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H O L I D A Y

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T R A V E L

w w w. t r a v e l n e w s n a m i b i a . c o m

2017

THE OFFICIAL NAMIBIAN TOURISM DIRECTORY


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Windhoek, Surroundings and Central East

Kavango and Surroundings

NAMIBIA HOLIDAY & TRAVEL PO Box 21593, Windhoek, Namibia Tel (+264 61) 42 0500, Fax (+264 61) 42 0511 e-mail: rieth@venture.com.na

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Etosha and Surroundings

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Kaokoland and Surroundings

Anja Denker Annabelle Venter Harrold Page Elzanne Erasmus

Coastal Strip

All photographs used in this publication are from the TALA image library, unless the photographer is otherwise identified.

Waterberg, Khaudum and Surroundings

Sossusvlei and Surroundings

Twyfelfontein and Surroundings

Fish River and Surroundings

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ANNABELLE VENTER

CONTENTS 2017 6 7

Map of Namibia About Venture Media

11

Message from the Namibia Tourism Board

TIPS FOR TRAVELLERS

12

13 Travelling Tips 22 Plan Your Trip 34 Routes 48 Camping 52 Namibian Lodge Groups

ADVENTURE

58

60 Tigerfishing 61 Game Viewing 62 Mountain Biking 63 Rock Climbing 64 Horse-back Safaris 65 4x4 Desert Trips

CULTURES 68 71 74 76 78 80 82

66 The People of Kavango and Zambezi The Owambo - People of the North The Himba - The last true nomads The Herero - From the great lakes of East Africa The San - Namibia’s earliest inhabitants The Damara - An Enigmatic Race The Nama - Denizens of the South

WINDHOEK AND SURROUNDINGS

84

86 Windhoek and surroundings 96 Eat in Windhoek 98 Heritage Sites 99 Arts and Culture Hotspots 101 Accommodation

8

110

KAVANGO & ZAMBEZI

112 Kavango East and West 113 Map of the region 114 The Zambezi Region 114 Parks in Zambezi 117 Basket traditions 117 KaZaTransfrontier Conservation Area 117 Accommodation

120

ETOSHA AND SURROUNDINGS

122 Etosha National Park 123 Map of the region 125 Gateways to Etosha 126 The traditional land of the Owambo people 126 Towns north of Etosha 128 Main tourist attractions in Owambo 128 Accommodation

134

KAOKOLAND AND SURROUNDINGS

136 The desert elephants 137 Map of the region 138 Epupa Falls 138 Opuwo 138 Ruacana Falls 138 Camping on the Kunene 139 Accommodation

140 WATERBERG, KHAUDUM & SURROUNDINGS 142 Waterberg Plateau Park 143 Map of the region 144 Hoba Meteorite 144 Dinosaur footprints 144 Dragon’s Breath 144 Towns in the region 147 Khaudum National Park 148 Accommodation


TWYFELFONTEIN & SURROUNDINGS

150

152 Twyfelfontein & surrounds 152 Khorixas and environs 153 Map of the region 154 Messum Crater 154 The Brandberg 157 Spitzkoppe 157 The Erongo Mountains 158 Otjimbingwe 159 Accommodation

SOSSUSVLEI & SURROUNDINGS

164

166 Namib section 167 Map of the region 168 Naukluft section 171 NamibRand Nature Reserve 171 Duwisib Castle 172 Accommodation

KEYS FEATURED ALONGSIDE ADVERTORIALS

178

COASTAL STRIP

180 Dorob National Park 181 Map of the region 182 Swakopmund 186 Walvis Bay 190 Henties Bay 191 Cape Cross Seal Reserve 192 Skeleton Coast Park 192 Accommodation

196

FISH RIVER & SURROUNDINGS

198 Fish River Canyon 198 /Ai-Ais Richtersveld Transfrontier Park 199 Map of the region 200 Lßderitz 204 The desert horses 205 Sperrgebiet National Park 208 Quiver Tree Forest and Giant’s Playground 209 Accommodation 212

