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Texas Water Utilities

JOURNAL

VOLUME 23

SEPTEMBER 2013

"Proudly Serving Education Excellence since 1918"

NUMBER 9


2014 TWUA REGIONAL SCHOOL SCHEDULE 2014 TWUA REGIONAL SCHOOL SCHEDULE:

DATE

EVENT

PRIMARY CONTACT

EXHIBITS CONTACT

Mar. 2-5

TWUA Annual School

David Moore (512) 459-3124

Norma Clark, (432)528-1608

Feb. 4-6

Far West Texas Regional School Pecos County Civic Center Ft. Stockton, Texas

Norma Clark (432) 528-1608

Tom Ezell, (432) 553-1196

Mar. 31-Apr. 3

Panhandle Regional School Amarillo Civic Center Amarillo, Texas

Jessie Flores (806) 378-3019

Ruben Arias (806)378-3019

Apr. 29- May 1

Southeast Regional School Holiday Inn Centre Beaumont, Texas

Bobby Rogers (409)385-7355

Rob Starr, (409) 755-1559

May 6-8

Central West Texas Regional School Abilene Civic Center Abilene, Texas

Charlotte McElwain (325)226-3085

Mickey Chaney (325) 548-2237

May 13-15

North Central Texas Regional School Univ. of Texas Arlington Arlington, Texas

Selena Jackson (972) 237-8377

Jon Mahoney (972)721-2261

June 9-12

Central Texas Regional School Killeen Civic Center Killeen, Texas

Teresa Bryant (254) 750-8007

Peggy Smith, (830) 598-2424 x 309

July 14-16

Southwest Texas Regional School Holy Family Catholic Church Victoria, Texas

Donald Reese (361)485-3414

Lynn Short, (361) 485-3381

August 12-14

Permian Basin Regional School MCM Grande Hotel Odessa, Texas

Norma Clark (432) 528-1608

Norma Clark, (432) 528-1608

August 26-28

East Texas Regional School Harvey Hall & R.T.D.C. Tyler, Texas

Mike Norris (903) 939-8278

Mike Norris (903) 939-8278

November 4-6

West Texas Regional School Lubbock Civic Center Lubbock, Texas

Neil Weems (806) 775-2880

Neil Weems (806) 775-2880

Please contact the person listed above for additional information about your regional school or call TWUA Central Office at (888)367-8982. Please visit our website at www.twua.org to register for one of these schools. Thank you for your support.


TEXAS WATER UTILITIES ASSOCIATION 65th WEST TEXAS REGIONAL SCHOOL LUBBOCK MEMORIAL CIVIC CENTER 1501 6TH STREET NOVEMBER 5 - NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Academic Offerings WASTEWATER Basic Wastewater Wastewater Treatment Wastewater Collection

WATER

Basic Water Water Distribution Ground Water Production *Surface Water I Water Laboratory

*24 hour course will begin on Monday November 4th from 1:00 to 5:00 Must be Pre-registered for this class

WATER/WASTEWATER Water Utilities Safety Water Utilities Management Water Utilities Calculations Valve and Hydrant Maintenance

Course schedule Tuesday 8:30 to12:00 and 1:00 to 5:30 Wednesday 8:00 to 12:00 and 1:00 to 5:00 Thursday 8:00 to 12:00 Buffet Lunch Tue, Wed, Thu, 12:00 to 1:00

Registration and Fees Pre-Registration Until November 1st, 2013 Mail Pre-Registration (Cash or Check Only) Internet Pre-Registration (Credit Card Only) On-Site Registration (No Credit Cards Accepted) (Check, Money Order, or Cash)

TWUA Member Price $ 205 $ 205 $ 220 with Proof of TWUA Membership

Non-Member Price $ 260 $ 260 $ 270

Pre-registration via Mail or Internet (preferred) www.TWUA.org with Master Card or Visa. All students are provided study manuals, necessary class room supplies, a quality buffet lunch daily If testing, make arrangements with a TCEQ representative and have a SEPARATE CHECK made out to TCEQ.

Hotel Information Holiday Inn Civic Center (Host Hotel), 801 Ave Q, Lubbock, TX 79401. (806) 763-1200 Group rate $74.00. (Use Group code WRS) Reservation cut off date is October 28, 2013. (To reserve your room online http://www.ihg.com/holidayinn/hotels/us/en/lubbock/lbbcc/hoteldetail?groupCode=WRS) La Quinta Inn, Inc., 601 Ave Q, Lubbock, TX 79401. (800) 531-5900

✄ Pre-Registration Form 65th WTRWUS School

Name: ___________________________________________ SS# or TCEQ Operator License#____________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip: _______________________________________________Home Phone:________________________________ Work Phone:_______________________________ Course Selection: _______________________________________________ Representing (Organization): _____________________________________Job Title:___________________________________ TWUA District/chapter: ____________________________________________________________________________________ Email Address:____________________________________________________________________________________________ Make checks payable to WTRWUS. No purchase orders accepted. No refunds after October 25, 2013. Please mail Pre-Registration Form and payment to: Attn: Secretary / Treasurer, P.O. Box 5068, Lubbock TX 79408 If you have any questions, please call Candy McCarthy at (806) 775-3221 or Fax (806) 775-3246


In This Issue ARTICLES S TRAINING LISTINGS S EMPLOYMENT

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL, 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 W., Austin, TX 78723-1093. TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL is not responsible for facts and/or opinions expressed by contributors or in advertisements herein. Editorials and comments do not necessarily represent the official policy of the Texas Water Utilities Association. All inquiries should be directed to: Texas Water Utilities Association, 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 W, Austin, TX 78723-1093, phone 512/459-3124. Any material accepted for publication is subject to revision and editing at the discretion of the publisher. All advertising in the TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL is subject to approval of the publisher. Learn more about T.W.U.A. at our Web site: www.twua.org

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL (ISSN 1051-709X) is published monthly by the Texas Water Utilities Association, located at 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 West, Austin, Texas 78723-1093, for engineers, operators, managers, laboratory technicians, customer service personnel, and other professionals employed in, or interested in, the water and/or wastewater industry. Five dollars of each annual membership dues payment to the Texas Water Utilities Association pays for a subscription. Non-Member subscription price: USA $50 per year; $4.20 per single copy; $60 per year outside USA. Periodicals Postage Paid at Austin, TX. The Texas Water Utilities Association is wholly independent, and is not affiliated with the American Water Works Association, the Water Environment Federation, or any other National organization.

ARTICLES: President's Perspective..................................................................6 by Roger Fussell, TWUA President TWUA Executive Director News......................................................8 by Russell Hamilton, Executive Director PES News: Biological Treatment of Wastewater ...........................................10 By Alphonse Newton, Pretreatment Supervisor, City of Fort Worth Safety News: Electrical Safety............................................................................12 by Robblyn Gentry, Texas Tech University Health Science Center Customer Service News: The Customer Service Training Success Equation.......................16 by Teresa Allen, Customer Service Specialist Texas 811 News: There's No "One Call" System in Texas........................................18 by Doug Meeks, Texas 811 Damage Prevention Manager TWDB News: Lubbock and Texoma Success Story...........................................20 by Texas Water Development Board Nation of Change News: New Study Finds High Levels of Arsenic in Groundwater...........22 by Theodoric Meyer, Nation of Change Turbidity News:

Accurate Calibration Gives Meaning to Low Turbidity Measurement..24

by Mike Sadar, Principal Scientist, Hach Company

ADVERTISERS: Classified Ads.......................................................................................30 Ana-Lab...............................................................................................26 Chlor-Serv, Inc.....................................................................................26 Global Treat.........................................................................................11 Hartwell Environmental Corporation........................................................7 Jim Cox Sales........................................................................................9 Magna Flow Environmental.....................................................................5 Professional Cards................................................................................26 Samco Leak Detection..........................................................................16 Scoop .................................................................................................17 Smith Pump Company, Inc...........................................Inside Back Cover

TRAINING: .TWUA

Training Schedule..................................................................................14 Annual School Customer Service Information...........................................17 .TWUA 65th West Texas Regional School Information.............................................3 Texas AWWA Drinking Water Seminar................................................................18 WEAT The Saga Continues Conference & Expo...................................................27 .TWUA

Front Cover Photo: City of Mansfield Texas Tower Courtesy of: Barbara Crumby 4 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

SEPTEMBER 2013


SEPTEMBER 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


President's Message Roger Fussell, Executive Director Lumberton MUD

Be Successful! I would like to begin by saying thank you to the Southwest Regional School and the Permian Basin Regional School for their support and hospitality extended to me during my recent visits. Both events were well attended and provided a great training opportunity for all who attended. As we continue our discussion on the word Professional, I would like to consider the second “S” this month. I believe the second “S” stands for Successful. Water utility professionals possess many positive qualities. After receiving training and passing exams, one could say “I am successful.” The dictionary defines successful as “having obtained something desired.” In 1989, author Stephen Covey published a book titled The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. This very successful book has sold more than 25 million copies in 38 languages. As “highly effective” water utility professionals, I encourage you to pursue “habits” for success to promote independence and continuous improvement. Successful water utility professionals are proud to be of service to the public and will continue to promote themselves and their careers. Legendary NFL coach Vince Lombardi once said, “The difference between successful people and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack of will.” Today’s water utility professionals possess the skills to do their jobs. We continually learn through hands-on experiences and by attending classes and trainings. In our hurry-up world of “getting things done,” we often forget to acknowledge our successes. Let’s make certain to take the time to recognize our personal successes and the successes of our colleagues. Do you know a water utility professional who you consider successful? Take the time to acknowledge that person. Abraham Lincoln said, “I’m a success today because I had a friend who believed in me and I did not have the heart to let him down”. As I travel around the great state of Texas this year, I have had the great fortune to visit with many dedicated and successful water utility professionals. So many individuals have portrayed outstanding dedication to their jobs, co-workers and the public. I have seen many individuals recognized by their local organizations and receive numerous awards. When others believe in us, it is easy to believe in ourselves. Are you a successful water utility professional? Believe in yourself, continue to grow and learn, and take the time to recognize your successes and the successes of others. S

