários CIEE Campinas Corassol CPA (Centro de Profissionalização de Adolescentes) Pe. Bello EE Profª Maria de Oliveira Lellis Ito EMEF Maria Aparecida de Oliveira Ribeiro Formare Fundação Educar DPaschoal Instituto Dom Bosco JAM - Jacareí Ampara Menores Obra Social Santa Luzia Projeto Nova Vida Annual Report 2012 | 2013

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Participating Companies Associated Companies

Partner Companies and Institutions

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Mission To mobilize human, financial and material resources of companies, individuals and public authorities, through voluntary work, education and income generation.

Live United

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Live United

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Live United

CONTRIBUTE. JOIN US. BE A VOLUNTEER. Av. Maria Coelho Aguiar, 215, Bloco E - 1ยบ andar Centro Empresarial de SP - Sรฃo Paulo - SP contato@unitedwaybrasil.org.br United Way Brasil

Tel.: +55 11 3748-9000

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Bi-Annual Reports 2012-2013 - United Way Brasil | English  
Bi-Annual Reports 2012-2013 - United Way Brasil | English  
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