Page 1

Texas Water Utilities

JOURNAL

VOLUME 23

AUGUST 2013

NUMBER 8


Arlington, Texas Teresa Bryant Peggy Smith, (830) 598-2424 x 309 2013 TWUA REGIONAL SCHOOL SCHEDULE

June 10-13

Central Texas Regional School Killeen Civic Center Killeen, Texas

(254) 750-8007

July 8-10

Southwest Texas Regional School EVENT McAllen Conference Center McAllen, Texas

PRIMARY (956) 681-1700CONTACT

August 6-8

Javier Santiago

Lynn Short, (361) 485-3381

Permian Basin Regional School MCM Grande Hotel Odessa, Texas

Norma Clark (432) 528-1608

Norma Clark, (432) 528-1608

August 27-30

East Texas Regional School Harvey Hall & R.T.D.C. Tyler, Texas

Mike Norris (903) 939-8278

Mike Norris (903) 939-8278

November 5-7

West Texas Regional School Lubbock Civic Center Lubbock, Texas

Curtis McDole (806) 775-2610

Neil Weems (806) 775-2880

DATE

12th

EXHIBITS CONTACT

Annual North Central Texas Chapter of Texas AWWA Drinking Water Seminar SAVE THE DATE & MARK YOUR CALENDARS

The North Central Texas Chapter will be presenting its 12th Annual Drinking Water Seminar at the Petroleum Club in Fort Worth on October 25, 2013. The annual one-day seminar attempts to provide an informative program on topics of interest to our industry. The topics for this year include:   

Water Supply Water Quality and Treatment Research, Legislative and Regulatory Updates. The seminar will provide attendees with more than 6 hours of Operator Certification CEUs and Engineering PDH credits. Please mark your calendars for this signature annual event of our Section. Additional information on the program will be included in future issues of The Lake. See you in Fort Worth in October!


Valve Boss Model 70 Save time and energy operating valves. Operate valves in water and wastewater treatment plants. Operate distribution valves. • • • • • •  •  •  • • • •

Honda 4-Stroke Engine Electronic Rotation Counters Lightweight-27 lbs. Clockwise and Counter Clockwise Rotation ½ Drive 70 ft. lbs of Torque 65 RPM Throttle Controlled Quick Setup Telescoping Valve Wrench to 8’ Removable T Handle Fits 2”Operating Nut

Call for free demo 800-838-7377 www.jimcoxsales.com

Office: 817-636-2092 Fax: 817-636-2382 email: info@jimcoxsales.com

P.O Box 2380 Keller, Texas 76244


In This Issue ARTICLES S TRAINING LISTINGS S EMPLOYMENT

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL, 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 W., Austin, TX 78723-1093. TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL is not responsible for facts and/or opinions expressed by contributors or in advertisements herein. Editorials and comments do not necessarily represent the official policy of the Texas Water Utilities Association. All inquiries should be directed to: Texas Water Utilities Association, 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 W, Austin, TX 78723-1093, phone 512/459-3124. Any material accepted for publication is subject to revision and editing at the discretion of the publisher. All advertising in the TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL is subject to approval of the publisher. Learn more about T.W.U.A. at our Web site: www.twua.org

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL (ISSN 1051-709X) is published monthly by the Texas Water Utilities Association, located at 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 West, Austin, Texas 78723-1093, for engineers, operators, managers, laboratory technicians, customer service personnel, and other professionals employed in, or interested in, the water and/or wastewater industry. Five dollars of each annual membership dues payment to the Texas Water Utilities Association pays for a subscription. Non-Member subscription price: USA $50 per year; $4.20 per single copy; $60 per year outside USA. Periodicals Postage Paid at Austin, TX. The Texas Water Utilities Association is wholly independent, and is not affiliated with the American Water Works Association, the Water Environment Federation, or any other National organization.

ARTICLES: President's Perspective..................................................................6 by Roger Fussell, TWUA President TWUA Executive Director News......................................................8 by Russell Hamilton, Executive Director PES News: Chemical Treatment Technology .................................................10 By Alphonse Newton, Pretreatment Supervisor, City of Fort Worth Safety News: Recognize and Prevent Heat Related Illnesses............................12 by Renee Witherspoon, Safety Committee Chair In The News: Weighted Calibration Curve..........................................................16 by Fanny Patel, Chemist, City of Dallas Central Office News: TWUA Turns 100...........................................................................18 by Cece White, TWUA Management Committee Member World News: Natural Gas Found In Drinking Water Near Fracked Wells .........20 by John Roach, Contributing Writer, NBC News Turbidity News: Better Turbidity Measurements/Better Process Control.............24 by Mike Sadar, Principal Scientist, Hach Company TWUA Obituaries........................................................................ 27

ADVERTISERS: Classified Ads.......................................................................................30 Ana-Lab...............................................................................................11 Chlor-Serv, Inc.....................................................................................26 Global Treat.........................................................................................26 Hartwell Environmental Corporation........................................................9 Jim Cox Sales........................................................................................3 Magna Flow Environmental...................................................................23 Professional Cards................................................................................26 Samco Leak Detection..........................................................................18 Scoop .................................................................................................15 Smith Pump Company, Inc...........................................Inside Back Cover USABlueBook....................................................................... Back Cover

TRAINING: .TWUA

Training Schedule and Webinar..........................................................14/22 59th Annual East Texas Regional School Information.................................19 .TWUA 62nd Annual Sam Houston Day School Information.....................................5 .TWUA 65th West Texas Regional School Information...........................................21 Texas AWWA Drinking Water Seminar.................................................................2 .TWUA

Front Cover Photo Courtesy of: City of Palestine - Curtis Logan 4 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

AUGUST 2013


SAM HOUSTON WATER UTILITY ASSOCIATION 62nd ANNUAL ALL-DAY CONFERENCE & EXPOSITION FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 Humble Civic Center 8233 Will Clayton Parkway TRAINING CREDIT IN WATER AND WASTEWATER CERTIFICATION (TCEQ APPROVAL PENDING)

REGISTRATION AND CLASSES Registration Time: 7:00 am Classes start at 8:00 am

All Classes Are Combined Classes for Water & Wastewater Credit Lunch – Meal Provided

**VENDOR EXHIBITORS BOOTHS** Open 7:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. Vendor Prize Drawing and Door Prize Awards at 2:00 P.M.

Detach here and send

Detach here and send

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

REGISTRATION FORM

Type of Application:

________Visitor

________ Non-Member

________ Member

Name (please print): _______________________________________________________________ Representing: ____________________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________________ City: ______________________

State: ______________

Phone: (______) ________________

Zip: ______________________

License #: ___________________________________

(May use SSN-members only, for certification credit only)

Texas Water Utilities Association Members: FREE

Non TWUA / AWBD Members $20.00

Visitors Welcome Utility District Board Members, City Administrators, Utility Department Heads, Elected Public Officials For exhibitor information, contact Allen Schreiber at 281- 381-9216, FAX 281- 499-4223 or e-mail at aschreiber@fbcwcid2.com. You can obtain further information at the Association’s web site www.shwua.org. For more information about this or Sam

Attn: Bonnie Worthington at PO Box 690008, Houston TX 77269-0008 or 281-477-PUMP or FAX 281-477-0888. Houston membership, please contact SHWUA

AUGUST 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


President's Message Roger Fussell, Executive Director Lumberton MUD

How Safe Are You? I would like to extend a thank you to all the good folks in Killeen. The Central Texas Regional School was a success due to the hard work and efforts of the officers, vendors, and volunteers. This month let’s consider the letter “S”. As we continue to define Professional, the letter S should represent Safety. Today’s water utility professionals must exhibit positive attitudes and practice safety every day. Some water utility professionals have overlooked or even ignored many safety regulations. In today’s workplace, however, safety must be our first priority. I am sure most of us have heard many slogans used to remind us of safety. Two that come to mind are “Safety is No Accident” and “Work Safe Today, Go Home Tonight.” How do we manage safety in our workplace? Water utility professionals can make safety a priority by providing enough resources, training, and equipment. Make it your job to be a part of the on- the- job trainings, evaluate hazards, and create checklists to prevent accidents or injuries. As water utility professionals, we deal with many potential hazards on our job. Hazardous chemicals, trench protection, traffic control, confined spaces, and sometimes even our customers are just a few of the potential safety issues. Water utility professionals should insist that all employees be active in making every working environment a safe place to work. The public deserves water utility professionals that are trained and practice safe work habits. I did some research on safety programs water utilities may have in place and found some interesting statistics. According to the AWWA Manual of Water Supply Practices, studies were done to compare the effectiveness of safety and health programs in the water utility workplace. The statistics indicate the utilities were top management did not actively promote safety awareness saw accident rates increase 470% and accident rates increased 130% for those utilities who had no written safety program in place. Safety awareness programs and written procedures are essential to insure our water utility professionals and customers are safe. Today’s water utility professionals should proudly participate in safety programs that will provide knowledge, action, and positive attitudes. Effective training will provide the knowledge to establish goals for safety, motivation to take action, and positive attitudes to promote safety for all water utility professionals and the public. How effective is your safety program? I challenge each of you to implement an effective safety program if you do not have one, or to practice the one you have in place to be safe at all times. Remember……. Be Safe.S

Roger Fussell TWUA President

6 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

AUGUST 2013


TWUA CENTRAL TEXAS SCHOOL NEWS: Photographer: Craig McCoy, Association Photographer

The 37th Annual Central Texas Regional School was held at the Killeen Civic and Conference Center in Killeen, Texas June 10-13, 2013. The school provided (10) different training classes with in attendance of (185) students and (36) supporting vendors. Overall the school was a great success the instructors presented quality training, and the vendors displayed top of the line products and good information. Congratulation was in order! TWUA recognized several members for their service and dedication to the association on the state and regional level. The Central Texas Board would like to personally thank every volunteer, instructor, sponsor, vendor, student, host, TCEQ Rep and the Killeen Civic Center for your contribution and time to the school. This event would not have been a success without all of your involvement. Because of your support we had another successful year. We look forward to working with everyone again next year.S

Darrell Winslett - Public Education Award

Best Tasting Ground Water Award - Jonah SUD

Christopher Parker - Leadership Award

Best Tasting Surface Water Award - City of Round Rock AUGUST 2013

Special Recognition Award to B2O and Dukes Root Control for their continued sponsorship support for the school Annual Horseshoe Tournament TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR NEWS Russell Hamilton, TWUA Executive Director

I hope this finds all well. Summer is moving rather quickly. I know this has been or is budget time. For those still actively finalizing budget projections – I wish you well. For those who have completed the process – I hope you were able to get a budget adopted that is realistic and provides for your needs. Rainfall has been spotty around the state and from the data I have seen, we as a state still need a significant rainfall event. I ask you to remember this in your prayers, and I join you in asking our creator to once again bless this state with abundant rainfall and make us better stewards of this precious resource. For those who may have missed it, TWUA is now providing training via the computer and internet in the form of webinars. The first attempt went well. We identified a few concerns in our process and have taken steps to simplify the registration and attendance process. We plan to offer a one or two hour webinar each month between now and the first of the year. The electronic delivery process has not officially been approved by TCEQ, but we anticipate an approval letter very soon. Once the official approval is in hand, we will schedule a 20-hour core class such as Basic Wastewater or Basic Water and anyone wanting to use this tool for operator training will have the option. The online training is not intended to take anything away from the classroom training, district meetings or regional events. Rather, it is intended to provide options for those who need training but do not have the resources or means to travel. I want to encourage those in the Permian Basin area to remember the Permian Basin Regional School in Odessa August 6th. There is still time to register and on site registration is always accepted. Also, the East Texas Regional School in Tyler is August 27th. Those in the Tyler area are encouraged to come to the regional school and get your renewal or advancement hours. You can go to the TWUA website and click on the training tab for a regional flier for all regional schools. I wanted to briefly bring to your attention that this past month we lost two instructors that many of you know. Jim Cates who taught for TEEX for many years passed away and Steve Hodge who worked for the City of Fort Worth and a TWUA Instructor passed away. There is more information on the TWUA website under the membership-obituaries. 8 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

