Page 1

UNIT 6: A FOODIE GENERATION check in main track

Step 4: writing a recipe

Step 1: describing food

Step 3: ordering a sandwich

Step 2: comparing breakfast foods

summary Step 5: using adjectives and adverbs

trace your steps

on different tracks check out: a food quiz


CHECK IN Breakfast, lunch or dinner? 1

READING

Do the food quiz and discover if you are a breakfast, lunch or dinner person. a Pick a potato:

hash browns

French fries

baked potato

cold cuts

steak

brown bread

ciabatta

cookies

chocolate mousse

b Pick your meat:

bacon c Pick a sandwich:

bagel d Pick a dessert:

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French toast

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A FOODIE GENERATION


e Pick a drink:

coffee More answers from the left column? More answers from the middle column? More answers from the right column?

soda

beer

You are a breakfast person. You are a lunch person. You are a dinner person.

Adapted from www.buzzfeed.com

Discuss these questions with a partner and then report to the rest of the class.

SPOKEN INTERACTION

a Do you agree with the outcome of the test? Why (not)? b Does your partner agree? Why (not)?

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MAIN TRACK Step 1

Meals of the day Describing food

1 / Beards full of food 1

2

Look at the picture of the Twits. For each pair of words, decide which one fits the couple (don’t forget the determiner a/an). Why do you think this?

Question

Answer

Nice or mean?

I think they are

couple.

Healthy or unhealthy?

I think they are

couple.

Pretty or ugly?

I think they are

couple.

Happy or sad?

I think they are

couple.

Read the extract from The Twits by Roald Dahl and answer these questions. a Why are there always bits of food sticking to the hairs around Mr Twit’s face?

b How does he remove most of the food from his beard?

c What are the 3 main meals of the day mentioned in this extract?

d Give 3 examples of food bits that you could fi nd in Mr Twit’s beard. two hundred and seventy-eight

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UNIT 6:

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SPEAKING

READING


Dirty Beards

1 A hideous, spiteful couple known as the Twits live together in a brick house without windows.

As you know, an ordinary unhairy face like yours or mine simply gets a bit smudgy if it is not washed often enough, and there’s nothing so awful about that. But a hairy face is a very different matter. Things cling to hairs, especially food. Things like gravy 5 go right in among the hairs and stay there. You and I can wipe our smooth faces with a flannel and we quickly look more or less all right again, but the hairy man cannot do that. We can also, if we are careful, eat our meals without spreading food all over our faces. But not so the hairy man. Watch carefully next time you see a hairy man eating his lunch and you will notice that even if he opens his mouth very wide, it is impossible for him to get a spoonful of 10 beef-stew or ice-cream and chocolate sauce into it without leaving some of it on the hairs. Mr. Twit didn’t even bother to open his mouth wide when he ate. As a result (and because he never washed) there were always hundreds of bits of old breakfasts and lunches and suppers sticking to the hairs around his face. They weren’t big bits, mind you, because he used to wipe those off with the back of his hand or on his sleeve while he was eating. But if you looked closely 15 (not that you’d ever want to) you would see tiny little specks of dried-up scrambled eggs tuck to the hairs, and spinach and tomato ketchup and fish fingers and minced chicken livers and all the other disgusting things Mr Twit liked to eat. If you look closer still (hold your noses, ladies and gentlemen), if you peered deep into the moustachy bristles sticking out over his upper lip, you would probably see much larger objects 20 that had escaped the wipe of his hand, things that had been there for months and months, like a piece of maggoty green cheese or a mouldy old cornflake or even the slimy tail of a tinned sardine. a bristle: short stiff hair gravy: sauce Because of all this, Mr Twit never went really hungry. By hideous: very ugly sticking out his tongue and curling it sideways to explore the hairy jungle around his mouth, he was always able to minced: in very small pieces 25 find a tasty morsel here and there to nibble on. a morsel: a piece mouldy: (here) food that has gone bad What I am trying to tell you is that Mr Twit was a foul and smudgy: a bit dirty smelly old man. spiteful: mean and unpleasant Source: The Twits, Roald Dahl

3

Read the extract again and underline the words that describe the following. What?

READING

How?

Mr Twit’s face the couple (the Twits) the house the sauce the specks of dried-up scrambled eggs

the kind of man Mr Twit is 4

What are the words that describe the face, the house, the sauce, etc. in exercise 3 called?

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5

Choose the correct adjectives to describe the food in the pictures. Not all the words have to be used. blue – burnt – chocolate – green – poached - red – regular – scrambled – vanilla

1

2

This is

3

This is



This is

 ice cream.

4

 toast.

5

This is

This is a

 cheese.

 egg.

bell pepper.

2 / Can you count that? 1

2

3

Can you count the following words? If you can count it with a number, write C for countable. If you can’t count it, write UC for uncountable. 1 apple



4 orange



7 carrot



2 bread



5 salt



8 cereal



3 butter



6 pear



9 jam



Look at these uncountable words. How can you make them countable? 1 

water

5 

sugar

2 

tea

6 

salt

3 

bread

7 

orange juice

4 

bread

8 

milk

What types of food or drink can go in these containers? Add as many as you can.

1

4

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2





3



























5



6



























A FOODIE GENERATION


7

4



8





9

























Fill in the grammar box with the information from exercises 1 to 3.

GRAMMAR

How to count things with and without numbers Countable and uncountable nouns

        nouns can be counted using numbers. They have: – a singular form (can use the indefinite article ‘a’ or ‘an’) e.g. a pear / an apple – a plural form e.g. two pears / two apples         nouns cannot be counted with numbers. – They are used with a singular verb. – They usually do not have a plural form. – To make uncountable nouns countable, we use e.g. some sugar • quantifiers. • containers in which they are sold. e.g. a carton of juice Some nouns can be both countable (C) and uncountable (UC). e.g. ice cream He has already had an ice cream today. (C) I really love ice cream. (UC)

You will get an item card from your teacher. Form a shopping list with the entire class. The first one starts with: ‘I’m going to the supermarket and I’m going to buy …’. Try to remember all the previous items and then add your item to the list.

SPOKEN INTERACTION

CHECK 1, p. 319

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Step 2

The battle of breakfast Comparing breakfast foods

1 / What do you have for breakfast? 1

Fill the gaps by writing down the name of an appropriate container. Choose from the following options. bowl (2x) – cup – glass (3x) – mug – piece

Food

A       

Drinks

of cereal

A       

A       

A       

of tea

of milk

of oatme

al

A       

of coffee

uit

Yoghurt with fr

A        of orange juice

A boiled egg

A        2 two hundred and eighty-two

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m

of toast with ja

A       

Indicate the items from the previous exercise that you regularly have in the morning. Then discuss the following questions with a partner. a Do you eat and drink the same things as your partner? b Do you eat and drink the same things every day? Is it different at the weekend? c Is there any other food you eat for breakfast that is not in the list? If so, what?

UNIT 6:

of water

A FOODIE GENERATION

SPOKEN INTERACTION


2 / Full English vs American pancakes 1

READING

Look at the title and the pictures of the article below and on the next page. a Which 2 countries are competing against each other?  b Who do you think will win the battle? Why? 

READING

Read the article in full. a Highlight the words that make it difficult for you to understand the entire sentence. Check the strategy ‘how to deal with difficult words in a text’ in the Summary of Unit 1, p. 43. b If you still don’t know what the word means, use a(n online) dictionary to find out what these words mean. Write them on a separate piece of paper. c Use the strategy ‘how to use a dictionary’ (Unit 2, p. 96) to find the correct meaning of the words. Write the explanation, a synonym or a translation next to the word on your sheet.

Full English vs American pancakes: 1

5

10

15

20

25

By Kristy McHale

who wins the battle of the breakfast?