Roger Fussell TWUA President

6 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

SEPTEMBER 2013


TWUA PERMIAN BASIN SCHOOL NEWS: By Norma Clark, Regional Officer

The 30th Annual Permian Basin Regional School was held August 5-8, 2013 at the MCM Grande Hotel and the University of Texas/Permian Basin in Odessa. The school was attended by 175 students and 28 exhibitors. Thanks to the excellent instructors who helped to make the school a success – James Lively, Mark Routon, David Moore, Emmett Autrey, Cande Hurn, Tim Crosswhite, Gary Sober, Wendell Preas, Teresa Bryant, and Charles Walton, and also to Debbie McReynolds and Roy Staggs for coordinating the Special Topics Course. The dates for next year’s school will be August 11-14, 2014 at the MCM Grande Hotel in Odessa. If you are in the West Texas area and need training, the Far West Texas Regional School will be held February 4-6, 2014 at the Pecos County Civic Center in Fort Stockton. S

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SEPTEMBER 2013

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR NEWS Russell Hamilton, TWUA Executive Director

I Hope this finds everyone doing well. Don’t know about you but I have had enough of hot and dry. The Austin area has lucked out and received a little rain this summer but just for perspective - as we speak, Lake Travis is sitting at 32% capacity and Buchanan is setting at 38% capacity. In West Texas, Lake Spence is sitting at 6% capacity and in the Panhandle Lake Meredith is at 0% capacity. Data indicates that 80% of Texas is currently experiencing severe drought conditions. I Read an article recently where some climatologists believe that Texas may still be in the front end of this drought cycle. Scary thought. I ask you to join me and continue to pray for a statewide significant rainfall event and to make us better stewards of this precious resource. I want to thank those who have participated in the TWUA Webinar events. We continue to work on the process and refine our procedure. We appreciate the feedback and we will be looking at topics that will extend the webinars. If you have not taken advantage of webinars as a source for continuing education, I encourage you to take a look at the TWUA training calendar and access one of our future events. We have not officially been approved for 20-hour core classes but we anticipate receiving the approval letter very soon. The core classes that we are looking to provide electronically are Basic Water, Basic Wastewater, Collections, Distribution, Safety, and Management. At some point we will add Cross Connection Control/ Customer Service Inspection, Wastewater Treatment, Ground Water Production, and we will be reviewing Pre-treatment and Activated Sludge to determine if it is feasible to offer these courses electronically. I also want to take this opportunity to reiterate that electronic training will NOT be easier than classroom training and that concept is not what the TWUA distant learning process is being developed around. Being able to skip through written text and challenge an exam, in our opinion, is not effective training. The association’s electronic training will have more requirements for comprehension and participation as well as an exit exam. This exit exam is open book (so to speak) and will not be significantly different from the chapter reviews but it will require at least a 70 in order to successfully complete an on-line course. At the same time, it is not our intent to scare anyone away from distant learning. The electronic environment will mimic the traditional classroom environment as much as possible. The event will start as a “live” event. There will be an instructor very much like a traditional

8 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

classroom environment and you will be able to ask question and get additional information through the chat room. You will be able to see the instructor and his/her PowerPoint presentation. There will be attendance verifications through voice biometrics and polling questions. There will be comprehension verifications through polling questions that will electronically appear on your computer screen. Without revealing all the capabilities of our distant learning process, allow me to say there are other monitoring functions built into the program to monitor attendance, comprehension, and participation. What I am attempting to convey, is if you want to learn and technology does not intimidate you, electronic training will not be more of a challenge than traditional classroom training. If you can Facebook and surf the internet, you can participate in our process. One major benefit of computer based training is that you will be able to receive approved operator training without the expenses associated with travel, hotel, and food. For those who have put off training or had conflicts that prohibited you from attending any of the TWUA training events this year, the West Texas Regional School (Lubbock) is scheduled for November 5th – 7th and will be the final TWUA regional training event for 2013. The West Texas board would like to extend an invitation to come to Lubbock and be a part of this training event. It’s not too soon to mark your calendar for March 2-5, 2014 and make plans to come to Corpus Christi and be a part of the 96th Annual School. The story goes something like this An elderly grandfather was sitting on the porch late one afternoon in a swing watching the dogs chase birds and enjoying the sunshine. The old man’s grandson came up and flopped down beside him and it was obvious the boy was angry and upset. The little boy’s arms were folded, his lower lip stuck out, and he began to tell the grandfather of a friend who had hurt his feelings and broke a favorite toy seemingly on purpose and without even saying he was sorry. The little boy said, "I wish something bad would happen to the one who was once my friend." In a very slow and deliberate manner the grandfather said; (Let’s talk about that). Most of us have felt a hate at some time for those who have hurt us and seem to have no sorrow or remorse for what they do. In the moment, our first thought might be to hurt back or even cause them pain. The grandfather went on and told the young boy "Hate left unchecked will wear you down but ,interestingly enough, does not hurt, harm, or upset the one who has wronged you." SEPTEMBER 2013


The young boy looked confused so the grandfather said "Do you know what poison is?" The young boy said it was something that could make you sick or even kill. The grandfather then said "Hate is like poison and certainly you would not take poison and then hope your enemy would become ill or die." The grandfather went on to say that he too had struggled with the same or similar feelings many times. He continued, "it is as if there is a battle between two wolves inside me." One is good and does no harm. One is restrained. He lives in harmony with all around him. He does not take offense when no offense was intended. He will only fight when it is right to do so and in the right way.

me, for both try to dominate my life and personality". I tell you from my lifetime of experience, what we think about and where we allow our thoughts to dwell has a dramatic influence on our lives and our behavior. The little boy never said a word but the look in his eye indicated he was thinking about what his grandfather had said. Finally he looked into his Grandfather’s eyes and asked, "Which wolf wins?" The grandfather smiled, pulled the little boy close, gave him a big comforting hug and quietly said, "The one you feed." Story originated from a Native American Proverb.

But the other wolf - he is evil and full of anger. The smallest thing will set him off and his temper comes out quickly. He fights with everyone and really does not need a reason. He has difficulty thinking clearly because his anger and hate are so great. He has no close friends because he has turned on them all. He is never at peace.

“Carefully watch your thoughts, for they become your words. Manage and watch your words, for they will become your actions. Consider and judge your actions, for they have become your habits. Acknowledge and watch your habits, for they shall become your values. Understand and embrace your values, for they become your destiny.” – Mahatma Gandhi S

The grandfather took the little boy’s hand and said "Sometimes it is hard to live with these two wolves inside

Remember – We do not need all the operators in Texas to be a member of TWUA – JUST YOU ! ! ! !

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TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


PES NEWS:

Biological Treatment of Wastewater By Alphonse Newton, Pretreatment Environmental Supervisor, City of Fort Worth

Biological Treatment: Biological treatment of wastewater involves processes where living organisms are used to breakdown organic waste. Waste is broken down into water and gases such as methane or carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide. It can be broken down into aldehydes, and organic acids. It can be broken down into microbial matter. The microorganism utilized is already presented in the raw wastewater and is recycled in the aeration process. In some instances, microorganisms can be developed to breakdown specific compounds which are introduced into the wastewater. With the exception of nitrogen or sulfur compounds, biological treatment systems typically are unable to process inorganics. The presence of toxic compounds in the water can kill microorganisms. When toxins can kill microbes, this cause processes to function improperly. High concentrations of inorganics and low concentrations of toxins can inhibit biological decomposition activity. Chemical or physical treatment may be required prior to biological treatment process to prevent killing the organism or lowering their activity to unacceptable levels. Sewage is generated by residential, institutional, commercial and industrial establishments. It includes household waste liquid from toilets, baths, showers, kitchens, and sinks. This waste is discharged into a wastewater collection system. Household waste is separated as graywater –dilute wastestreams and black water which consist of human waste. Restaurants also separate waste as yellow grease –which does not come into contact with plumbing and brown grease - waste which comes into contact with the plumbing system.

organics under aerobic conditions. Activated sludge in its simplest form consists of an aeration tank, a clarifier and sludge recycle system. Activated sludge processes may be customized for different applications. The activated sludge system is considered an advanced treatment system. Activated sludge treatment systems have successfully treated refinery, petrochemical and other biodegradable organic wastes. Activated sludge plants have reported removal efficiencies as high as 95% for organic pollutants. Solids content must be less than one percent and organic pollutants must be biodegradable.

Stabilization Ponds: Stabilizations ponds are all natural systems. These are large shallow ponds in which wastes are permitted to decompose biologically over extended periods of time with a maximum depth of 5 feet. All of these processes occur over the minimum 45 day detention time during which the water stays in the stabilization pond. Stabilization of wastes is achieved by a combination of aerobic, aerobic-anaerobic and facultative bacteria within three treatment zones. The typical pond, with an aerobic zone near the surface and an anaerobic zone near the bottom, is a facultative pond.  The top or aerobic level contains bacteria and algae in suspension that aerobically biodegrade the wastes. The second level is a combination of an aerobic-anaerobic organism to biodegrades the waste. The third level is where anaerobic degradation occurs. Like a facultative bacteria, a facultative pond can carry out both aerobic and anaerobic processes based on the presence or absence of oxygen.  This is the most common type of stabilization pond.

Aerated Lagoons:

Sanitary sewers normally collect human, commercial and industrial waste. These systems are not designed to handle stormwater. A sewerage system that is large and expensive and is capable of handling storm water and sanitary wastewater is known as a combined sewer system.

An aerated lagoon is a large, shallow, aerated earthen structure in which wastewater is treated on a flow-through basis. These lagoons use the same biological processes as activated sludge systems; however, aerated lagoons have longer retention times to decompose organic matter and there is no sludge return.

