Page 1

Texas Water Utilities

JOURNAL

VOLUME 21

SEPTEMBER 2011

NUMBER 9


Corpus Christi, Texas August 2-4

August 22-25

DATE Nov. 1-3

Permian Basin Regional School MCM Grande Hotel Odessa, Texas

Norma Clark

Norma Clark, (432) 528-1608

Mike Norris

Mike Norris (903)939-8278

Mike Lowe (806)675-0636

Russ Ropes (806)775-3237

2011 TWUA Regional School (432)528-1608 2011 TWUA Regional School Schedule East Texas Regional School Harvey Hall & R.T.D.C. EVENT Tyler, Texas West Texas Regional School Lubbock Civic Center Lubbock, Texas

(903)939-8278CONTACT PRIMARY

EXHIBITS CONTACT

MARK YOUR CALENDER FOR TWUA 94TH ANNUAL SCHOOL! MARCH 4-7, 2012 CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS INFORMATION COMING SOON IN YOUR NEXT ISSUE!

Please contact the person listed above or T.W.U.A. Central Office at (888) 367-8982 Fax: (512) 459-7124 or write to T.W.U.A. 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 West., Austin, Texas 78723-1093 for additional information, visit www.twua.org. Thank you for your support!


TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL 3


ARTICLES: President's Perspective..................................................................6 by CeCe White, T.W.U.A. President

In This Issue

ARTICLES S TRAINING LISTINGS S EMPLOYMENT

TWUA Executive Director News:....................................................8 by Russell Hamilton, ED Public Education News: Kids Say the Darndest Thing........................................................10 by Craig McCoy, Public Education Committee Member PES News: Data Management .......................................................................12 by Yilma Zerhum, Pretreatment & Laboratory Services, City of Dallas Safety News: Dallas Water Utilities Goes Electric..............................................16 by Gary Strong, Assistant Manager, CWWTP TXWARN News: It's That Time of Year................................................................. 17

14

Texas News: Drought Continues to Rise in Texas ............................................18 By Texas Water Development Board Customer Service News: Avoiding Workplace Conflict........................................................21 by David Friedman, Customer Service Coach Central Texas News: Awards..........................................................................................22 Photo by Craig McCoy,TWUA Board Member

ADVERTISERS:

Classified Ads.....................................................................................30 Ana-Lab...............................................................................................9 East Jordan Iron Works.......................................................................23 Global Treat, Inc................................................................................. 7 Jim Cox Sales, Inc. ............................................................................24 Layne-Texas.......................................................................................26 Professional Cards..............................................................................26 Magna Flow......................................................................................... 3 Moody Bros., Inc................................................................................15 Solar Bee...........................................................................................15 Samco Leak Detection........................................................................23 Scoop Sludge Hog................................................................................ 2 Smith Pump Company, Inc........................................ Inside Back Cover Chlor Serv, Inc...................................................................... Back Cover

TRAINING:

T.W.U.A. Training Schedule........................................................................14-15 .T.W.U.A. Customer Service Day School formation...............................................5 T.W.U.A. West Texas Regional School Registration............................................11 TEEX Training Schedule..................................................................................27

16

21 Front Cover Photo Courtesy of : Russell Hamilton The Benini Studio & Sculpture Ranch Johnson City, Texas

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL (ISSN 1051-709X) is published monthly by the Texas Water Utilities Association, located at 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 West, Austin, Texas 78723-1093, for engineers, operators, managers, laboratory technicians, customer service personnel, and other professionals employed in, or interested in, the water and/or wastewater industry. Five dollars of each annual membership dues payment to the Texas Water Utilities Association pays for a subscription. Non-Member subscription price: USA $50 per year; $4.20 per single copy; $60 per year outside USA. Periodicals Postage Paid at Austin, TX. The Texas Water Utilities Association is wholly independent, and is not affiliated with the American Water Works Association, the Water Environment Federation, or any other National organization. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL, 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 W., Austin, TX 78723-1093. TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL is not responsible for facts and/or opinions expressed by contributors or in advertisements herein. Editorials and comments do not necessarily represent the official policy of the Texas Water Utilities Association. All inquiries should be directed to: Texas Water Utilities Association, 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 W, Austin, TX 78723-1093, phone 512/459-3124. Any material accepted for publication is subject to revision and editing at the discretion of the publisher. All advertising in the TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL is subject to approval of the publisher. Learn more about T.W.U.A. at our Web site: www.twua.org

4 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

September 2011


TWUA Customer Service Chapter Day School TWUA C.S.S. Chapter Day School

DAY 1

Instructor

Topic

Glenda Dunn

08:00-09:00 0:900-09:15

Teambuilding

09:15-10:00

Break Fraud &/or Roundtable Discussion LUNCH The Image of Your City Through the Eyes of Your Citizens Break The Image of Your City Through the Eyes of Your Citizens Break Ergonomics and Workplace Safety Break Ergonomics and Workplace Safety Break All Things Backflow

10:15-10:30 10:30-11:15 11:15-12:15 12:15 -1:00 1:00-1:15 1:15-2:00 2:00-2:15 2:15-3:00 3:00-3:15 3:15-4:00 4:00-4:15 4:15-5:00

Break

Glenda Dunn Marcus Ivey/TBA Arlene Wegwerth Arlene Wegwerth Teresa Bryant Teresa Bryant

Time

Teambuilding

TWUA C.S.S. Chapter Day School

Charlotte Doran

DAY 2

Instructor

JimBob Sims

Sally French

Michael Shearer - General Mgr. Tatex Annette Jones Steve Dieterich Sofie Martinez TWUA Rep - TBA

Topic

Break

Time

Texas811

08:00-09:00 09:00-09:15

Utilities Complaints - Helping the customers when they don't know the problem - What warrants a sample collection?? Break 5S - Workplace Organization Techniques LUNCH Ordinances Break Workplace Violence Break Dealing with the Public Break Membership

09:15-10:00 10:15-10:30 10:30-11:30 11:30-12:30 12:30-1:45 1:45-2:00 2:00-2:45 2:45-3:00 3:00-3:45 3:45-4:00 4:00-5:00

October 19-20, 2011 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. /both days

Location: City of Waco

Water Office Training Room,

Address: 425 Franklin Ave (Waco, Texas )

Fee: $85.00 for member

and $95.00 for non-member

e e e e e

(14) CS Hours Networking Problem Solving Enhancement Tools Training

REGISTRATION FORM (Note: Please Print Legibly) Name:____________________________ E-Mail Address:____________________________________ Home Address:____________________________ City:_____________State:_____ Zip:___________ Day Time Phone #:______________________ SS# or W/WW License number#:_________________ Company Name:_________________________________TWUA Member/Non-Member_______________ Visa/MC Acct. #: _____________ ___________________Expire Date: ____________________________ Cardholder: _____________________________________Fee:____________________________________ For credit cards please fax this form to 512/459-7124 Checks or money orders mail completed registration form along with payment to: Texas Water Utilities Association 路 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 West 路 Austin, TX 78723-1093,

*For Questions Contact: Karen Gafford or Solie Compian at (254)299-2489 September 2011

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


TWUA PRESIDENT:

Jerry Pollard, Water Utility Operator , City of Waco CeCe White, President

Jerry Pollard is a Water Utility Operator in the Maintenance Divi-

sion in the City of Waco.

1. Why did you choose this industry as your profession? The industry sort of chose me. I was hired on with the City of Waco at an entry level position. I soon learned of the many different opportunities that were available within the water industry. The challenges associated with providing an adequate and safe supply of water to the public are what keep me in the industry.

2. What about this industry do you find the most challenging? I find that interpretation and application of the state and federal rules related to water and wastewater are the most challenging. 3. What contributions do you feel that you have made to this industry? I feel my biggest contributions have come through my involvement with our local TWUA Chapter. As a local chapter, we provide our members the opportunity for continued education and training opportunities. This training and education assists them to meet renewal hours required for their certifications. 4. How many years have you been in this industry? I have been in the industry for 14 years. 5. What challenges do you see facing this industry? I see two major challenges. The first would be the age of our workforce. Within the next few years, we will be losing very knowledgeable people through retirement. Their knowledge and skills are invaluable to our industry. The second challenge facing the industry is water and wastewater systems which will need to be upgraded or replaced when new technologies are available. My concern is how the current economy will affect our ability to upgrade and/or replace these systems.

I want to be remembered for my involvement in our local TWUA chapter and for being honest, dependable and always willing to help others. 7. How long have you been a member of TWUA? I have been a member of TWUA for 13 years. 8. How has TWUA assisted you in your profession? TWUA assisted me in my profession initially, through training and education classes. Attending classes helped me to be successful in obtaining my certifications and licenses. Being an officer in our local chapter has helped me to develop and improve leadership skills such as public speaking and networking with others in the industry. 9. What changes can TWUA implement to become a better organization for our members? I would like to see additional training and education aids made available to local districts. An example of this would be current training videos related to safety and customer service. 10. What would you like to ask the president? I would like to ask the President; if it was your job to recruit and retain individuals to the water/wastewater industry, how would you accomplish this? I think the first step to recruitment is education. The industry needs to be a presence in the elementary schools – as TWUA is with the poster and essay contest. This lets even the small children know that it is people that provide their drinking water and sanitary sewer services. Also, the elementary school curriculum includes segments on water and conservation. Letting the schools in your area know that tours of water and wastewater plants are available to school groups (if they are) would be a great introduction for this age group.

6. What do you want to be remembered for from your involvement in this industry? 6 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

September 2011


We would need to be a part of every possible job fair throughout the state. The local districts and chapters could be a big help in this endeavor. The local organization can be the link between the water/wastewater entities and the agencies providing the job fair, whether it is a high school, college or community event. Actual operators, field personnel or office personnel could be on hand to describe and explain and maybe even demonstrate the various facets of working with water and wastewater. Their pride in their profession would be a first hand testimony that the work is a necessary and rewarding service to each and every community. Additionally, I think a program could and should be developed with the public education system and approved by TCEQ that would provide a junior or senior student in high school or a community college student with an elective class in water and/or wastewater. This elective would consist of the basic water and wastewater materials and the end result could be a “D” class license if he or she passed the exam. The student would leave high school or a semester or two at the community college with a marketable skill. As a corollary program, the local water and wastewater entities could, perhaps, hire some

September 2011

of these students as a part-time employees giving them valuable hands-on experience in various areas of the water and wastewater profession. As a matter of fact, I believe that TAWWA has a committee that is working on something like this. Cooperation between state and local levels of TWUA, TMUA, Texas Rural Water, TAWWA, TCEQ, the Board of Education and the Workforce Commission could build an outstanding program that will help us fill some of the void left by retiring baby boomers. On the other side, utility employees need to make every effort to “capture” this experience and knowledge that will shortly be walking out the door. One way this can be done is through the district and chapter meetings – peer to peer time. Another avenue would be monitoring – pairing a more experienced employee with a relatively new comer – for training and education.