The Brits love a fry-up; the Americans are mad for pancakes ... we headed to The Interesting Eating Company on Allerton Road for a transatlantic breakfast battle. UK vs USA ... who will win the Battle of the Breakfasts in National Breakfast Week? This week is National Breakfast Week, so we’re celebrating the most important meal of the day. In Britain, the breakfast staple is a good oldfashioned fry-up. Across the Atlantic, the Americans are mad for stacks upon stacks of pancakes, drenched in maple syrup. ECHO reporters Amy Browne and Kirsty McHale headed to The Interesting Eating Company on Allerton Road for a transatlantic Battle of the Breakfasts. In the British corner ... Amy takes on the ‘All the 2s Full English Breakfast’ Marked with the Union Flag, the traditional British breakfast consists of two poached eggs, two sausages, a grilled tomato and mushroom, two rashers of grilled bacon and baked beans, with two slices of thick cut toast, served with tea or coffee. Price £ 9,00. ‘When they say full English, they really mean it here. What arrived in front of me was enough food to keep me full until gone lunchtime because the portion is HUGE. The two rashers of thick cut bacon were lean, tasty and thankfully not glistening in fat - always off-putting for me. I’d liked the few – but present – vitamins in the beans, mushrooms and tomatoes. The beans were served in a little pot and the two eggs came perfectly poached. Two slices of toast were a bit too much for me, but I’m sure those with a bigger appetite wouldn’t complain. But the real highlight had to be the sausages. Made by the owner’s dad, a butcher, they were smooth yet meaty in texture, with a delicious savoury after taste.’

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30

35

40

45

In the American corner ... Kirsty enjoys ‘American-style Pancakes’ In the stars and stripes corner, the all-American pancake breakfast – with added bacon and maple syrup. Kirsty gets three American-style pancakes with two strips of crispy bacon, topped with maple syrup. The price is $ 6,99. ‘First I thought the combination of sweet and savoury would be weird, but it is delicious. The last time I had pancakes this good was in a New York diner. The pancakes were beautifully light and fluffy; a lot of places can make the mistake of making ‘American’ pancakes too dense. But these were cooked to perfection. The bacon was maybe a little TOO crispy, but that’s just my personal taste. The maple syrup complemented the whole meal without overpowering the pancakes. For a minute I thought I was back on 8th Avenue!’ And the winner is ... USA! It was tight, but as unpatriotic as it may be on Britain’s week of celebration, the American-style pancakes were just too good to ignore. The conclusion: although Great Britain is the most important country in the world, the Americans have the best and the tastiest breakfast. Adapted from www.liverpoolecho.co.uk

3

Connect the words with the definition from the Oxford Dictionary. Maybe these words were on your list from exercise 2. If necessary, look up the word. Word

Meaning

1 transatlantic

A closely compacted

2 drenched

B crossing the Atlantic ocean

3 lean

C covered thoroughly

4 savoury

D salty or spicy rather than sweet

5 dense

E containing little fat

1

4

UNIT 6:

3

4

5

What are the ingredients of the 2 competing dishes? If you don’t know the word in English, use the Summary on p. 313.

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2

A FOODIE GENERATION

READING


5

Do you think the writer is British or American? Why?  

6

Discuss with a partner.

SPOKEN INTERACTION

a Was the winner who you expected it to be? b Who would you elect to be the winner? Why? 7

READING

Are the following statements true or false? Statement

True

False

1 The English breakfast is healthier than American breakfast. 2 The American portion is bigger than British portion. 3 The American combination is weirder than the British combination. 4 The bacon of the fry-up is crispier than the other. 5 The American breakfast is sweeter than the English breakfast. 6 The American breakfast is more expensive than the English breakfast. Complete the following sentences with words from the text. 1 The United Kingdom is the 

country.

2 The Americans have the            and the  9

breakfast.

Certain words are printed in bold in exercise 7. Use this information, and the information from exercise 8 to fill in the grammar box about how to make comparisons using adjectives.

GRAMMAR

How to make comparisons Comparative and superlative          can be used to make comparisons.             

            

USE

USE

– To compare 1 person or thing with another – To compare 1 person or thing with all of their group. person or thing. – Used with ‘the’: – Used with ‘than’: e.g. Honey is sweeter than a salty cracker. e.g. The Americans have the tastiest breakfast. FORM

FORM

– –

– –

Short adjectives: add      e.g. faster, smaller, hotter Long adjectives: add      e.g. more delicious

Short adjectives: add      e.g. fastest, smallest, hottest Long adjectives: add      e.g. most delicious

Keep in mind! – –

With adjectives ending in a short vowel + consonant,  e.g. big, bigger, biggest There are irregular forms! e.g. good, better, best

the consonant. See p. 310

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10 Complete the sentences about breakfast using the comparative form of the adjective. Don’t forget to add ‘than’. 1 Beans in a chili sauce are  beans in a tomato sauce.

(spicy)

2 Maple syrup is  plain syrup.

(yummy)

3 American pancakes are  pancakes in Belgium.

(small)

4 A full breakfast is  a bowl of cereal.

(enjoyable)

5 Regular tea is  mint tea with fresh mint leaves.

(boring)

6 A mango is  a green apple.

(sweet)

11 Complete the sentences using the superlative form of the adjective. Don’t forget to add ‘the’. 1 Aya can cut fruit very fast, but Dzemil cuts 

.

2 The chocolate cupcake is pretty, but the cupcakes with the roses are 

.

3 Cereal is crunchy, but granola is 

.

12 Fill in these sentences using a superlative form of the adjective and what you think is the right answer. Then form groups and compare your answer.

SPOKEN INTERACTION

1 The            

(famous) TV-chef in the world is 

.

2                

(good) cook is 

.

3                

(bad) restaurant I know is 

.

4                

(enjoyable) meal I’ve had is 

 5                

(bad) meal I have eaten this year is 

 13 Watch the fragment of the pancake art challenge and answer the questions. a What are the names of the competitors?  b Milk is one ingredient of pancakes, but what other ingredients are used?  c What types of pancake does the couple make? two hundred and eighty-six



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 d Which 2 signs does Jeana accidentally mix up?                           Draw them. UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

listening


14 Compare Jeana and Jesse’s pancakes. Use comparisons in the positive and in the negative like in the example.

WRITING

e.g. YouTube button – pretty Jeana’s YouTube button is the prettiest/prettier than Jesse’s. Jesse’s button is the least pretty. 1 Cat – realistic   2 Dinosaur – tasty   3 Emoji – original  

WRITING

15 Compare the pictures of these 2 breakfasts. Follow the procedure. a Preparation: indicate 5 differences (think about the food itself, the taste, etc.). b Action: write 5 sentences (about 40 words). Use the comparative and superlative correctly. You can use the suggested adjectives. crispy – delicious – healthy – nutritious – tasty

      



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c Reflection: find a partner and compare your texts. Did you write about the same things? Did your partner use the comparative and superlative correctly? Checklist: description

Yes

I think so

No

1 Content • I wrote 5 sentences or about 40 words. • I compared at least 5 things from the 2 breakfasts. 2 Language • I used the comparative and superlative correctly. • I used the correct words to describe the food. • I used correct spelling and punctuation. Feedback

CHECK 2, p. 321

Step 3

What’s for lunch? Ordering a sandwich

1 / Ordering a sandwich 1

1 Which  do you want? 2 Which  do you want?

3 Do you want   with that?

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listening

Watch the Subway video and complete the different steps.

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

4 Which  would you like?

5 Would y 

ou like som

6 Wh ich  do you want?

e ?


Complete the names of the bakery items.

b       bread or

      te or

whole       bread

Fr    st    

ba     3

Which 

do you want?

bread      

    ant

Cheese, meat, cold cuts and seafood: match the names of the food items to the pictures.

1

2

4

5

7

8

       bread

Which 

do you want? 3

6

9

bacon

crab

mozzarella

cheddar

ham

shrimp

chicken filet

meatballs

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4

Do you want 

Unscramble the letters to get the correct cheese.

aredchd

atef

 5

ellazarmoz



with that?

issws cesehe





Find the names of the vegetables in the word search (horizontally, vertically and diagonally) and link them to the right picture.

uebl eseche 

Which 

would you like? 







Y

P

B M H

D

I

F W O

Q

B

I

D

V

Q

Y

S

C

C

K

C

U

S

T

Q

J

T

P

Z

E

B N

A

E

H N

Q

G

J

D

H

H

Q

A

S

S

A

S

R

E

B M U

C

U

C

Y

R

E

H

I

R M R

O

U

E

O

N H

T

Y

Z

Z

D

X

E

X

O W C

B

E

O

C

Z

S

C

C

J

D

E M W P

U

C M

V

Y

O

H

F

A

V

O

N

C

G

T

A

H W G

J

L

Y

R

V

N H N B

P

T

U

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N H

H

X

W

R

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V

Y

O

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H

H

Q

C

T

Y

B

O

V

O

G

F

E

S

L

Z

P

A

S

F

T

V

T

K

N

Z

S

S

U W W N

S

T

V

W A

S

S

S M W C

U

L

I

C

Q

J

S

Q

G

E

S

Q

N

S

E

P

P

E

P

L

L

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B

U

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K

D

C M S

A

R

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R

F E

R



6

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Write the name of the sauce under the picture.