I want to extend our heartfelt sympathies to family and say that we greatly appreciate their contributions to operator training. Do you remember this creed? Do you know who is credited for making it popular? I will keep the identity and author until the end. I Believe . . . . “That to have a friend, a man must be one. That all men are created equal and that everyone has within himself the power to make this a better world. That God put the firewood here but, that every man must gather and light it himself. In being prepared physically, mentally, and morally to fight when necessary for that which is right? That a man should make the most of what equipment he has. That ‘This government, of the people, by the people and for the people’ shall live always. That men should live by the rule of what is best for the greatest number. That sooner or later... somewhere...somehow... we must settle with the world and make payment for what we have taken. That all things change but truth and that truth alone lives on forever. In my Creator, my country, my fellow man.” Written by Fran Striker Jack was born on September 14, 1914, in Chicago, Illinois. In his early years, he worked as a model and circus performer. He displayed athletic skills and worked as a trapeze artist in a circus. He traveled to Hollywood in 1938 where he worked as a stunt actor, and took small acting roles and finally leading roles in various Saturday afternoon serials such as Dick Tracy. In 1949, Jack won the starring role in one of the first shows to be filmed exclusively for television on an up and coming network known as ABC. Jack got into a salary dispute with the studio and was replaced in his leading role for two years. Popular demand helped get Jack back into the role AUGUST 2013


he made popular, and he remained the leading actor in the show until 1957 when the show was cancelled. Jack had a side kick in the show whose real name was Jay Silverheels. This equally popular side kick referred to Jack in the show as “Kemo Sabe.” Kemo Sabe rode a white horse called Silver. Kemo Sabe’s trade mark was a silver bullet. Jack Clayton Moore was the Lone Ranger, and the faithful companion was Tonto. On December 28, 1999, Moore died of a heart attack, at age 85; he was survived by his daughter and his second wife, Clarita. Jay Silverheels died March 5, 1980 at the age of 60. The Ranger creed - I believe . . . . was written by Fran Striker and was an integral part of the Lone Ranger fan club. I just think how much simpler life seemed then. There were no gangs. There were no drugs. Family was important. Kids played outside with neighbors and the cue to come home was when the street lights came on. Kids rode bicycles (without helmets and pads). Kids built forts or club houses. Kids swam in creeks and ponds.

Kids played baseball. Kids played army or cowboys and Indians. If you were really good, you got a quarter to go get a snow cone. And you got change. Kids climbed trees and built tree houses. Kids had chores and were expected to perform them. Kids collected baseball cards. Neighbor moms had standing approval to hand out punishment to all and typically that was just a sample of what was waiting at home. Kids respected old people. There was no “time out” – kids got spankings. There were no Xboxes or Nintendo. There was no 24 hour cartoon network. There was only one television in most homes, and it was in the family room. You were considered rich if your parents subscribed to cable and you had more than 3 channels to choose from. Color televisions were not the norm. There were no cell phones. If you were really important you might have a pager. The message of the series was always Good triumphs Evil. Honor and Respect are important. Assisting someone in their time of need was simply the right thing to do. Perhaps I am a bit naive but could not help but think of the operators as I read about the Lone Ranger. Helping others – providing a service – making life better. Sound familiar?S Remember – We do not need all the operators in Texas to be a member of TWUA – JUST YOU ! ! ! !

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TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


PES NEWS:

Wastewater Treatment Technology -Chemical Treatments By Alphonse Newton, Pretreatment Supervisor, City of Fort Worth

Chemical Treatment: Chemical treatment technologies treat wastewater by altering the chemical structure of the constituents so they can be removed from the wastestream prior to release into the collection system. The expected result is the production of an effluent with minimal hazardous and nonhazardous residual. Chemical processes are desired because they produce minimal air emissions, operation requirements are generally not highly technical in nature and are not labor intensive, and these processes are easily implemented by industry. Nevertheless, chemical processes generate sludge and require solids handling equipment. The choice of chemicals used for neutralization, coagulation and flocculation can greatly affect the quantity of sludge produced upon treatment. Common chemical treatment methods for treating wastewater are discussed below.

Neutralization: Neutralization is a common treatment process used to adjust the pH of wastewater by adding acids or bases to produce a solution, which is neutral, or within the acceptable range for further treatment or disposal. Neutralization is a basic and proven technology for treating wastewater. Sulfuric, sulfamic and hydrochloric acids are commonly used for neutralization of alkaline or basic wastestreams. On the other hand, sodium hydroxide (caustic soda), calcium hydroxide (hydrated lime), calcium oxide (quicklime), calcium carbonate (limestone), sodium bicarbonate (soda ash) and ammonia are used for neutralization of acids. Make sure your industries use analytical grade chemicals for treating wastewater. Lower grade treatment chemicals have a high probability of containing undesired constituent’s. As an example, hydrated lime may contain heavy metal concentrations that exceed most jurisdictions metal limits. The lime used by one industry contained elevated levels of heavy metals. Neutralization is a process that is amenable to automation. Automation would require installation component such as pH sensors, controllers, chemical feeders, flash mixers and flow control valves. Some are even outfitted with pumps. In the early years of pretreatment, industry would put the components together and thus would have an intimate knowledge of how the system worked. Now skid mounted systems are available and sometime the personnel have no idea the purpose of each component and its contribution to the system. Moreover, besides compliance with wastewater discharge limits, pH adjustment by neutralization is used for other important reasons. 10 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

Biological treatment at a downstream POTW plant proceeds optimally at a pH near seven. A small deviation from this value may reduce biological treatment efficiency, while a large difference may result in total inactivation of the bacteria. Next, low pH wastewaters corrode sewers and potentially cause the release of hydrogen sulfide gas from sulfide containing wastewater. The adjustment and control of pH is used to attain allowable metal concentration limits by forming metal hydroxide precipitates. The solubility of metallic ions such as lead, mercury, zinc, cadmium, copper, chromium and nickel is directly related to pH. Examples of wastestreams which may be treated by neutralization are sulfuric or hydrochloric acid pickle liquors from steel cleaning, alkaline or acid metal plating wastes, spent acid catalysts, acid sludge, wash water from the petrochemical industry and leather tanning wastes, and regeneration wastes from deionization plants (used in many electronic component and printed circuit board plants).

Hydroxide Precipitation: Precipitation is a process for removing soluble compounds contained in a wastestream by forming an insoluble precipitate. A specific chemical is added to cause the formation of the insoluble precipitate. The process is specifically applicable to wastewater streams containing heavy metals. Most metals form hydroxide precipitates with the addition of lime or caustic or sodium hydroxide. Metals can also be precipitated as sulfide or carbonate complexes. The precipitation process is well developed and usually combined with solids removal processes in wastewater treatment. Precipitation has applications in the iron, steel and copper industries for the removal of metals from pickling wastewaters. In the metal finishing industry, hydroxide precipitation is utilized for removing cadmium, chromium, and nickel from rinse water and spent plating bath solutions. In the electronics industry, precipitation is responsible for removing copper from spent etching solutions. In the printed circuit board industry, hydroxide precipitation is utilized to removing nickel from stripping solutions. In the inorganic chemical industry, hydroxide precipitation is used for removing metals from a variety of wastestreams.

Ion Exchange: Ion exchange is a process normally used to remove dissolved inorganic ions from aqueous solutions. Zeolites are naturally occurring minerals associated with volcanoes. For the majority of treatment systems, synthetic zeolites are used. Zeolites have a porous structure that can accommodate a wide variety of cation, such as Na+, K+, AUGUST 2013


Ca2+, Mg2+ and others. These positive ions are rather loosely held and can readily be exchanged for others in a contact solution. In treatment, the liquid is passed through a fixed bed of natural or synthetic resin. In ion exchange, one type of ion containing the water is absorbed into an insoluble solid material and replaced by an equivalent quantity of another ion of the same charge.

Oxidation-Reduction: Chemical oxidation/reduction processes involve the exchange of electrons to convert toxic compounds into simpler, less toxic chemicals. One of the more common applications of oxidation treatment is for the treatment of cyanide. Cyanide waste flow is treated by alkaline chlorination process for the oxidation of cyanides to carbon dioxide and nitrogen. The equipment consists of an equalization tank followed by two reaction tanks. Each tank has an electronic recorder and controller to maintain required conditions with respect to pH and oxidationreduction potential (ORP). In the first reaction tank, conditions are adjusted to oxidize cyanides to cyanates. To facilitate reaction, chlorine is metered to the reaction tank as required to maintain the ORP in the range of 350 to 400 millivolts and 50 percent aqueous caustic soda is added to maintain a range of 9.5 to 10. In the second reaction tank, conditions are maintained to oxidize cyanates to carbon dioxide and nitrogen. The desired ORP is 600 millivolts and the desired pH is eight. A common reduction reaction is converting hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium. In a pH range of 2 to 3, utilizing reducing agents sulfur dioxide or more commonly sodium metabisulfite, the ORP is in the range of 240 to 300. A disadvantage of this treatment method is the slow reaction time. Reduction time can vary up to two hours.

Dechlorination: Dechlorination is a specialized treatment technology used to strip chlorine atoms from highly chlorinated toxic compounds such as PCBs (Polychlorinated Biphenyls) and PCP Polychlorinated Phenol) in order to produce nontoxic residue. This process is also used on chlorinated pesticides. The treatment process consists of polyethylene glycol 600, potassium hydroxide (KOH) and aluminum. The reaction of PEG with PCBs produces arylpolyglycols, the products of nucleophilic aromatic substitution. At elevated temperatures, 1500C for 4 hours duration, removal efficiencies reached 99.9% or better. Companies have developed and marketed similar technology to provide on-site treatment of electrical transformer fluids and chlorinated pesticides.

In the September issue we will look at biological treatment. S

References: 1. Development Document for Effluent Limitation Guidelines and Standards for the Metal Finishing Point Source Category EPA 440/1-82/091 August 1982 2. Destruction and Removal of PCBs in Waste Transformer Oil by a Chemical Dechlorination Process Keon Sang Ryoo,* Sang Hyuk Byun, Jong-Ha Choi, Yong Pyo Hong,Young Tae Ryu,† Jae Seol Song,† Dong Suk Lee,† and Hwasung Lee‡ Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Andong National University, Andong 760-749, Korea. *E-mail: ksr@andong. ac.kr†Youngsinmetal Company, Gyeongsan 712-837, Korea‡Gyeongbuk Government Public Institute Health & Environment, Daegu 702-839, Korea Received August 22, 2006

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Dallas 972-620-8900

Brownsville 956-831-6437

Austin 512-821-0045

Houston 281-333-9414

T104704201

AUGUST 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


SAFETY NEWS:

Recognize and Prevent Heat - Related Illnesses By Renee Witherspoon, MS, CSP, CIH, CHMM, Safety Committee Chair

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 400 Americans die each year due to heat related illnesses. The National Weather Service states that excessive heat was the number one weatherrelated killer, causing more fatalities per year than floods, lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes, winter storms and extreme cold from 1994 to 2003. Exposure to excessive heat can cause many safety challenges including increased accidents due to sweaty palms, dizziness or fogging of safety glasses. Working in hot environments can also decrease mental alertness and physical performance. With multiple days of triple-digit temperatures in Texas, utility professionals have to be able to recognize heat stress conditions, understand how our body responses to the heat (also called “heat strain”), and the basics of a heat stress program to prevent injury. Recognition of Heat Stress Conditions: The combination of high heat and humidity can be a killer. When heavy workloads and personal protective equipment (PPE) are added, it can place an extra strain on the body. Each of us react differently when in hot environments and can depend on several factors including our age, weight, degree of physical fitness, degree of acclimatization, metabolism, use of alcohol or drugs, and a variety of other medical conditions including high blood pressure and heart disease. The National Weather Service (NWS) issues heat alerts based on the Heat Index Values (see NOAA National Weather Service Heat Index graph). The Heat Index Value factors in actual temperature and relative humidity to give an index of what it actually feels like. This index then provides a likelihood of someone developing a heat-related illness with prolonged exposure or strenuous activity outside. Use this chart to determine if further heat stress prevention activities should be implemented. The following are some risk factors for Heat-related Illness: •

High temperature and humidity, direct sun exposure with no breeze or wind

Low liquid intake

Previous heat-related illnesses

12 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

Heavy physical labor

Waterproof clothing

No recent exposure in hot work areas or work outside during high heat conditions.