Process overview:

Aerated lagoons are classified by the extent of mixing as aerobic or aerobic-anaerobic. Aerated lagoons are classified by the amount of mixing provided. If enough energy is provided to keep all solids in suspension, they have been termed a complete mix. If energy is provided only to provide sufficient oxygen to oxidize BOD entering the lagoon, and no attempt is made to keep solids in suspension, it is termed a partial mix lagoon. Complete mix lagoons have more in common with the activated sludge process than other lagoon technologies. The retention times are typically shorter, and performance is better than the

Municipalities may use a number of different systems to treat and handle wastewater. Below we will examine a few.

Activated Sludge: The activated sludge process biologically converts organic matter in a wastestream to carbon dioxide and simple 10 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

SEPTEMBER 2013


latter, though energy costs are higher for the complete mix systems.

Trickling Filter: The trickling filter consists of a bed of rock or synthetic media with attached bacteria. Wastewater is applied to the top of the trickling filter and passes through the media. Microbes grow on the surface of media and decompose organic matter in the wastestream. Trickling filters are classified as high-rate or low-rate filters. In most wastewater treatment systems, the trickling filter follows primary treatment and includes a secondary settling tank or clarifier. The process is a fixed film biological treatment method designed to remove BOD and suspended solids. The trickling filter consists of several major components including distribution system, media, under drains, effluent channel, secondary settling tank, and recirculation pumps and piping. Each of these components has one or more purposes.

Land Treatment: Land treatment is a process involving the interaction of waste, soil, climate and biological activity. These components breakdown and deactivate waste constituents. Different application methods are used for land treatment. In land farming, waste is applied on or into the soil and regularly tilled to facilitate biological activity. For land spreading operations, wastes are applied on top of the soil and permitted to evaporate and biodegrade. Land farming is limited to organics that are biodegradable organic waste, such as tank bottoms, municipal sludge, and grit or sand trap waste. Land farming is primarily used for oily wastes from petroleum refinery operations. For the record Land farming is not a form of pretreatment prior to discharging into the POTW.S For additional information about this article, you may contact me at: Alphonse.Newton@fortworthtexas.gov.

In operation, wastewater is distributed evenly over the surface of the trickling filter media. As the wastewater flows over the surface of the media the organisms in the slime remove the organic matter from the flow. The organisms aerobically decompose the solids producing more organisms and stable wastes, which either become part of the zoogleal slime or are discharged back into the wastewater flowing over the media. Oxygen is transferred from the air to the wastewater and slime to maintain the aerobic conditions. Periodically the slime on the media becomes too heavy, and portions will be released. This material known as sloughing is carried out of the filter with the wastewater flow and is removed in the settling tank following the filter.

Anaerobic Digestion: Anaerobic digestion is a biological process where microorganism metabolizes organic matter under anaerobic conditions. This process involves a measure of stabilization with a low volume of sludge. The end products of anaerobic digestion are the production of methane gas, carbon dioxide and a microbial cell mass. Anaerobic digestion is primarily used by municipalities for treatment of wastewater sludge. In recent years, this process has been utilized for the treatment of industrial wastewater. This process is used by breweries, sugar processors, distillers, the petrochemical industry and the dairy industry. SEPTEMBER 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


SAFETY NEWS:

Electrical Safety By Robblyn Gentry, BSOE, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Safety Service Department Electricity is an integral part of our lives both at home and in the workplace. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has reported that 346 deaths were attributed to contact with electric current, and more than half of that number was due to unsafe work practices. Learning more about electricity and using safe work practices while working around or with electrical parts can decrease chances of being injured from electricity. Electrical Principles Conductors An electrical conductor is ANY material that allows electric current to move or flow freely through it. Examples include: • •

Water can contain minerals, dirt, or other particles. Pure water is not a good conductor. Metals are the best metal conductors, including silver, copper, gold and aluminum respectively. Other metals that can also act as conductors include iron, mercury, brass, and graphite.

Insulators Insulators are the opposite of conductors. They have a very large resistance to the flow of electric current. Examples include: • Rubber • Plastic • Asphalt • Glass • Oil • Ceramic • Diamond

The higher the current and voltage the more likely it is to be lethal. However, even small shocks can be painful and cause other problems such as falling.

Shocks are most dangerous when current travels through vital organs. For instance, it is typical for current to travel across the chest from arm to arm or from arm to foot. However, if current travels through the heart muscle or the lungs it is more likely to be lethal. The longer current flows through you, the more damage it does. Effects of shock in the body A mild electrical shock can cause tingling throughout the body. If you are shocked with a higher voltage, you may be thrown back from the source, limiting the length of the shock. A severe electrical shock may knock a person unconscious; however, the current may cause your hand to contract and clench the electrical contact point tightly making the current flow longer in your body. This is dangerous even at low voltage. Since your muscles are controlled by electrical impulses, the result of the shock is that your muscles will contract very tightly. At the same time your body is resisting the electricity’s path to reach the ground (in other words providing a shortcut to the ground) which makes your tissues start to heat and ultimately cook. This may cause internal damage depending on how well you are grounded and what path the electricity is taking through your body. The effects of an electric shock on the body can range from a tingle where the body touches the circuit to immediate cardiac arrest.

Although using an insulator will increase a resistance to shock, for example, standing on a rubber mat or wearing rubber-soled shoes; this will not make you totally shockproof. Not all conductive materials have the same level of conductivity, and not all insulators are equally resistant to electrical shock.

Preventing Electrical Shock

Effects of Electrical Discharge

Report and replace any cord or plug that appears damaged, has cracked or worn insulation, or heats up when used. Electrical problems and equipment defects can lead to a fire. Make sure plugs and sockets fit firmly, so some force is required for insertion and removal. Remove cords from outlet by the plug; never pull or stretch cords. Don’t plug in too many cords into one outlet; this can overload the circuit. Remember not to carry equipment by its cord, and protect it from damage by a door closure.

When electric current flows through your body from an outside source, you receive an electric shock. The severity of the shock depends on: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Amount of voltage and current Body’s resistance Path of current Shock duration

12 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

Electricity naturally flows to the earth, or to ground, through anything that will conduct electrical current. Most electrical systems are grounded. Grounding electricity means creating a safe path for current that is confined within whatever piece of electrical equipment that is being used.

According to OSHA extension cords should not be used where permanent electrical in conduit is required. If SEPTEMBER 2013


extension cords are necessary, remember to use the right size or rating for the intended use. Never attach cords to floors, walls, or other objects with tacks or pins and avoid “daisy chaining” power strips together. Electrical Emergencies Knowing what to do during an electrical emergency can save your life or someone else’s. The first thing you can do is to turn off the source of electricity, if possible, in a safe manner. If the floor is wet or the outlet is sparking or burning, do not touch the cord or appliance. Call for a qualified person to turn off power to the circuit at the service panel. To rescue someone from receiving a continuous shock from live current, remember the following.

Never touch the victim or the source of the shock. o If power cannot be cut immediately, use a wooden broom handle or chair to free the victim.

Never use your bare hands to free a victim who is frozen by electric shock. o If in immediate danger, move yourself and the victim away from source if possible and call for medical help.

First Aid for Electrical Shock While waiting for help to arrive, tend to the victim by checking for a regular pulse and regular breathing. If the victim is not breathing, start CPR or chest compression if you have been trained to do so. If there is a burn, take off

burned clothing that has not adhered to the skin. Remove any jewelry around the burned area such as a ring or watch before swelling begins. Remove wire rim glasses, or anything that can become a conductor. Do not cover the victim with anything that is heavy or has loose fibers, such as a towel or blanket. If the person has suffered a mild shock, check skin tone for slight or obvious discoloration around the affected area. If the victim is feeling faint, have them lie with their head slightly lower than their trunk and elevate their legs. Summary Electrical power can change from a beneficial workhorse to a lethal force in a flash. But because it’s such a tremendous force, we need to be very cautious handling any type of electrical devices. Always use good judgment and common sense when working around electricity. Know the difference between conductive and insulation materials. Also, make sure you are familiar with the safety procedures for your job. Good work habits soon become second nature. Don’t take chances with electricity—one mistake can cost you your life! Robbie is the Multimedia Instructional Designer for the Department of Safety Services at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) in Lubbock. She has a BS degree in Occupational Education with her major studies in Management from Wayland Baptist University. She is an active member of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) and currently involved in the Have an Exit Strategy (HAES) program at TTUHSC.S

“Electrical Safety”

By Robblyn Gentry, BSOE, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Safety Services Department

*What's wrong in this picture? Fortunately the fire extinguisher is mounted and inspected as it may be needed to put out the fire stated by the adjacent electrical hazard.

Current level (Milliamperes) 1 mA 5mA 6mA - 16mA 17mA - 99mA 100mA - 2000mA > 2,000mA

Probable Effect on Human Body Perception level. Slight tingling sensation. Still dangerous under certain conditions. Slight shock felt; not painful but disturbing. Average individual can let go. However, strong involuntary reactions to shocks in this range may lead to injuries. Painful shock, begin to lose muscular control. Commonly referred to as the freezing current or "let-go" range. Extreme pain, respiratory arrest, severe muscular contractions. Individual cannot let go. Death is possible. Ventricular fibrillation (uneven, uncoordinated pumping of the heart.) Muscular contraction and nerve damage begins to occur. Death is likely. Cardiac arrest, internal organ damage, and severe burns. Death is probable.