UNIT 6:



A FOODIE GENERATION







Would you like some 



?


Listen to the dialogue between a sandwich maker (S) and a customer (C). Fill the gaps with the word you hear.

listening

S: Good morning and welcome to Subway. How can I help you? C: I would like a sub, please. S: How        (1) subs would you like? C: Just one. S:        (2) size preference? 6 inch or footlong? C: I’d like a 6-inch, please. S: Good, so a 6-inch sub. Which bread would you like? C: Italian Herbs and Cheese please. S: Which fillings would you like? We have        (3) options. C: How        (4) fillings can I choose? S: Two maximum. C: Okay, I’d like bacon and turkey breast. S: Anything else? Maybe        (5) cheese? C: No, thank you. I don’t want        (6) cheese. S: Would you like it toasted? C: Yes, please. S: Which vegetables would you like? C: I’d like        (7) tomatoes and        (8) red onions. S: I am sorry; we don’t have        (9) tomatoes left. C: No problem, I don’t need        (10) vegetables. Then just        (11) slices of cucumber instead. S: Would you like        (12) sauce on your sub? C:        (13) honey mustard, please. S: Would you like to make it a fresh value meal? C: Sure. How        (14) water is there in a bottle? S: We have bottles of 33 cl and 50 cl. C: I’ll have a small bottle of water and a cookie. S: Ok. C: How        (15) is that? S: That will be £5.57. C: Here you go. S: Thank you, you can pick up your order at the Pick Up line. Have a nice meal. C: Thanks, bye.

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8

Look at the sentences below. Complete the grid by answering the questions. a Are the sentences positive, negative or questions? b Underline the nouns in each of the sentences below. Is the noun countable or uncountable? Some/any Sentence 1

Maybe some cheese?

2

I don’t want any cheese.

3

I would like some tomatoes.

4

We don’t have any tomatoes left.

5

Then some slices of cucumber instead.

6

Do you have any size preference?

+

-

?

C

UC

+

-

?

C

UC

+

-

?

C

UC

Much/many Sentence 1

How many subs would you like?

2

How many fillings can I choose?

3

How much water is there in a bottle?

4

How much is that?

A lot of Sentence

9

1

We have a lot of options.

2

I don’t need a lot of vegetables.

3

Do you have a lot of different sauces to choose from?

4

I don’t have a lot of money left to spend on lunch.

Complete the grammar box about some, any, much and many with information from exercise 8. How to indicate quantity

GRAMMAR

Quantifiers Unspecified quantity:                 – In general,       is used in positive sentences. e.g. I bought some apples today. – In general,       is used in questions and negative sentences. e.g. Do you have any apples? I don’t have any apples today. Large quantity:                 two hundred and ninety-two

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– ‘Many’ is used before plural countable nouns. e.g. How many ice cubes would you like? – ‘Much’ is used before uncountable nouns. e.g. There is too much sugar in my tea. – ‘A lot of’ is always correct. e.g. We have a lot of options. See p. 308

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION


10 Fill in ‘some’ or ‘any’. 1 Have you put       vegetables on your sandwich? 2 Would you like       water? 3 Jayden had       leftovers for lunch. 4 There aren’t       tomatoes left. 5 Jamie had       chocolate chip cookies for dessert. 6 I would like       ketchup on my sandwich. 7 Do you have       tomatoes left? 11 Fill in ‘much’ or ‘many’. 1 How       strawberries did you pick? 2 How       soup should we make? 3 I don’t eat       pasta. I prefer rice. 4 Do you know how       cupcakes we need for the party? 5 Do you always put that       sugar in your coffee? 6 I didn’t know you ate so       peaches. 12 Look at the pictures of before and after a party and compare what is left.

WRITING

a Preparation: indicate what is different. Do you know all the words you need? b Action: write 5 sentences (or about 30 words) about what is left. Use quantifiers correctly. Use ‘much’ and ‘many’ at least twice each. Before

After

e.g. There aren’t many cupcakes left. – They did not drink much lemonade.   two hundred and ninety-three

  

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c Refl ection: check your text by fi lling in the checklist. Checklist: quantifiers

Yes

I think so

No

1 Content • I wrote 5 sentences or about 30 words. • I compared the 2 photos. 2 Language • I used the quantifi ers correctly. • I used the correct words to describe the food. • I used correct spelling and punctuation. Feedback

13 Work with a partner. Prepare a dialogue in which one of you is the sandwich maker, and the other is the customer. Check the useful expressions in the Summary (p. 318) to see how you can get started. a Preparation: what are the different steps? Check them in exercise 1 on page 288. Write your preparation on a separate piece of paper. b Action: talk to your partner. Make sure you use the quantifi ers correctly and that you use the correct words for all the food. c Refl ection: check your dialogue by fi lling in the checklist. Checklist: ordering a sandwich 1 Content • We went through all the steps of ordering a sandwich. • We started and ended the conversation properly. 2 Language • We used some, any, much, many correctly. • We used correct words for all the food. • We checked the pronunciation of a word in an online dictionary if we didn’t know how to pronounce it. Feedback

CHECK 3, p. 325

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Yes

I think so

No

SPOKEN INTERACTION


Step 4

Look at these smoothies. What fruits are in each one? Use the Summary on p. 313 if you don’t know the word of the fruit.

1

2

Writing a recipe

2

3

Look at the infographic and put the following subtitles where they belong.

READING

Add your base – Add your liquids – Blend it all together - Optional: add veggies – Pick 2-3 types of fruit How to make the perfect smoothie 1

strawberry pineapple banana

Choose at least 2 types of fruit (fresh or frozen) for a super healthy smoothie.

2

carrot spinach

Make a smoothie by adding vegetables such as carrot and spinach.

3 Pour 1-2 cups of liquids in the blender.

tea milk water 4

yoghurt oats ice cubes

Add a base to make your smoothie thicker, smoother and more nutritious.

5

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A FOODIE GENERATION

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How to make a smoothie

295


3

Read this recipe for a healthy strawberry-plum-blueberry smoothie and answer the questions.

Healthy strawberry-plum-blueberry smoothie Ingredients - A handful of blueberries - 5 strawberries - 3 plums - ½ lime - ½ glass of water - ½ cup of plain yoghurt

Preparation - Remove the stems of the strawberries. - Stone the plums. - Slice the strawberries and plums. - Cut the lime in half. - Squeeze the lime juice in the blender. - Put all the other ingredients in the blender. - Start blending. - Pour your smoothie in a glass. njoy!

E

a Use a verb from the smoothie recipe to describe what you see in each picture.

1

2

3

5

6

7

4

b Have a look at the preparation, which form of the verb is used?

c Give an example of a positive and a negative form. + 4

Fill in the grammar box with the information from exercise 3. How to give instructions

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– To give instructions, the is used. This is the e.g. (to choose) Choose your favourite fruit. – When you tell someone not to do something, put the verb. e.g. (not to forget) Don’t forget to remove the stones.

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

GRAMMAR of the verb.

in front of the base form of

READING


5

WRITING

Choose ingredients to make your own smoothie and follow the steps from the infographic to write out the recipe. My

smoothie!

Pick 2-3 types of fruit:

.

(optional) Add veggies:

.

Add your liquids:

.

Choose your base:

.

Title: Ingredients:

Instructions:

Form groups. Use the information about your favourite smoothie and tell your group how to make it. Use the imperative and linking words.

SPEAKING

STRATEGY

How to structure a text

If there are several steps in your instructions, you can use specifi c linking words, called sequence markers. You can also use ‘steps’, letters (a, b, c ...) or numbers (1, 2, 3 ...).

e.g. First, boil the water. Then add the pasta and boil until done. Next, drain the pasta. Finally, enjoy your meal. e.g. Step 1, choose your fruit and vegetables. Step 2, add your liquids. Step 3, add a base. Checklist: giving instructions

Yes

I think so

No

1 Content • I used the infographic to structure my recipe. 2 Language • I used the imperative correctly. • I used linking words to structure the instructions. Feedback

CHECK 4, p. 328

two hundred and ninety-seven

6

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

297


Let’s get dinner!