These are both things that can be done here and now without a lot of planning, programs or monetary investment. I would encourage all of you to take advantage of the knowledge (and wisdom) of the experience around you. Recognize that it can only benefit you to ask questions and listen to the answers – maybe even write them down for those that come after you. None of us know all we need to know to do our best. There is always knowledge out there that will help us solve a problem, meet a challenge and move forward with our careers. S

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR NEWS: Russell Hamilton, TWUA ED " Supporting Breast Cancer Awareness"

With the drought, heat, and current state of the economy, I hope that everyone is surviving this summer. I know for most the drought and strain on the water systems has been a challenge. For the Austin area, we have set new records for both heat and lack of rainfall. Some are in the 3rd and 4th stages of drought plan contingencies with little relief in the long range weather forecast. At least one provider near Austin has notified users that they have less than 60 days water remaining in their reserve and nothing additional to supplement with. Not wishing any ill will toward those on the Texas Coast; but we need a major weather changing event, hopefully in the form of Tropical Depressions. Pray for rain. TWUA was able to utilize equipment that was recently purchased to broadcast the annual TCEQ Instructors Seminar held in Austin. For those who were not able to attend, we were able to provide a mechanism for remote viewing of this update and from the feedback, everything went very well. We were able to identify potential issues with sound and lighting and have made plans to address these concerns. TWUA is also in the final stages of combining all the technologies into one product to present to TCEQ for approval; so that electronic operator training becomes a viable option. If you would like to view any of the recorded material from the instructor’s seminar, there is a link on the TWUA website. For those who are still in search of classroom training we have the Lubbock Regional Training Event still on our training calendar and the board would welcome your support and participation. When you are planning your training budgets and making decision regarding which operator will attend a specific training event for next year, there will be a change in the regional calendar. Odessa will move from August to September. There was another event scheduled for the same time in Odessa and hotel rooms were an issue this 8 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

year. The same event was scheduled for the same time frame next year, so the board made the decision to move the school to September. Hopefully this will not cause any issues for the operators. Just wanted to make everyone aware especially the supervisors who schedule. Every day in life is a test of character. We should strive to develop a culture of honor. The key is to give people more than they expect and do it cheerfully. Be responsible for all of your actions. When you realize you have made a mistake, take immediate steps to correct it. While you are recovering from your mistake and you say “I’m sorry,” look the person in the eye who you have disappointed the most; for they will know if there is sincerity in your words – author unknown. He’s My Dad: To the Staff and Management - Author Unknown As you pick up that chart and scan that Medicare card, I hope that you will remember what I am about to say. I spent yesterday with you. I was there with my mother and father. We did not know where we were supposed to go or what we were supposed to do, for we have never needed your services before, and we never thought of ourselves as charity. I watched yesterday as a proud man became a diagnosis, a chart, a case number. I saw a weakened man stand in line, waiting for five hours to be shuffled through a system of impatient office workers and burned out nursing staff. I saw a man being robbed of any dignity and pride that he may have had left. I was amazed at how impersonal your staff was. Huffing and blowing when a patient presented the wrong form, or asked a question not understanding the numerous forms with redundant information. I was shocked at how carelessly your staff spoke of other patients’ cases in front of strangers or passersby’s. My dad is now only a green card, a file number, a patient who will ask for directions twice, since the first time they are mechanically recited by you without even looking up September 2011


or acknowledging his existence. But that person you just disrespected; that’s not my dad, that’s only what you see. What you fail to see is the hard working man who for the last 30 years treated your drinking water and spent time away from our family on holidays, so that you would have abundant water. A man who has children and grandchildren, all of whom think this man is the greatest. This man is everything a dad and husband should be - strong and firm yet tender, rough around the edges, a country boy, yet well respected by his co-workers, peers, and community. You will probably say these are words of a grieving child, lashing out in helplessness at the prospect and likelihood of losing a loved one. I would not disagree. Yet I would urge you not to discount the importance of what I say. Never lose sight of the people behind your charts. Each chart, each number, represents a person with feelings and whom you have the power to touch by your words and actions.

Officers:

Central Office:

CECE WHITE

RUSSELL HAMILTON

President white@txkusa.org

NORMA CLARK

President Elect nclark874@cableone.net

ROGER FUSSELL

Vice President rogerf@lumbertonmud.com

BYRON HARDIN

Immediate Past President bgmhardin@verizon.net

TOM CLARK

Second Past President T.Clark@bcmud.org

JAN CLAWSON

Ex-Officio jclawson@wachsco.com

Executive Director r.hamilton@twua.org

DAVID MOORE

Traning Coordinator d.moore@twua.org

ANGELA MONROE Event Coordinator a.monroe@twua.org

DONNA MARTIN Accounting d.martin@twua.org

HENRIETTA ADEE

Membership Coordinator h.adee@twua.org PATTI WUNDERLICH Administrative Assistant p.wunderlich@twua.org

I sincerely hope it is not but this person could be your neighbor, your loved one, or your friend, so please do not allow this person to become a case number, green card, or name to be marked off with a yellow marker as done at the end of the day. I pray that you will receive the intended meaning of this letter and reward the next person you greet with a kind word and smile; because that person is someone’s dad, husband, wife, mother, son or daughter - - or simply because he or she is a human being, created and unconditionally loved by God, just as you are. Pretty powerful customer service message. Some are more than likely wondering what this medical analogy has to do with water or wastewaster? Customer service is a part of everyone’s job. Some more than others but hopefully the next time you have to go reread a meter, check system pressure, or flush the main lines because that little old lady who calls every month, called again. Perhaps the next time she calls, you will think of this story and take an extra minute to hear her. Look her in the eye and offer a smile and be thankful that you have the opportunity to make a difference in someone else’s life and hopefully you will treat her with the same respect and dignity that you would want for your mother or loved one. S Remember – We do not need all the operators in Texas to be a member of TWUA – JUST YOU ! ! ! !

Staff: RUSSELL HAMILTON Executive Director r.hamilton@twua.org DAVID MOORE Training Coordinator d.moore@twua.org

P. O. Box 9000 • Kilgore, Texas 75663-9000 903-984-0551 • Fax: 903-984-5914 ANGELA MONROE Service Coordinator www.ana-lab.com • email: corp@ana-lab.com a.monroe@twua.org DONNA MARTIN Ana-Lab Corporation is an employee-owned Accounting d.martin@twua.org organization which provides industry, HENRIETTA ADEE government, consultants, and individuals with complete, timely, and accurate chemical analysis, including state approved total coliform testing.

Amarillo 806-355-3556

Dallas 972-620-8900

Brownsville 956-831-6437

Austin 512-821-0045

Houston 281-333-9414

T104704201

September 2011

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


PUBLIC EDUCATION NEWS: Kids Say the Darndest Things!

By Craig McCoy , Public Education Committee Member

In 1957, the late Art Linkletter penned a book called Kids say the Darndest Things that has become a comedy and family classic and is just as funny as it was then. In the book, Linkletter quoted children trying to explain the great mysteries of life – sometimes in ways that we grownups don’t expect and there is usually humor involved. Each year, the Public Education Committee conducts a state-wide poster and essay contest for children in grades 4 – 6. The contest is judged by members of the committee and TWUA staff. Winners of the contest have their work displayed at Annual School. Although it takes several hours to read and judge the sometimes 200+ essays, there are those essays that have a funny or sometimes prophetic statement made by kids that are only 9 – 11 years old. You know, we could learn from these youngsters! The italicized words are direct quotes from the children and my comments follow the quotes. Callie Wheeler, a 6th grader from Longview, TX is worried about aquatic creatures, when she says “If there were any chemicals that got into the rivers, lakes, or ponds, some animals could no longer survive.” Do you think she’s heard “Give a hoot, don’t pollute? Joey Alviar, a 4th grader from Belton, TX is worried about sea turtles, when he writes, “Paper bags (in the ocean) are mistaken for jelly fish and a jelly fish is a sea turtle’s favorite snack.” I didn’t know that! Alanni Connor, a 6th grader from Jefferson, TX is worried about her pets and certain other things involved with them, when she wrote, “Everyone’s pets would get dehydrated and pass out or even die. They would no longer be able to reproduce and eventually become extinct.” Most people think that I should not be able to reproduce, so I’ll just dehydrate! Does this make me a pet? Alfredo Nuñez, III, a 4th grader from Laredo, TX probably put it best when

he wrote, “Water is more valuable than gold or any other currency in the world.” Wise beyond his years! Shane Gonzales, a 4th grader from McDade, TX is worried that, without water, there would be no beaches, so, “I couldn’t go on a family vacation to see my cousins.” Can I go on vacation to the beach with you? Dorian Medina, a 4th grader from Alvarado, TX thinks that cleanliness is very important, when she wrote, “Water is important for people and animals because it helps them drink and take a bath so they don’t stink.” Don’t dogs still kinda smell even after their baths? Tia Glidewell, a 4th grader from Burkeville, TX agrees when she says, “(We) need clean clothes so we will not stink and have germs so we will be healthy.” We don’t need stinky clothes, do we? Cody Gill, a 4th grader from Wiergate, TX thinks of other things, when he said, “If we ran out of water, we would have to wear dirty clothes. We would have to go to bed on dirty sheets and no water to drink.” Reminds me of a few motels that I have stayed in! Kylie Neuvar, a 5th grade student from Victoria, TX, denotes the value of water when she says, “Water is the most valuable thing in nature. If we don’t have water, we would be drinking sodas and bad things like that.” I bet her dentist loves her! Hunter Price, a 6th grader from Aledo, TX, prefers not to drink tap water, when he notes, “Tap water can be nasty. It is best to not drink tap water because it can cause very bad and serious side effects.” I’ve heard that he is the new spokesman for the bottled water industry! Preston Lacy, a 5th grader from Vernon, TX, also feels strongly about the

10 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

importance of water when he writes, “So if you ever think that water is stupid or dumb, I would think twice if I were you!” I whole heartily agree Preston! And Dagan Baker, a 4th grader from Bangs, TX, has words for you lazy people when he notes, “I know the world can be a better place if we weren’t couch potatoes and keep being lazy. So let’s get up off the couch and save the water!!!!!!” Here, here Dagan! Another of my very favorites is from Kylie Akin, a 5th grader from McGregor, TX, who says, “The amount of water on Earth never changes. It’s strange to think about, but you may be drinking the same water George Washington or maybe even Leonardo de Caprio, drank. Strange, right?” I didn’t realize that de Caprio was that old! My personal favorite comes from Richard Landeras, a 4th grader from Robstown, TX, who asks, “Did you know that if you do not drink water or any liquid like Coke, Dr. Pepper or even beer (if you’re over 21 years or older) you can get dehydrated?” Sign me up for the beer – I’m 21 years or older and I’m dehydrated! But the best of the best quote is from Andrew John Hutchison, a 4th grader from Academy, TX who educates us about where water comes from, when he writes, “So I washed and got dressed and went down stairs and asked Mom where we get water. And she said it was from the Water Utilities Association.” That’s my story and I’m stickin’ to it! How about you, Russell? The teachers of these children aroused their creativity and got them to think about the importance of water to our lives. We may get a chuckle from their unique way of communicating their ideas, but each one was dedicated to entering our contest. If you would like your child’s school included in this program, please contact the TWUA office and give them the name of the school. As previously mentioned, the contest is open to 4th, 5th, and 6th graders. S

September 2011


TEXAS WATER UTILITIES ASSOCIATION 63rd WEST TEXAS REGIONAL SCHOOL LUBBOCK MEMORIAL CIVIC CENTER 1501 6TH STREET NOVEMBER 1 - NOVEMBER 3, 2011

Academic Offerings WASTEWATER Basic Wastewater Wastewater Treatment Wastewater Collection

WATER

WATER/WASTEWATER

Basic Water Water Distribution Ground Water Production *Surface Water 1 Water Laboratory

Water Utilities Safety Water Utilities Management Water Utilities Calculations Chlorinator Maintenance

Course schedule Tuesday 8:30 to12:00 and 1:00 to 5:30 Wednesday 8:00 to 12:00 and 1:00 to 5:00 Thursday 8:00 to 12:00 Buffet Lunch Tue, Wed, Thu, 12:00 to 1:00

*24 hour course will begin on Monday October 31st from 1:00 to 5:00

Registration and Fees Pre-Registration Until October 27, 2011 Internet Pre-Registration (Credit Card Only) Mail Pre-Registration (Check or Money Order) On-Site Registration (No Credit Cards Accepted) (Check, Money Order, or Cash)

TWUA Member Price $ 205 $ 200 $ 220 with Proof of TWUA Membership

Non-Member Price $ 260 $ 255 $ 270

Pre-registration via Mail or Internet (preferred) www.TWUA.org with Master Card or Visa. All students are provided study manuals, necessary class room supplies, a quality buffet lunch daily If testing, make arrangements with a TCEQ representative and have a SEPARATE CHECK made out to TCEQ.