Note: 15,000 mA (15 amps) is the lowest overcurrent at which a typical fuse or circuit breaker will open a circuit. Table reference: https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/construction/electrical_incidents/eleccurrent.html SEPTEMBER 2013

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TWUA TRAIN To register for any TWUA classes – simply complete the registration form and fax to (512)459-7124 or contact TWUA @ 888-367-8982 for additional details. *NOTICE: Due To Recent Increases For Training Materials - Class Costs Have Increased. ***Pre-Registration Is Defined To Mean 14 Days Prior To Any Scheduled Event. All registrations received after the pre-registration cutoff date must pay on-site registration fee. We strongly encourage everyone to please pre-register by fax, e-mail, or calling. On-site registrations are welcome but not preferred. Date

Location

Course

Address/Hours

Credit

Basic Water Laredo San Marcos

TCEQ 0092 Basic Water Basic Water

20 Hours 5512 Thomas Ave. 170 Charles Austin Dr.

Water

Ground Water Prod

TCEQ 0223

20 Hours

Water

Distribution

TCEQ 0605

20 Hours

Water

Surface Water Production I

TCEQ 0942

24 Hours

Water

Sept 17-19 Sept 24-26

Surface Water Production II Gatesville Harlingen

TCEQ 0954 Surface Water Prod II Surface Water Prod II

20 Hours 106 S 23rd 114 North L Street

Water

Oct 22-24

Water Lab Bridge City

TCEQ 0285 Water Lab

20 Hours 220 Nitche Street

Water

Basic Wastewater

TCEQ 0059

20 Hours

Wastewater

Sept 10-12

Wastewater Treatment Gatesville

TCEQ 0437 Wastewater Treatment

20 Hours 106 S 23rd

Wastewater

Sept 17-19 Nov 4-6

Wastewater Collection San Marcos Corpus

TCEQ 0080 Wastewater Collection Wastewater Collection

20 Hours 170 Charles Austin Dr. 2726 Holly

Wastewater

Wastewater Lab

TCEQ 0081

20 Hours

Wastewater

Oct 21-23

Activated Sludge Corpus

TCEQ 0009 Activated Sludge

20 Hours 2726 Holly

Wastewater

Sept 23-25 Oct 14-16 Nov 19-21

Utilities Management Corpus El Paso Gatesville

TCEQ 0550 Management Management Management

20 Hours 2726 Holly 10751 Montana 106 S 23rd

Water/Wastewater

Sept 17-19

Pump and Pumping Victoria

TCEQ 0430 Pump and Pumping

24 Hours 2902 Bluff

Water/Wastewater

Utilities Safety Richardson

TCEQ 0426 Utilities Safety

20 Hours 1260 Columbia Drive

Water/Wastewater

Sept 24-26 Nov 19-21

Valve & Hydrant Victoria Utilities Calculations Terrell Victoria

TCEQ 0961 Valve & Hydrant TCEQ 0108 Calculations Calculations

20 Hours 2902 Bluff 20 Hours 400 Industrial 2902 Bluff

Water/Wastewater Water/Wastewater Water/Wastewater

Oct 8-10

Chlorinator Maintenance Gatesville

TCEQ 0124 20 Hours Chlorinator Maintenance 106 S 23rd

Sept 11-13 Oct 29-31

Oct 15-17

Sept 22-27

Water/Wastewater

Customer Service InspectionI/ Cross Connection Control TCEQ 0173,0043

20 Hours

W/WW/CSI/BPAT

BPAT Refresher

TCEQ 1194,1195,1201

24 Hours

W/WW/CSI/BPAT

BPAT 40 Hr Carrollton

TCEQ 1200 BPAT Initial

40 Hours Nimitz

BPAT

14 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

SEPTEMBER 2013


NING SCHEDULE 20 HOUR CLASSES : (PRE-REGISTRATION) $200 MEMBER $250 NON-MEMBER (ON-SITE ) $250 MEMBER $300 NON-MEMBER 24 HOUR CLASSES: (PRE-REGISTRATION) $260 MEMBER $310 NON-MEMBER (ON-SITE) $310 MEMBER $360 NON-MEMBER You can register on-line at http://www.twua.org/training.php for your next training class.

OCCUPATIONAL LICENSING CUSTOMERS: Beginning March 1, 2011, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) will accept a credit card or electronic check transfer for payments for all new occupational license and registration applications. As a result, any person applying for a new Occupational License or registration will be able to pay their application fee online using the TCEQ’s ePay system.  Note: All online renewals will continue to be processed through Texas.gov. The ePay system allows companies, cities, municipalities, and organizations to pay up to 20 employees at one time using this system. At the time of the exam a printed receipt will be required. The receipt is considered to be a copy of the email verifying your payment or a copy of the web page showing the Trace Number and Voucher Number(s). For additional information and instructions on how to use the ePay system, please visit http://www.tceq.texas.gov/licensing/exams/registration. If you have questions please contact the Occupational Licensing Section at 512-239-6133 or email us at licenses@tceq.texas.gov. Russell Gardner, Manager Occupational Licensing Section. (24 hours) *(24 Students Max)

Pre-registration $260 Member, $310 Non-Member On-site Registration $310 Member, $360 Non-Member 8 hr Mod I: TCEQ Training credit for: 8 hrs BPAT, CSI, LI, W/WW & WTS Licenses 8 hr Mod II: TCEQ Training credit for: 8 hrs BPAT, CSI, LI, W/WW & WTS Licenses 8 hr BPAT PRACTICAL SKILLS REFRESHER: TCEQ Training credit for: 8 hrs BPAT ONLY License

TWUA COURSE REGISTRATION FORM

(Note: Please Print Legibly)

Name:_______________________________ E-Mail Address:_____________________________________ Course Name: ___________________________________ Date:__________________________________ Location:___________________________________________ Fee: ________________________________ Home Address:_________________________________ City:_____________State:_____ Zip:___________ Day Time Phone #:______________________ SS# or W/WW License number#:______________________ Company Name:__________________________________TWUA Member/Non-Member_________________ Visa/MC Acct. #:___________________________________________Expire Date: _____________________ Cardholder: __________________________________________________________________________

For credit cards please fax this form to 512/459-7124 Checks or money orders mail completed registration form along with payment to: Texas Water Utilities Association · 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 West Austin, TX 78723-1093, Phone: 512/459-3124 or 888/367-8982, FAX: 512/459-7124, Register on-line at www.twua.org To obtain TCEQ License Number: http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/nav/data/licensed_data.html SEPTEMBER 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


CUSTOMER SERVICE NEWS:

The Customer Service Training Success Equation By Teresa Allen, Customer Service Specialist When you invest in customer service training, you naturally want results. The sad truth is that many times there are no lasting results from business training programs. Sometimes this can be the fault of a poor instructor or materials, but more often it is a result of how training fits into a bigger business picture. This picture is painted with a few training success equations. Let’s look at a few of these. First, here are the three main parameters to be included: Training, Measurement, & Reward T= Training M= Measurement R= Reward T X M = Short Term Results If we train and measure the results; we are assured of at least short term results. How you train, and how you measure are of course important components. Training in today’s world, especially in the customer service realm, should be highly interactive and situation specific. If you have employees who interact with the public or even with other B2B clients, do not make the mistake of putting them in front of a screen to take a computer based course and think that you will have great results. A huge part of their success lies in the intricacies of human interaction, and that cannot be trained with a visual only. It requires a ‘full body’ experience and face to face skills practice.

The last equation to consider is an important one: Reward X Perceived Opportunity to Earn = Motivation Having worked in customer service and sales for many years prior to starting my consulting business, I know firsthand the meaning of this equation. Let’s put it in other words. If I offered you a million dollars to swim from Miami to Cuba, would you get in the water? NOOOO... you would know that you’d never make it as you would either drown or be eaten by sharks on the way! In an effort to minimize expense, businesses often set the bar so high that the rewards are unattainable for most at which point the rewards cease to be a motivator. Another pitfall to avoid is a system which allows the same employees to be rewarded over and over again while other ones have not a chance of receiving anything. How many of us would even watch the Super Bowl if we knew the same two teams were going to play and whom the winner would be? In your next management meeting, have an open and frank discussion about how your success equations are stacking up for success! S

How do YOU measure results? If your training participant sits in training and knows from past experience that no one will check to see if they are implementing the skills being taught, behavioral change is not highly likely. Thus, it is important to measure AND to let trainees know how they will be measured when the training begins, so they know they have a stake in learning. By the way, if the M=Zero, then the result of this mathematical equation unfortunately, will likely be Zero! T X M X R = Long Term Results Training combined with measurement AND reward will naturally bring longer results. So why do so few businesses embrace this strategy? Many operate under the ‘I am paying you to work - that is your reward’ philosophy. In addition, firms often associate reward with cost. While costs can be incurred, there are literally thousands of ways to reward employees without spending a dime. Creativity is the must have here. Yes, financial rewards are important to, and should be considered an investment in your bottom line. Just be careful as the same dollar reward received on a consistent basis actually becomes part of what an employee considers regular compensation and then ceases to motivate.

16 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

SEPTEMBER 2013


MARK YOUR CALENDAR!!! March 2-5, 2014

96th TWUA Annual School

Corpus Christi, Texas

ATTENTION CUSTOMER SERVICE PROFESSIONALS Make plans to attend the Customer Service Section’s training at TWUA’s Annual School. Twenty hours of customer service training will include topics such as: Cross Connection CSI Distribution System and Meters Communication, Motivation and Values Working with Difficult People Guest instructors include: CeCe White, (Past TWUA President), Barry Stephens, Bill Darby and Tom Ezell (Past TWUA President). Our customers are important to all of us, so take advantage of TWUA’s Customer Service Section’s up-to-date customer service issues and skills development training. For details on TWUA’s Customer Service Section Certification, please check out our website: www.twua.or/index.php/certifications/css. Contact Roe Gawlik, CSS Chair, for more information @ rosa.gawlik@saws.org.