There are many types of Heat Stress-related illnesses ranging from mild to severe. Heat stroke is the most severe, and the one we are most familiar with. It occurs when the body is unable to regulate its temperature, the sweating mechanism fails and the body is unable to cool down. Heat stoke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided immediately. Our Body’s Response to Heat: Working in a hot environment is stressful on the human body. When exposed to heat, the body tries to keep its internal temperature at about 98°F. And when the body temperature rises, it cools itself through perspiration. If it is unable to keep up and dissipate the extra heat, vital organs such as the kidneys can shut down and cause damage to the central nervous system including the brain.

AUGUST 2013


Heat exhaustion can be very mild with symptoms of headaches and dizziness. Irritability and confusion are additional symptoms of heat exhaustion. If someone passes out or collapses, call 911 and implement first aid procedures as it may have already escalated to a life-threatening condition. Being alert to physical signs and symptoms of heat stress is a simple method to prevent a more serious injury. If a worker becomes ill from the heat, the following are some basic procedures:

amounts frequently, every 15 to 20 minutes--rather than relying on thirst. Electrolyte drinks like Gatorade also work. 6. Allowing workers to take rest breaks in cooler environments. 7. Using power assists and tools that reduce physical demands. 8. Utilizing body cooling devices, such as ice vests and wetted bandanas. 9. Establishing a screening program to identify health conditions aggravated by exposure to heat stress.

Call a supervisor for help. If the supervisor is not available, call 911.

Have someone stay with the worker until help arrives.

Move the worker to a cooler/shaded area.

Remove outer clothing.

Fan and mist the worker with water.

Apply ice (ice bags or ice towels) to the victim’s armpits, groin, neck, and back. (These areas are rich with blood vessels close to the skin, cooling them may reduce body temperature.)

Working in temperature extremes is just part of the job for a utility professional. As with other types of safety hazards, recognition of the signs and symptoms is a key. We should avoid exposure to extreme heat and high humidity if possible, and if it cannot be avoided, be able to take the appropriate steps to prevent heat-related illness for ourselves and our coworkers.

Provide cool drinking water, if able to drink.

Save a life---Never ignore signs or symptoms of heat strain.

Prevention of Heat Stress: Not only do we need to recognize the signs and symptoms of heat stress and how to treat symptoms, but we need to educate and train our personnel on how to prevent heat-related illness. A simple program for Heat Stress may include:

1. Implementing a good Heat Acclimatization Program that gradually adapts workers to the heat. 2. Having workers wear light-colored, loose fitting and breathable clothing such as cotton. 3. Monitoring the Heat Index so that hot jobs can be scheduled during cooler times of the day. 4. Using engineering controls, such as cooling mist fans, air conditioners or shielding for hot sources. 5. Providing plenty of cool liquid (except alcoholic beverages) and encouraging employees to drink small AUGUST 2013

10. Providing training programs regarding the health effects associated with heat stress, symptoms of heat-related illnesses and the methods of preventing such illnesses.

References: NOAA’s National Weather Service Heat Index can be found at http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/heat/images/heatindex.png Heat Stress, NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topics, http://198.246.98.21/niosh/topics/heatstress/ OSHA Regional Notice: Region VI emphasis program for outdoor heat related health hazards, Directive 02-00-027, Effective date: October 1, 2010 WebMD, Heat Stroke: Symptoms and Treatment, http:// www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/heat-stroke-symptoms-andtreatment *There are many additional resources on heat stress, acclimatization programs, exposure limits and measurement techniques not discussed in this article. If you would like additional information on setting up a program or would like a copy of my one-page Heat Stress Evaluation Checklist or Single Task Heat Stress Analysis sheet, send me an email at renee.witherspoon@ttuhsc.edu S TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


TWUA TRAIN To register for any TWUA classes – simply complete the registration form and fax to (512)459-7124 or contact TWUA @ 888-367-8982 for additional details. *NOTICE: Due To Recent Increases For Training Materials - Class Costs Have Increased. ***Pre-Registration Is Defined To Mean 14 Days Prior To Any Scheduled Event. All registrations received after the pre-registration cutoff date must pay on-site registration fee. We strongly encourage everyone to please pre-register by fax, e-mail, or calling. On-site registrations are welcome but not preferred. Date

Location

Course

Address

Hours

Credit

Oct 29-31 Sept 17-19 Aug 20-22 Oct 22-24

San Marcos Gatesville Victoria Bridge City

Basic Water Surface Water Production II Water Lab Water Lab

170 Charles Austin Dr. 106 S. 23rd 2902 Bluff 220 Nitche St.

20 20 20 20

W W W W

Sept 17-19 Nov 4-6 Aug 13-15 Oct 21-23

San Marcos Corpus Huntsville Corpus

Wastewater Collection Wastewater Collection Activated Sludge Activated Sludge

170 Charles Austin Dr. 2726 Holly 448 SH 75 N. 2726 Holly

20 20 20 20

WW WW WW WW

Sept 23-25 Oct 14-16 Nov 19-21 Aug 19-21 Sept 17-19 Aug 13-15 Aug 13-15 Oct 15-17 Sept 24-26 Nov 19-21 Oct 8-10

Corpus El Paso Gatesville Corpus Victoria San Marcos Gatesville Victoria Terrell Victoria Gatesville

Management Management Management Pump and Pumping Pump and Pumping Utilities Safety Valve & Hydrant Valve & Hydrant Utilities Calculations Utilities Calculations Chlorinator Maintenance

2726 Holly 10751 Montana 106 S. 23rd 2726 Holly 2902 Bluff 170 Charles Austin Dr. 106 S. 23rd 2902 Bluff 400 Industrial 2902 Bluff 106 S. 23rd

20 20 20 24 24 20 20 20 20 20 20

W/WW W/WW W/WW W/WW W/WW W/WW W/WW W/WW W/WW W/WW W/WW

TWUA COURSE REGISTRATION FORM

(Note: Please Print Legibly)

Name:_______________________________ E-Mail Address:_____________________________________ Course Name: ___________________________________ Date:__________________________________ Location:___________________________________________ Fee: ________________________________ Home Address:_________________________________ City:_____________State:_____ Zip:___________ Day Time Phone #:______________________ SS# or W/WW License number#:______________________ Company Name:__________________________________TWUA Member/Non-Member_________________ Visa/MC Acct. #:___________________________________________Expire Date: _____________________ Cardholder: __________________________________________________________________________

For credit cards please fax this form to 512/459-7124 Checks or money orders mail completed registration form along with payment to: Texas Water Utilities Association · 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 West Austin, TX 78723-1093, Phone: 512/459-3124 or 888/367-8982, FAX: 512/459-7124, Register on-line at www.twua.org To obtain TCEQ License Number: http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/nav/data/licensed_data.html

14 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

AUGUST 2013


NING SCHEDULE 20 HOUR CLASSES : (PRE-REGISTRATION) $200 MEMBER $250 NON-MEMBER (ON-SITE ) $250 MEMBER $300 NON-MEMBER 24 HOUR CLASSES: (PRE-REGISTRATION) $260 MEMBER $310 NON-MEMBER (ON-SITE) $310 MEMBER $360 NON-MEMBER You can register on-line at http://www.twua.org/training.php for your next training class.

OCCUPATIONAL LICENSING CUSTOMERS: Beginning March 1, 2011, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) will accept a credit card or electronic check transfer for payments for all new occupational license and registration applications. As a result, any person applying for a new Occupational License or registration will be able to pay their application fee online using the TCEQ’s ePay system.  Note: All online renewals will continue to be processed through Texas.gov. The ePay system allows companies, cities, municipalities, and organizations to pay up to 20 employees at one time using this system. At the time of the exam a printed receipt will be required. The receipt is considered to be a copy of the email verifying your payment or a copy of the web page showing the Trace Number and Voucher Number(s). For additional information and instructions on how to use the ePay system, please visit http://www.tceq.texas.gov/licensing/exams/registration. If you have questions please contact the Occupational Licensing Section at 512-239-6133 or email us at licenses@tceq.texas.gov. Russell Gardner, Manager Occupational Licensing Section. (24 hours) *(24 Students Max)

Pre-registration $260 Member, $310 Non-Member On-site Registration $310 Member, $360 Non-Member 8 hr Mod I: TCEQ Training credit for: 8 hrs BPAT, CSI, LI, W/WW & WTS Licenses 8 hr Mod II: TCEQ Training credit for: 8 hrs BPAT, CSI, LI, W/WW & WTS Licenses 8 hr BPAT PRACTICAL SKILLS REFRESHER: TCEQ Training credit for: 8 hrs BPAT ONLY License

AUGUST 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


IN THE NEWS:

Weighted Calibration Curve: The Difference It Makes! By Fanny Patel, Chemist, City of Dallas Weighted Calibration Curve: The Difference It Makes! Suppose you are at an airport with lots of noise from jets taking off. If the person next to lower concentrations. To compensate for the potential of you speaks softly, you will probably not hear them because the of calibration their voice the increased error at the volume low end of the curve, over it becomes more appropriate to use a weighted calibration noise of the jets is less than the limit of detectionmodel of your ear. Ifthethey louder, that involves use of speak a weighting factor. Byyou may giving lower concentrations more “weight” than the higher concentrations, importance is placedear on the lessdetect hear them over the noise. Likewise, if the noise from the jetsgreater is reduced, your can variable data points towards the fit of the calibration curve. theanoise from volume. the jets is reduced, ear can theirLikewise, voiceifat lower Thus,your detection limits are dependent both on the signal intensity detect their voice at a lower volume. Thus, detection limits The data points with greater variability are given less are dependent bothvolume on the signal intensity of the speaker’s significance. An easysets approach to determining a proper of the speaker’s and the noise of jets. While the noise a limit to what can be volume and the noise of jets. weighting factor is to use curve weighting options that are into most packages. If that is not an option, a detected, amplifying the detector response of thebuilt signal orsoftware reducing noise may exponentially While the noise sets a limit to what can be detected, useful weighting factor that can be applied at each calibration amplifying the detector response or reducing concentration is the inverse of concentration. In this analytically way, lower the detection limit. Inof the thissignal way, most pollutants in water and wastewater are noise may exponentially lower the detection limit. In this weighting of a calibration curve will often improve quality of way, most pollutants in water and wastewater are analytically analytical results by: 1) lowering overall error of the method detected and measured at very low concentrations using modern analysis instrumentation. detected and measured at very low concentrations using and 2) accurately measuring concentrations over the entire modern analysis instrumentation. Furthermore, by using an Furthermore, by using an appropriate calibrationcalibration model,range. detection limits may be reduced even appropriate calibration model, detection limits may be reduced even more, possibly from parts per million (ppm) to parts per more, possibly from parts per million (ppm) to parts per billion (ppb) levels. billion (ppb) levels. Suppose you are at an airport with lots of noise from jets taking off. If the person next to you speaks softly, you will probably not hear them because the volume of their voice over the noise of the jets is less than the limit of detection of your ear. If they speak louder, you may hear them over the noise.