Hotel Information Holiday Inn Civic Center (Host Hotel), 801 Ave Q, Lubbock, TX 79401. (806) 763-1200 Group rate $72.00. Reservation cut off date is October 21, 2011. (To reserve your room online http://events.ichotelsgroup.com/DPRD-7LXU9V/LBBCC/website/ Use Group code WRW) Radisson, 505 Ave Q, Lubbock, TX 79401. (806) 747-0171 La Quinta Inn, Inc., 601 Ave Q, Lubbock, TX 79401. (800) 531-5900

✄ Pre-Registration Form 63rd WTRWUS School

Name: ___________________________________________ SS# or TCEQ Operator License#____________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip: _______________________________________________Home Phone:________________________________ Work Phone:_______________________________ Course Selection: _______________________________________________ Representing (Organization): _____________________________________Job Title:___________________________________ TWUA District/chapter: ____________________________________________________________________________________ Email Address:____________________________________________________________________________________________ Make checks payable to WTRWUS. No purchase orders accepted. No refunds after October 21, 2011. Please mail Pre-Registration Form and payment to: Attn: Secretary / Treasurer, P.O. Box 5068, Lubbock TX 79408 If you have any questions, please call Candy McCarthy at (806) 775-3221 or Fax (806) 775-3246 September 2011

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


PES NEWS:

Data Management By Yilma Zerihum, Pretreatment Supervisor, Pretreatment & Lab Division, City of Dallas

In the pretreatment world, one of the major challenges to the pretreatment group is managing enormous the amount of data they collect on a daily basis. Why focus on the topic of Data Management? There are several reasons why we focus on Data Management. First, it is required by the regulatory and program approval agencies. The pretreatment group is required to not only create reports at various time intervals during the pretreatment years but also to maintain the records for a specified number of years ranging from three years to decades. The approval agencies such as the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) require all programs to comply with record retention schedules. Cities and municipalities in turn require their Industrial Users (IU) to maintain some of their records for a minimum of three years. The other reason why we focus on data management is that it saves time to organize and methodically keep information. Keeping data systematically will assist programs and industrial users to improve their compliance tracking, reporting flexibility, accuracy, and finally archiving. Improved efficiency, reliability, forecasting of trends such as SNC, pollutant loading, and tracking work flow, surcharge, and billing information are the benefits of a good data management system. One may ask what kind of data should be tracked. Sampling data is one of the most important items to be tracked. Depending on the pretreatment program configuration, the sampling data varies. Some programs the Control Authority (CA) will require the IU to conduct self-monitoring by defining the pollutant parameters as well as the frequency of sampling for each six-month period. On the other hand, many programs elect to conduct all compliance sampling and transfer the cost of sampling on to the IU. Even when the IU is required to self-monitor, the City must sample at least once a year to independently verify that the IUs are compliant. Although the size of pretreatment programs varies in terms of number of permitted industries from a dozen to more than one hundred, the amount of sampling data alone could be overwhelming. A typical routine involves, scheduling a facility for 12 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

sampling at least one month ahead of time, creating chain of custodies, collecting and sending the samples to the laboratory, receiving the sample data from the laboratory, checking the Quality Assurance and Quality Control parameters, creating reports and notifying the industrial users of their compliance or noncompliance status. The other set of information that must be tracked is inspection related facts. These include basic facility identifying information such as name, address, contact person the company’s production process, the pretreatment process, water accounts, and surcharge information. Permits are also tracked. Typically, a permit is issued for duration of five years. Several things could change regarding a permit. The permit signatory, the changing aspect of pollutant limits and flow conditions, change in regulations, and combined waste stream activities. Enforcement actions are another set of information that must be tracked. Compliance sampling is what creates the most number of enforcement actions in the form of notice of violation (NOV) since every violation limit must be acted upon. When NOVs are issued, a whole spectrum of additional enforcement actions could be taken according to the program’s Enforcement Response Plan (ERP) such as criminal and civil citations, administrative orders, show cause hearings, cease discharge, and even disconnection of services – although not necessarily in this order. Compliance plans and significant noncompliance (SNC) activities are among the information that are tracked routinely Reporting requirements by the industry, such as periodic or semi-annual compliance reports, baseline monitoring reports, 90 day report on compliance, correspondence, surcharge information, pollution prevention information, best management practices, Industrial User surveys, spill and slug discharge information all need to be tracked. Pretreatment personnel, sample monitoring personnel, laboratory staff, management, QA/QC officers are involved to a certain degree in keeping up with some of this data. The frequency of document ion varies depending on the activity. There are daily routines, monthly, quarterly and annual routines. As sampling activities are conducted on September 2011


a daily basis, information is entered on a daily basis while annual reports are compiled once a year per each Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (TPDES) permit. Telephone calls are another area of communication that may need to be tracked on a daily basis while compliance related meetings may only occur occasionally. Where the data would be kept? Permits, correspondence, sampling reports, citations, NOVs, PCRs, BMRs, 90-day ROCs, slug discharge control plans, should be kept in company binder files where they are accessible for the regulatory agencies and staff. On the other hand, similar information could be kept electronically in the form of spreadsheets, databases, word processing documents on network drives as well as individual workstations. Today’s technology even allows scanning hard copy paper documents into an edit able or readable file format. During the 1980’s and 1990’s spreadsheet software such as Lotus 1-2-3 were the dominant forms of data storage.

In the early 2000’s Microsoft Excel and Access were being used effectively. Since mid 2005, commercially available pretreatment information-tracking software such as Linko CTS, Enfotech PACS, and PreWin became widely available. Commercial Software selection can become a challenging task. What works for one may not necessarily work for the other program. A knowledgeable team of individuals should be assigned to evaluate various packages for features they are looking for, functionality, networking needs, ease of use, upgrade options, support and customer service.

September 2011

Other factors such as compatibility with other programs, such as the most popular Office Suites, are essential. Proprietary software that cannot be maintained by in-house IT personnel should be avoided if the cost of support and maintenance is not affordable. The initial cost and ongoing expenses, customization costs and the learning curve can also be factors in selecting suitable software. Productivity, network ability, multi-user friendly, performance speed should be additional factors. Most of all evaluating a demo, if available, and satisfaction by other customers in similar programs is key. Involve all level of employees while evaluating a particular product. Benefits of data management and tracking are - improved quality assurance data by minimizing inconsistencies, and other anomalies within the data, faster processing of sample result reports, better tracking of SNC reports. Additional benefits include the supervisor’s ability to keep track of inspectors work – reports and other activities, quicker turnover of reports to industries and regulators, better tracking of enforcement actions and compliance activities, minimizing errors in scheduling

sampling activities, ability to access and view information on the network from any workstation within the work group, shared information. Each year, the facts change and programs and their capability changes accordingly. A Database Software is an essential tool for tracking pretreatment activities. As each program is unique, data management system must be selected very carefully. S

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


TO REGISTER FOR ANY OF THESE CLASSES, GO TO WWW.TWUA.ORG/TRAINING.HTM

TWUA TRAIN To register for any T.W.U.A. classes – simply complete the registration form and fax to (512)459-7124 or contact T.W.U.A. @ 888-367-8982 for additional details. The name following the address is the scheduled instructor. The contact name, or last name listed after each class, is for information related to directions, training site or questions involving the host city. ***NOTICE: Due To Recent Increases For Training Materials – Class Costs Have Increased. ***Pre-Registration Is Defined To Mean 14 Days Prior To Any Scheduled Event. All registrations received after the pre-registration cutoff date must pay on-site registration fee. We strongly encourage everyone to please pre-register by fax, e-mail, or calling on site registrations are welcome but not preferred. Date

Location

Sept 13-15 Waco Oct 4-6 Coleman Oct 18-20 New Braunfels Sept 27-29

Woodway

Course

Address

Waco

Credit

Basic Water Basic Water Basic Water

200 Colcord Library Annex 355 FM 306

20 20 20

W W W

GW Prod

922 Estates Dr.

20

W

24

W

SWP I Sept 27-29

Hours

SWP II

200 Colcord

20

W

Oct 18-20 Victoria Dec 13-15 Waco May 15-17 New Braunfels

Distribution Distribution Distribution

2902 Bluff 200 Colcord 355 FM 306

20 20 20

W W W

Nov 15-17 New Braunfels

Basic Wastewater

355 FM 306

20

WW

WW Treatment Sept 13-15 New Braunfels Sept 20-22 Victoria Oct 11-13 Waco Nov 7-9 Corpus Nov 15-17 San Marcos June 12-14 New Braunfels

WW

WW Collection WW Collection WW Collection WW Collection WW Collection WW Collection

355 FM 306 2902 Bluff 200 Colcord 2726 Holly Activities Center 355 FM 306

20 20 20 20 20 20

WW WW WW WW WW WW

Sept 6-8

Gatesville

WW Lab

110 N 8th

20

WW

Sept 13-15 Oct 17-19

Early El Paso

Management Management

1030 Early Blvd 10751 Montana

20 20

W/WW W/WW

Nov 8-10 Gatesville Pump and Pumping April 17-19 New Braunfels Pump and Pumping

110 N 8th 355 FM 306

24 20

W/WW WW

Mar 20-22 New Braunfels

Safety

355 FM 306

20

W/WW

Nov 15-17 Victoria Feb 21-23 New Braunfels

Valve and Hydrant Valve and Hydrant

2902 Bluff 355 FM 306

20 20

W/WW W/WW

Sept 13-15

Carrollton

Calculations

4750 Josey Lane

20

W/WW

Sept 20-22

Gatesville

Chlorinator Maint

110 N 8th

20

W/WW

Dec 13-15

San Marcos

CSI/CCC

Activities Center

20

W/WW/CSI/BPAT

BPAT Refresher Sept 12-16

Beaumont

EIT (Instructor I)

1350 Langham

40

No operator hours

Oct 3-7 Oct 17-21

Amarillo Arlington

IDE (Instructor II) IDE (Instructor II)

Osage Plant TRA

40 40

No operator hours No operator hours

14 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

September 2011


NING SCHEDULE 20 HOUR CLASSES : (PRE-REGISTRATION) $180 MEMBER $230 NON-MEMBER (ON-SITE ) $230 MEMBER $280 NON-MEMBER 24 HOUR CLASSES: (PRE-REGISTRATION) $240 MEMBER $ 290 NON-MEMBER (ON-SITE) $290 MEMBER $340 NON-MEMBER

OCCUPATIONAL LICENSING CUSTOMERS: Beginning March 1, 2011, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) will accept a credit card or electronic check transfer for payments for all new occupational license and registration applications. As a result, any person applying for a new Occupational License or registration will be able to pay their application fee online using the TCEQ’s ePay system.   Note: All online renewals will continue to be processed through Texas. gov. The ePay system allows companies, cities, municipalities, and organizations to pay up to 20 employees at one time using this system. At the time of the exam a printed receipt will be required. The receipt is considered to be a copy of the email verifying your payment or a copy of the web page showing the Trace Number and Voucher Number(s). For additional information and instructions on how to use the ePay system, please visit http://www.tceq.texas.gov/licensing/exams/registration. If you have questions please contact the Occupational Licensing Section at 512-239-6133 or email us at licenses@tceq.texas.gov. Allan Vargas, Manager Occupational Licensing Section.