Step 5 1

Using adjectives and adverbs

Let’s make some spaghetti! a Match the adjectives with the correct noun. chopped – dried – fresh – medium – olive – Parmesan – red

1 bunch of

basil

2 cloves of garlic

onion

2 x 400g tins of

oil 480 g

1

tomatoes

1 tablespoon

wine

wholewheat spaghetti 15 g

cheese READING

b Read the recipe for Classic Tomato Spaghetti. While you are reading, highlight the equipment you need.

Classic Tomato Spaghetti

Method

Once you’ve made this a few times you can add other very simple ingredients, such as baby spinach, chopped rocket leaves, or fresh or frozen peas, to your basic tomato sauce to completely transform it. 1

Pick the basil leaves onto a chopping board (reserving a few baby leaves to garnish), then roughly chop the remaining leaves and finely chop the stalks.

2

Peel and finely slice the onion and garlic. If using fresh, cut the tomatoes in half, then carefully open the tins of tomatoes.

3

Put a saucepan on a medium heat and add 1 tablespoon of olive oil and the onion, then cook for around 7 minutes, or until soft and lightly golden.

4 Stir in the garlic and basil stalks for a few minutes, then add the fresh or tinned tomatoes and the vinegar. 5 Season with a tiny pinch of salt and pepper, then continue cooking for around 15 minutes, stirring really occasionally.

two hundred and ninety-eight

298

6

Stir in the chopped basil leaves, then reduce to low heat. Meanwhile …

7

Carefully fill a large pot three-quarters of the way up with boiling water, add a tiny pinch of salt and bring back to the boil.

8

Add the spaghetti and cook according to packet instructions – you want to cook your pasta until it is al dente. Use the timings on the packet instructions as a guide, but try some just before the time is up to make sure it’s perfectly cooked.

9

Once the pasta is done, ladle out and reserve a cup of the cooking water and keep it to one side, then drain in a colander over the sink and tip the spaghetti back into the pot.

10 Stir the spaghetti into the sauce, adding a splash of the pasta water to loosen, if needed. 11

Serve with the reserved basil leaves sprinkled over the top and use a grater to finely grate the Parmesan cheese, then sprinkle over. Source: www.jamieoliver.com

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION


c Now match the kitchen utensils you highlighted in the recipe with the correct picture.









d What kitchen utensil do you need … 

2 to open the tin of tomatoes?



3 to stir in the pan?



4 to get a cup of water out of the pot?



5 to grate the cheese?



Go through the recipe in exercise 1 again and answer these questions, using only one word. Then fill in the grammar box. 1 How simple are the other ingredients you can add?



2 How do you have to chop the basil leaves?



3 How do you have to slice the onion and garlic?



4 How do you have to open the tins of tomatoes?



5 How occasionally do you have to stir?



GRAMMAR

How to describe people, things and actions Adjectives and adverbs

Adjectives tell us something more about            or are used with linking verbs or the verb ‘to be’: 1 Noun: e.g. a sharp knife = ‘sharp’ tells you how the knife is.

simple ingredients = ‘simple’ tells you how the ingredients are. 2 Linking verbs: e.g. Dinner looks good. = ‘good’ tells you something about dinner. 3 ‘To be’: e.g. The soup is delicious. = ‘delicious’ tells you something about the soup. Adverbs of manner tell us something more about           ,  or           . 1 Verb: e.g. Roughly chop the leaves. = ‘roughly’ tells you something more about how to chop.

e.g. Stir really occasionally. = ‘occasionally’ tells you something more about how to stir. 2 Adjective: e.g. very simple ingredients = ‘very’ tells you something more about simple. 3 Adverb: e.g. Stir really occasionally. = ‘really’ tells you something more about occasionally. See p. 311 UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

two hundred and ninety-nine

2

1 to chop the leaves?

299


3

Find the adverbs of these adjectives in the recipe. Adjective

Adverb

rough fine careful real occasional 4

Write the adjectives in the grid and complete the rules. Adjective ends in

Adverb: -y  easily angrily happily

Adjective ends in

Adverb: -ble  probably terribly

Adjective ends in

Adverb : -le  simply gently

Adjective ends in

Adverb: + fantastically enthusiastically economically

5

There are also irregular adverbs. Fill in their corresponding adjectives. Adjective

6

Adverb

Adjective

Adverb

well

early

fast

daily

hard

straight

late

wrong, wrongly

Fill in the correct adverb in these sentences. 1 My mother can cook really           (good). 2 The cook was           (serious) injured after the oven exploded. 3 Sookie           (careful) took the dish out of the oven. 4 I ate the chocolate           (hungry). 5 Pour the water very           (gentle) into the bowl.

three hundred

300

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION


Look at the recipe and complete it with the correct adverb or adjective.

Chic’ Penne

Preparation Time: 20 minutes Cooking Time: 20 minutes Makes six 1 ½-cup servings

Ingredients Directions 3 cups penne pasta,

1 Preheat oven to 350 °F.

wholewheat, dry (12 oz)

2 In a

1 tsp granulated garlic 2 cups

(fresh)

broccoli fl orets

(Gradual) stir in pasta and return to a boil. Cook uncovered for 8-10 minutes or until tender. Do not overcook. Drain

1 cup cooked diced chicken, ½ pieces (4 oz) 1 ½ cup fat-free half and half 1 tbsp enriched all-purpose fl our 1/8 cup low-sodium chicken broth

(good). Toss pasta with ½ teaspoon garlic.

3 Fill a

(medium) pot with water and bring to

a boil. Add broccoli fl orets and cook for 5 minutes. Drain (good). Sprinkle with remaining garlic. 4 Transfer pasta and broccoli to a medium casserole dish coated with non-stick cooking spray. Add chicken. Mix (good). 5 In a

1 tsp salt ½ tsp

(large) pot, bring 2 quarts water to a boil.

(ground)

black pepper

(small) mixing bowl, mix ½ cup half and

half with fl our. Whisk to remove lumps. 6 In a medium skillet, heat chicken broth, salt, pepper, and

½ cup reduced-fat cheddar

remaining half and half. Stir

cheese, shredded (2 oz)

Stir in half and half/fl our mixture. Stir

½ cup low-fat mozzarella

(constant) and bring to a boil.

cheese, low-moisture, partskim, shredded (2 oz)

(constant).

7 Reduce heat to low. Stir

(frequent) for

5 minutes. Sauce will thicken. Add cheese and stir until cheese melts. Remove from heat. Pour sauce over broccoli/ pasta mixture. 8 Cover casserole dish with lid or with foil. Bake at 350 °F for 8 minutes. Heat to an

(internal)

temperature of 165 °F or higher for at least 15 seconds. Remove from oven. 9 Serve hot. Source: Recipes for Healthy Kids: Cookbook for Homes, Food and Nutrition Service

Did you know? Did you know that people in the USA use Fahrenheit (°F) instead of Celsius (°C)? When it is 68 °F, it’s actually just 20 °C. When it is 0 °C it is 32 °F.

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

three hundred and one

7

301


8

Below is an excerpt from the graphic novel Relish. Use it to write down the recipe for Huevos Rancheros. a Preparation: highlight the ingredients and decide which preparation methods you are going to use. Check the Summary on p. 313-317 if necessary! b Action: write the recipe. Describe the ingredients, preparation method and the result (looks, taste, smell). Don’t forget to use the imperative, quantifi ers, adjectives and adverbs correctly. RELISH - LUCY KNISLEY As the daughter of a chef, Lucy Knisley has always loved food. In Relish she combines her love for food with her talents as a cartoonist. Relish is a funny graphic novel memoir in which Knisley describes her life, explained by what she was eating at the time and the lessons she learned about food, cooking and life. At the end of every chapter you can also fi nd an illustrated recipe.

three hundred and two

302

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

READING


three hundred and three

Source: Relish, Lucy Knisley

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

303


c Reflection: check your recipe by filling in the checklist. Checklist: giving instructions

Yes I think so

No

1 Content • I described the ingredients. • I described the preparation method. • I described the result (what it looks like and what it will taste like). 2 Language • I used the imperative correctly. • I used quantifiers correctly. • I used adjectives and adverbs correctly. • I used linking words or sequence markers to structure the instructions. • I used the correct words in my recipe. • I used correct spelling and punctuation. Feedback

9

Read the extracts from Relish and answer the questions. a How does Lucy remember things best?   b What did Lucy do after her first year of college?   c Where did she really fall in love with croissants?  d Describe the croissants.    e Why did Lucy have to go back to the bakery?   f What will ‘croissants’ make Lucy think of from then on, you think?

three hundred and four

304

  

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

READING


three hundred and fi ve UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

305


three hundred and six

306

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION


three hundred and seven

CHECK 5, p. 334 UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

307


GRAMMAR

SUMMARY HOW TO indicate quantity I would like to have some tea and some toast, please. Just one and I want a lot of sugar in my tea!