Figure 1. Calibration curve with fixed error at each point.

Figure 2. Calibration curve with relative error at each point.

The exaggerated graphs above are of twoThe different calibration curves with error bars EPA Method Update Rule, effective June 2012, does allow for modification of a calibration model in a method. representing standard deviation at each calibration concentration point. Figure 1 displays Our City of Dallas Analytical Laboratory was exploring options to meet lower minimum analytical levels as required by constant errors at each data point. So a simple calibration that applies equal weighting to the TCEQ, therefore a weighted linear calibration model was applied to the analysis of trace metals in wastewater, soil and data points is appropriate. Figure 2 exemplifies the trend standard deviation is increasing sludge using where an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) instrument per EPA method with concentration. The large variation at higher 200.7. concentrations a greater on While there was exerts no significant differenceinfluence between correlation coefficients, the calculated concentration percent the calculation of a non-weighted linear calibration curve resulting in excessive percent error of 16 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org AUGUST 2013 calculated concentrations at lower concentrations. To compensate for the potential of increased error at the low end of the calibration curve it becomes more appropriate to use a The exaggerated graphs above are of two different calibration curves with error bars representing standard deviation at each calibration concentration point. Figure 1 displays constant errors at each data point. So a simple calibration that applies equal weighting to the data points is appropriate. Figure 2 exemplifies the trend where standard deviation is increasing with concentration. The large variation at higher concentrations exerts a greater influence on the calculation of a non-weighted linear calibration curve, resulting in excessive percent error of calculated concentrations at


calibration model in a method. Our City of Dallas Analytical Laboratory was exploring options to meet lower minimum analytical levels as required by TCEQ, therefore a weighted linear calibration model was applied to the analysis of trace metals in wastewater, soil and sludge using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) instrument per EPA method 200.7. While there was no significant difference between correlation coefficients; the calculated concentration percent error of lower calibration standards was significantly reduced using a weighted calibration. Quality control samples required as part of the method passed in similar manner as a non-weighted calibration. The most significant difference was between method detection limits of weighted and solution non-weighted linear calibrations as is over of each metal with seven replicate analyses error of lower calibration standards was significantly reduced three non-consecutive days. A weighted calibration model using a weighted calibration. Quality control samples outlined in the tables below. Method detection limits are calculated using a very low increases accuracy and precision over the entire calibration required as part of the method passed in similar manner as range. a non-weighted calibration. concentration solution of each metal with seven replicate analyses over three non-consecutive This is most evident in the outstanding detection limit The most significant difference was between method days. A weighted calibration model increases accuracy precision over theNELAC entire calibration resultsand which were verified per The Institute (TNI) detection limits of weighted and non-weighted linear requirements. S calibrations as is outlined in the tables below. Method range. This is most evident in the outstanding detection limit results which were verified per detection limits are calculated using a very low concentration The NELAC Institute (TNI) requirements. Metal

Non-Weighted Calibration MDL (ppm)

Weighted Calibration MDL (ppm)

Percent Difference

Metal

Non-Weighted Calibration MDL (ppm)

Weighted Calibration MDL (ppm)

Percent Difference

Ag

0.002

0.002

0.0%

K

0.061

0.002

-67.2%

Al

0.021

0.005

-76.2%

Mg

0.031

0.020

-35.5%

As

0.006

0.002

-66.7%

Mn

0.003

0.002

-33.3%

Ba

0.010

0.002

-80.0%

Mo

0.007

0.002

-71.4%

Be

0.006

0.001

-83.3%

Na

0.038

0.020

-47.4%

Ca

0.045

0.040

-11.1%

Ni

0.005

0.003

-40.0%

Cd

0.004

0.001

-75.0%

P

0.054

0.002

-96.3%

Co

0.006

0.004

-33.3%

Pb

0.007

0.002

-71.4%

Cr

0.007

0.001

-85.7%

Se

0.016

0.002

-87.5%

Cu

0.009

0.002

-77.8%

Tl

0.015

0.002

-86.7%

Fe

0.028

0.005

-82.1%

Zn

0.016

0.002

-87.5%

Minimum analytical levels set forth by regulatory agencies to quantitate pollutants in water and wastewater keep Minimum analytical levelsprocedures set forth by agencies to quantitate topollutants decreasing. Laboratories must update andregulatory invest in the latest instrumentation meet newinlevels. By applying a weighted calibration model, the minimum analytical levels for priority pollutant metals were easily met water and wastewater keep decreasing. Laboratories must update procedures and invest in the by City of Dallas Analytical Laboratory using an ICP-AES per EPA method 200.7.

latest instrumentation to meet new levels. By applying a weighted calibration model, the

The benefits of using a weighted calibration model were twofold in that: analyticalanalysis levels for priority metals were easily met by City of Dallas 1)minimum in-house laboratory easily meets pollutant new regulatory requirements. 2)Analytical the laboratory did not need invest in new Laboratory usingtoan ICP-AES perinstrumentation. EPA method 200.7. The benefits of using a weighted AUGUST 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


CENTRAL OFFICE NEWS:

TWUA Turns 100 By Cece White, TWUA Management Committee Member

Do you know the original name of the Texas Water Utilities Association as established 1918? (Texas Water and Sewerage Works Association.) Do you know the first bill requiring certification or licensing of operators to the Texas Legislature was in 1923. It was submitted once again in 1925 for a second time around because it did not pass the first submittal? And the bill did not pass that time either. Did you know that the first Code of Ethics for operators was adopted by the Association on January 28, 1927? Did you know that after the bills requiring certification did not pass, the Association began a voluntary program of certification for operators in 1933 that continued until 1945, when state law made it mandatory?

in planning and execution. Evening or lunchtime events are also possibilities – we are open to suggestions. Do you know of a motivational speaker the group would enjoy? (Video recordings of Swamp People or Duck Dynasty probably would not work. Although I do know, as a program presenter, it sometimes takes priority over our District Meetings! J) What about some special activities for spouses or families during the actual class hours? Please give it some thought and send us your ideas. You can email them to Twuaturns100@twua.org . There are a lot of creative people out there with lots of good ideas don’t be shy about sending them to us. Thank youS

TWUA has played an impressive role in supporting and providing safe drinking water for the State of Texas. When the Association was first organized, Texas was faced with a large problem. Twelve to fourteen thousand cases of typhoid fever were occurring annually. From January, 1915 – September, 1917, over 1600 deaths from typhoid fever were reported. That does not even begin to take into account the tens of thousands who suffered from other water borne pathogens. TWUA has worked continuously for over 95 years to educate operators and provide safe water for all the inhabitants of the state. This is a heritage to be proud of. At the 2018 Annual School in Corpus Christi, our Association will celebrate 100 years of learning, teaching and serving – a heritage of excellence! In an effort to commemorate our 100 Year mile marker, the Management Committee is looking for ideas to make our Annual School of 2018 truly special and memorable. We need your input, and we need it soon. Yes, we have 5 years to get ready, but as you all know time really flies and we cannot make special events happen at the last minute. One of the ideas we have is to create a photo/document gallery going as far into the past as we can. A “Hall of Fame”, if you will. This project alone, if decided on, will take quite a bit of time to gather the documents and photos from wherever we can and get them ready for viewing. Another idea is to invite all Past Presidents who are able to come and honor them at some sort of reception. A third that was briefly mentioned was a display of old, and I mean OLD, types of pipe, fire hydrants, meters, tools, etc. This is another idea that would take quite a bit of time 18 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

AUGUST 2013


Texas Water Utilities Association th

59 Annual East Texas Regional School th August 27 (24hr Classes start on the 26 ) thru 29, 2013

Harvey Convention Center, 2000 W. Front St., Tyler, Texas COURSE OFFERINGS WATER Basic Water * Surface Water Production I (24hr) Surface Water Production II Ground Water Production Water Distribution

WASTEWATER Basic Wastewater Wastewater Treatment Wastewater Collection Wastewater Lab

WATER & WASTEWATER Utilities Safety Utilities Management Utilities Calculations * Pumps & Pumping (24hr) Customer Service Inspection-Cross Connection Control (10 Hrs. Wastewater 10 Hrs. Water Credit)

* Pre-Registration Required – Surface Water Production I and Pumps & Pumping classes are 24hrs. th

These classes start at 1:00 p.m. on Monday August 26 2013 at Harvey Convention Center th All other classes start with the General Assembly in Harvey Hall at 9:00 a.m. Tuesday, August 27 , 2013. The General Assembly is part of each course and attendance is mandatory Final class room locations for 20 hour courses will be announced at the General Assembly th Exams for Class “B, C, D” and Class “I, II, & III” certifications will be given the afternoon of August 29 . “A” exams 8:30am 8/28/12, Call TCEQ to schedule Class “A” exam. Water or Wastewater 512-239-6133 Separate checks for examinations may be made payable to TCEQ. No cash will be accepted.

REGISTRATION FEES Pre-Registration Through 8/16/2012 TWUA Members Only Non-Members

* On-Site Registration

$200.00 $250.00

$220.00 $270.00 th

* On-Site Registration for 20 hr. courses will be conducted at Harvey Convention Center from 7:30 – 8:45 a.m. August 27 th

Pre-Registration check-in and packets will be available at Harvey Convention Center from 7:30 – 8:45 a.m. August 27 th

th

Registration fees include lunch on August 27 and 28 . Extra lunch tickets may be purchased for $12 ACCOMMODATIONS Holiday Inn – 5701 S. Broadway, Tyler, TX 75703 903-561-5800 $89.00 for King / Double Rooms (Cutoff Date 8/4/2013) Specify East Texas Regional Water School

REGISTRATION FORM (ONLINE WITH CREDIT CARD) PRE-REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS AUGUST 16, 2013

PLEASE USE ONE FORM PER PERSON – COPY AS REQUIRED, PRINT CLEARLY

To Register at the door - have form completed with a check, cash, or money order payable to ETRS, No credit cards th

PRE-REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS AUGUST 16 , 2013 For Pre-Registration mail completed form with credit card info, check or money order payable to T.W.U.A., 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 West, Austin TX 78723-1093 www.twua.org Credit card payments may be mailed or faxed (512-459-7124) to T.W.U.A. Name:

SS# or License # :

Course Selection:

E-mail:

Representing:

Day Phone:

Address:

City:

Fax: State:

Zip:

T.W.U.A. District/Chapter: Credit Card:

Master Card or Visa (circle one)

Card Number: Signature: AUGUST 2013

Expires On:

/

If you have any questions contact: TWUA @ 1-888-367-8982 or Mike Norris @ 903-939-8278 mnorris@tylertexas.com

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


WORLD NEWS:

Natural Gas Found In Drinking Water Near Fracked Wells By John Roach, Contributing Writer, NBC News Elevated levels of methane and other stray gases have been found in drinking water near natural gas wells in Pennsylvania’s gas-rich Marcellus shale region, according to new research. In the case of methane, concentrations were six times higher in some drinking water found within one kilometer of drilling operations. “The bottom line is strong evidence for gas leaking into drinking water in some cases,” Robert Jackson, an environmental scientist at Duke University in Durham, N.C., told NBC News. “We think the likeliest explanation is leaky wells,” he added. Producing natural gas from shale rock formations involves a technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, that shoots several million gallons of water laced with chemicals and sand deep underground to break apart chunks of shale, freeing trapped gas to escape through cracks and fissures into wells. The technique has unlocked the potential to usher in a new era of energy independence and may serve as a bridge to a clean energy future. But the fast-developing industry has raised a host of environmental concerns, including the potential for drinking water near natural gas wells to become contaminated. The new research builds on earlier work from Jackson and his colleagues that also found high concentrations of methane near natural gas wells. In this new study, Jackson’s team analyzed 141 drinking water samples from private wells across northeastern Pennsylvania.  In addition to the higher methane concentrations, the new study documented higher ethane and propane concentrations. Ethane concentrations were 23 times higher at homes within a kilometer of a shale gas well. Propane was detected in 10 samples, all from wells within one kilometer of drilling. All the gases appear to be fossil in origin. “That is the point of the ethane and propane analyses in the paper,” Jackson said. “Those are gases that are not generated by microbes” that can live in the ground and affect well water.