Registrar for your class today on-line at http://www.twua.org/training.php * Or download the form at http:// www.twua.org/forms.php Request a complimentary site risk assessment of your preexisting chemical feed system:

www.moodybros.com/twua 713 462 8544

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www.moodybros.com/twua September 2011

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


SAFETY NEWS:

Dallas Water Utilities Central Wastewater Treatment Plant Goes Electric By Gary Strong, Assistant Manager, CWWTP

“Green Energy” has arrived at the Dallas Central Wastewater Treatment Plant (CWWTP)! In 2010, the Engineering Department completed a study of the feasibility of using electric vehicles for transportation at the 400 acre plant to replace the gasoline pickups. The results indicated that in addition to benefitting the environment, a significant savings in the expense for gasoline could be achieved. A presentation was made for City Hall management and approval was granted to purchase two vehicles. In 2009, an electric pickup and an electric van were purchased. These vehicles as classified as “low-speed” electric vehicles, because they have a maximum speed of 30 miles per hour. Similar vehicles were in use at the Fort Worth Village Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant and were favorably recommended. Once the vehicles were received at the plant, the staff installed watt meters, so that the electrical usage could be tracked versus the miles driven. For 3 months, data was collected to determine the savings of electric vehicles over gasoline vehicles. Earlier data collected from the gasoline vehicles over a 2 year period revealed that $1.00 of gas would carry the vehicle approximately 2.7 miles. Using the electrical data collected, $1.00 of electricity would carry the van 37 miles and the pickup could travel 28 miles. Another way of looking at this expense is that this van and pickup would cost respectively, 7.5% and 10.2% in “fuel” costs compared to gasoline. But this was just for fuel. Additionally, the employees driving the gasoline vehicles frequently have to drive the vehicles to a fuel station off of the plant to refuel. With the electric vehicles, all the employees have to do is plug the vehicles into an electrical outlet when they are not driving. So, the City of Dallas also saves in this labor cost for the gasoline refueling trips. A complete fleet of electric pickups and vans at the CWWTP could save between $37,381 and $33,820 annually in operating costs for power consumption. This does not include the savings in labor expended when the employees leave the plant to purchase gasoline, diesel fuel or CNG. Additionally, the two electric vehicles purchase cost was roughly 60% of the purchase cost of a new pickup or van.

vehicles were equipped with heaters and air conditioning. Similar watt measurements with the heater running resulted in the operation costs for the electricity increasing 75% to 100%. This means that the cost comparisons for the van and pickup were increased to 15.0% and 20.4% of the gasoline versions. Also, the heater and air conditioners were not as robust as the non-electric systems. In any case, this new trend in electric vehicles seems to have real benefits, at least in certain situations. In 2010, the City of Dallas was given a Federal grant to supply more electric pickups. In March 2011, nine low speed electric pickups were delivered to the plant. Included with the vehicles were three 220 Volt electric charge stations that can charge the vehicle batteries from dead to full charge in less than 60 minutes. These vehicles have all been assigned to five different departments at the plant for personnel transportation. Each department has initiated their role in reducing air pollution, improving the environment and saving the City of Dallas money. If these vehicles run properly, what can Dallas expect to save? Well, a bunch. These 11 electric vehicles should be able to save the following each year: $13,150 + in gasoline costs at today’s prices $8,500 for the labor to fill the gasoline tanks $5,700 less for maintenance expenses $19,700 per vehicle in total Also, the difference in the purchase cost of each is $10,000 less, so if the City of Dallas purchases 11 electric vehicles, they can also save $110,000 up front. Oh yeah, what about the environment? This is the big winner! These vehicles have zero emissions. The gasoline engines typically emit over 18,000 pounds per year of carbon dioxide. These 11 electric vehicles will reduce the level of carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere above the plant by 99 tons each year. Now, that’s clean, green energy at work. S

Ok, this is impressive, but electric vehicles can’t be all good, right? The experiences learned from these first two vehicles show that they cannot replace all of the gas guzzlers. It will be necessary to keep larger gasoline vehicles for handling heavier jobs and driving off of the plant. Also, there were issues with the smaller leg room and head room of the electric vehicles. Both of the new 16 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

September 2011


It’s That Time of Year!

Is your utility prepared and are you a member of TXWARN? TXWARN or Texas Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network was established a couple of years ago after Hurricane Katrina hit the Texas coast and is maintained by the Texas Section of AWWA. It cost nothing to become a member and the resources that TXWARN provides are remarkable. If you are not a member it only takes a little effort to register and once the registration process is complete, and the mutual aid agreement is signed you will receive updates and alerts from TXWARN of approaching storms, tornados, events, or utilities that are in need.

Hurricane Activity

Entities that are members have listed equipment, manpower, and resources that could be available in the time of need. Members simply go to TXWARN.org (or call 866-989-9276) and under the incident tab state the need and start the process to request aid and assistance. TXWARN then sends out the request and acts as a facilitator to match the need with an entity that has the capability of providing assistance. Temporary access to items such as generators, pumps, licensed operators, equipment, is streamlined using this tool so if you have not taken the time to register and become a member you are highly encouraged to do so. By listing your resources you are NOT obligating yourself to participate if a need arises.

Tornados

The decision to participate in an event always remains with the entity and it is understood that everyone will not be able to participate in all requests for aid and assistance. TXWARN is a tremendous resource and tool that should be strongly considered and incorporated into your individual emergency response plan. S For more information or to register go to www.TXWARN.ORG Wildfires September 2011

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


Drought Continues to Rise In Texas: Provided by: Texas Water Development Board As of August 10, 2011

TX Share of TX Share of Current Conservatio Current Conservatio TX Share of TXCurrent Share of Stage (feet Conservatio n Capacity Storage Percent Full Current Current Conservatio Current n Capacity Storage Stage (feet Capacity (acre-feet) Storage Percent Full above msl) n (acre-feet) n Capacity (acre-feet) Storage (acre-feet) above msl) (acre-feet) (acre-feet)

Lake ID

Reservoir Name

(acre-feet)

(acre-feet)

12060

Abilene, Lake

2,005.01

6,099

2,467

40.45

6,099

2,467

10080

Addicks Reservoir

70.28

214,151

32

0.01

214,151

32

12015

2,213.98

94,808

79,456

83.81

94,808

79,456

23050 23050

Alan Henry Reservoir Alan Henry Reservoir Amistad Reservoir, Amistad Reservoir, International International

1,111.46 1,111.46

3,274,057 3,274,057

2,933,646 2,933,646

89.6 89.6

1,840,020 1,840,020

1,841,000 1,841,000

8020 8020

Amon Amon G G Carter, Carter, Lake Lake

915.84 915.84

27,353 27,353

14,103 14,103

51.56 51.56

27,353 27,353

14,103 14,103

12220

Aquilla Lake

533.86

44,534

34,221

76.84

44,534

34,221

8120

Arlington, Lake

541.16

40,156

24,060

59.92

40,156

24,060

2190 2190

Arrowhead, Lake Lake Arrowhead,

918.56 918.56

235,997 235,997

141,109 141,109

59.79 59.79

235,997 235,997

141,109 141,109

6010 6010

Athens, Lake Lake Athens,

436.53 436.53

29,435 29,435

23,674 23,674

80.43 80.43

29,435 29,435

23,674 23,674

Austin, Lake

492.03

24,031

22,830

95

24,031

22,830

82.45

66,966

61,279

91.51

66,966

61,279

418.13

46,122

37,462

81.22

46,122

37,462

Lake ID

12060 10080 12015

14240

14240 6130

Reservoir Name

Abilene, Lake

Addicks Reservoir

Austin, Lake

B A Steinhagen Lake

6130

B A Steinhagen Lake

8210

Bardwell Lake

8210

10090

Bardwell Lake

Barker Reservoir

10090

Barker Reservoir

12290 8060

2,005.01 70.28

2,213.98

492.03 82.45

418.13 73.07

6,099

214,151 94,808

24,031

66,966 46,122

204,819

73.07

204,819

Belton Lake Benbrook Lake

587.31 683.91

435,225 85,648

8060 4030

Benbrook Bob Sandlin,Lake Lake

683.91 330.71

4030 2270

Bob Sandlin, Lake Bonham, Lake

14150 2270

2,467 32

79,456

22,830

61,279 37,462 6

0.01

83.81

95

91.51 81.22 0

6,099

214,151 94,808

24,031

66,966 46,122

204,819

2,467 32

79,456

22,830

61,279 37,462 6

0

204,819

358,393 53,424

82.35 62.38

435,225 85,648

358,393 53,424

85,648 198,449

53,424 144,032

62.38 72.58

85,648 198,449

53,424 144,032

330.71 562.63

198,449 11,026

144,032 8,662

72.58 78.56

198,449 11,026

144,032 8,662

Brady Creek Reservoir Bonham, Lake

1,728.99 562.63

29,110 11,026

8,707 8,662

29.91 78.56

29,110 11,026

8,707 8,662

8010 14150

Bridgeport, Lake Brady Creek Reservoir

825.37 1,728.99

366,236 29,110

251,661 8,707

68.72 29.91

366,236 29,110

251,661 8,707

14140 8010

Brownwood, Lake Bridgeport, Lake

1,410.08 825.37

131,427 366,236

55,923 251,661

42.55 68.72

131,427 366,236

55,923 251,661

14170 14140

Buchanan, Lake Brownwood, Lake

996.61 1,410.08

831,889 131,427

441,138

55,923

53.03 42.55

831,889 131,427

441,138

14170

Buchanan, Lake

996.61

831,889

441,138

53.03

831,889

441,138

167.28

59,800

27,800

46.49

29,900

13,900

12290

4100

18020

4100

8190 18020 14030 8190 21060

Belton Lake

Caddo Lake

Canyon Lake CedarCaddo CreekLake Reservoir Trinity Canyon Lake Champion Creek Cedar Creek Reservoir Reservoir Trinity Choke Canyon Champion Creek Reservoir

587.31

167.28

902.62

59,800

378,781

358,393

27,800

328,612

82.35

46.49

86.76

435,225

29,900

378,781

6

358,393

55,923

13,900

328,612

316.8 902.62

644,686 378,781

487,623 328,612

75.64 86.76

644,686 378,781

487,623 328,612

2,042.38 316.8

41,618 644,686

5,094 487,623

12.24 75.64

41,618 644,686

5,094 487,623

210.93

695,262

472,190

67.92

695,262

472,190

1,501.85

45.02

26,000

11,705

2,042.38

14110 21060

Reservoir Cisco,Canyon Lake Choke Coleman, Lake Reservoir

18100 12110

14030

435,225

6

40.45

26,000

5,094

11,705

12.24

1,702.94 210.93

38,076 695,262

16,542 472,190

43.45 67.92

38,076 695,262

16,542 472,190

ColetoCisco, CreekLake Reservoir

94.88 1,501.85

31,040 26,000

23,696 11,705

76.34 45.02

31,040 26,000

23,696 11,705

14020 14110

Colorado City, Lake Coleman, Lake

2,053.60 1,702.94

30,765 38,076

11,306 16,542

36.75 43.45

30,765 38,076

11,306 16,542

10060 18100

Conroe, Lake Coleto Creek Reservoir

12110

41,618

41,618

5,094

197.11

94.88

416,177

31,040

344,270

23,696

82.72 76.34

416,177

31,040

344,270

Corpus Christi Colorado City, Lake Reservoir, Lake

2,053.60 86.86

30,765 256,961

11,306 137,864

36.75 53.65

30,765 256,961

11,306 137,864

10060 2300

Conroe, Lake Crook, Lake

197.11 474.28

416,177 9,195

344,270 7,438

82.72 80.9

416,177 9,195

344,270 7,438

4010

Corpus ChristiLake Cypress Springs,

375.19

66,756

57,950

86.81

66,756

12130

14020 21070

21070

Reservoir, Lake

23,696

57,950

86.86

256,961

137,864

53.65

256,961

137,864

2300 14040

Daniel, Lake

Crook, Lake E V Spence Reservoir

1,267.47

474.28 1,814.86

9,195 517,272

7,438 2,730

80.9 0.53

9,195 517,272

7,438 2,730

4010 8030

Cypress Springs,Lake Lake Eagle Mountain

375.19 644.2

66,756 179,880

57,950 139,689

86.81 77.66

66,756 179,880

57,950 139,689

12130 2150

Daniel, Lake Electra, Lake Falcon Reservoir, E V Spence Reservoir International

1,267.47 1,091.48

9,435 5,626

2,369 56

25.1 1

9,435 5,626

2,369 56

517,272

2,730

14040

23070

1,814.86 283.22

8030 Eagle Mountain Lake 644.2 18 TEXAS2150 WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org Electra, Lake 1,091.48 Falcon Reservoir, International 23070 283.22