SEPTEMBER 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


IN THE NEWS:

There 's No "One Call" System in Texas By Doug Meeks, Texas 811 Damage Prevention Manager Texas doesn’t have a drop of water to waste, so when an excavator ruptures your pipeline after they called 811 but didn’t call you, it’s much more than a broken pipe - it’s a broken system. Many TWUA members, large and small, participate in the 811 notification system: not because they have to, but because it makes good business sense and helps to provide safe and dependable drinking water to the tap. When some facility operators participate in 811, but others do not, it’s hardly a “One Call” system and as a result, everybody suffers. As you know, Texas811 is – from top to bottom – a Damage Prevention Organization. Statewide damage prevention is the reason Texas811 was founded in 1984, and is why we exist today. We’re a non-profit, member directed corporation, and our utility operator members, and the citizens they serve benefit

12th

from Texas811’s unparalleled damage prevention services all across Texas. In support of Damage Prevention, TWUA has offered Texas811 the opportunity to address its membership in this space each month. While we could use this exciting opportunity to write our standard, “you need to join Texas811 and here’s why” column, let’s instead start a conversation about damage prevention and how we can all work together to make it happen. If it’s not through membership in Texas811, what is the most effective way you can contribute to providing safe, dependable drinking water to every person in Texas? How can Texas811 help you do so? Texas811 has been a solid supporter of TWUA for many years and will be standing with TWUA members and leadership on the organization’s 100th Anniversary and beyond. As long as we’re standing here together, let’s talk. Please contact me directly at: (512)963-0034 or e-mail me at dougmeeks@texas811.org S

Annual North Central Texas Chapter of Texas AWWA Drinking Water Seminar SAVE THE DATE & MARK YOUR CALENDARS

The North Central Texas Chapter will be presenting its 12th Annual Drinking Water Seminar at the Petroleum Club in Fort Worth on October 25, 2013. The annual one-day seminar attempts to provide an informative program on topics of interest to our industry. The topics for this year include:   

Water Supply Water Quality and Treatment Research, Legislative and Regulatory Updates. The seminar will provide attendees with more than 6 hours of Operator Certification CEUs and Engineering PDH credits. Please mark your calendars for this signature annual event of our Section. Additional information on the program will be included in future issues of The Lake. See you in Fort Worth in October!

18 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

SEPTEMBER 2013


TEXAS WATER UTILITIES ASSOCIATION connect engage educate

DISTANT LEARNING NOW TCEQ APPROVED

Visit www.twua.org for more information SEPTEMBER 2013

Contact Us: 888-367-8982 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


TWDB NEWS:

Lubbock Success Story: Lake Allen Henry By Texas Water Development Board

The City of Lubbock once relied on the Canadian River Municipal Water Authority (CRMWA) for more than 70 percent of its water supply. When supplies started to diminish, the CRMWA decreased the amount of water its members could get.  In 2007, Lubbock took action and later completed a State Water Plan-recommended project to supplement its water supply tapping into Lake Alan Henry. The size and scope of this project would be our largest ever, so we were concerned about how to finance it and to keep costs down,” reports Aubrey Spear, Lubbock’s Director of Water Resources.  Spear says the city was looking for a program that had less red tape and a way to take advantage of better interest rates. “The Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) had just introduced the Water Infrastructure Fund, which was a streamlined program that allowed us to save $15 million in interest rates,” he says.  “At that time, it was the best funding option for a community our size.” Using Lake Alan Henry entailed creating more than 60 miles of raw water lines, pumping stations, a treatment plant and 13 miles of treated water lines to transport water to Lubbock.  The city used more than $83 million in financing from TWDB. In addition to its 230,000 residents, Lubbock also serves smaller communities like Ransom Canyon, Buffalo Springs and Shallowater.  The water in the lake is also used for residential needs, small businesses, Reese Technology Center, Texas Tech University and industries related to cotton growing. Spear adds that any incoming industries are encouraged to use air-cooled rather than water-cooled systems to help conservation efforts. “Lake Alan Henry represents about 40 percent of our water supply.  Over the long term, it should help us with sustainable growth over the next 100 years,” he says. S

20 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

SEPTEMBER 2013


TWDB NEWS:

Lake Texoma Success Story By Texas Water Development Board

Lake Texoma: just 50 miles north of the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, it’s one of the three largest lakes in Texas. Federal legislation, combined with more than $21 million in financial assistance from the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB), recently enabled the Greater Texoma Utility Authority (GTUA) to acquire more water storage space in Lake Texoma. This strategy was recommended in the 2007 State Water Plan. How did this come about? Like so many things in Texas, it helps to understand the history. The federal government, through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), began building a dam in 1939, creating Lake Texoma. Although the lake was originally built for flood control, USACE added hydropower in the 1940s and water storage capabilities in the 1950s. In 1986, GTUA began developing a pump station and pipeline to serve Sherman and south Grayson County. According to GTUA General Manager Jerry Chapman, TWDB financing enabled the authority to purchase 50,000 acre-feet of additional storage capacity from the USACE in 2010. For the authority’s member cities and other water providers in the fast-expanding counties of Cooke, Fannin, Grayson and northern Collin, this capacity will help provide for future water supply by utilizing surface water and lessening dependency on groundwater. In addition to residential use, this water will help cool a new 500-megawatt power plant constructed in Sherman and will be used for other industries that need either treated or raw water. “Without the favorable interest rates TWDB offered, it would have been much more difficult for us to achieve our objectives,” Chapman says. “With this new capacity, our long-term surface water supplies are more secure.” GTUA has taken advantage of TWDB funding for several other projects over the years, securing funding on behalf of many communities for water treatment, pump station, water pipeline, wastewater treatment, and wastewater collection projects. As a result, it’s become TWDB’s largest “customer” in terms of number of loans. S

SEPTEMBER 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


NATION OF CHANGE NEWS:

New Study Finds High Levels of Arsenic in Groundwater Near Fracking Sites By Theodoric Meyer, Nation of Change What kind of previous studies had been done in this vein?

A recently published study by researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington found elevated levels of arsenic and other heavy metals in groundwater near natural gas fracking sites in Texas’ Barnett Shale. While the findings are far from conclusive, the study provides further evidence tying fracking to arsenic contamination. An internal Environmental Protection Agency PowerPoint presentation recently obtained by the Los Angeles Times warned that wells near Dimock, Pa., showed elevated levels of arsenic in the groundwater. The EPA also found arsenic in groundwater near fracking sites in Pavillion, Wyo., in 2009 — a study the agency later abandoned. ProPublica talked with Brian Fontenot, the paper’s lead author, about how his team carried out the study and why it matters. (Fontenot and another author, Laura Hunt, work for the EPA in Dallas, but they conducted the study on their own time in collaboration with several UT Arlington researchers.) Here’s an edited version of our interview: What led you guys to do the study? We were sort of talking around lunch one day, and came up with the idea of actually going out and testing water in the Barnett Shale. We’d heard all the things that you see in the media, all the sort of really left-wing stuff and right-wing stuff, but there weren’t a whole lot of answers out there in terms of an actual scientific study of water in the Barnett Shale. Our main intent was to bring an unbiased viewpoint here — to just look at the water, see if we could find anything, and report what we found.

22 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

The closest analog that I could find to our type of study are the things that have been done in the Marcellus Shale, with Rob Jackson’s group out at Duke University. Ours is set up very similarly to theirs in that we went out to private landowners’ wells and sampled their water wells and assayed them for various things. We decided to go with a list of chemicals thought to be included in hydraulic fracturing that was actually released in a congressional report. Our plan was to sample everyone’s water that we could, and then go through that list of these potential chemical compounds within the congressional list. How did you do it? NationofChange is a 501(c)3 nonprofit funded directly by our readers. Please make a small donation to support our work. We were able to get a press release put out from UT Arlington that went into the local newspapers that essentially called for volunteers to be participants in the study. For being a participant, you would get free water testing, and we would tell them our results. We were upfront with everyone about, you know, we don’t have a bias, we’re not anti-industry, we’re not pro-industry. We’re just here to finally get some scientific data on this subject. And we had a pretty overwhelming response. From there we chose folks that we would be able to get to. We had to work on nights and weekends, because we had an agreement with EPA to work on this study outside of work hours. So we spent quite a few weekend days going out to folks who had responded to our call and sampling their water. But that wasn’t quite enough. We also had to get samples from within the Barnett Shale in areas where fracking was not going on, and samples from outside the Barnett Shale where there’s no fracking going on, because we wanted to have those for reference samples. For those samples we went door to door and explained to folks what our study was about. We have people that were pro-industry that wanted to participate in this study to help out — saying, you know, ‘You’re not going to find anything and I’m going to help you prove it.’ And we also had folks that were determined to find SEPTEMBER 2013


problems. We have the whole gamut of folks represented in our study. We would take a water well, and we would go directly to the head, the closest we could get to the actual water source coming out of the ground, and we would purge that well for about 20 minutes. That ensures that you’re getting fresh water from within the aquifer. So we didn’t take anything from the tap, and nothing that had been through any kind of filtration system. This was as close to the actual groundwater as we could get. We took some measurements, and then we took several samples back to UT Arlington for a battery of chemistry analyses. That’s where we went through and looked for the various volatile organic compounds and heavy metals and methanols and alcohols and things like that. What did you find? We found that there were actually quite a few examples of elevated constituents, such as heavy metals, the main players being arsenic, selenium and strontium. And we found each of those metals at levels that are above EPA’s maximum contaminate limit for drinking water. These heavy metals do naturally occur in the groundwater in this region. But we have a historical dataset that points to the fact that the levels we found are sort of unusual and not natural. These really high levels differ from what the groundwater used to be like before fracking came in. And when you look at the location of the natural gas wells, you find that any time you have water wells that exceed the maximum contaminate limit for any of these heavy metals, they are within about three kilometers of a natural gas well. Once you get a private water well that’s not very close to a natural gas well, all of these heavy metals come down. But just because you’re close to a natural gas well does not mean you’re guaranteed to have elevated contaminate levels. We had quite a few samples that were very close to natural gas wells that had no problems with their water at all. We also found a few samples that had measureable levels of methanol and ethanol, and these are two substances that don’t naturally occur in groundwater. They can actually be created by bacterial interactions underwater, but whenever methanol or ethanol occur in the environment, they’re very fleeting and transient. So for us to be able to actually randomly take a grab sample and detect detectable methanol and ethanol — that implies that there may be a continuous source of this. You found levels of arsenic in areas with fracking that were almost 18 times higher than in areas without fracking or in the historical data. What would happen to someone who drank that water? Arsenic is a pretty well-known poison. If you experience a lot of long-term exposure to arsenic, you get a lot of different risks, like skin damage, problems with the circulatory system or even an increased risk of cancer. The levels that we found would not be a lethal dose, but they’re certainly levels that you would not want to be exposed to for any extended period of time.