through and the well. An improper cement job, Jackson explained, could permit gas from a pocket at mid-depth to move into the space outside the well, and move up to the drinking water. “In that case, you would never expect to see Marcellus gas or, more importantly, fracking chemicals and metals and salts” in the drinking water, he said. The biggest known risk of high methane concentrations in drinking water is an explosion or fire due to the buildup of the gas in a confined space such as a basement or a shed, Jackson noted. “The flip side of that is the Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t regulate methane in drinking water, so we really don’t know much about the health risks.” Naturally occurring methane is “ubiquitous” in water wells throughout the study region, Steve Everley, with the natural gas industry group Energy-in-Depth, writes in a blog post that characterizes the new study as full of flaws. Chief among them, Everley argues that methane is ubiquitous in the region, and that the Duke University research team found methane in water wells “nowhere near natural gas wells.” The group also notes that the new research does not find evidence of fluids used during fracking in the groundwater. “On that point, at least, we’re happy to agree with them,” Everley writes. Radisav Vidic is a civil and environmental engineer at the University of Pittsburgh who recently conducted a review study of the scientific literature about environmental issues related to hydraulic fracturing. The new research, he told NBC News, will “help us to better understand the whole picture of potential risks,” related to the fast-evolving industry. But, he added, there is a lack of background data on these drinking water wells from before the onset of drilling for comparison. So, the findings of higher methane contamination near natural gas drilling is “not a direct proof” of a link, he said. “We don’t have the data from before the industry came to town.”

The researchers also conducted chemical analyses of hydrocarbon and helium that suggest the gas found in some instances comes not just from the ground, but from leaky steel pipes used in the extraction system, Jackson added.

Jackson and his team are trying to build this baseline data, which requires greater disclosure from the natural gas industry through the release of well records, for example, so researchers can compare the chemical signature of the methane, ethane and propane they find in drinking water with the natural gas wells.

“If you have a casing leak (in the tubing), you might expect to see other things through time,” he noted, “not just the gases, but whatever is coming up out of the well.”

“The long term goal is to understand why problems occur and keep them from happening somewhere else,” he said. “We want to work productively to make things better.”

The methane contamination may be a result of cracks in the cement that surrounds the outside of the steel tubing and serves as a barrier between the rock that is drilled

The new research appears in a paper published online today by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. S

20 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

AUGUST 2013


TEXAS WATER UTILITIES ASSOCIATION 65th WEST TEXAS REGIONAL SCHOOL LUBBOCK MEMORIAL CIVIC CENTER 1501 6TH STREET NOVEMBER 5 - NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Academic Offerings WASTEWATER Basic Wastewater Wastewater Treatment Wastewater Collection

WATER

WATER/WASTEWATER

Basic Water Water Distribution Ground Water Production *Surface Water I Water Laboratory

Water Utilities Safety Water Utilities Management Water Utilities Calculations Valve and Hydrant Maintenance

Course schedule Tuesday 8:30 to12:00 and 1:00 to 5:30 Wednesday 8:00 to 12:00 and 1:00 to 5:00 Thursday 8:00 to 12:00 Buffet Lunch Tue, Wed, Thu, 12:00 to 1:00

*24 hour course will begin on Monday November 4th from 1:00 to 5:00 Must be Pre-registered for this class

Registration and Fees Pre-Registration Until November 1st, 2013 Mail Pre-Registration (Cash or Check Only) Internet Pre-Registration (Credit Card Only) On-Site Registration (No Credit Cards Accepted) (Check, Money Order, or Cash)

TWUA Member Price $ 205 $ 205 $ 220 with Proof of TWUA Membership

Non-Member Price $ 260 $ 260 $ 270

Pre-registration via Mail or Internet (preferred) www.TWUA.org with Master Card or Visa. All students are provided study manuals, necessary class room supplies, a quality buffet lunch daily If testing, make arrangements with a TCEQ representative and have a SEPARATE CHECK made out to TCEQ.

Hotel Information Holiday Inn Civic Center (Host Hotel), 801 Ave Q, Lubbock, TX 79401. (806) 763-1200 Group rate $74.00. (Use Group code WRS) Reservation cut off date is October 28, 2013. (To reserve your room online http://www.ihg.com/holidayinn/hotels/us/en/lubbock/lbbcc/hoteldetail?groupCode=WRS) La Quinta Inn, Inc., 601 Ave Q, Lubbock, TX 79401. (800) 531-5900

✄ Pre-Registration Form 65th WTRWUS School

Name: ___________________________________________ SS# or TCEQ Operator License#____________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip: _______________________________________________Home Phone:________________________________ Work Phone:_______________________________ Course Selection: _______________________________________________ Representing (Organization): _____________________________________Job Title:___________________________________ TWUA District/chapter: ____________________________________________________________________________________ Email Address:____________________________________________________________________________________________ Make checks payable to WTRWUS. No purchase orders accepted. No refunds after October 25, 2013. Please mail Pre-Registration Form and payment to: Attn: Secretary / Treasurer, P.O. Box 5068, Lubbock TX 79408 If you have any questions, please call Candy McCarthy at (806) 775-3221 or Fax (806) 775-3246 AUGUST 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


connect engage educate

METER TECHNOLOGY August 14, 2013 Time: 11:00am - 12:00pm (CST) Non-Members - $55 Fee: Members - $40 (TCEQ approval pending - 1 hour) REGISTER!! (Registration deadline: August 11, 2013) Space is limited. RESERVE YOUR WEBINAR SEAT NOW

There will be a discussion related to metering. Items such as Meter sizing, Meter accuracy, durability and leak detection. Meter types - Residential, Commercial, Turbine Meters, Compound, Mag Meters and Reading options such as radio read and remote read. PRESENTER:

OBJECTIVES WITH THIS WEBINAR: Share knowledge and experience that will: • • • • •

Improve Improve Improve Improve Improve

operations and efficiency of metering selection and application of meters knowledge of current technology revenue stream water loss

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: • • • •

Justin Hamilton

Water Operators Managers and billing staff Anyone in the Water industry Anyone interested in Metering

Webinar Training: • • •

Cannot be substituted for hands-on training required to teach critical skills, and Can only be used as training for renewal of a license. The same distance training repeated in the license renewal period will not receive training credit per 30 TAC 30.28 (p)(3)(c).

Texas Territory Manager for Sensus Metering Justin Hamilton is a Graduate from Texas A&M University and has led over 50 training classes and presentations on metering. He has worked extensively with Ferguson Waterworks and Johnson Lab Supply before joining Sensus Metering in 2012.

Requirements: • • • •

Registrant will be required to complete TWUA’s identity verification process upon successful registration. Voice verification and polling will be conducted during this training. Guaranteed bandwidth of at least 1 Mbps downstream. Any questions contact TWUA Central Office – 888-367-8982

REGISTER TODAY!! Visit www.twua.org for more information Follow us on: 22 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

AUGUST 2013


AUGUST 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


In The News: Better Turbidity Measurements Mean Better Process Control Decisions By, Mike Sadar, Principal Scientist- Hach Company, Loveland, Colorado

When measuring turbidity at 0.1 NTU or less, the slightest contamination can create significant error. So here are some guidelines to help operators achieve accurate, low-level turbidity readings. Eliminate interferences In the bench-top environment, keep the work area – and testers’ hands – clean, to minimize sample and instrument contamination. Acid wash sample cells and collection containers, rinse them several times with deionized (DI) or RO water, and immediately store them filled with DI water and covered tightly. Then, rinse the cells and containers several times with sample prior to collection. Fill the sample cell slowly to prevent formation of air bubbles that can scatter light and be seen by the instrument as turbidity, then immediately cap the cell. Even if bubbles aren’t visible, letting the cell stand for a minute or two lets any developing bubbles dissipate. However, the cell then should be inverted once or twice – gently – immediately before measurement, to re-suspend any particles. If the analysis is in an environment with high humidity, an air purging system for the sample cell chamber will eliminate interfering condensation on the sample cell.

Rewards for everyone Every water utility, large or small, should scrutinize its turbidity monitoring program – from sampling and handling technique to instrument maintenance – to find opportunities for monitoring improvement. The next step: an operators’ training program, based on the utility’s evaluation, which targets the facility’s specific needs and supports good monitoring habits. The big payoff: more consistent and accurate low-level turbidity measurements that will help the entire staff optimize the treatment process and final product quality. Consist measurement and treatment will result in lower treatment costs. Next in this series: Accurate calibration gives meaning to the low turbidity measurement.

Hach Regional Sales Manager in Texas, Terry Smith, is ready to answer turbidity monitoring questions you might have after reading this article. Contact him toll-free 800-227-4224, ext. 2114.

For on-line monitoring, install instruments as close to the sampling point as possible to minimize response time and contamination from particle shedding or entrained air. Rely on instruments with built-in bubble traps or electronic bubble rejection. Make sure your on-line turbidimeter is certified to be non-susceptible to the radio waves transmitted by cell phones and other electromagnetic interferences prevalent in the instrument landscape. Follow instructions! Don’t shortchange your process turbidimeter maintenance program – it will cost you more later than you can save now. A rigid instrument maintenance schedule will eliminate accuracy problems that can be caused by decaying lamps, plugged flow lines, and dust contamination on the optical and measuring chamber surfaces. Maintain proper and consistent sample flows. In a nutshell: rely on the instrument operator’s manual for complete instructions on sample handling and instrument maintenance. For detailed, practical advice on turbidity measurement technique and instrument maintenance, a free copy of Hach Company technical booklet #7061, Turbidity Science may be downloaded from www.hach.com.

24 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

Figure 1: Different rotational positioning of a glass cell in the instrument’s cell compartment can cause up to 0.04-NTU variance in readings, significant when performing low-level filter effluent monitoring and reporting. Operators can “index” or mark their sample cells for consistent orientation. They should handle cells only by the top to avoid adding fingerprints or dirt. Another tip: after adding silicone oil to the outside of a cell to mask any slight, interfering scratches, remove excess oil with a lint-free cloth. When this cloth is stored in a re-sealable plastic bag, it will become saturated with oil and be convenient for wiping a cell at each measurement. AUGUST 2013


Figure 2: Filtered water samples usually do not require degasification if sample cells are filled slowly. Operators can let capped sample cells stand for one or two minutes to allow bubbles to vacate the sample. Or, they can remove bubbles by applying a vacuum to the sample, with a stopper and syringe as shown here, or with an electric or hand-operated pump equivalent. Once a sample has been conditioned, a very slow and gentle inversion of the sample cell, one or two times, will re-suspend particles that may be in the sample.

Figure 3: The body of the Hach 1720E Low Range Turbidimeter incorporates a baffled bubble removal system. Maintaining a steady, controlled flow rate up to and through the process turbidimeter with integral baffling system allows efficient removal of air bubbles. Typically, slower flow rates will result in better bubble removal and more accurate measurements. A desirable instrument feature is automatic electronic rejection of signal spikes caused by the transient bubble. The recommended flow rate is between 250-750 ml/ min. Use lower flow rates when entrained air bubbles are significant. When air bubbles are not significant, a higher flow rate between 500-750 ml/min will provide more rapid response.