9,435

517,272

2,369

2,730

25.1

0.53

2,645,646

1,400,133

139,689

77.66

5,626

56

1

2,645,646

1,400,133

52.92

179,880

52.92

9,435

1,550,349

2,369

0

179,880 139,689 September 2011 5,626 56

1,550,349

0


Current Conservatio Stage (feet n Capacity above msl) (acre-feet)

Lake ID

Reservoir Name

12060

Farmers Abilene, Creek Lake Reservoir

2,005.01

Fork Reservoir, Lake

397.57

2210

10080 5040

12015

12080

12310 23050 12140

8020

12180

12220

Addicks Reservoir

821.71

6,099

14,325

605,061

472,337

70,030

41,546

214,151

Alan Henry Reservoir

2,213.98

94,808

Georgetown, Lake International

772.2 1,111.46

Graham, Lake

1,069.53

Amon G Carter, Lake Granbury, Lake

1,627.27

915.84

2,467

21,445

70.28

Fort Phantom Hill, Lake Amistad Reservoir,

TX Share of TX Share of Current Conservatio Current Storage Percent Full n Capacity Storage (acre-feet) (acre-feet) (acre-feet)

36,823 3,274,057 45,260

27,353

32

66.8

6,099

14,325

605,061

472,337

214,151

79,456

83.81

94,808

17,240 2,933,646

46.82 89.6

32,802

78.06

59.33 72.47

14,103

51.56

34,221

76.84

128,046

100,681

500.93

50,779

39,262

2,467

21,445

0.01

689.14

70,030

36,823 1,840,020 45,260

27,353

78.63

128,046

77.32

50,779

79,456

41,546

17,240 1,841,000 32,802

14,103

100,681

Granger Lake

Aquilla Lake

533.86

8120 8070

Arlington, Lake Grapevine Lake

541.16 532.78

40,156 164,702

24,060 150,252

59.92 91.23

40,156 164,702

24,060 150,252

2050 2190

Greenbelt Lake Arrowhead, Lake

2,627.67 918.56

59,500 235,997

12,319 141,109

20.7 59.79

59,500 235,997

12,319 141,109

8220

Halbert, Lake

361.16

6,033

2,661

44.11

6,033

14100

Hords Creek Lake

1,881.25

8280

Houston County Lake

257.82

8210

10090 2220

Hubbard Creek Bardwell Lake Reservoir

BarkerHReservoir Hubert Moss Lake

1,169.28

14180 12290

14240

6130 10030 12120

Athens, Lake Austin, Lake

B AHouston, Steinhagen Lake Lake

436.53

29,435

23,674

492.03

24,031

22,830

82.45 39.83

66,966 103,394

418.13

5,684

17,113

46,122

39,262

2,661

29,435

23,674

95

24,031

22,830

61,279 86,525

91.51 83.68

66,966 103,394

61,279 86,525

37,462

81.22

14,401

73.07 712.92

204,819 24,155

153,162

6 21,961

Inks Lake Belton Lake

887.33 587.31

14,074 435,225

14010

J B Thomas, Lake

Benbrook Lake

2,208.07

Jacksonville, Lake

683.91

199,931

6030

Bob Sandlin, Lake

418.48

25,670

4030

34,221

80.43

0

318,067

8060

44,534

32

12330

6010

44,534

40.45

0

84.15

17,113

46,122

0

14,401

37,462

0 90.92

318,067

204,819 24,155

153,162

13,382 358,393

95.09 82.35

14,074 435,225

13,382 358,393

85,648

4,247 53,424

2.12 62.38

199,931

85,648

4,247 53,424

330.71

198,449

144,032

72.58

198,449

144,032

11,026 142,875

8,662 127,734

78.56 89.4

11,026 142,875

8,662 127,734

562.63 519.92

2130 14150

BradyKemp, Creek Lake Reservoir

1,131.14 1,728.99

245,308 29,110

115,203 8,707

46.96 29.91

245,308 29,110

115,203 8,707

2160 8010

Kickapoo, Lake Bridgeport, Lake

1,037.75 825.37

85,825 366,236

48,973 251,661

57.06 68.72

85,825 366,236

48,973 251,661

14140

Brownwood, Lake

1,410.08

131,427

55,923

42.55

131,427

55,923

14170 8110

Buchanan, Lake Lewisville Lake

996.61 518.27

831,889 570,964

441,138 474,678

53.03 83.14

831,889 570,964

4100 12380

Caddo Lake Limestone, Lake

167.28 356.61

59,800 208,015

27,800 137,010

46.49 65.87

29,900 208,015

13,900 137,010

8290 18020

Livingston, Lake Canyon Lake

129.29 902.62

1,741,312 378,781

1,603,038 328,612

92.06 86.76

1,741,312 378,781

1,603,038 328,612

8005

Lost Creek Cedar CreekReservoir Reservoir Lyndon B Johnson, Trinity Lake Champion Creek Mackenzie Reservoir Reservoir Martin Lake Choke Canyon Medina Lake Reservoir

1,003.37

11,950

9,748

81.58

11,950

9,748

316.8

644,686

487,623

75.64

644,686

487,623

3,016.19

46,453

4,789

10.31

46,453

12270

8190

14200 2020

14030 5150

19010 21060 1030

12110

Leon, Lake

484.41

1,363.21

824.75

443,844 26,421

113,323

298,650 12,021

111,782

50.77

67.29 45.5

98.64

260,332

21,766

Bonham, Lake Joe Pool Lake

Lavon Lake

132,163

25,670

Jim Chapman Lake

8160

260,332

84.79

6 21,961

3010

2270 8130

431.66

21,766

48.15

5,684

443,844 26,421

113,323

132,163

298,650 12,021

441,138 474,678

111,782 4,789

2,042.38

41,618

75,116

37,386

5,094

12.24

41,618

75,116

37,386

1,028.07 210.93

254,823 695,262

92,914 472,190

36.46 67.92

254,823 695,262

92,914 472,190

Cisco, Lake

1,501.85

26,000

11,705

45.02

26,000

11,705

Meredith, Lake

296.43

2,845.59

38,076 7,065

16,542 4,850

43.45 68.64

38,076 7,065

16,542 4,850

18100 4020

Coleto CreekReservoir Reservoir Monticello

94.88 340.58

31,040 34,740

23,696 34,740

76.34 >100.00

31,040 34,740

23,696 34,740

8140 14020

Mountain Lake ColoradoCreek City, Lake

455.62 2,053.60

22,840 30,765

19,507 11,306

85.41 36.75

22,840 30,765

19,507 11,306

5160

Murvaul, Lake

261.76

38,285

26,943

70.38

38,285

21070 2300

Crook, Lake

6100 8230 8180

Navarro Mills Lake

27,888

0

1,702.94 859.34

14033

44.62

500,000

Coleman, Lake Mineral Wells, Lake

Conroe, Lake Nacogdoches, Lake Corpus Christi Natural Dam Lake Reservoir, Lake

12,443

0

Millers Creek Reservoir

10060

27,888

0

5,094

12040

14110 12170

1,325.21

779,556

49.77

12,443

26,943

197.11

416,177

344,270

82.72

416,177

344,270

2,447.32

54,560

26,489

48.55

54,560

26,489

269.49

39,521

22,318

56.47

39,521

22,318

86.86

256,961

137,864

53.65

256,961

137,864

474.28

9,195

7,438

80.9

9,195

7,438

422.12

14060 14040

C Fisher Lake E VOSpence Reservoir

No Data 1,814.86

79,483 517,272

Available 2,730

644.2

179,880

1,091.48

5,626

139,689 77.66 179,880 139,689 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org 56 1 5,626 56

283.22

2,645,646

66,756

57,950

9,435

2,369 Not

1,036.00

15,395

3,105

1,400,133

86.81

20.17 25.1 Not Available 0.53

8,583

39,144

1,267.47

375.19

73.96

49,826

Daniel, Lake

8030 Eagle Mountain Lake September 2011 2150 Electra, Lake Falcon Reservoir, International 23070

6,348

78.56

2170

12130

8,583

39,144

New Terrell City Lake North Fork Buffalo Cypress Springs, Lake Creek Reservoir

4010

501.24

49,826

6,348

66,756

57,950

9,435

2,369 Not

79,483 517,272

Available 2,730

15,395

3,105

Continued on next page

52.92

1,550,349

0

ďƒ„


Current Conservatio Stage (feet n Capacity above msl) (acre-feet)

Current Storage (acre-feet)

TX Share of TX Share of Conservatio Current Percent Full n Capacity Storage (acre-feet) (acre-feet)

Lake ID

Reservoir Name

12060 14090 10080 4070 12015 14050

Abilene, Lake O H Ivie Reservoir Addicks Reservoir O the Pines, Lake Alan Henry Reservoir Oak CreekReservoir, Reservoir Amistad

2,005.01 1,516.75 70.28 226.51 2,213.98 1,987.57

6,099 554,340 214,151 248,022 94,808 39,260

2,467 125,480 32 205,381 79,456 17,177

40.45 22.64 0.01 82.81 83.81 43.75

6,099 554,340 214,151 248,022 94,808 39,260

2,467 125,480 32 205,381 79,456 17,177

23050 6020

International Palestine, Lake Amon G Carter, Lake Palo Duro Reservoir

1,111.46 340.63

3,274,057 370,909

2,933,646 280,262

1,840,020 370,909

1,841,000 280,262

915.84 2,851.35 533.86 863.26

27,353 60,897 44,534 26,848

14,103 5,754 34,221 18,454

89.6 75.56 51.56 9.45

27,353 60,897 44,534 26,848

14,103 5,754 34,221 18,454

541.16 729.32 918.56 449.27

40,156 26,008 235,997 113,684

24,060 19,733 141,109 104,101

40,156 26,008 235,997 113,684

24,060 19,733 141,109 104,101

436.53 992.82 492.03 1,152.65

29,435 540,340 24,031 55,457

23,674 429,263 22,830 23,360

29,435 540,340 24,031 55,457

23,674 429,263 22,830 23,360

82.45 600.26 418.13 431.71

66,966 4,070 46,122 452,040

61,279 1,228 37,462 375,476

66,966 4,070 46,122 452,040

61,279 1,228 37,462 375,476

8020 1020 12220 12160 8120 12200 2190 2290 6010 12150 14240 12280 6130 2240 8210 8170

Aquilla Lake Palo Pinto, Lake Arlington, Lake Pat Cleburne, Lake Arrowhead, Lake Pat Mayse Lake Athens, Lake Lake Possum Kingdom Austin, Lake Proctor Lake B A Randell Steinhagen LakeLake

59.79 91.57 80.43 79.44 95 42.12 91.51 30.16

73.07 629.58 587.31 2,799.32 683.91 309.87 330.71

204,819 788,167 435,225 130,170 85,648 1,087,840 198,449

6 707,957 358,393 11,878 53,424 877,740 144,032

81.22 83.06 0 89.82 82.35 9.12 62.38 80.69 72.58

562.63 153.6 1,728.99 230.34 825.37 775.16 1,410.08 1,412.38 996.61 609.9 167.28 453.69 902.62 2,104.02

11,026 2,857,076 29,110 147,104 366,236 151,367 131,427 51,570 831,889 227,771 59,800 17,838 378,781 9,688

8,662 1,798,000 8,707 75,642 251,661 151,367 55,923 32,343 441,138 160,596 27,800 9,930 328,612 3,813