SEPTEMBER 2013

What about the other stuff you found? The heavy metals are a little bit different because they are known to be included in some fracking recipes. But they’re also naturally occurring compounds. We think the problem is that they’re becoming concentrated at levels that aren’t normal as a result of some aspect of natural gas extraction. It’s not necessarily that we’re saying fracking fluid getting out. We don’t have any evidence of that. But there are many other steps involved, from drilling the hole to getting the water back out. A lot of these can actually cause different scenarios whereby the naturally occurring heavy metals will become concentrated in ways they normally wouldn’t. For example, if you have a private water well that’s not kept up well, you’ll have a scale of rust on the inside. And if someone were to do a lot of drilling nearby, you may find some pressure waves or vibrations that would cause those rust particles to flake out into the water. Arsenic is bound up inside that rust, and that can actually mobilize arsenic that would never be in the water otherwise. Methanol and ethanol are substances that should not be very easy to find in the groundwater naturally. We definitely know that those are on the list of things that are known to be in hydraulic fracturing fluid. But we were unable to actually sample any hydraulic fracturing fluid, so we can’t make any claims that we have evidence fluids got into the water. Have you talked with the homeowners whose wells you sampled? We have shown those homeowners the results. I think most of the folks that had high levels of heavy metals were not necessarily surprised. You hear so much I think maybe they were expecting it to come back with something even more extreme than that. I don’t want to say they were relieved, but I think they all sort of took the news in stride and realized, OK, well, as a private well owner there’s no state or federal agency that provides any kind of oversight or regulation, so it’s incumbent on that well owner to get testing done and get any kind of remediation. Do you think fracking is responsible for what you found? Well, I can’t say we have a smoking gun. We don’t want the public to take away from this that we have pegged fracking as the cause of these issues. But we have shown that these issues do occur in close relation, geographically, to natural gas extraction. And we have this historical database from pretty much the same exact areas that we sampled that never had these issues until the onset of all the fracking. We have about 16,000 active wells here in the Barnett Shale, and that’s all popped up in about the last decade, so it’s been a pretty dramatic increase. We noticed that when you’re closer to a well, you’re more likely to have a problem, and that today’s samples have problems, while yesterday’s samples before the fracking showed up did not. So we think that the strongest argument we can say is that this needs more research. S TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


In The News: Accurate Calibration Gives Meaning to The Low Turbidity Measurement By, Mike Sadar, Principal Scientist- Hach Company, Loveland, Colorado We discussed in the previous article in this series how small mistakes in testing technique can result in big measurement errors at turbidity levels less than 0.5 Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU). Calibration accuracy is especially vital in obtaining the reliable low-level readings on which you base municipal water treatment process decisions. Primary turbidity calibration standards USEPA guidelines require lab and on-line turbidimeters used for NPDWR reporting be calibrated following the manufacturer’s guidelines. The formazin1 and stabilized formazin2, StablCal, polymers, recognized by the water industry and USEPA as primary turbidity standards, contain a highly reproducible (statistically consistent) range of irregularly shaped particles sized from 0.01 to 10 microns. This particle profile statistically represents the variety of natural particles in a water sample and ‘mimics’ the light scattering of water samples. Comparative Calibrations Attempting to calibrate a turbidimeter by comparison to another instrument will often result in significant errors. Hence, the electronic design of Hach Company instruments will not permit comparative calibrations. Use the manufacturer’s recommended standard The correlation between nephelometric (90°) light scattering and turbidity measurement made by a tungsten-lamp instrument is well defined and linear from approximately 0.012 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) to 40 NTU. Table 1 and Figures 1 and 2 illustrate that a higher-concentration standard solution suffering a small contamination or dilution error has much less impact on the accuracy of low-level measurements, than does 1.0-NTU solution with the same preparation error. It makes sense, then, that turbidimeter manufacturers usually recommend higher-concentration primary calibration standards such as 20 NTU or 40 NTU, even when expected measurements are less than 1 NTU. Verification confirms the entire measurement process Operators may validate instrument performance using e ultra-low-turbidity standard solutions to validate the low end of their 20-NTU calibration. Operators can use commercially prepared, stabilized formazin (StablCal) verification standard solutions of 0.10, 0.30, 0.50, or 1.0 NTU as often as needed after primary calibration to confirm instrument stability and repeatability, check for problems in the optical system, and validate operator technique.

24 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

End users should not attempt to prepare low-level check solutions from formazin. Dilute solutions of formazin are very unstable. Even more convenient are mechanical calibration verification devices that operators can use quickly and repeatedly. Turbidity reading verification with wet or dry secondary standards is the ultimate proof of the effectiveness of the entire filtration and turbidity control program. For detailed, practical advice on turbidity standards anc calibration, a free copy of Hach Company technical booklet #7045, Turbidity Standards may be downloaded from www.hach.com. Next: How improved turbidity measurement optimizes plant performance and product quality S

Hach Regional Sales Manager in Texas, Terry Smith, is ready to answer turbidity monitoring questions you might have after reading this article. Contact him toll-free 800-227-4224, ext. 2114

Table 1: The effect of calibration standard preparation error on sample measurement

Actual Calibration Targeted Calibration Standard Value Standard Value (NTU), considering a (NTU) 0.2-NTU (best-case) error 20.0 20.2 2.0 2.20 1.0 1.20 0.5 0.70 0.2 0.40

Percent Error

How the Instrument Reads a 0.3-NTU Sample (NTU)

1.0% 10% 20% 40% 100%

0.303 0.330 0.360 0.420 0.600

SEPTEMBER 2013


Figure 1: Contamination, along with dilution (volumetric transfer) error, often creates at least a 0.2-NTU error in the actual value of a formazin calibration standard solution. The chart on the left shows the minimal impact on low-level measurements when a calibration is made with a 20 NTU standard exhibiting 0.2-NTU preparation error. The chart on the right, the impact on accuracy of low-level measurements is much greater if the calibration is based on a 1.0-NTU standard with 0.2-NTU error.

Figure 2: With both laboratory and on-line turbidity measurement, the key to normalized readings – those that can be compared meaningfully with each other and with regulatory values – is an accurate instrument calibration.

1

Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, 20th edition 2130 B, American Public Health Association, American Water Works Association, Water Environment Federation, 1998. 2 Hach method 8195, accepted by USEPA for NPDWR (National Primary Drinking Water Regulations) compliance monitoring, USEPA letter dated April 20, 1998. SEPTEMBER 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


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Equipment Sales & Service

Recondition Specialist of all Brands, Makes, and Models of:

Blowers and Air Ends ELGI, Gardner Denver, Roots, Lamson, Hoffman, ANY BRAND

www.newmanregencygroup.com

WE UNDERSTAND WATER & WASTEWATER DISINFECTION At Severn Trent Services, we understand water. That’s why our Capital Controls® gas feed equipment products are used the world over for water and wastewater disinfection. Vacuum Regulators

Residual Analyzers

Gas Detectors

Gas Control Valves

P. O. Box 9000 • Kilgore, Texas 75663-9000 903-984-0551 • Fax: 903-984-5914 www.ana-lab.com • email: corp@ana-lab.com Ana-Lab Corporation is an employee-owned organization which provides industry, government, consultants, and individuals with complete, timely, and accurate chemical analysis, including state approved total coliform testing. Amarillo 806-355-3556

Represented t dB By: Chl Chlor-Serv, S Inc. 107 Tradesman Drive Hutto, Texas 78634 T: +1 512 992 7473 E: chris@chlorserv.com www.chlorserv.com

Dallas 972-620-8900

Brownsville 956-831-6437

Austin 512-821-0045

Houston 281-333-9414

T104704201

26 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

SEPTEMBER 2013


The 4M’s of Collection Systems Management: The Saga Continues Conference & Expo January 22 – 23, 2014 – San Marcos, TX Sponsored by the Water Environment Association of Texas

In the first 4Ms conference, the basics of collection system mapping, flow monitoring, hydraulic modeling and master planning were presented. This second conference is designed to move beyond the basics of collection system management to flow and condition assessment analysis, maintenance and operations optimization, system needs prioritization and funding, long range planning and regulatory compliance. Speakers will include industry and municipal leaders in their field of expertise. Register on line at www.weat.org.

Early Registration Deadline – January 14, 2014 Please register me for the – 4M’s of Collection Systems: The Saga Continues Conference & Expo. Name _________________________________________ Title/Position ___________________________________ Organization ___________________________________ Billing Address_________________________________

 Check

Method of Payment:  Visa  MC  AMEX

Discover

Card#___________________________________ Expiration Date:___________________________ Name on Card____________________________ Card Holder Signature ________________________________________ Amount:_________________________________

City _________________ State _____ Zip____________

Registration Fee Includes: continental breakfast, lunch, and breaks. Space is limited, so register early.

Op or PE License #:______________________________

8.5 hours of CEUs for wastewater operators has been requested through the TCEQ

Email Address __________________________________ Telephone_____________________________________ Fax__________________________________________ Member of WEAT/WEF @$185 = ........ Member – Government/City @$145= ..... Student @$15= ....................................... *Non-Member @$235= ........................... *Non-Member – Gov/City@$195= .......... *(includes WEAT Only Membership) Total = .................

$________ $________ $________ $________ $________ $________

AFTER JANUARY 14 – ADD $20 TO FEE. Please duplicate form for additional registration

Please mail or fax registration form with check or credit card payment to: WEAT 1825 Fort View Road, Suite 102 Austin, Texas 78704 Phone: (512) 693-0060 Fax: (512) 693-0062 Register on line at www.weat.org or Email registration forms to julie@weat.org Cancellation Policy: Full refund if registrant cancels 10 days before program date. WEAT has reserved a block of rooms at the Embassy Suites, 1001 McCarty Lane, San Marcos, TX 78666. WEAT has obtained discounted single or double rate of $134. The reservation deadline is January 4, 2014. After this date, reservations will be accepted on a availability basis. To make your reservation, call 512-392-6450. Be sure to mention WEAT when making your reservation.