AUGUST 2013

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org


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WE UNDERSTAND WATER & WASTEWATER DISINFECTION At Severn Trent Services, we understand water. That’s why our Capital Controls® gas feed equipment products are used the world over for water and wastewater disinfection. Vacuum Regulators

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26 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

AUGUST 2013


IMAGINE A PROGRAM T H AT H E L P S U S S A V E W A T E R T O D AY. S O T H E Y ’ L L H AV E I T T O M O R R O W.

EPA is proud to introduce WaterSense, a program that sets performance and water-efficiency specifications for products and services. Local utilities can use WaterSense to help residents save water. Together, we can build an ethic of water efficiency and protect this resource for future generations. Learn more at www.epa.gov/watersense.

AUGUST 2013

In Memory of: Stephan “Steve” Hodge, 65, passed away peacefully on Friday, June 14, 2013. Memorial service: 3 p.m. Saturday, June 29, in Bluebonnet Hills Memorial Chapel. Steve was a Worshipful Master Mason (with lifelong ties) and the former president of the North Texas Mustang Club. He was a loving father, grandfather, great-grandfather and a wonderful friend. He will be dearly missed but never forgotten. Survivors: Daughters, Samantha Hodge and fiancé, Glen Golden, Stephanie Drake and husband, Tl.; grandchildren, Jessica, Brandi, Matthew, Travis, Jonathon and Jacob; greatgrandchildren; brother, David Hodge; sister, Roberta Hodge; and numerous other dear family and friends. Steve, will truly be missed by his family at Texas Water Utilities Association and the water industry. ODESSA Jimmy A. Cates, 76, of Odessa, was born July 25, 1936, in Big Spring, TX, to his parents, Olen & Jewel Cates. He passed away at Hospice House in Odessa on Wednesday, June 12, 2013. He is now in the “BEST” place. He married Jeanette Stroope Fox on February 14, 2003, in Odessa. He was preceded in death by his parents, Olen & Jewel Cates; his brother, Bob Cates; and his daughter, Angie Mertz. His survivors include his wife, Jeanette Cates of the home; his step-son, Mark Fox and wife Kaye of Prosper, TX; his step-daughter, Terri Fox of Odessa; 2 grandsons, Doug Mertz of Bryan, TX, and Devin Mertz of Brenham, TX; 3 great-grandchildren, Neela, Marlee & Levi Mertz; 5 stepgreat-grandchildren; 2 brothers-in-law, Dale Stroope and wife Frances of Rowlett, TX, and James Stroope and wife Marilyn of Ft. Worth, TX. Jim grew up in Odessa and graduated from Odessa High School in 1955. He worked for Odessa and Garland, TX, water departments before becoming an instructor for Texas A&M’s Texas Engineering & Extension Service (TEEX) water and wastewater training from 1969 till he retired in 2000 after 31 years. He started Catesco water training in 2001, and continued teaching and holding water schools, traveling across Texas. He was a member of the Double A Club at Texas A&M and Texas Water Utilities Association, holding an “A” license in both water and wastewater. He was a member of Northside Baptist Church. He always answered when asked how he was, “I’m the happiest guy WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org alive!”TEXAS Jimmy, will be missed by many in the industry and TWUA.


MIKULEC, HEATH J CLASS C

AGUIRRE, JESUS V JR AINSWORTH, ERNEST ALBERT, CHARLES K ALEMAN, CATALINO ALLEN, TREY AUVENSHINE, JEREMIAH BAILEY, LARRY L BARBEREE, WENDELL BATZKO, STARLA K BHATT, NITINKUMAR BLACK, KERRY R BOOTH, KEITH WAYNE BREWER, SHEILA K BURCIAGA, RAFAEL BURKE, JUSTIN A BURLESON, STEVEN K BUTLER, EMMANUEL D CADENA, JOSE CALDWELL, JAISON K CARRIZALES, DERLY CASAS, HOMERO CHAVAN, VIKRANT S CORONADO, JAVIER J CORRALEZ, DION J CORTEZ, ROBERTO H CUSTER, CLIFTON R CUZZART, JAMES L DEAN, THOMAS S DEOPERE, CHRIS DIKE, JOHN H DIXON, JULIE F ELLIS, PHILLIP D ENGLISH, DON R SR FLANAGAN, JEREMY FLANNERY, DOUG M FLECK, LOUIS W FLORES, GLORIA F FOSTON, KATHRYN N FOX, WILL HARDY FULTON, SETH J MITCHELL,JERRY JAMARCUS T GAMBLE, L PIERCE, TROY A GARCIA, JONATHAN RUBRECHT, JASON GATES, TRAVIS W D ZAMORA, ROGER ROLANDO GODWIN, D GREEN, BRENT J WATER DIST

NISBY, JERMAINE STANDIFER, ERIC STANDIFER, ERIC WAUGH, BRAD WAUGH, BRAD WRIGHT, NICHOLAS WRIGHT, NICHOLAS

GIBBS, EBEN M HOUGHTON, SETH M JAHNEL, ROBERT B KELLEY, PATRICK D LOOPER, JON D LOPEZ, JOE C MARBLE, JOSHUA D MARBLE, JUSTIN L MARTINEZ, OSBALDO NOE, JOHN R II NOLEN, MARSHALL PARKER, STEVEN A PATE, MICHAEL J PORRAS, RODOLFO SALINAS, JUAN P JR SANCHEZ, IVAN F THERIOT, CHARLES M WHISENHUNT, RANDY WIDERMYRE, ALBERT S IV WILLIAMS, JACOB P

LICENSES ISSUED BY TCEQ: JUNE 2013

ASHCRAFT, JOHNSON BAIER, RYAN A GROUND WATER BANKS, REGINALD TREATMENT CHAMBERS, GARRY EDWARDS, RITA L CLASS B GARCIA, MIGUEL A GILBY, DUBIEL,MATTHEW BRIAN M P HERNANDEZ, LEOS, RUBEN JOSE R JR JURADO, RICHARD MIKULEC, HEATH J L GROUND WATER KELLER, ROYCE L TREATMENT LEE, WALTER E JR CLASS C LEE, ZACHARY T CLASS B GROUND WATER MARCANTEL, GARY L ASHCRAFT, JOHNSON TREATMENT MCADAMS, TONYA R BAIER, RYAN A DUBIEL, BRIAN M MCDONALD, JAMES B WATER REGINALD OPERATOR BANKS, LEOS, RUBEN R JR GROUND WATER MCMILLAN, CHAMBERS, GARRY TREATMENT MIKULEC, HEATH J CLASS B GREGORY MIGGINS, JEREK EDWARDS, RITA LR CLASS ABRIAN DUBIEL, M AC MILLER, TIMOTHY GARCIA, MIGUEL CLASS C B LEOS, REVES, SHANERCAJRP JONES,RUBEN STEVE GILBY, MATTHEW MIKULEC, HEATH J RICHTER, NICKY E KELLEY, GREGORY DUBIEL, BRIAN M HERNANDEZ, JOSE ASHCRAFT, JOHNSON RUSH, ROBERT A DL MOODY, RUSSELL LEOS, RUBEN JURADO, RICHARD BAIER, RYAN AR JR SAMUELSON, RIOS, IIISHANE CLASSMAYO CROYCE MIKULEC, HEATH J KELLER, L BANKS, REGINALD SHELTON, TERRY SAMFORD, TIMOTHY LEE, WALTER E JRA CHAMBERS, GARRY ASHCRAFT, JOHNSON TUMLINSON, PATRICK SMITH, JASON ET LEE, ZACHARY EDWARDS, CLASS C RITA L BAIER, RYAN AGARYWL VAUGHN, THOMAS WILLIAMS, RICHARD MARCANTEL, GARCIA, MIGUEL A BANKS, REGINALD WEEKS, MATTHEW WOODARD, KENT LR ASHCRAFT, JOHNSON MCADAMS, TONYA GILBY, MATTHEW P CHAMBERS, GARRY WILKES, A D B BAIER, RYAN AJOSE WRIGHT,PAUL DEANO MCDONALD, JAMES HERNANDEZ, EDWARDS, RITA LP WILLIAMS, JACOB ZINK, ERNEST J JR BANKS, REGINALD MCMILLAN, GREGORY JURADO, RICHARD L GARCIA, CHAMBERS, GARRY MIGGINS,MIGUEL JEREK RA KELLER, ROYCE L GILBY, EDWARDS, RITA L MILLER,MATTHEW TIMOTHY PC LEE, WALTER E JR HERNANDEZ, JOSE CLASS DSHANE GARCIA, MIGUEL REVES, A LEE, ZACHARY TA SURFACE WATER JURADO, RICHARD L GILBY, MATTHEW PL RICHTER, NICKY E MARCANTEL, GARY TREATMENT ABILA, FRANCISCO KELLER, ROYCEAL E HERNANDEZ, JOSER RUSH, ROBERT MCADAMS, TONYA ACEVEDO, JONATHAN LEE, WALTER E JR WATER OPERATOR JURADO, RICHARD SAMUELSON, SHANE MCDONALD, JAMESLB CLASS B JESUS AGUIRRE, LEE, ZACHARY T VAJR KELLER, ROYCE L SHELTON, TERRY MCMILLAN, GREGORY AINSWORTH, ERNEST MARCANTEL, GARY L LEE, WALTER E JR TUMLINSON, PATRICK MIGGINS, JEREK R CLASS A ALBERT, CHARLES K MCADAMS, TONYA CW R ALLMAN, MICHAEL LEE, ZACHARY T C VAUGHN, THOMAS MILLER, TIMOTHY ALEMAN, CATALINO MCDONALD, JAMES BRICKEY, JUSTIN T RB JONES, SHANE STEVEGARY C MARCANTEL, WEEKS, MATTHEW REVES, A L ALLEN, TREY MCMILLAN, GREGORY ELLIOTT, JOHN M KELLEY, GREGORY MCADAMS, TONYA WILKES, PAUL A RICHTER, NICKY ER AUVENSHINE, JEREMIAH MIGGINS, JEREK EVANS, ANGUS L RP MOODY, RUSSELL DB MCDONALD, JAMES WILLIAMS, JACOB RUSH, ROBERT A BAILEY, LARRY L BC MILLER, TIMOTHY GARDNER, MARK RIOS, MAYOGREGORY IIISHANE MCMILLAN, SAMUELSON, BARBEREE, WENDELL REVES, SHANE A RODRIGUEZ, JEFFREY SAMFORD,JEREK TIMOTHY MIGGINS, RA SHELTON, TERRY BATZKO, STARLA RICHTER, NICKY EK SMITH, JASON E C MILLER, TIMOTHY TUMLINSON, PATRICK SURFACE WATER BHATT,ROBERT NITINKUMAR RUSH, A WILLIAMS, RICHARD REVES, SHANE A W VAUGHN, THOMAS GROUND WATER TREATMENT BLACK, KERRY R CLASS C SAMUELSON, SHANE WOODARD, KENTELR CLASS B RICHTER, NICKY WEEKS, MATTHEW TREATMENT BOOTH, KEITH WAYNE SHELTON, TERRY A WRIGHT, DEANO RUSH, ROBERT AD WILKES, PAUL A CLIFTON, DOUGLAS BREWER, KW CLASS B SHEILA TUMLINSON, PATRICK BLACKARD, COBY ZINK, ERNEST J JRP SAMUELSON, SHANE WILLIAMS, JACOB MAPP, THOMAS L BURCIAGA, RAFAEL CLASS B LISA VAUGHN, THOMAS BUSHER, S W SHELTON, TERRY A RUIZ, CASIMIRO BURKE, JUSTIN A WEEKS, MATTHEW CARLSON, EMEIL ALLMAN, MICHAEL TUMLINSON, PATRICK DUBIEL, BRIAN M JRCR K BURLESON, STEVEN CLASS D WILKES, PAUL A GARCIA, ANTONIO G JR BRICKEY, JUSTIN T VAUGHN, LEOS, RUBEN R JR D SURFACETHOMAS WATER W BUTLER, EMMANUEL WILLIAMS, JACOB GATES, ALEXANDER ELLIOTT, JOHN M JP D WEEKS, MATTHEW RE CLASS C MIKULEC, HEATH TREATMENT ABILA, FRANCISCO CADENA,ANGUS JOSE LIEVANOS, GERARDO EVANS, L WILKES, PAUL A ACEVEDO, JONATHAN CALDWELL,MARK JAISON MARAVILLA, JOSEBR K GARDNER, WILLIAMS, JACOB P BILBREY, ZACHERY AGUIRRE, CLASS C CARRIZALES, DERLY CLASS B JESUS V JR RODRIGUEZ, JEFFREY SURFACE WATER BOLLES, SHANE W AINSWORTH, ERNEST CASAS, HOMERO TREATMENTJOHNSON ASHCRAFT, CARMONA, NEMECIO ALBERT, CHARLES K CHAVAN, VIKRANT S ALLMAN, MICHAEL BAIER, RYAN JAVIER A DODD, LESTER R SURFACE WATER C ALEMAN, CATALINO CORONADO, J CLASS C BRICKEY, JUSTIN T BANKS, REGINALD FALK, HAROLD C TREATMENT CLASS B ALLEN, TREY CORRALEZ, DION J ELLIOTT, JOHN M CHAMBERS, GARRY H GILSTRAP, DAVID R AUVENSHINE, JEREMIAH CORTEZ, ROBERTO EVANS, ANGUS L BLACKARD,RITA COBYL W GONZALEZ, JAVIER II EDWARDS, BAILEY, LARRY L ALLMAN, MICHAEL C CUSTER, CLIFTON CLASS B MARK B GARDNER, BUSHER, LISA S A R HOOKS, JODY J GARCIA, MIGUEL BARBEREE, WENDELL BRICKEY, JUSTIN T CUZZART, JAMES L RODRIGUEZ, JEFFREY CARLSON, EMEIL JR JAMES, BRIAN A GILBY, MATTHEW P BATZKO, STARLA K ELLIOTT, JOHN M DEAN, THOMAS S G JR ALLMAN, MICHAEL C GARCIA, ANTONIO JONES, RICHARD D HERNANDEZ, JOSE BHATT, NITINKUMAR EVANS, ANGUS L DEOPERE, CHRIS BRICKEY, JUSTIN T GATES, ALEXANDER D LADUE, JOSHUA M JURADO, RICHARD L BLACK, KERRY R GARDNER, MARK B DIKE, JOHNGERARDO H CLASS C JOHN M ELLIOTT, LIEVANOS, LONGORIA, ADOLFO KELLER, ROYCE L BOOTH,ANGUS KEITH WAYNE RODRIGUEZ, JEFFREY DIXON, JULIEJOSE F R EVANS, L MARAVILLA, MARTINEZ, JUAN C LEE, WALTER E JR BREWER, SHEILA K ELLIS, PHILLIP D MARK BW NICKERSON, ROBERT BLACKARD, COBY MITCHELL, JAMARCUS T GARDNER, LEE, ZACHARY T BURCIAGA, RAFAEL ENGLISH, DON A R SR RODRIGUEZ, PARK, JOSEPH S JR BUSHER, LISAJEFFREY SA PIERCE,CTROYGARY MARCANTEL, L CLASS BURKE, JUSTIN FLANAGAN, JEREMY SCHIEBEL, PATRICK CARLSON, EMEIL JR RUBRECHT,TONYA JASONRD MCADAMS, BURLESON, STEVEN K FLANNERY, DOUG M STEWART, JAMES E ZAMORA, ROLANDO GARCIA, ANTONIO G JR MCDONALD, JAMES BUTLER, EMMANUEL D FLECK, LOUIS W WB BLACKARD, COBY CLASS CALEXANDER STURGEON, STEVEN GATES, D MCMILLAN, GREGORY CADENA, JOSE FLORES, GLORIA BUSHER, LISA S F VEGA, ROMAN JR LIEVANOS, GERARDO MIGGINS, JEREK CALDWELL, JAISON K WATER DIST FOSTON, KATHRYN CARLSON, EMEILRJRN BLACKARD, COBY W MARAVILLA, JOSE R MILLER, TIMOTHY C CARRIZALES, DERLY FOX, WILLANTONIO HARDY 28 TEXAS WATERGUTILITIES JOURNAL GARCIA, JR BUSHER, LISA S www.twua.org REVES, SHANE CASAS, HOMERO FULTON, SETH JA GATES, ALEXANDER D CLASS B CARLSON, EMEIL JR RICHTER, NICKY CHAVAN, VIKRANT S GAMBLE, JERRY LE LIEVANOS, GERARDO GARCIA, ANTONIO G JR RUSH, ROBERT A R CLIFTON, DOUGLAS CORONADO, JAVIER J GARCIA, JONATHAN MARAVILLA, JOSE GATES, ALEXANDER D