Quantifi ers

How many slices of toast would you like? There isn’t any sugar left, I’m afraid. How much milk do you want?

1 Unspecified quantity USE

some

any

– – – – –

with plural of countable nouns with uncountable nouns in positive sentences in offers in requests

– – – – –

an apple g some apples water g some water There is some milk in the fridge. Do you want some tea? Could you get me some milk, please?

– – – – –

with plural of countable nouns with uncountable nouns in questions in negative sentences when the meaning is ‘it doesn’t matter which’

– – – – –

a pear g any pears milk g any milk Is there any milk left in the fridge? There isn’t any milk left in the fridge. You can ask for help any time!

three hundred and eight

308

UNIT 6:

EXAMPLES

A FOODIE GENERATION


2 Large quantity USE

much

many

a lot of

EXAMPLES

– – – –

before uncountable nouns in questions in negative sentences in positive sentences with ‘so’, ‘as’ or ‘too’

– – – –

much sugar How much sugar do you want? I don’t need much sugar. There is too much sugar in my tea.

– – – –

before plural countable nouns in questions in negative sentences in positive sentences with ‘so’, ‘as’ or ‘too’

– – – –

many restaurants How many ice cubes would you like? There aren’t many restaurants here. There are too many ice cubes in my drink.

– We have a lot of options.

– always correct

3 Small quantity USE

a little

few

a few

– before uncountable nouns – mostly used in positive sentences – used in formal contexts

– little sugar – I had little choice over the menu at the banquet.

– before uncountable nouns – mostly used in positive sentences

– a little milk – Have a little salsa on your eggs. It’s delicious!

– before plural countable nouns – mostly used in positive sentences – used in formal contexts

– few restaurants – Few people love hot sauce as much as I do.

– before plural countable nouns – mostly used in positive sentences

– a few apples – He let me pick a few peaches from the tree in his garden.

three hundred and nine

little

EXAMPLES

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

309


HOW TO make comparisons This is a really big hamburger.

Comparative and superlative

Yes, but mine is bigger!

And mine is the biggest!

USE Adjectives can be used to make comparisons. Comparative

Superlative

– To compare 1 person or thing with another person or thing. – Used with ‘than’: e.g. Honey is sweeter than a salty cracker.

– To compare 1 person or thing with all of their group. – Used with ‘the’: e.g. The Americans have the tastiest breakfast. FORM

1 syllable

2 syllables

> 2 syllables

Comparative

Superlative

adjective + er e.g. fast g faster

adjective + est e.g. fast g fastest

– Adjectives ending in consonant + y g y changes to i before adding -er e.g. healthy ghealthier crispy g crispier

– Adjectives ending in consonant + y g y changes to i before adding -est e.g. healthy g healthiest crispy g crispiest

– Other adjectives more + adjective + than e.g. more healthy than more boring than more pleasant than

– Other adjectives the most + adjective e.g. the most healthy the most boring the most pleasant

more + adjective + than e.g. more expensive than more delicious than

the most + adjective e.g. the most expensive the most delicious

Keep in mind! – Adjectives ending in a short vowel + consonant = double the consonant e.g. big, bigger, biggest – Irregular forms! e.g. good, better, best three hundred and ten

310

Adjective good bad much little

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

Comparative better worse more less

Superlative best worst most least


HOW TO describe people, things and actions

Adjectives and adverbs

We use really simple ingredients. Roughly chop the tomatoes and onions. Careful, it’s a sharp knife!

1

Then, add them to the pot very carefully and stir occasionally.

Adjectives

Adjectives tell us something more about a noun or are used with linking verbs or the verb ‘to be’. USE 1 Noun: e.g. a sharp knife = ‘sharp’ tells you how the knife is. 2 Linking verbs: e.g. Dinner looks good. = ‘good’ tells you something about dinner. 3 ‘To be’: e.g. The soup is delicious. = ‘delicious’ tells you something about the soup.

2

Adverbs

Adverbs of manner tell us something more about a verb, an adjective or an adverb. FORM Adjective

Adverb

Example

general

adjective + ly

rough

g roughly

ending in -y

-y g -ily

easy

g easily

ending in -ble

-ble g -bly

probable g probably

ending in consonant + -le

-le g -ly

simple

ending in -ic

adjective + ally

fantastic g fantastically

g simply

Adjective

Adverb

Adjective

Adverb

good fast hard late

well fast hard late

early daily straight wrong

early daily straight wrong, wrongly

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

three hundred and eleven

Irregular!

311


USE 1 Verb: e.g. Roughly chop the leaves. = ‘roughly’ tells you something more about how to chop.

e.g. Stir really occasionally. = ‘occasionally’ tells you something more about how to stir. 2 Adjective: e.g. very simple ingredients = ‘very’ tells you something more about simple. 3 Adverb: e.g. Stir really occasionally. = ‘really’ tells you something more about occasionally. Keep in mind! – Use an adjective (and not an adverb) with linking verbs that describe the senses: taste, smell, look, feel … e.g. This really smells delicious! – Degrees of comparison can also be used with adverbs of manner. e.g. quickly, more quickly, the most quickly

three hundred and twelve

312

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION


bacon

butter



cereal



French toast



jam

pancakes



toast



yoghurt



coffee

oatmeal







tea



eggs



hash browns



VOCABULARY

1 BREAKFAST FOOD AND DRINKS

milk



orange juice





apple 

banana 

cherry(-ies) 

grapes

grapefruit 



UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

three hundred and thirteen

2 FRUIT

313


kiwi

lemon



lime



melon



nectarine





pineapple

pear

peach 



plum







orange



mango

mandarin

raspberry(-ies)



strawberry(-ies)





3 BAKERY ITEMS

bagel

biscuit/cookie





cake





croissant



brown/white bread

bread roll

French stick/baguette





muffin 

4 VEGETABLES AND HERBS three hundred and fourteen

314

aubergine/eggplant 

UNIT 6:

asparagus 

A FOODIE GENERATION

basil 

broccoli

beans 




cabbage

carrot





corn 



courgette/zucchini 



potato(-es) 

cucumber

onion





(bell) peppers

peas 



spinach 

lettuce

garlic

parsley

radish(-es)







chives

celery 



mushrooms 

cauliflower

turnips

tomato(-es) 



5 MEAT

chicken/grilled chicken breast 



lamb 

chicken/ roast chicken 

meatballs 





minced meat 

ham

cold cuts

sausages

salami 



UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

three hundred and fifteen

bacon

315


6 CHEESE

cheddar 

feta

gouda cheese





parmesan

mozzarella 



7  KITCHEN UTENSILS

blender 

corkscrew 

bottle opener 

chopping board

knife

three hundred and sixteen

316

A FOODIE GENERATION

peeler 

colander 

tin/can opener

UNIT 6:







juicer

spatula

saucepan









scale(s)

bowl

ladle

pot 







grater



whisk 

pan


8  OTHER WORDS Translation

to blend

mengen

to boil

koken

to cook

koken

to cut

snijden

to drain

afgieten

to garnish

versieren

to grill

grillen

to ladle

lepelen, uitgieten

to peel

schillen

to pour

gieten

to remove

verwijderen

to roast

roosteren

to season

kruiden

to serve

serveren

to slice

snijden (in schijfjes)

to sprinkle

besprenkelen, bestrooien

to squeeze

(uit)persen

to stone

ontpitten

My notes

three hundred and seventeen

Word

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

317


USEFUL EXPRESSIONS

HOW TO order in a shop

1

Starting the conversation

2

Ordering

Hi, how can I help you? Hello, how may I help you?

Can I get ... ? I would like to get ...

3 Taking the order Would you like ...? Do you want ...? Yes, we do. I’m sorry, we don’t have ... Would you like anything else? Anything else?

4

Yes, I would. / No, I wouldn’t. Yes, I do. / No, I don’t. Do you have ...? I’d like some ..., please. I would like some ..., please. Some ..., please. No, thank you.

Finishing the conversation Will that be all? That will be ..., please. Thank you very much. Have a nice day.

5

Paying Yes, thank you. How much is it? How much is that? Here you go. Here you are.

three hundred and eighteen

318

Thanks. Bye. Thank you. Goodbye.