QUESTIONS: Call the WEAT Office at (866) 406-9328 or email julie@weat.org Exhibits and Sponsorship Opportunities Available

SEPTEMBER 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


SHANKLES, KELLY S SIMMONS, JOE D THERIOT, CHARLES

ESTES, JERRY R GARCIA, HECTOR H GARCIA, MARIA F GARZA, OSCAR L GENTRY, BYRON D GONZALEZ, ARTURO III GONZALEZ, CHRIS GONZALEZ, ULYSES GRIFFIN, KODAK C GUERRA, RODOLFO GUILLEN, PEDRO JR GUTIERREZ, HOMERO GUZMAN, RUSTY L HALLEY, CHRIS L HANSEN, CHAD A HERRERA, LORENZO HERZOG, RUSSELL HOFFER, DONALD J HOLDER, BRANDON JACKSON, DAVID G KENNAN, DEREK M KEPRTA, THEODORE KIE, MICHAEL W JR KOVALSKY, MICHAEL KRISTINEK, JOSH

LICENSES ISSUED BY TCEQ: JULY 2013 GROUND WATER TREATMENT CLASS C

WATER CLASS A ACKER, THOMAS J BARTEK, BRANDON HERRING, RICHARD MILLER, KEVIN S OLIVO, JESUS PRAESEL, JUSTIN W WALLACE, CHRIS

AGUINAGA, ALFREDO BECK, MICHAEL L CONKLE, WILLIAM L CORTEZ, DOMINIC CORTEZ, GENARO DEVILLE, ROBIN L FREI, ALLEN R FREI, GARY A FREI, RANDY A HENRY, JOHN W JORDEN, ALICIA E CLASS D

ADAM, GLEN A SR ADAMS, JOHN W ALCOSER, RAY JR ALFORD, JAMES K ARNDT, MARK R WATER DIST SURFACE WATER AYALA, JOSHUA M TREATMENT BARTON, JAMIE N CLASS B BELTRAN, ERNEST BERTLES, STUART CLASS B CANTU, GABRIEL BILTJINITIS, SHAWN KUBALA, CHRIS G SECHREST, DAVID BONNET, JAMES S RENOVATO, EMILIO BOWEN, JAMES C SHORT, BRUCE BOX, HEATH A GROUND WATER BRADY, CAMERON R TREATMENT CLASS C BUCHANAN, CLARENCE CARRINGTON, MONTE ABBOTT, ERIC D CLASS B CARRISALEZ, GILBERT ALEXANDER, CODY CASTILLO, NOE M JR ARMES, BRADY MORRIS CAVINESS, JEREMY MARQUEZ, GUILLERMO BAKER, CLEM C JR CHAVEZ, DEVIN V PARROTT, JAMES E BINGHAM, NICHOLAS CLAMP, DONALD W BOLENBARR, SHAWN CLAXTON, JEFFREY BUTLER, ROBBIE A SURFACE WATER COOKLIN, BRANDEE CAMPBELL, BRADLY TREATMENT CROSBY, CLIFFORD CAMPOS, MIGUEL A CRUZ, RAUL JR CHAMBERS, GARRY CLASS C CULWELL, STEVEN COX, CHRISTOPHER DAGNEL, BARRY S DAVILA, JOHN P ALCAZAR, AMADO DEGRAZIA, PHILIP J DELEON, CRISTOBAL ARREDONDO, GERARDO DELGADO, HECTOR EDGAR, TERRY W GIDDENS, CODY R DIAZ DEL CAMPO, GARCIA, EDGAR R GONZALEZ, JOSUE EDGAR GARLOWICH, JOSEPH KAIN, KRISTOPHER DORTH, RYAN G HAND, JAIME L KLEIN, MISTY DAWN DUBRULE, ERIC J HARRIS, LUTHER C MCKASKLE, CLYDE DUNHAM, PATRICK HARRISON, LARRY H NOLTE, JOSHUA G EHLERS, JOHNNY N HAYES, ZACHARY R REED, MATTHEW S ENGLISH, DON R JR HERRERA, MARKO ROBSON, TONYA P ESPINOSA, JACKIE HUNT, JESSE L SHANKLES, KELLY S ESTES, JERRY R KUENSTLER, MATT SIMMONS, JOE D GARCIA, HECTOR H LEONARD, JEFFERY THERIOT, CHARLES GARCIA, MARIA F LONG, MICHAEL GARZA, OSCAR L MANUEL, JEREMY GROUND WATER GENTRY, BYRON D MASSEY, CHARLES TREATMENT GONZALEZ, ARTURO III MENDOZA, JESSE GONZALEZ, CHRIS MITCHELL, CHIPPER CLASS C GONZALEZ, ULYSES NEWBILL, BRANDON GRIFFIN, KODAK C PARTAIN, JIMMY AGUINAGA, ALFREDO GUERRA, RODOLFO PAYNE, CODY J BECK, MICHAEL L GUILLEN, PEDRO JR PEACOCK, MICHAEL CONKLE, WILLIAM L GUTIERREZ, HOMERO ROHAN, BRANDON CORTEZ, DOMINIC GUZMAN, RUSTY L SILVER, JOHN M CORTEZ, GENARO HALLEY, CHRIS L TAYLOR, MICHAEL DEVILLE, ROBIN L HANSEN, CHAD A THOMPSON, STEVEN FREI, ALLEN R HERRERA, LORENZO FREI, GARY A HERZOG, RUSSELL 28 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org FREI, RANDY A HOFFER, DONALD J HENRY, JOHN W HOLDER, BRANDON JORDEN, ALICIA E JACKSON, DAVID G

CLASS D

ANDERSON, CHRIS E ANWASH, CORY J ARIS, DANIEL BEECHING, BRADFORD BOOTH, RONDY W BOSTICK, BILLY W BROWN, DYLAN L WASTEWATER CARY, JAMES S TREATMENT CAVINESS, JEREMY M CHOATE, LINDY T CLARK, ERIC D CLASS A CULWELL, STEVEN B SR BLUNDELL, NOLAN J DELOSREYES, MATTHEW SCHRECKENBACH, JAMES DOLAN, MICHAEL F STILLWELL, ROBERT DUFFEY, CALYNN T DUNHAM, PATRICK FERNANDEZ, DAVID J CLASS B GARCIA, JULIAN GARZA, VICTORINO JR BEASSIE, LESLIE J GLOVER, RUSSELL CRAFT, CHRIS L GONZALEZ, LUCAS A ESHETU, MICHAEL A GRANADOS, EDWARD GARZA, STEVEN L HAHN, JAMES CHRIS HERRMANN, BRAD L KRETZSCHMAR, CHARLES HAINLEY, MARK W MALINOWSKI, CHRIS PE HALL, JOHN W HALL, OWEN R JR ROGERS, SCOTT E TINKLEPAUGH, MATTHEW HEFLIN, JEFFREY L HENDRIX, FLOYD E YBARRA, MACARIO HILL, BRANDON M SR ZHANG, DAVID Y HOFFMAN, SARAH E ZHANG, YI G HOLLOWAY, JOHN G HULING, DAVID W JARAMILLO, SANTIAGO CLASS C JOHNSON, STEVE A ANDERSON, GARY KARSTEDT, RICHARD CAMPBELL, BRADLEY KHAN, AZEEM CASEY, JAMES A JR KUHN, JOHN M DUPUY, THOMAS W LYNCH, PATRICK GREEN, PHILLIP C ONATE, JUAN HART, MARY J ORANDAY, JIMMY JACKSON, BROOKS PALMER, RONALD JOHNSON, JERMAINE PENA, ELIUD LEWIS, CHERYL L PETERSON, WILLIAM MARTINEZ, MARIO PHARRIES, BEN A MAXWELL, CHRIS C PRICE, CORY D MOORE, TOMMY A QUINN, SHAWN L MOREE, ERIC A RAINE, JONATHAN S NORRIS, ANTHONY RAMIREZ, FRANCISCO OBRYAN, STACY J REDIC, VIRAMONTES PATTON, DERIC C REVES, SHANE A PECHAL, EDWIN J JR RICO, CODY T WHITE, JERRY W JR RODRIGUEZ, JORGE WHITFIELD, MICHAEL RUBIO, JORGE F WILDE, WESLEY A RUIZ, LYDIA C YOUNG, GREG B SAIJAS, KEVIN ZAMBRANO, MOSES SCHULER, MARK D SERRANO, JUAN SHARP, CURTIS D CLASS D SHIPP, WILLIAM L ANDERSON, CHRIS E SIMMONS, CHARLES ANWASH, CORY J SINKULE, MARK S SR ARIS, DANIEL SLATER, BILLY B BEECHING, BRADFORD SMITHERS, DAVID A BOOTH, RONDY W SPAIN, CHARLES M BOSTICK, BILLY W SPURLIN, HERSHEL BROWN, DYLAN L SQUIRES, AUSTIN J CARY, JAMES S STAVES, ANTWAN T CAVINESS, JEREMY M STONE, GENE A SEPTEMBER 2013 CHOATE, LINDY T SUTTON, JOSEPH CLARK, ERIC D TORRES, ELIAS V CULWELL, STEVEN B SR TREIDER, TED B DELOSREYES, MATTHEW