CLASS III CLASS III BAKER, TODD E BAKER, TODD E BRANTLEY, TERRELL BRANTLEY, TERRELL COX, CHARLES A COX, CHARLES A DOLLAR, HEATH D DOLLAR, HEATH D HUDSON, RICKY D HUDSON, RICKY D MUNOZ, JAVIER SR MUNOZ, JAVIER SR RUIZ, CASIMIRO M RUIZ, CASIMIRO M SAMPLES, RICHARD SAMPLES, RICHARD STARK, ADAM K STARK, ADAM K

WASTEWATER WASTEWATER TREATMENT TREATMENT CLASS A CLASS A CLARK, ROBERT E CLARK, ROBERT E DE LEON, HERIBERTO DE LEON, HERIBERTO KRUEGER, TRAVIS J KRUEGER, TRAVIS J SIBLEY, KEVIN W SIBLEY, KEVIN W TABOR, PATRICK S TABOR, PATRICK S VAN DER STERRE, CARL VAN DER STERRE, CARL

CLASS D

ACEVEDO, JONATHAN AGUILAR, ALBERT A ALBERT, CHARLES K ANDERSON, JODRICK BARNUM, DERL M BAUMGARDNER, JOHN CLASS B BENETATO, JERRY A CLASS B BREWER, SHEILA K BROWN, RICKY L AGUILAR, SANTIAGO AGUILAR, SANTIAGO CARMONA, JAVIER L CHISHOLM, GLENN E CHISHOLM, GLENN E CONTRERAS, BARDO GARDNER, WESLEY A GARDNER, WESLEY A COURVILLE, AARON L GONZALEZ, ELVIS A CURTIS, RACHEL N GONZALEZ, JUAN M DARNELL, DUSTIN C GONZALEZ, VICTOR H DAVENPORT, ALTON HART, JOSHUA D DUNCAN, LEO E HOSKIN, ANTHONY JR ELDRED, JUSTIN S LOYD, MELISSA L ESCOBEDO, ARMANDO MILLS, CODY M FLORES, JAVIER NEWBERRY, AARON J FONTENOT, CHRIS NOLAND, JOHN L II FORD, CECIL A RAMOS, AARON JR RODRIGUEZ, GERARD P FOREHAND, ALEX GILMORE, SHAUN GONZALEZ, JUAN CLASS C GRANTHAM, DAVID HALL, CRYSTAL Y BALLARD, MATTHEW R HAYNES, WAYMON JARVIS, J B CAIRNS, JOSHUA A KNOBLOCH, JASON COMBS, JERRY C LESTER, BRUCE L CRAIG, BRADY M DELOSSANTOS, CHRIS LOPEZ, JORGE L SR LYDAY, BRANDON J ELLIS, ROBERT W MANSFIELD, CLINTON GIBBS, EBEN M MAPP, THOMAS L HOUGHTON, SETH M NEELEY, GINGER K JAHNEL, ROBERT B OLIVER, DANYELL E KELLEY, PATRICK D OWENS, CHRISL LOOPER, JON D OWENS, PATRICK J LOPEZ, JOE C PAGE, JULIE A MARBLE, JOSHUA D PARKER, BRIAN T MARBLE, JUSTIN L PEVETO, KENNETH D MARTINEZ, OSBALDO PHANSANA, NOE, JOHN R II SOUKSAVANH NOLEN, MARSHALL PHILLIPS, BRANT PARKER, STEVEN A RICHARDSON, CURTIS PATE, MICHAEL J ROACH, LESTER E PORRAS, RODOLFO SALDANA, JORGE SALINAS, JUAN P JR SANTIAGO, HECTOR SANCHEZ, IVAN F SCHASTEEN, KENNETH THERIOT, CHARLES M SCHULZ, JEFF A WHISENHUNT, RANDY WIDERMYRE, ALBERT S IV SOTO, VICENTE A AUGUST THOMAS, JUSTIN R 2013 WILLIAMS, JACOB P WINDHAM, JAMES R