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION


ON DIFFERENT TRACKS Check 1 1

Describing food listening

Listen to the dialogue at the greengrocer’s. a Tick the items Zakaria has to buy. a jar of mayonnaise a packet of green tea some pears a packet of coffee a bottle of orange juice a bottle of lemonade a bag of crisps 1 kg of carrots a carton of milk a carton of eggs b Add an appropriate adjective for the items that Zakaria doesn’t have to buy. Are these items countable or uncountable?       < 10

≥ 10

Next exercise

ex. 2

ex. 3

Can you count the following words? If you can count it, write C for countable. If you can’t count it, write UC for uncountable. 1 cheese 2 coffee 3 grape 4 lettuce 5 milk

    

Score Next exercise

6 mushroom 7 pineapple 8 rice 9 sugar 10 water <7

    

≥7 three hundred and nineteen

2

Score

ex. 3

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

319


3

Name the containers, then give 2 examples of food that can go into these containers.

1

2

Container Food

3

Food

4

Container Food

5

6

Container

three hundred and twenty

320

8

Container

Container Food

Score

< 14

14 – 18

> 18

Next exercise

ex. 4

ex. 6

ex. 5

Which options are possible? Sometimes there is more than one option. 1 A … of honey

packet

jar

cup

bottle

2 A …. of water.

piece

carton

glass

bottle

3 A … of biscuits

carton

packet

box

jar

4 A … of tea

jar

cup

bottle

glass

5 A … of milk

cup

glass

carton

bottle

6 A carton of …

sugar

coffee

eggs

yoghurt

7 A bottle of …

wine

lemonade

yoghurt

coffee

8 A jar of …

mayonnaise

potatoes

apples

wine

9 A cup of …

water

orange juice

coffee

tea

10 A bag of …

apples

crisps

cookies

potatoes

Score

<6

Next exercise

UNIT 6:

Container Food

Food

4

Container Food

Food

7

Container

A FOODIE GENERATION

6–8

>8

ex. 6

Check 2, p. 321


6

Work with a partner. You will each get a picture of a loaded shopping trolley. Memorize what is in it. Then tell student B what was in the cart. Student B has to make a shopping list of the items you have seen. Then switch roles!

Score

/

Next exercise

Check 2, p. 321

Look at the pictures and complete the shopping list with an appropriate container and/or adjective. 1 A

potatoes

2 A

milk

3 A

bread

4 Five

onions

5 A

wine

6 A

of mayonnaise

7 A

cheese

8 Three

apples

9 A

water

10 A

crisps with

Score

/

Next exercise

Check 2, p. 321

Check 2 1

SPOKEN INTERACTION

fl avour

Comparing breakfast foods

Compare the picture of the fast food ad for the Burger King Whopper on the left to the picture of the actual food on the right.

WRITING

three hundred and twenty-one

5

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

321


a Write 6 sentences, using the adjectives below. Use the comparative (C) or superlative (S) correctly as indicated. bad (S) – big (C) – delicious (C) – greasy (C) - small (S) – tasty (S)       b Write in 2 sentences (about 20 words) which of these 2 you would like to eat. Explain why.  

2

Score

<4

4-6

>6

Next exercise

ex. 2

ex. 4

ex. 5

Look at the photos and read the text. Fill in the correct form of the comparative and superlative.

three hundred and twenty-two

322

Jack’s cake

1 Jack’s cake is

Yasin’s cake.

(pretty).

Jack’s cake is

2 Yasin’s cake is

Jack’s cake.

(small).

Yasin’s cake is

3 Yasin’s cake is

Jack’s cake.

(realistic).

Yasin’s cake is

4 Jack’s cake is

Yasin’s cake.

(original).

Jack’s cake is

5 Yasin’s cake is

(bad).

(good).

Jack’s cake is Score

<6

Next exercise

UNIT 6:

Yasin’s cake

A FOODIE GENERATION

6–8

>8

ex. 3

ex. 4


3

Write sentences comparing the 2 foods. Write a sentence with a comparative and one with a superlative.

e.g. Apple – grapefruit (juicy) A grapefruit is juicier than an apple. A grapefruit is the juiciest. 1 Lime – pear (sour)  2 Cucumber – cheese (salty)  3 Red pepper – bell pepper (spicy)  4 Grape – blueberry (small)  5 Whole grain bread – white bread (nutricient).   Score

<7

≥7

Next exercise

WRITING

Compare the Holtin to All You Need Is Food. a Preparation: check the grid below. What are the most important differences? b Action: write a paragraph of at least 5 sentences (about 40 words) in which you compare the 2 restaurants.

Price

The Holtin

All You Need Is Food (AYNIF)

€€€€

€€

Friendly personnel + + +

++

Food

++

+++

Location

6 km from London

11 km from London

Interior

 three hundred and twenty-three

4

ex. 4

    c Reflection: check your text by filling in the checklist.

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

323


Checklist: comparing restaurants

Yes

I think so No

1 Content • I wrote 5 sentences (about 40 words). • I compared at least 5 things from the 2 breakfasts. 2 Language • I used the comparative and superlative correctly. • I used the correct words to describe the restaurants. • I used correct spelling and punctuation. Feedback

5

Score

/

Next exercise

Check 3, p. 325

WRITING

Compare what the Revis family and the Mendoza family eat. a Preparation: check the photos and indicate 5 things you want to write about. b Action: write your comparison (about 50 words). The Revis family

The Mendoza family

     c Reflection: check your text by filling in the checklist. Checklist: comparing food 1 Content • I wrote about 50 words. • I compared at least 5 items.

three hundred and twenty-four

2 Language • I used the comparative and superlative correctly. • I used the correct words to describe the food. • I used correct spelling and punctuation.

324

Feedback

UNIT 6:

Score

/

Next exercise

Check 3, p. 325

A FOODIE GENERATION

Yes

I think so

No


Check 3 1

Ordering a sandwich

Come up with the most delicious sandwich for your classmate. a Use the 6 steps in exercise 1 on page 288. b Use ‘some’, ‘any’, ‘much’, ‘many’, ‘a lot of’ correctly.

WRITING

c Make a short written preparation. Before you go to step d, give your text to the teacher.     

SPEAKING

d Tell a classmate what you made for them. Did they like it or not?

2

Score

<6

6–8

>8

Next exercise

ex. 2

ex. 5

ex. 6

4–6

>6

ex. 4

ex. 5

What are the ingredients of this sandwich?                                                                                                                                         Score

<4

Next exercise Complete the sentences. a Use ‘some’ or ‘any’.

1 I wanted to make an apple pie but there aren’t       apples left. 2 Would you like       more coffee? 3 Would you like       sugar in your tea? 4 Is there       chance of getting a breakfast? 5 Have you got       mayonnaise to go with my French fries?

three hundred and twenty-five

3

6 I bought       cookies for a charity today. 7 I can’t find       butter but we’ve got some olive oil. 8 There aren’t       greengrocers open on a Sunday.

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

325


b Use ‘much’ or ‘many’. 1 How       bottles of wine are there in the cellar? 2 How       eggs do you need to make a cake? 3 This shop has so       types of sweets. 4 How       bacon have you eaten this morning? 5 We don’t need       from the store; we have some leftovers. 6 There are       people waiting for the new restaurant to open. 7 How       tea do you need? Score

< 10

Next exercise 4

≥ 10 ex. 5

Juan and Mary are going on a daytrip. Choose the correct form. Juan I am going to make us some/any sandwiches for lunch. Mary: That’s a good idea, then we can save some/any money. Juan: As we are leaving, I am going to use some/any leftovers. Is there some/any bacon left from yesterday? Mary: Erm, yes I think there is some/any left, but it is not much/many. Let me check the fridge. … Oh, there are some/any tomatoes and cucumber in here. Juan: Perfect. Is there some/any chicken? Mary: No. we had too much/many chicken yesterday. But we do have some/any hard-boiled eggs. How much/many eggs do you need? Juan: Two will be fine. Can you also bring some/any mayonnaise? Mary: OK, but I don’t want much/many mayonnaise on my sandwich. Juan: Got that! Could you get some/any snacks and a drink? Mary: I have already packed some/any fruit and cookies. Do you want some/any water or coke? Juan: Do we still have some/any diet coke? Mary: No there isn’t some/any left. Juan: Then I will have some/any water, please. Not too much/many. Mary: Ok, then we are ready to go! Score

< 12

Next exercise 5

12 – 16

> 16

ex. 3

ex. 5

Look at the pictures. Would you add this ingredient to your sandwich? Write a sentence using ‘some’, ‘any’, ‘much’, ‘many’, ‘a lof of’.

e.g. I would add a lot of lettuce to my sandwich. I wouldn’t add much lettuce to my sandwich.

three hundred and twenty-six

326

1



2

UNIT 6:



A FOODIE GENERATION


3

4 5

/

Next exercise

Check 4, p. 328

Watch the fragment ‘Healthy Ideas for your Kid’s lunch’ and write down all the ingredients you have seen. Then come up with your own healthy sandwich. Write down the ingredients and how it would become funny.

listening

Ingredients – Put a spin on a traditional wrap:

– Make lunchbox kebabs:

– Think outside the breadbox: • Change bread into:

• Use veggies to build vessels:

My own funny sandwich 1 Ingredients:

2 Why it is funny:

Score

/

Next exercise

Check 4, p. 328

three hundred and twenty-seven

6

Score

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

327


Check 4 1

Writing a recipe

Look at the pictures and write the recipe to make blueberry pancakes.