78.56 62.93 29.91 51.42 68.72 >100.00 42.55 62.72 53.03 70.51 46.49 55.67 86.76 39.36

11,026 2,857,076 29,110 147,104 366,236 151,367 131,427 51,570 831,889 227,771 29,900 17,838 378,781 9,688

8,662 1,798,000 8,707 75,642 251,661 151,367 55,923 32,343 441,138 160,596 13,900 9,930 328,612 3,813

432.72 316.8

871,685 644,686

704,779 487,623

80.85 75.64

871,685 644,686

704,779 487,623

35.2 2,042.38 612.35

152,723 41,618 2,575,777

82,163 5,094 2,200,858

53.8 12.24 85.44

152,723 41,618 1,287,889

82,163 5,094 1,100,429

5170 21060

Bonham, Lake Sam Rayburn Reservoir Brady Creek Reservoir Somerville Lake Bridgeport, Lake Squaw Creek Reservoir Brownwood, Lake Stamford, Lake Buchanan, Lake Stillhouse Hollow Lake Caddo Lake Sulphur Springs, Lake Canyon Lake Sweetwater, Lake Cedar Creek Reservoir Tawakoni, TrinityLake Champion Creek Texana, Lake Reservoir Texoma, Lake Choke Canyon ToledoReservoir Bend Reservoir

162.01 210.93

4,472,900 695,262

2,892,480 472,190

64.67 67.92

2,236,450 695,262

1,446,240 472,190

12110 14230

Cisco, Lake Travis, Lake

1,501.85 638.14

26,000 1,113,255

11,705 497,461

45.02 44.69

26,000 1,113,255

11,705 497,461

14110 14070

Coleman, Lake Twin Buttes Reservoir

1,702.94 1,894.90

38,076 177,850

16,542 3,862

43.45 2.17

38,076 177,850

16,542 3,862

18100 6065

ColetoTyler, CreekLake Reservoir

94.88 370.55

31,040 73,256

23,696 52,112

76.34 71.14

31,040 73,256

23,696 52,112

14020 12240

Colorado Waco,City, LakeLake

2,053.60 457.26

30,765 198,993

11,306 161,234

36.75 81.02

30,765 198,993

11,306 161,234

Conroe, Lake 197.11 416,177 Waxahachie, Lake 528.56 10,846 Corpus Christi Weatherford, Lake 889.99 17,789 Reservoir, Lake 86.86 256,961 White River Lake 2,351.13 29,880 Crook, Lake 474.28 9,195 Whitney, Lake 518.7 553,349 Cypress Springs, Lake 375.19 66,756 Worth, Lake 591.29 24,419 Daniel, Lake 1,267.47 9,435 Wright Patman Lake 225.62 263,916 E V Spence Reservoir 1,814.86 517,272 WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org Eagle Mountain Lake 644.2 179,880

344,270 9,037

82.72 83.32

416,177 10,846

344,270 9,037

11,831 137,864 6,228 7,438 301,555 57,950 15,580 2,369 249,845 2,730

66.51 53.65 20.84 80.9 54.5 86.81 63.8 25.1 94.67 0.53

17,789 256,961 29,880 9,195 553,349 66,756 24,419 9,435 263,916 517,272

139,689

77.66

56

1

10090 8100 12290 23043 8060 8240 4030 2270 6120 14150 12360 8010 12190 14140 12090 14170 12300 4100 3040 18020 12050

5010 8190 16010 14030 2230

10060 8200

8050 21070 12020 2300 12210 4010 8040 12130 3080 14040 20 TEXAS 8030 2150

Bardwell Lake Ray Hubbard, Lake Barker Reservoir Ray Roberts, Lake Belton Lake Red Bluff Reservoir Benbrook Lake Richland-Chambers Bob Reservoir Sandlin, Lake

76.84 68.74 59.92 75.87

Electra, Lake Falcon Reservoir,

1,091.48

5,626

204,819 788,167 435,225 130,170 85,648 1,087,840 198,449

6 707,957 358,393 11,878 53,424 877,740 144,032

11,831 137,864 6,228 7,438 301,555 57,950 15,580 2,369 249,845 2,730 September 2011 179,880 139,689 5,626

56


CUSTOMER SERVICE NEWS: Avoiding Workplace Conflict

By David Friedman, Customer Service Coach Unfortunately, conflict between human beings is about as old as life itself. Is there any doubt that early cave dwellers likely got in disagreements about whose turn it was to go snag another wooly mammoth or who got to sleep closest to the fire? They may have lacked the sophisticated swear words we’ve been clever enough to invent but the conflict was there, nonetheless. No matter the era, the reality is, if you put two or more people in close quarters, sooner or later, there will be conflict. So it goes in today’s modern office. The only thing worse is that in the workplace, negative internal relationships can severely impact how well your organization operates. And ultimately, how well your external customers are treated. We all know that it’s really difficult for people to concentrate on providing high levels of external service, when there’s conflict, unhappiness or lack of respect within an organization. While it’s not possible to avoid all employee conflicts, there are ways to better manage most situations. When a major conflict erupts between coworkers, it’s usually necessary to involve a manager to help resolve it. However, there’s a process to help resolve internal relationship issues and possibly prevent the need for management involvement. Used properly, this three-step process will help maintain a positive, healthy workplace atmosphere. We call it the B.I.F. Approach. EXAMPLE OF AN INTERNAL CONFLICT SITUATION: Let’s imagine there are two coworkers named Cynthia and Joe. They sit near each other in open cubicles. During his breaks, Joe enjoys listening to his favorite heavy metal band on his desktop boom box. This music really disturbs Cynthia and she has trouble concentrating while talking with customers. EXISTING METHOD FOR HANDLING CONFLICT: Cynthia walks up to Joe and yells, “Hey Joe, do you have any clue how loud that is? Turn it down, now!” Joe will likely give an angry stare and either ignore her request or turn the volume higher! Obviously, simply ordering Joe to change his behavior isn’t likely to be an effective tactic.

September 2011

LEARNING THE B. I. F. APPROACH: Here’s a better way. Let’s examine the B.I.F. Approach letter by letter: B - Behavior - First, describe the behavior. Use specific facts or an objective description. It’s important to keep from asking questions that will put him or her on the defensive and possibly start an argument all before we even get to the point. I - Impact - Next, tell the effects that the behavior is having on you. How is it impacting your job or your performance? F - Feelings - Lastly, relate how the behavior and impact cause you to feel. After that, you stop and let the other person absorb what you said. Often, that silent period will result in the other person apologizing or suggesting a solution. HANDLING CONFLICT USING THE B. I. F. APPROACH: Cynthia: “Excuse me, Joe... That radio is really distracting. It’s making it difficult for me to hear my customers and concentrate. It’s embarrassing for me because I’ve just had to ask my customer to repeat herself a number of times.” Sentence by sentence that was: B - Behavior “That radio is really distracting". I - Impact “It’s making it difficult for me to hear and concentrate. “ F - Feelings “It’s embarrassing for me because I’ve had to ask my customer to repeat herself a number of times.” Then, Cynthia stops to let Joe absorb what was said. Cynthia’s tone of voice is also very important. It needs to be even-tempered because a calm delivery sets the tone of the conversation. If Cynthia’s tone is angry or attacking, it’s likely Joe will mirror that tone and respond in the same angry way. Obviously, the B. I. F. Approach won’t work in every case. But in many situations, it can help diffuse minor workplace conflicts and reduce the need for management involvement. Plus, you’ll know you handled the situation professionally. Give the B.I.F. Approach a try the next time you encounter a workplace conflict situation. S

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CENTRAL TEXAS REGIONAL AWARDS

CRAIG MCCOY – DEDICATED SERVICE CENTRAL TEXAS REGION SCHOOL CHAIRMAN

TERESA BRYANT, CITY OF WACO OUTSTANDING SERVICE PUBLIC EDUCATION

JONAH WATER – BEST TASTING GROUNDWATER (PICTURED L TO R – BILL BROWN, GM, GARY SMITH, BEST TASTING WATER COORDINATOR, GARY BOPP, OPERATIONS MANAGER

CITY OF ROUND ROCK – BEST TASTING SURFACE WATER (PICTURED L TO R – GARY SMITH, DAVID LOGAN, CITY OF ROUND ROCK

MASON MILLER ALLIANCE AWARD

ALBERT ADAMS CITY OF AUSTIN – OUTSTANDING SERVICE LAB ANALYST PHOTOS PROVIDED BY : CRAIG MCCOY

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September 2011


TEXAS WATER UTILITIES ASSOCIATION Individual Membership Application Use this form to: 1) Join T.W.U.A. "At Large" 2) Join T.W.U.A. and a District/Chapter

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Submit all dues to the T.W.U.A. Central Office: 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 W, Austin, TX 78723-1093 For more information, call 888-367-8982 or 512-459-3124. Fax: 512-459-7124. September 2011

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PowerGrit.com © 2011 PowerGrit® is a registered trademark and patent pending product of Blount Inc.

September 2011


TWUA ANNOUNCEMENTS : Congratulations are in Order to our TWUA Publication Committee Chairman! Ashbrook Simon-Hartley has named Paul Bland National Business Development Manager of their Aftermarket Business Unit. Ashbrook’s Aftermarket business continues to grow in sales volume and product reach in the course of developing client relationships. Successful expansion into the equipment rental market, centrifuge repair services, UV lamp direct replacement, and general strategic growth in the business unit created the need to make positive changes to better serve Ashbrook’s client base throughout North America. Mr. Bland brings 23 years of industry experience to the position. Bland’s career includes broad working knowledge of both municipal and industrial water and wastewater projects with focus on liquid solids separation, process, training, equipment sourcing, and solutions. Bland’s service to the water and wastewater industry include leadership roles in several nationally recognized trade associations including the Texas Water Utility Association as Publications Committee Chairman, the Rocky Mountain and California Water Environment Associations. Ashbrook Simon-Hartley, Water and Wastewater Treatment Solutions. (800)362-9041 www. as-h.com

Licensing Review Questions 1. The Wet Well in a lift station measures 12 feet X 12 feet & is 30 feet deep – How many gallons of water will this tank hold if 100 % full ? a. 4,320 b. 5,400 c. 9,000 d. 32,313 e. 40,392 2. All trenches over ______ deep require shoring protection a. Three Feet b. Four Feet c. Five Feet d. Seven Feet e. Only Suggestions, No Current Requirements 3. Recycling is water recovery from spent backwash and sludge drainage. Recycling carries the risk of returning to the plant _____________ and _________. a. Giardia and Cryptosporidium b. Trihalomethanes and Waste Sludge c. Supernate and Mixed Liquor d. Mudballs and Snails e. Filter Flies and Snails 4. You are charged with the task of Chlorinating 20,000 gallons of water in a new distribution line with a dosage of 50 mg/l using 65% HTH. How many pounds of HTH will you use? Hint: MG x 8.34 x dose = lbs 100% chlorine/0.65 = lbs HTH a. 1.28 pounds b. 12.8 pounds c. 128 pounds d. 8.34 pounds e. 7.48 pounds Answers to Licensing Review: 1.D 2.C 3.A 4.B

September 2011

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TWUA PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS CARDS:

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Texas Offices:

Austin: 512.328.8975 • Dallas: 972.393.3100 • El Paso: 915.545.4400 Houston: 713.759.0999 • San Antonio: 210.824.8949 45 Offices Nationwide • BrownandCaldwell.com

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“Russell Drilling Co., Inc.” 15286 U.S. Hwy. 259 North Nacogdoches, Texas 75965 Municipal Well Drilling & Designing Complete Submersible Pump Service and Well Workover Service

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Phone: (936) 569-8909

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WATER RADIOCHEMISTRY Tritium Uranium Radiostrontium Radium Isotopes

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Contact: Analytical Department 4601 Indiana St. Golden, Colorado 80403 303-279-4501

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September 2011


R E T A W E T S A W & R E G T N A I N W I A TR

Indust ry new s and course inform ation e-mail ed dire ctly to you r inbo x.