RAMIREZ, CANUTO RIDGE, JUSTEN D ROCHA, RENE RODRIGUEZ, ARTHUR ROSALES, DELFINO SCHNAUTZ, THOMAS SCHWARTZ, LEE B SCOTT, ANTHONY B SMOOT, BARRY M JR SPRADLIN, BILL C STRICKLAND, TERRY L TAYLOR, SAMUEL F BACKFLOW BACKFLOW PREVENTION PREVENTION TITUS, LARRY W ASSEMBLY TOWNSON, DAVID S ASSEMBLY TESTER TESTER VARGAS, ADAM R JR ADEE, VARGAS, CASIMIRO J ADEE, JONATHON JONATHON G G ALONZO, WALTER, JAMIE L ALONZO, EDWARD EDWARD ANTAL, WARNCKE, MEAGAN K ANTAL, BRANDON BRANDON R R BARGER, WILLIAMS, DEVIN BARGER, JAMES JAMES E E ZAMORA, NOE O BEYER, WILLIAMSON, CHRIS BEYER, GEOFFREY GEOFFREY A A BRAVO, BRAVO, PLACIDO PLACIDO C C ZAMORA, NOE O BROCKETT, DANIEL BROCKETT, DANIEL WASTEWATER BULBER, BULBER, BRETT BRETT E E CUSTOMER SERVICE CALL, INSPECTOR CALL, PHILLIP PHILLIP A A WASTEWATER CARRANZA, CUSTOMER SERVICE CARRANZA, MARIA MARIA G G COLLECTION CASTILLO, INSPECTOR CASTILLO, FRANCISCO FRANCISCO ACOSTA, LOUIS CONWELL, CONWELL, DARRELL DARRELL T T ALDER, CHARLES B CUMMINGS, CLASS I ACOSTA, CUMMINGS, DONALD DONALD C C DENTON, LOUIS JUSTIN W DAO, THANH ALDER, CHARLESJ B DAO, THANH DORIA, GABRIEL ATTAWAY, NAKEEA DELBOSQUE, RODOLFO JUSTINJ W DELBOSQUE, RODOLFO DENTON, GARCIA, PETER DODD, LESTER R DIAZ, DORIA, GABRIEL DIAZ, RICH RICH A A HADLEY, TERRY DJ FELLS, DANIEL C ENRIQUEZ, GARCIA, PETER J ENRIQUEZ, RAYMOND RAYMOND HARDIN, JOHN T FERRELL, TRACEY S FOY, HADLEY, TERRY FOY, RON RON JJ HILL, CASEY J D HERRERA, ARMANDO GANDARA, JUAN M HARDIN, JOHN TW GANDARA, JUAN M HYLES, FRANKIE LEDAY, THOMAS W JR GARNER, HILL, CASEY J GARNER, MARK MARK H H JACKSON, JESSIE B MENDEZ, RICARDO L GLASSCOCK, HYLES, FRANKIE GLASSCOCK, GERALD GERALD JOHNSTON, JED TW MULLINS, BRENDAN GRANILLO, JACKSON, GRANILLO, EDQUIN EDQUIN R R LANDERS, JESSIE JACK E B RODRIGUEZ, DAVID HECKS, JOHNSTON, JED TJR HECKS, MICHAEL MICHAEL JJ LOPEZ, ANTONIO ROEPKE, PATRICK R HICKS, LANDERS, JACK E E HICKS, DANIEL DANIEL A A MARTIN, COLMAN ROLLINGS, JUSTIN C JOHNSON, LOPEZ, ANTONIO JOHNSON, ROYEL ROYEL JR JR MARTIN, KEVIN T JR VIGEN, BRETT A KELLY, ALEX MARTIN, COLMAN KELLY, ALEX M M MCGOWAN, CHAD EL YOUNG, JOSH B KING, MARTIN, KEVIN T KING, ROBERT ROBERT W W PAREDEZ, DANIEL KULP, MCGOWAN, CHAD KULP, DUANE DUANE C C PEPIN, DANIEL J L LITTLE, PAREDEZ, DANIELW LITTLE, TIMOTHY TIMOTHY P P II TWEED, ROBERT CLASS II LOGWOOD, ROBERT PEPIN, DANIELROBERT J LOGWOOD, ROBERT JJ WOODROOF, MAYER, TWEED, ROBERT WB AVILA, MARCOS MAYER, JAMES JAMES A A WRIGHT, NICHOLAS MCCLELLAND, WOODROOF, ROBERT DEDRICK, PAUL MCCLELLAND, CAMERON WRIGHT, NICHOLAS B JUSTIS, ROBERT E CAMERON MCKINLEY, MOTA, FELIPE MCKINLEY, SOLOMON SOLOMON A A MCVEY NISBY, JERMAINE MCVEY CLARK, CLARK, DANIEL DANIEL MERIMON, STANDIFER, ERIC MERIMON, GARY GARY LL MOORE, WAUGH, BRAD MOORE, CHRIS CHRIS M M OLIVAS, ISAAC WRIGHT, NICHOLAS OLIVAS, ISAAC E E ORTEGA, ORTEGA, MICHAEL MICHAEL PHILLIPS, PHILLIPS, SCOTT SCOTT A A RAINS, CLASS III RAINS, JASON JASON A A RAMIREZ, RAMIREZ, CANUTO CANUTO BAKER, TODD E RIDGE, RIDGE, JUSTEN JUSTEN D D BRANTLEY, TERRELL ROCHA, RENE ROCHA, RENE COX, CHARLES A RODRIGUEZ, RODRIGUEZ, ARTHUR ARTHUR DOLLAR, HEATH D ROSALES, DELFINO ROSALES, DELFINO HUDSON, RICKY D SCHNAUTZ, SCHNAUTZ, THOMAS THOMAS MUNOZ, JAVIER SR SCHWARTZ, LEE SCHWARTZ, LEE B B RUIZ, CASIMIRO M SCOTT, ANTHONY B SCOTT, ANTHONY B SAMPLES, RICHARD SMOOT, BARRY M JR SMOOT, BARRY M JR STARK, ADAM K SPRADLIN, SPRADLIN, BILL BILL C C STRICKLAND, TERRY L STRICKLAND, TERRY BACKFLOW PREVENTION TAYLOR, SAMUEL F L TAYLOR, SAMUEL F ASSEMBLY TESTER WASTEWATER TITUS, LARRY LARRY W W TITUS, TREATMENT TOWNSON, TOWNSON, DAVID DAVID S S VARGAS, ADEE, JONATHON G VARGAS, ADAM ADAM R R JR JR VARGAS, ALONZO, CLASS A EDWARD VARGAS, CASIMIRO CASIMIRO JJ WALTER, ANTAL, BRANDON R WALTER, JAMIE JAMIE LL CLARK, WARNCKE, BARGER,ROBERT JAMES E E WARNCKE, MEAGAN MEAGAN K K DE LEON, HERIBERTO WILLIAMS, DEVIN BEYER, GEOFFREY A WILLIAMS, DEVIN KRUEGER, TRAVIS J WILLIAMSON, BRAVO, PLACIDO AUGUST 2013 C WILLIAMSON, CHRIS CHRIS SIBLEY, KEVIN W BROCKETT, DANIEL TABOR, BULBER,PATRICK BRETT ES VAN STERRE, CALL,DER PHILLIP A CARL

Licensing Review Questions 1. ______________ solids are those which cannot be removed by filtration. a. Total b. Dissolved c. Suspended d. Combined e. inert

2. Karst aquifers are formed in formations such as limestone and allows ground water to: a. Move slowly through and provides prolonged filtration b. Moves rapidly through and provides little natural filtration c. Be stored in natural underground caverns for future use d. Be filtered of impurities without increasing mineral content e. Be filtered of impurities but it increases mineral content

3. In the far reaches of the Distribution System there must be a minimum free chlorine residual of: a. 0.2 mg/L or 0.5 mg/L Chloramine b. 2.0 mg/L or 5.0 mg/L Chloramine c. 0.2 mg/L or 4.0 mg/L Chloramine d. 0.5 mg/L or 1.0 mg/L Chloramine e. 4.0 mg/L or 5.0 mg/L Chloramine

4. A _______ percent ammonia solution is required for testing for chlorine leaks. a. 5 % b. 10% c. 25 % d. 50 % e. 75 %

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

Answers to Licensing Review: 1. B 2. B 3. A 4. B

MANSFIELD, CLINTON MAPP, THOMAS L NEELEY, GINGER K OLIVER, DANYELL E OWENS, CHRISL OWENS, PATRICK J PAGE, JULIE A PARKER, BRIAN T PEVETO, KENNETH D PHANSANA, SOUKSAVANH PHILLIPS, BRANT RICHARDSON, CURTIS ROACH, LESTER E SALDANA, JORGE SANTIAGO, HECTOR SCHASTEEN, KENNETH SCHULZ, JEFF A SOTO, VICENTE A THOMAS, JUSTIN R WINDHAM, JAMES R


TWUA EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIED ADS:

SURFACE WATER OPERATOR San Marcos, Texas The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has immediate openings at the Water Treatment Plant in San Marcos, TX. Duties include maintaining plant equipment and facilities, performing laboratory testing and adjusting plant controls to process raw water in accordance with TCEQ regulations. Rotating shift work required. Download applications from www.gbra.org.Email to hr@gbra.org or fax to 830.379.9923. A resume may be included, but does not substitute for a completed application. See detailed description online at www. gbra.org. Position is open until filled. Basic math and computer skills. Must have a valid TX Driver’s License and live within 45 minutes travel time of the plant. Candidate must be able to pass a background check, pre-employment physical and drug screen. A high school diploma/GED plus Surface Water “C” TCEQ license; 2 years’ experience. Salary: DOQ and certification level. Fax resume and salary requirements to: (830)379.9923 or Email resume and salary requirements to: hr@gbra.org EOE

WATER TREATMENT OPERATOR Brenham, Texas Performs various tests, prepares reports, and operates and maintains various plant equipment associated with the treatment of raw surface water for general consumption High school graduation; plus one year of experience; Valid Class B CDL Texas driver’s license; Class C surface water certificate or ability to obtain within 2 years of hire date. Salary: Minimum hourly rate $ 15.04. Fax resume and salary requirements to: (979) 337-7513 Email resume and salary requirements to: snienstedt@cityofbrenham.org

OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE MANAGER Kingsland, Texas In accordance with established policies, practices, and regulation, supervises the operations and maintenance of the wastewater collection system and pumping facilities. Maintains associated equipment, buildings, and grounds. Defines practices, projects, and priorities to achieve continuous and efficient operations. Evaluates the performance and recommends personnel actions for employees under his/her supervision. Provides instruction for, and assists in the performance of work supervised. Acts as the General Manager in her absence when required. Required to qualify for Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Grade B certification in wastewater. Applicant must have a valid Texas Driver’s License. Salary range $56,721 to $70,304 DOQ. Required Skills: High School Diploma- Salary range: $56,721 to $70,304 DOQ. Fax resume and salary requirements to Anita LaBier: (325)388-5003 - Email resume and salary requirements to: kmud-aa@nctv.co

PUBLIC WORKS CREW SUPERVISOR Goliad, Texas The City of Goliad is seeking a Public Works Crew Supervisor. Under the direction of the Public Works Director, supervises personnel and directs the day to day operations, maintenance, and repair activities of the Public Works Department. Performs a variety of semi-skilled duties involving the daily operations and maintenance of the Public Works Department which includes but is not limited to; vehicles and equipment maintenance, assist in the water/wastewater department, assist and work with

30 TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL www.twua.org

other departments, assist with animal control, help to maintain ordinance enforcement duties, assist to maintain a clean city, maintain records and/ or any other job duties assigned by the supervisor. Certain licenses will be required to be obtained. City will provide training. Candidates should possess a High School Diploma and a valid Driver’s License, and earnest desire to serve the public. College Education recommended. Must have 3-5 years of supervisory experience. Applicants must be able to: handle significant physical exertion outdoors, work with limited supervision, possess a teamwork attitude, create and edit with Microsoft Office products, and provide outstanding customer service. Salary is competitive and dependent on qualification and experience. For more information, please contact Cindy Shilinga, email: citysupt@goliadtx.net phone: 361645-2081. Application is available online and at City Hall. Required Skills: High School Diploma-Salary is competitive and dependent on qualification and experience. Fax resume and salary requirements to Cindy Shilinga: (361)645-8315 Email resume and salary requirements to: CITYSUPT@GOLIADTX.NET

Employer. For more information please contact Cindy Shilinga at (361)645-2081, or visit City Hall at 152 W End St. Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. High school diploma or GED- Salary: Pending qualification and experience. Fax resume and salary requirements to Cindy Shilinga: (361)645-8315 Email resume and salary requirements to: CITYSUPT@GOLIADTX.NET

WATER/WASTEWATER PLANT OPERATOR Brookshire, Texas The Brookshire Municipal Water District is seeking qualified applicants for the fulltime position of Water/Wastewater Plant Operator. Interested parties can obtain an application from the Administrative Office at 4004 6th St. Brookshire, TX 77423. Applicants MUST possess the minimum qualifications: be at least 18 years of age, have a high school diploma or equivalent, TCEQ Double C License, and a valid Texas Driver’s License. Salary: Depending on Qualifications. Fax resume and salary requirements to Tonya J. Pierre: (281)934-4877. Email resume and salary requirements to: bmwd@consolidated.net

WATER/WASTEWATER OPERATOR Goliad, Texas

W/WW PLANT OPERATIONS SUPERVISOR Brookshire, Texas

The City of Goliad is accepting applications for the position of Water/ Wastewater Operator. Ground Water C and Wastewater C certification is required or must obtain within 1 year. High school diploma or GED along with a valid Driver’s license is also required. The knowledge of compliance reports for the State is a must. Applicant should have at least 3 to 5 years supervisory experience, ability to operate heavy equipment, able to be on call and respond to emergency situations, and be able to provide good customer service. The City of Goliad is an Equal Opportunity

The Brookshire Municipal Water District is seeking qualified applicants for the fulltime position of Water/Wastewater Plant Supervisor. Interested parties can obtain an application from the Administrative Office at 4004 6th St. Brookshire, TX 77423. Applicants MUST possess the minimum qualifications: be at least 18 years of age, have a high school diploma or equivalent, TCEQ Double B License, and a valid Texas Driver’s License. Salary: Depending on Qualifications. Fax resume and salary requirements to Tonya J. Pierre: (281)934-4877. Email resume and salary requirements to: bmwd@consolidated.net AUGUST 2013


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August journal 2013