Ingredients – – – –

Blueberry pancakes

1 ½ cup blueberries 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon salt

– – – –

2 eggs 1 ½ cups milk 1 ½ cups fl our 3 tablespoons melted butter

Preparation

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

three hundred and twenty-eight

Source: www.wikihow.com

328

1 2 3 4

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

WRITING


5  6  7  8  9  10  Checklist: giving instructions (recipe)

Yes

I think so

No

1 Content • My recipe has clear instructions. 2 Language • I used the imperative correctly. • I used linking words to structure the instructions of the recipe. • I used the correct words for the utensils and the food items. Feedback

<6

6-8

>8

Next exercise

ex. 2

ex. 6

ex. 5

Complete the text about how to write a recipe, using the imperative. Then put it in the correct order.

How to write a recipe A Secondly,            (to write) about the utensils and kitchen appliances you need to prepare your dishes. B            (to finish) with serving instructions. C Then,            (to describe) all the different steps in the correct order. D First,            (to make) a list of all the items you need.         (to forget, negative) to mention the quantities.            (to list) the ingredients in the order you need them. E            (to write, negative) complete sentences;           (to be) as short and concise as possible. F Next,            (to mention) the temperature of the oven if you use one. 1

2

Score Next exercise

3

< 10

4

5

6

10 - 12

> 12

ex. 3

ex. 6

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

three hundred and twenty-nine

2

Score

329


3

Watch the fragment and write down what the caterpillar eats.

Score

< 10

Next exercise

three hundred and thirty

330

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

â&#x2030;¥ 10 ex. 4

listening


Look at the pictures. First add the ingredients and then describe what you have to do to make the smoothie.

WRITING

Ingredients – 10

– ½

– ½

Recipe

1

2

3

4

5

6

Score

/

Next exercise

Check 5, p. 334

three hundred and thirty-one

4

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

331


5

Watch the fragment in which a man makes a mojito in a completely crazy way. a Complete the ingredients. Ingredients – A few fresh

leaves

– 1.5 ounce light

– Three teaspoons of brown sugar

– Soda water

– Ice

juice

– 1 teaspoon sugar syrup b Write 2 sentences for each step: one sentence about what NOT to do and one about what you have to do instead. e.g. Don’t cut the lime randomly. – Cut the lime carefully.

Mix it all together. Add soda water. Ready! Score

/

Next exercise

Check 5, p. 334

three hundred and thirty-two

332

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

listening


Watch the fragment ‘How to make Thai Curry with Chicken’. Add the ingredients you need. Then complete the recipe. Don’t forget to use the imperative correctly.

listening

Ingredients – 500 g of

breast

– 1 fresh

– 1 tablespoon of red curry paste or a bit

, thumb-sized

less

– 1 tablespoon of soy sauce

– 1 tablespoon of peanut butter

– 2 tablespoons of vegetable

– 400 ml of coconut

– 2 red

cut into thin strips

,

unsweetened and creamy

– 3 spring

cut into thin strips – 1 small pot of shredded bamboo shoots,

– 10 baby

cut lengthwise

well drained

– 1 teaspoon of lemon grass, as a paste or fi nely chopped

– 1 teaspoon of palm sugar or brown sugar – 1 tablespoon of fi sh sauce

– 1 tablespoon of fresh Thai basil

– 500 g of rice (jasmine rice)

Thai Curry with Chicken 1 Cut the

into thin strips.

2 Peel and fi nely

the ginger.

3

the meat with 1 tablespoon of oil, soy sauce and ginger.

4

for about 30

5

and clean the

. , spring onions,

and lemon grass. 6 Heat some

in a large pan.

7

the meat in a pan and put aside.

8 Fry the curry paste. 9 Stir in the

, letting it melt.

10

in the coconut milk.

11

the vegetables.

12 Leave the vegetables to

for about 15 minutes.

13 Add the meat. 14 Season to taste with palm sugar,

and lemongrass paste.

15 Cook the rice. 16 Serve over

.

Source: www.pinchofyum.com

Score

/

Next exercise

Check 5, p. 334

three hundred and thirty-three

6

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

333


Check 5 1

Using adjectives and adverbs READING

Read the text and answer the questions. a What does Mrs Twit do? Why?

b Why couldn’t Mr Twit see what was in his spaghetti?

c How does Mrs Twit react at the end?

The previous night Mr Twit had put a frog in Mrs Twit’s bed. She decided to take her revenge …

sss The Wormy Spaghetti The next day, to pay Mr Twit back for the frog trick, Mrs Twit sneaked out into the garden and dug up some worms. She chose big long ones and put them in a tin and carried the tin back to the house under her apron. At one o’clock, she cooked spaghetti for lunch and she mixed the worms in with the spaghetti, but only on her husband’s plate. The worms didn’t show because everything was covered with tomato sauce and sprinkled with cheese. ‘Hey, my spaghetti’s moving!’ cried Mr Twit, poking around in it with his fork. ‘It’s a new kind,’ Mrs Twit said, taking a mouthful from her own plate, which of course had no worms. ‘It’s called Squiggly Spaghetti. It’s delicious. Eat it up while it’s nice and hot.’ Mr Twit started eating, twisting the long tomato-covered strings around his fork and shovelling them into his mouth. Soon there was tomato sauce all over his hairy chin. ‘It’s not as good as the ordinary kind,’ he said, talking with his mouth full. ‘It’s too squishy.’ ‘I find it very tasty,’ Mrs Twit said. She was watching him from the other end of the table. It gave her great pleasure to watch him eating worms. ‘I find it rather bitter,’ Mr Twit said. ‘It’s got a distinctly bitter flavour. Buy the other kind next time.’ Mrs Twit waited until Mr Twit had eaten the whole plateful. Then she said, ‘You want to know why your spaghetti was squishy?’ Mr Twit wiped the tomato sauce from his beard with a corner of the tablecloth. ‘Why?’ he said. ‘And why it had a nasty bitter taste?’ ‘Why?’ he said. ‘Because they were worms!’ cried Mrs Twit, clapping her hands and stamping her feet on the floor and rocking with horrible laughter. three hundred and thirty-four

334

Source: The Twits, Roald Dahl

Score

UNIT 6:

/3

A FOODIE GENERATION


d Which words describe the following? 1 the worms:



2 the night



3 the spaghetti:



4 the flavour:



5 Mrs Twit’s laughter:



Score

   / 5

Score

<5

Next exercise

ex. 2

WRITING

Describe Mr Twit’s reaction to the news about the wormy spaghetti. a Preparation: check the list with adjectives you can use (as an adjective or as an adverb). big – calm – clean – horrible – mean – quiet – small – ugly b Action: write your text (about 40 words).       c Reflection: check your text by filling in the checklist. Checklist: using adjectives