p u g n Signi fast, e, f a s . is e l p im s d n a

Visit org/ subs c to si gn up ribe .

teex. our r t a us ewate n i o J st a W r & g Expo s e t a W xa nin Trai gelo, Te . An , 2011 n a in S . 18-20 Oct September 2011

Infrastructure Training & Safety Institute 301 Tarrow | College Station, TX 77840 800-SAFE-811 (800-723-3811) teex.org/www | itsi@teexmail.tamu.edu

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GROUND WATER TREATMENT

LICENSES ISSUED: JUNE 2011

CLASS B DOVE, DARREN K JEFFREY, CURTIS L ROHRBACH, DAVID

GANDY, ARCHIE W GARCIA, SCOTT M GARDNER, ALAN V GASPARD, JIMMY W CLASS A GASPER, CHARLES R BECKER, SHAWN J GEARY, BRADLEY S HARRIS, KENNETH GEARY, STEVE A LAIL, MATT T GEORGE, TYLER J ONEAL, ROBERT A GODEAUX, BRYAN J SADDLER, RAYMOND GOMEZ, GEORGE A WRIGHT, JAMES H JR GONZALES, QUINTIN ZABOLIO, DOW J III GONZALEZ, MARCOS GOSNELL, CHAD N GOZA, PATRICK W CLASS D GRINNELL, JASON A AGUILAR, RICARDO HALDER, MICHAEL K ANDERSON, JAMES HARDING, STEVE ANDERSON, MARK HARRIS, LESLIE H ARIS, DANIEL HEIL, GLENN S BAILEY, TIMOTHY M HERNANDEZ, SAUL BAIRD, KENNETH A HOLBROOK, DAVID BANKHEAD, JAMES R HOLDER, JEAN BARTOSCH, MICHAEL HOLT, JOSEPH M BEHNKE, MICHAEL C HOWARD, DYER K BELL, DARWIN A JACKSON, JAY D JR BEVER, SAMUEL D JACKSON, MATT D BILBREY, ZACHERY A JAMES, DUSTIN K BLACKWELL, ANDREW JANDA, TRAVIS BOLAND, LUKE T JOHN, BENNY K BOLANDER, GARY D JOHNSON, DANIEL BOWERMEISTER, STEVEN JOHNSON, DUSTIN BOYETT, JOEL E JONES, COREY H BREGER, JOEY K JONES, JULIAN W BROWN, MICHAEL JUAREZ, GERARDO BRYAN, DOYLE G KEFFER, MYLES M BURNS, JEFF KEITH, AARON S BUSH, BARRETT L KELLER, KIRBAN K BUSTOS, JAMES E KELLEY, CASEY S CANNON, LINDELL KELSAW, QUINTRALL CANTU, JOSEPH A KERTESZ, ROBERT CAPP, KYLE J KNIPPA, ANTHONY V CARUSO, VIRGINIE KOCIAN, RAYMOND F CHAPA, DAVID JR KOSKI, NICHOLAS J CLARK, KELLY C KREEGER, JAY R CLAYTON, BENNY R LAWRENCE, WARD E COKER, JON K LAWTON, JOHN P COLEMAN, JOHNNIE LEMONS, COURTNEY M COOK, JEROME S LINSCOMB, ALLAN W CORLEY, JASON W LOFTIN, JIMMY D CUNNINGHAM, SHEILA LYLES, TYLER J DAHLGREN, JAMES E MALDONADO, FRANCISCO DAVILA, ROBERT T MARTIN, CHARLES E DONALD, DANNY R MARTINEZ, AARON R DORSEY, ELSMER W MCKINNEY, STEPHEN R DUGAS, ERROL W MCWHORTER, CODY A DUPREE, KINNEY M MCWILLIAMS, NICHOLAS DUTKO, JOSEPH P MELDE, JEFF A DUTROW, NICHOLAS MENARD, KAREN E FELDER, PHILIP R MERCADO, ARTURO FELTS, LARRY M MERONEY, LINDA J FITZGERALD, MATTHEW MICAN, JOHN A FRANCIS, IAN MIGURA, COLTON R FUHRKEN, BARRY L MILLER, JOSH D FULLER, WILLIAM B MILLER, RICKY L WATER OPERATOR

MILLER, STEPHANIE MLODZIK, BRAD A MOODY, LEROY MOORE, JEFFREY N MPOY, FREDDY L NEWBOULD, WILLIAM NIXON, STEVE R OLIVARRI, BRAD S ONEILL, LAWRENCE K OSTRANDER, MARCUS PADILLA, JESUS JR PERALES, JOHN M PIETSCH, JOEL R PITCHER, WILLIAM L PULIS, THOMAS V QUALLS, BRANDON L REYES, DANNY F RICE, CHASE A RICHARDSON, NATHAN RIVERA, JORGE E ROBERTS, JOE BEN III ROBINSON, CHRIS ROJAS, MANFRED ROUSE, JORDAN D RUSH, AARON J RUTHERFORD, JARETT SABRSULA, SHANE A SAENZ, ISMAEL SANCHEZ, DAVID A SANCHEZ, JOSE E SARTIN, MARK A SAUCEDA, JOSEPH T SCHEPOK, MAGGIE J SEGURA, RICHARD G SETTLE, DON A SHERMAN, JASON W SHOEMAKER, WESLEY SMITH, EDDIE L SMITH, JAMES SMITH, THOMAS D SOAP, JOHNNY R SPAIN, CHARLES M SUGG, EDWARD G SULLIVAN, PATRICK TESTA, PAUL C THWEATT, JUSTIN K TICHENOR, DAN R TIDWELL, JERRY N VALERO, ROGELIO VILLANUEVA, FRANKLIN VILLARREAL, AMALIA WATSON, AMANDA J WHEELER, TIMOTHY WHITCHER, BRANDON WHITE, COY A WHITE, WALTER C WIGGINS, JOHN T WILLIAMS, KELLY WILLINGHAM, RANDY WILSON, DON C WOMACK, PATRICK A WRIGHT, LANDON K YOUNGBLOOD, DAVID ZENT, RUSTY A ZEPEDA, CHRIS

28 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

WATER DIST OPERATOR CLASS B ARAUJO, IGNACIO ARMSTRONG, VICKIE BROWN, CORY D DUVAL, JOE D HARRIS, MICHAEL SAULS, RYAN D SMITH, RICHARD TURNER, CHRIS CLASS C ALEXANDER, DANIEL ARAIZA, DAVID T BENNETT, MARK A BROWN, JERAMIE BURGESS, JOSHUA CHAVEZ, PETE DAVIS, ERIC B GOOSSEN, NOBLE GUTIERREZ, ENNIS HART, ERIN D HERRERA, EDUARDO HOBBS, SAMUEL HOSHAW, GERALD KELLY, MATTHEW C LANDERS, JACK E LARA, HECTOR M MARLOW, KENNETH MARQUEZ, EDWARD MARTINEZ, JOSE A MCADOO, MATTHEW MCVEA, MICHAEL S MILES, MALCOLM MITCHELL, SILAS N MOSIER, WELDON NOLEN, JOHN W PATE, HERMAN W PEREZ, MIGUEL A PETTIT, STEVEN M RAYBURN, TOMMY L RAYNOR, EDWIN L ROSS, CLARENCE SAWYER, JOSH R I SEAY, MICHAEL E SHORTER, COURTENAY SMITH, DANIEL P SOTO, JOSE G TIPTON, TIM W TOLBERT, MICHAEL VALDEZ, MARIO WILLIS, PHILLIP GROUND WATER TREATMENT CLASS B DOVE, DARREN K JEFFREY, CURTIS L ROHRBACH, DAVID CLASS C ANDERSON, CHRIS

CLASS C ANDERSON, CHRIS BONINE, R CHRISTINE BORREGO, ISRAEL G BOWEN, JOHN J III BROYLES, WILL R BRYANT, KEITHLON F CHAMPAGNE, BRANDON CHAPMAN, WILLIAM A COUEY, MICHAEL S GAST, PAUL M GERAY, LORRIE L HANER, RICHARD E HANSON, DARREN K HATTON, JOHNATHAN HODGE, LARRY J JR JOHNSON, DON JR JONES, TONY R KNEESE, DAVID W MCKNIGHT, CHARLES MITCHELL, THOMAS MURILLO SIERRA, JOSE MYREN, TERRY J PAGE, DOUGLAS A PAZ, ERICK I PERALES, MARK C POWELL, WALTER K RAMIREZ, JASON J ROWE, BRADFORD D RUTLEDGE, TIMOTHY SILER, ROBERT C SOLIS, RAYMOND STRATMANN, SCOTT TALLEY, JASON E TICE, MIKE J TORRES, ROGELIO VILLAREAL, CHRIS A VILLESCAS, GILBERTO WATSON, CODY D WHEELER, ALLEN B WILLIAMS, RANDY SURFACE WATER TREATMENT CLASS B BINKLEY, SANDRA CANTU, JOHN P GERLAND, JOHN D INALPOLAT, LINDA LEWIS, BILLY J MOOSE, CORY D CLASS C ALFORD, GARY L BEAVER, STERLING CARTER, RANDALL CHEEK, TIMOTHY CROW, STEPHEN EVANS, ANGUS FISHER, JAMES A FLOYD, KATHERINE FOLEY, LEROY September 2011 FONTENOT, KEVIN A GAMBRELL, KENNY R HERNANDEZ, BEATRICE


CLASS C ALFORD, GARY L BEAVER, STERLING CARTER, RANDALL CHEEK, TIMOTHY CROW, STEPHEN EVANS, ANGUS FISHER, JAMES A FLOYD, KATHERINE FOLEY, LEROY FONTENOT, KEVIN A GAMBRELL, KENNY R HERNANDEZ, BEATRICE JONES, WILLIAM D II KOCH, MARK I MARTINDALE, DOUGLAS MARTINEZ, SIGFRIDO MINER, JAMES L MONTIEL, YVONNE D MORALES, SALVADOR MORAN, JOSE R NAFF, CHRISTOPHER OEBEL, JOSHUA A OLIVARES, RODOLFO ORDONEZ, ROGELIO TIJERINA, VICTOR VARELA, LUIS R WATERS, DON W WELCH, JERRY L WHITTY, CRAIG S WRIGHT, STEPHEN WASTEWATER COLLECTION CLASS I BROWN, TODD BYRD, JARED COOPER, JAMES DIXON, JEFFREY GARCIA, JERRY HALL, CODY HELMBOLD, DAMIAN HOCKETT, KEVIN L HORAK, JAMES KELLEY, ANDREW N MORGAN, ERIC J PACHA, BRENT J PERRY, CORY K PITCHFORD, SHAWN REAGAN, NICHOLAS ROSE, ADRIAN C SCHERBEL, DAVID A SONNIER, MICHAEL VELAZQUEZ, SALVADOR WILKES, PAUL A II CLASS II BROWN, DAVID M DAVILA, ROBERT R DEVILLIER, JASON FARGO, SHAWN E HAGENS, DUSTIN HURST, BENNIE D LAYFIELD, WESLEY MCKINNON, DAVID PAZ, ERICK I PIPPIN, RAYMOND ROJAS, JUAN C ROWE, KYLE D STEPHENS, KENNETH VASQUEZ, 2011 RICARDO September WILLEY, JEFFERY L WRIGHT, JAMES C