RODRIGUEZ, JORGE RUBIO, JORGE F RUIZ, LYDIA C SAIJAS, KEVIN SCHULER, MARK D SERRANO, JUAN SHARP, CURTIS D SHIPP, WILLIAM L SIMMONS, CHARLES SINKULE, MARK S SR SLATER, BILLY B SMITHERS, DAVID A SPAIN, CHARLES M SPURLIN, HERSHEL SQUIRES, AUSTIN J STAVES, ANTWAN T STONE, GENE A SUTTON, JOSEPH TORRES, ELIAS V TREIDER, TED B VANDENBIGGELARR, JONATHAN M VANWINKLE, JERRY VILLANUEVA, ROBERT VINES, BRANDON C WALKER, MARCUS E WALL, PATRICK S WALLEN, BRENDA K WEATHERLY, ERIC WILLIAMS, KAYLA A YOUNG, JIMMY J SR ZAMUDIO, JESUS WASTEWATER COLLECTION CLASS I ACOSTA, EDWARD BAGBY, WILLIAM T BARTON, DUSTIN R BLAIR, RANDY L BRADFORD, HOWARD BURTON, PATRICK CAPP, KYLE J CASSO, JOHN L COLLINGS, JOSEPH B CROWDER, CRAIG PE DAVIS, SCOTT J GILMORE, WESLEY O HAIRE, DONOVAN T HANSEN, CHAD A HARVEY, STEVEN R HAWKES, JOHNATHON HERNANDEZ, RAMIRO HULIN, SCOTTY L HURD, WARRAND JEWELL, CASEY A KILLION, JAMES A LAYER, JOSHUA A LONGORIA, JUAN J LOZANO, HUMBERTO MCENTIRE, JOHN C MILLER, DAVID W MILLER, MICHAEL NGUYEN, CALVIN PADILLA, NICHOLAS PEREZ, JOSE A PINA, JORGE JR PRICE, CORY D REDDELL, DANIEL RIOS, JUAN C RIVERA PEREZ, ALEXIS ROBERSON, ROGER C ROBERTS, KERRY D SEPTEMBER 2013 SALDIVAR, ALEJANDRO SIPES, CHARLES E THOMAS, BRADLEY

KILLION, JAMES A LAYER, JOSHUA A LONGORIA, JUAN J LOZANO, HUMBERTO MCENTIRE, JOHN C MILLER, DAVID W MILLER, MICHAEL NGUYEN, CALVIN PADILLA, NICHOLAS PEREZ, JOSE A PINA, JORGE JR PRICE, CORY D REDDELL, DANIEL RIOS, JUAN C RIVERA PEREZ, ALEXIS ROBERSON, ROGER C ROBERTS, KERRY D SALDIVAR, ALEJANDRO SIPES, CHARLES E THOMAS, BRADLEY THOMAS, JAMES L VILLARREAL, JUAN VITEK, KEVIN D WAGONER, TREY WILLIAMS, TOBY BACKFLOW PREVENTION ASSEMBLY TESTER ALSIP, RICHARD J ALSOBROOKS, JOHN ALVAREZ, JOHN A ALVAREZ, JUAN JR ARANDA, ANASTACIO ARDON, WILBER E BEERY, MICHAEL R BEN YEHOSHUA, SHAI BLOYS, GARY D SR BROWN, CURTIS W CORLEY, JOHN A DURAN, ROBERT ESCAMILLA, JAMES ESTRADA, CESAR FINE, BRIAN K GARCIA, JOHN D III GARNER, PHILIP J HART, JONATHON G HERNANDEZ, JEREMY KNAPP, SHAWN P LINAN, CHRYSTIAN MARBACH, BRETT S MATOSKA, ANTHONY MEDDERS, RYAN C MILES, DARIN M MONTORELLO, RICHARD MORRIS, CODY R MOYER, CORBIN S PARKER, BONNIE F PEREZ, ALFREDO D PHILLIPS, ALVIN L SR PLASCENCIA, EDUARDO PURTEE, JOHN W REPASS, JEFFREY REYNA, SANMARTIN RICHARDSON, ROBERT STEWART, TRAMMELL TELLES, ELIAS JR TRAN, SON M VILLARREAL, EDUARDO WHITE, BRIAN J ZILAHY, PETER J JR

IMAGINE A PROGRAM CUSTOMER SERVICE INSPECTOR BOWMAN, BRETT A CULVER, CHRISTIAN DAVIS, JOHNNEY L JORDAN, BRAD A MITCHELL, THOMAS MOORE, TOMMY A RODRIGUEZ, RONALD ROSS, CLARENCE SANCHEZ, STEPHEN SCALES, JEFFREY W WILLIFORD, ORLAND WILSON, JACK B VALERO, ROGELIO VELASQUEZ, JOSE A III WHEATFALL, DON P WILLIAMS, TRAVIS W WRIGHT, JOHN D

T H AT H E L P S U S S AV E WA T E R T O D AY. S O T H E Y ’ L L H AV E I T T O M O R R O W.

EPA is proud to introduce WaterSense, a program that sets

performance and water-efficiency specifications for products and services. Local utilities can use WaterSense to help residents save water. Together, we can build an ethic of water efficiency and protect this resource for future generations. Learn more at www.epa.gov/watersense.

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


TWUA EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIED ADS:

OFFICER & STAFF

Officer:

Management: BOBBY FUSSELL ROGERS ROGER

SURFACE WATER TREATMENT PLANT SUPERINTENDENT Beeville, Texas The Superintendent – Morrill Treatment Plant provides daily supervision and guidance to crews at a plant facility responsible for monitoring and maintaining potable water production and treatment. This position oversees plant process control ensuring compliance with Beeville and local, state, and federal regulatory safety and operating requirements. MINIMUM REQUREMENTS • Five years’ Water Treatment experience. • Two years’ Supervisory experience. • Class “B” Water Treatment Plant Operator License. • Proficient in the use of word processing spreadsheet, and database software. • High School Diploma or GED; and • Possession of a valid Texas Class-A Driver’s License. Salary DOE, DOQ City of Beeville, fax resume and salary requirements to: (361)3587355 or email resume and salary requirements to: cesario.vela@ beevilletx.org

WATER DISTRICT GENERAL MANAGER Community of Coryell City, Texas The Coryell City Water Supply District is seeking qualified applications for a full-time General Manager. Qualifications include current CDL license, current TCEQ

Class B Water Certification, 2-3 yrs. water department supervisory experience, knowledge of state compliance reports, ability to operate and maintain heavy equipment, be on call and respond to emergency situation, provide good customer service. Salary ranges from $50K - $75K annually pending qualifications and experience. E-mail resumes to info@coryellcitywater.com or fax to (254) 865-0148. Qualifications include current CDL license, current TCEQ Class B Water Certification, 2-3 yrs. water department supervisory experience, knowledge of state compliance reports, ability to operate and maintain heavy equipment, be on call and respond to emergency situation, provide good customer service. Current CDL license, current TCEQ Class B Water Certification. Salary ranges from $50K - $75K annually pending qualifications and experience. Coryell City. Water Supply District, fax resume and salary requirements to: (254)865-0148 or email resume and salary requirements to: info@coryellcitywater.com

WATER OPERATOR La Grange, Texas Class C ground water license is preferred but not required. Responsibilities include, but not limited to, routine operation and maintenance of water facilities. Candidates must have a high school diploma or equivalent, a valid and clean driving record. Wages and benefits are based

30 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

on experience. Fayette Water Supply Corporation, Email resume and salary requirements to: fayettewsc@yahoo.com

WASTEWATER OPERATOR Various Locations SouthWest Water Company has opening for Water and Wastewater Operators in Austin, Baytown, Benbrook, Conroe, Mabank and Pottsboro, Texas. Performs routine checks of the facilities, maintenance and field customer service; helps ensure compliance with governing agencies regulations. Advanced skills and technical knowledge of water and wastewater treatment. High school diploma or GED; 1-2 years’ related experience; water / wastewater certification a preferred and backhoe experience a plus. SouthWest Water Company, fax resume and salary requirements to: (832)209-5007 email resume and salary requirements to: jobs@swwc.com.

WATER OPERATOR II Whitehouse, Texas See www.whitehousetx.org/ employment.php for details. City of Whitehouse, Fax resume and salary requirements to: (903)839-4915 or email resume and salary requirements to: jtomlin@whitehousetx.org

President President brogers@cityofsilsbee.com rogerf@lumbertonmud.com LYNN SHORT President-Elect President Elect Secretary/Treasurer tsalinas@sanmarcostx.gov lshort@victoriatx.org

TONY SALINAS

ALLEN SCHREIBER

TOMPresident CLARK Vice Vice-President AShreiber@fbcwid2.com Secretary/Treasurer T.Clark@bcmud.org NORMA CLARK

Past President GLENDA DUNN nclark874@cableone.net Immediate Past President glendad@ci.waco.tx.us

CECE WHITE

Second Past President TANNY BUSBY, JR. white@txkusa.org 2nd Past President tannyb@envirodyne.com

CHRIS ROBLES

Ex Officio crobles@american-usa.com

Central Office Staff: RUSSELL HAMILTON Executive Director r.hamilton@twua.org

DAVID MOORE

Traning Coordinator d.moore@twua.org

ANGELA MONROE Event Coordinator a.monroe@twua.org

DONNA MARTIN Accounting d.martin@twua.org

HENRIETTA ADEE

Membership Coordinator h.adee@twua.org

SEPTEMBER 2013


Committed to Texas

Now There Are TWO Stars Serving the Lone Star State Flowserve announces a partnership with Texas-based Smith Pump Company. With 50 years of experience, Smith Pump in its affiliation with Flowserve offers the benefits of vast expertise, product breadth and offerings for every essential water resource pumping requirement. Smith Pump offers five locations across the state of Texas to serve you: Waco, Austin, Fort Worth, San Antonio and Houston.

Coverage Area Rely on Smith Pump Company and Flowserve for all your water resource pumping needs. www.flowserve.com

www.smithpump.com

Experience In Motion

(All counties in Texas, except El Paso) Pump Technology for Every Water Resource Application • Source Water • Water Transmission • Water Treatment and Distribution • Wastewater • Irrigation • Flood Control and Drainage • Industrial

flowserve.com


WEBINARS AND ONLINE TRAINING “Can’t travel? No problem...we’re bringing the training to you.” Are you in need of operator renewal credit hours? Look no further, we can help you save time and money! We are excited to announce our online training programs coming soon. TWUA will be hosting a wide range of webinars and online courses designed to fit everyone’s busy schedule. Visit our website at: www.twua.org to see the latest educational offerings.

Why attend online training?

v Convenient v Cost Effective v Efficient v Flexible v Quality v Easy Access v Variety v Comfortable v Certification v Tracking

One Click AWAY

Texas Water Utilities Association Voice: 888.367.8982

Website: www.twua.org Follow us on:

Email: d.moore@twua.org

September 2013  

TWUA Journal September 2013

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