Yes

I think so

No

1 Content • I wrote about 40 words. • I described Mr Twit’s reaction. 2 Language • I used at least 5 adjectives and/or adverbs correctly. • I used linking words to structure the text. • I used correct spelling and punctuation. Feedback

d Give your text to the teacher who will give you some feedback. Score

<6

6-8

>8

Next exercise

ex. 3

ex. 5

ex. 6

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

three hundred and thirty-five

2

≥5

335


3

Underline the adjective or adverb in the sentence and draw an arrow to its corresponding noun, adjective or verb. 1 Ripe cranberries will bounce like rubber balls. 2 An average ear of corn has an even number of rows, usually 16. 3 The most expensive pizza in the world costs $12,000 and takes 72 hours to make. 4 If improperly prepared, fugu, or puffer fish, can kill you since it contains a toxin. 5 McDonald’s easily sells 75 hamburgers every second of every day. 6 Most humans crave sugar desperately . 7 Oklahoma’s state vegetable is the juicy watermelon. 8 One of the most popular pizza toppings in Brazil is green peas. 9 Store bought 100% ‘real’ orange juice is 100% artificially flavored. 10 The most expensive fruit in the world is the Japanese Yubari cantaloupe, and two melons once sold at auction for $23,500. Source: www.buzzfeed.com

Score

<9

Next exercise 4

9 - 12

> 12

ex. 5

ex. 4

Complete the definitions of the fruit, using the appropriate adjectives or adverbs from below. 1

careful – fine – juicy – stiff – tropical – yellow Pineapple: A large        ,         fruit consisting of aromatic edible         flesh surrounded by a tough segmented skin and topped with a tuft of         leaves. Cut off the top and bottom of the pineapple using a sharp knife. Stand the fruit upright and cut off the skin        , following the curve of the fruit. Quarter the peeled pineapple lengthwise. Stand each quarter upright and cut away the center core. Slice the quarter         into thin wedges. Source: www.foodnetwork.com

2

crisp – gentle – green – red – rose – round – vertical Apple: The         fruit of a tree of the         family, which typically has thin         or         skin and         flesh.         turn the fruit upside down and

three hundred and thirty-six

make the first incision a few centimeters away from the core. Then

336

continue to cut         into the apple until you have a grid. Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION


3

curved – fi rm – immediate – pulpy – yellow Banana: A long

fruit which grows in clusters and has soft fl esh and

skin when ripe. Find the end of

the banana opposite from the stem. Take your thumb and nail and press it into the black part of the top. Once you’ve got the top part off, start

to peel it back towards the stem.

Source: www.instructables.com

< 12

≥ 12

Next exercise

ex. 5

ex. 7

Fill in the correct adjective or adverb.

Chef John’s Quiche Lorraine ‘In my opinion, a

(1 proper) quiche should be

and

(2 rich), custardy,

(3 luxurious), not some kind of dense, baked omelet. This has only enough

eggs and yolks to hold things together, but that means you need to let it cool to just warm before serving, to

1 2

(4 full) enjoy the experience.’

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Roll pie dough to fi t a 9 inch pie plate. Place bottom crust in pie plate. Line the chilled pie crust with foil and fi ll halfway up with dried beans, rice, or baking weights. Bake (5 partial) in the preheated oven for 7 minutes. Remove foil and weights.

3 4

Reduce oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Cook bacon in a skillet over

(6 medium) heat until they are

(7 brown). Remove from pan to drain. Blot out some of the oil from the skillet, leaving 1 to 2 teaspoons. Add leeks, onion, salt, black pepper, and cayenne pepper. Cook and stir

(8 thorough) until tender and browned, 5 to 7 minutes.

Set aside.

5

Whisk eggs, egg yolks, cream, and milk together in a Add thyme and stir

6

(9 large) bowl.

(10 careful) to combine.

Sprinkle 1/3 onion-leek mixture on the bottom of the baked crust. Top with 1/3 cooked bacon and 1/3 Gruyere cheese. Ladle in half the egg mixture. Sprinkle with 1/3 the onionleek mixture, 1/3 bacon, and 1/3 cheese.

(11 careful) pour in remaining egg

mixture and top with remaining onion-leek mixture, bacon, and cheese.

7

Bake the fi lled quiche in the preheated oven until browned and set, but no longer jiggly in the center, 40 to 45 minutes. Allow to cool

(12 slight) before serving.

Source: www.allrecipes.com

Score

/

Next exercise

All done!

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

three hundred and thirty-seven

5

Score

337


6

Read the poem and answer the questions. If you don’t understand a word, and this means you don’t understand the entire sentence, use a(n) online dictionary as explained in the strategy in the Summary of Unit 2, p. 96.

1

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45 three hundred and thirty-eight

338

‘Sarah Cynthia Silvia Stout Would Not Take the Garbage Out’ from Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein. © 1974, renewed 2002 Evil Eye, LLC. By permission of Edite Kroll Literary Agency Inc.

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

READING


a What is Sarah Cynthia Silvia Stout’s problem?  b What happens when Sarah Cynthia Silvia Stout doesn’t throw the garbage out?  c What kind of person do you think Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout is? Describe her in 2 sentences using appropriate adjectives.   d Which adjectives create an unpleasant image about the food? Find 6 examples. 1 

4 

2 

5 

3 

6 

e Explain the meaning of the following words. Remember that you can use a(n) online dictionary, if necessary, but first use the strategy ‘how to deal with difficult words in a text’ (see Unit 1, p. 43). 1 Scour (line 3):  2 Withered (line 17):  3 Soggy (line 18):  4 Gristly (line 20):  5 Globs (line 24):  6 Cellophane (line 25):  7 Blubbery (line 26):  8 Caked (line 27):  9 Curdled (line 28):  10 Rancid (line 31):  SPOKEN INTERACTION

f Find a partner and make a dialogue between Sarah and her father about her chore. Use a separate piece of paper to write down your preparation. Act it out! Checklist: a dialogue

Yes

I think so

No

1 Content • I used the information from the poem. • I had a good (and funny?) conversation with my partner. 2 Language • I used adjectives and adverbs. • I pronounced all the words correctly.

Score

/

Next exercise

All done!

three hundred and thirty-nine

Feedback

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

339


7

In her graphic novel Relish Lucy writes in one panel ‘I hope you remember a time you tasted something that would shape you for years to come.’ a Preparation: what food do you associate with an event or person from your past? Think about good memories. b Action: write a paragraph (about 50 words) in which you describe the food, what it tasted like, the person or event, and the good (or bad!) things you associate with this. Use at least 5 adjectives or adverbs in your text.           c Reflection: check your text by filling in the checklist. Checklist: food memories 1 Content • I wrote about 50 words. • I described the event/person and the food that makes me think of this in a clear way. 2 Language • I used adjectives and adverbs correctly. • I used the correct words in my text. • I used the correct tenses in my text (past tense for past experiences). • I used correct spelling and punctuation. Feedback

Score

/

Next exercise

All done!

three hundred and forty

340

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

Yes I think so

No

WRITING


CHECK OUT: A FOOD QUIZ Orientation You will fi ll in a(n online) questionnaire to fi nd out what type of foodie you are. You will compare the profi le you get with how you really are. Before you start, make sure to read through the checklists in the refl ection.

Preparation 1

WRITING

Do you still remember whether you are a breakfast, lunch or dinner person (see Check In, p. 276). Did/do you agree with that? Do you know what kind of eater you are? Prepare a short paragraph (3 sentences or about 30 words) about what you generally eat/drink.

Action Go online and fill in the food quiz.

READING

a Read the profi le you get.

WRITING b Do you agree with this? – Use the information from your preparation to compare what type of eater you are with the profi le you got when you fi lled in the quiz. – Make sure you use at least 5 comparisons (comparative or superlative) in your text. – Write about 50 words.

three hundred and forty-one

2

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

341


c Finally, write down the recipe of one of the recommended dishes in your profi le. Write down the ingredients you need and the instructions on how to make it.

Reflection 3

Reflect on your work by filling the checklist after each step of the Check Out. Checklist: food quiz

Yes

I think so

No

Yes

I think so

No

Yes

I think so

No

1 Content • I understood all the questions. • I understood the profi le I got. 2 Language • I used the strategy ‘how to use a dictionary’ if necessary. Feedback

Checklist: comparing profiles 1 Content • I wrote about 50 words. • I compared my own preparation with the profi le I got. 2 Language • I used the comparative and superlative correctly. • I used the correct words to describe what type of food I like. • I used correct spelling and punctuation. Feedback

Checklist: writing a recipe 1 Content • I listed all the ingredients. • My instructions are clear. • My recipe has a good structure. 2 Language • I used the imperative correctly. • I used linking words to structure the instructions. • I used the correct words for my recipe. • I used correct spelling and punctuation. three hundred and forty-two

Feedback

342

Trace your steps on diddit.

UNIT 6:

A FOODIE GENERATION

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Trackntrace 3 voorbeeldhoofdstuk