FARGO, SHAWN E HAGENS, DUSTIN HURST, BENNIE D LAYFIELD, WESLEY MCKINNON, DAVID PAZ, ERICK I PIPPIN, RAYMOND ROJAS, JUAN C ROWE, KYLE D STEPHENS, KENNETH VASQUEZ, RICARDO WILLEY, JEFFERY L WRIGHT, JAMES C CLASS III CLIFTON, DOUGLAS DAWSON, RANDALL DELGADO, RODOLFO GERGEIS, FAROUK S HICKS, JONATHAN HINES, JOHN H JR LANGLEY, JASON LUNA, RENE MCADA, GENE R NAVARRO, ISMAEL NEWCOMB, PAUL S OCHOA, DANIEL JR OLIVO, NOE SMITH, TONY W TANNER, CLINT JR WASTEWATER TREATMENT CLASS A BADHIWALA, GORDHAN FARMER, ROGER GUINN, TINA J LAIL, MATT T LILLEY, JERRY M POWERS, DONALD ROSNAGEL, DAVID TORRES, JERRY CLASS B ALLEN, STEVE P ANDING, CHRIS BAUMGARDNER, ROBERT BECKER, RONALD CARR, STEPHEN P COUCH, JAMES C DAUGHTRY, JESSE JOHNSON, WILSON PADALINO, JOSEPH STIENKE, ERVIN R TABOR, PATRICK S WEAVER, LARRY W WELCH, JERRY L CLASS C AGUILAR, JAIME AMEZAGA, GILBERTO ANDERSON, MARK N ANTHONY, MANUEL J ARCHULETTA, ROBERT BEASSIE, LESLIE J BECKHAM, MICHAEL E BRYANT, KEITHLON F BURTON, TERRY L CHUMBLEY, ROBERT CORTES, PEDRO JR CRAWFORD, CHRIS

CLASS C AGUILAR, JAIME HURFF, CHARLES AMEZAGA, GILBERTO INMAN, JOSHUA ANDERSON, MARK N JAMES, DANIEL ANTHONY, MANUEL J KEEL, JASON A ARCHULETTA, ROBERTKLEIN, CHARLES BEASSIE, LESLIE J KOHL, CHRIS BECKHAM, MICHAEL E LACY, GARY D LYTLE, JOSHUA B BRYANT, KEITHLON F LAIRD HARRIS, MARSHALL, TIMOTHY BURTON, TERRY L WILLIAM MARTINEZ, JAVIER A CHUMBLEY, ROBERT LIPSEY, EDWARD MATHIS, TIMOTHY L CORTES, PEDRO JR MARTINEZ, GREGORY MATTESON, JEFFREY CRAWFORD, CHRIS MCCULLAR, TAVION D MCDANIEL, TOBY CRICKMA, CHRIS S MONTANEZ, ORLANDO MIGHELL, BRETT K DAUGHTREY, JAMES NORRIS, TYLER S MITCHELL, AMANDA L FENDER, LOUIS K OBRYAN, STACY J MITCHELL, JEFF W FREDRICKS, DOUGLAS REDD, CODY M MORA, ANTONIO III GANEY, JOSHUA D RICHARDSON, MUELLER, JOHN K GRIFFIN, GAYLN J DARRYL NOTEBOOM, RICHARD KEMBRO, KIMBERLY RUSSELL, IRVIN OLAUGHLIN, THOMAS LAUGHLIN, ROBERT SIMS, RANDY J OLGUIN, DAVID LEBLANC, RONALD SMITH, TRAVIS C OLIVIERI, JASON M LEE, JAVIER D SPIVEY, GREGG ORTEGA, DANIEL LIPSEY, CHARLES D STONE, KEITH L PEREZ, RAUL T LOYD, MELISSA L TARPLEY, ROBERT PIEDRA, RAMON LOZANO, JOSEPH P THOMAS, BRYAN P PORTIS, TROY A LUCERO, ABEL TURNER, BOYD W REED, KEVIN Y MCCONKEY, MICHAEL VASQUEZ, RICARDO REYES, ROCKY M MCNEILL, AARON T WAIT, JASON L RIOS, JUAN G MORVANT, PAUL L WAIT, THOMAS J ROBERSON, BOBBY MOYER, DEREK P WHITE, TIMOTHY L ROCHA, RICARDO MYERS, JASON W WILLIAMS, VERONIKA RODRIGUEZ, ALBERT ORTIZ, SAMUEL ROLLINS, PAUL E PARK, RUSTY M BACKFLOW PREVENTION SALINAS, LOUIS PORTER, STEVEN R ASSEMBLY TESTER SANTOS, DANIEL POWELL, HARVEY L SCHUURMAN, JESSE REED, JASON S SIMON, BLAKE A ALLEN, LAVERNE RIGGAN, ZACHARY F SIMPSON, EDDIE H ANDERSON, GARY RIVERA, ERIC O ANDERSON, HUGH SPONSELLER, GREG SHEPARD, THOMAS L ARAMINO, BRAD S SWIFT, LARRY W SMITH, STEVEN M BARRETO, MICHAEL THOMAS, CRAIG SOSA, DANIEL P BROOKS, GEORGE VIGIL, GILBERT J SPIVEY, DAVID BURLESON, VAUGHN VILLARREAL, IGNACIO STEEN, WILLIAM M CAPLINGER, DAVID VINEYARD, GARY W TAYLOR, TOMMIE J CASALI, SHAWN VORCE, JEREMY C WELCH, JERRY L CASE, DAVID A WATSON, ANTHONY WEST, RYAN T CLARK, CALVIN L WILKINSON, BYRON WILLIAMS, JANICE DAHLSTROM, WILSON, RANDEL CARL L CUSTOMER SERVICE INSPECTOR DAVEY, JEFFREY DOKTORCHIK, ACOSTA, LAWRENCE CLASS D ANDY ADAMS, JODY B BAKER, THOMAS F I DOUGLAS, BLAKELY, SHIRLEY E ESTRADA, OSIEL BRIAN, JUSTIN D BRICKEY, JUSTIN T FIELD, DOYCE W BROWN, SAMUEL L COWLEY, RICKEY D FINK, RON M BURNETT, KEVIN D EWING, CHAD J ESCAMILLA, THOMAS FLETCHER, SHERMAN GARCIA, RAFAEL JR FOSTER, DAVID M GAST, PAUL M GAONA, TERRY L HALE, CAMERON B GILES, MICHAEL HAMMERSCHMIDT, HERNANDEZ, JOSE A GONZALES, DAVID BERRY S HICKS, ANDREW C GONZALEZ, EDDIE JENKINS, GARY L HANLON, JOHN A MERRITT, WILLIAM D GRIFFITH, CLYDE HONEA, TERRY D MESSER, LEONARD F GUTIERREZ, JASON MORENO, LEONEL H HOPKINS, JACOB S HAFELE, ROBERT MUNOZ, JOSE HOUGHTON, SETH PORTER, JEREMY W HARRIS, BRAD A HOYT, SHAWN M ROBY, CASSEY D HENSLEY, DON SELBY, CHI D HURFF, CHARLES HERNANDEZ, JUAN SHORT, RONNIE E SMITH, TOMMY D INMAN, JOSHUA HOPKINS, MARK SORRELLS, JEFFREY L JAMES, DANIEL HOWARD, CHRIS TREVINO, JOSE KEEL, JASON A VARNER, JAMES A HOWELL, DOUG VEGA, RAYMOND KLEIN, CHARLES HUBER, FRED VILLEGAS, ALFONSO JR KOHL, CHRIS HYDEN, BRIAN K WHISENHUNT, RANDY J LACY, GARY D WHITE, JAMES T INGALLS, SCOTT WILLMORE, TEDDY G LAIRD HARRIS, IVEY, TONY D WILLIAM JEDLICKA, PHILIP TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org LIPSEY, EDWARD JOHNSON, TIMOTHY MARTINEZ, GREGORY JORDAN, CHRIS MCCULLAR, TAVION D KOEHN, GARRY


TWUA Employment Classified ADS:

WASTEWATER PLANT OPERATOR Austin, Texas Lost Creek Municipal Utility District 1305 Quaker Ridge Drive Austin, Texas 78746 The Lost Creek Municipal Utility District is searching for a wastewater plant operator to operate a .6 mgd activated sludge wastewater plant. This is a responsible position performing operational duties related to safe operation and maintenance, inspecting, operating, laboratory testing, minor maintenance and sludge handling equipment, as well as various physical, chemical and biological testing systems and processes. The position is primarily 8-5 Monday through Friday and requires rotating after hours standby for emergencies. Lost Creek has a generous benefits package that includes hospitalization for employee and contribution to family medical, paid holidays, retirement and sick/vacation. Lost Creek is located in Austin, Texas. Must possess Class ‘C’ wastewater plant operators certificate minimum and salary is dependent on level of certification and experience. For additional information see www.lostcreekmud.org or contact John or Tom at 512-3276243. Lost Creek Municipal Utility District: Fax resume and salary requirements to: 512327-6282 Email resume and salary requirements to: gm@ lostcreekmud.org ASSISTANT WATER SUPERINTENDENT Houston, Texas Manages water production, water distribution, sewage collection, and storm sewer systems. Class B Groundwater &

Class B Wastewater license. Min. of 3 years experience as Assistant Superintendent or Chief Operator. Must have knowledge of SCADA systems, Microsoft Word and Excel. Valid Class C Texas Driver’s License with clean driving record. High School Diploma Applications available at www.clcwa. org Email to jobs@clcwa. orgbased on experience with benefits. Clear Lake City Water Authority, Fax resume and salary requirements to: 281-488-6644 Email resume and salary requirements to: njacks@clcwa.org ASSISTANT UTILITIES DIRECTOR Midland, Texas SCOPE OF WORK: The employee assists the director in the administration of the Utilities Department and in the design work and various problem-solving tasks within the department. Provides professional engineering and administrative assistance in the operation of eight divisions. Reports to the Director of Utilities and serves as director in his/her absence. BUDGETARY RESPONSIBILITIES: The employee assists the division superintendents in preparation of budgets and capital expenditure projections. ESSENTIAL JOB DUTIES: Assists director in administration of the various divisions of the department. Implements department’s procedures and objectives. Interprets state and federal regulations and implements as needed within the department. Completes and/or reviews reports to regulatory

30 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

agencies and responds to regulatory requests. Prepares design plans and specifications as needed. Consults with staff on personnel matters, City policies and regulatory standards. Assists in the long range planning of the department. Acts as project manager for CIP construction projects. Represents department and City in presentations as requested by schools, individuals and civic organizations. Performs related duties as required. PHYSICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS: Must be able to sit and stand in an office setting and drive when needed to various locations. REQUIRED CONTACTS: Must communicate with co-workers, other departments, construction personnel, sales personnel, technical personnel, subordinates and regulatory representatives. REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS: Knowledge, Abilities and Skills Must have knowledge of principles and practices involved in water production, purification, distribution, and sewage collection, treatment and disposal. Minimum Education, Experience and Certification Bachelor degree in Engineering or other related field. Professional Engineer license from the State of Texas preferred. Five (5) years experience in municipal utilities required. City of Midland: Fax resume and salary requirements to: 432-685-7925 Email resume and salary requirements to: mwoodruff@midlandtexas. gov

WATER/WASTEWATER INSTRUCTOR Regional **Position will be posted sometime in September at www. teexjobs.com** The Instructor delivers and conducts training courses for water and wastewater utility personnel to increase their technical competence and skills at remote locations. This position’s duties include classroom and topic preparation, delivery of classes including demonstrating with teaching aids, and completing required administrative paperwork. The Instructor is expected to maintain their technical competence and skills and will report to the Training Director. Three years of experience in the operation, maintenance, design, construction, or regulation of water utility systems. One year of experience in training adults, and 60 hours of classroom instructional experience OR Completion of approved Instructor training courses in: 1. Methods of Teaching OR Effective Instructional Techniques AND 2. Instructional Design and Evaluation OR Organizational and Use of Training Materials. Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university. We will allow for equivalency of training and experience. See posting at teexjobs.com Texas Engineering Extension Service: Human Resources (979)458-6801 Fax resume and salary requirements to: 979-862-5051 Email resume and salary requirements to: HR@teexmail.tamu.edu

September 2011


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September 2011  

September Issue of TWUA Journal

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