General information

224

General index

air-conditioning

hiking

bath

nature drives

bureau de change

restaurant

bar

HAN member

bungalow (no. of)

playground

casino & entertainment

swimming facilities on site

boating/ sailing

pets allowed

car rental

spa

credit cards accepted

television

campsites/ permanent tented camp

rooms (no. of)

conference facilities

telephone in room

extended tours

eco awards recipient

coffee/ tea station

swimming facilities nearby

curio shop

wireless internet

game drives

windsurfing

cultural tours

walks

fishing

ballooning

hunting

kite surfing

facilities for the disabled

airstrip

horse riding

bird-watching

parking

canoeing

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HEAD OFFICE & WAREHOUSE 15 Newcastle Street PO Box 726, Windhoek Tel: (+264 61) 331 600 info@cymot.com

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ROSH PINAH Tel: (063) 274 853

KATUTURA Tel: (061) 237 759

OTJIWARONGO Tel: (067) 302 454

RUNDU Tel: (066) 255 668

KEETMANSHOOP Te l: (063) 227 800

SWAKOPMUND Tel: (064) 400 318

TSUMEB Tel: (067) 221 161

LÃœDERITZ Tel: (063) 203 855


MESSAGE FROM THE NAMIBIA TOURISM BOARD

2017 bodes well for tourism in Namibia. If the trend of the past 12 months is anything to go by, it may exceed all previous growth records. Apart from the well-known and appreciated aspects of Namibia as a long-haul tourist destination, the fact that four international airlines added routes to Namibia, will have a positive growth effect on the sector, stimulating infrastructure development and creating opportunities for marketing to a wider international travel audience. For a young country with just over two million inhabitants and a relatively small economy, cooperation with international airlines, is invaluable. It is the aim of the Namibian Tourism Board to drive the development of tourism and to support the diversification of tourism products in order to meet the growing demand for Namibia as a destination. This we achieve through effective destination marketing in partnership with not only our national carrier and partner airlines, but also in collaboration with local tourism businesses and international trade partners.

order to carry out innovative marketing offers, to benefit from the reputation of popular, wide-reaching brands and to tap into new target groups.

NTB is committed to expanding the geographic spread beyond the wellknown popular tourist attractions. We engage with NGOs, communities, towns and regions to support and direct them towards the right marketing and developmental decisions, in order to be able to offer products to support the growing demand for Namibia as a destination. Our work is focussed on initiating and carrying out strategic media and marketing collaborations with strong partners in order to awaken interest of potential tourists in Namibia as a travel destination.

The ultimate aim and strategy of NTB’s marketing drive is to increase the time that visitors spend in Namibia and to broaden their experience to include more than the most popular tourist attractions, because the ultimate goal is to make tourism inclusive and relevant for all Namibians in all parts of the country. Tourism plays an important role in job creation, reducing poverty as the third biggest contributor to the GDP. It is our obligation to make sure that decision makers appreciate, and understand the impact of the sector on the economy. It is also our obligation to work with other Government agencies to make it easy for our trading partners to do business with us and grow the sector and for tourists to visit Namibia without unnecessary obstacles.

By creating far-reaching, cross-media collaborations in cooperation with partners from the tour operator and air travel sector we draw positive attention to Namibia as a travel destination among relevant target groups. A callto-action element also creates direct booking incentives. We work closely with strong market partners from strategically relevant industry sectors in

NTB Head Office C/O Haddy & Sam Nujoma Drive Private Bag 13244, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 290 6000 Fax (+264 61) 254 848 info@namibiatourism.com.na www.namibiatourism.com.na NTB Trade & PR Representative in United Kingdom c/o HB Portfolio, Colechurch House 1 London Bridge Walk London, SE1 2SX Tel (+44 0) 20 7593 1777 Fax (+44 0) 20 7022 8662 Namibia@hbportfolio.co.uk www.travelnamibia.co.uk

Travel agencies and tour operators are our indispensable partners when it comes to destination marketing. By training travel agency staff and carrying out study trips, we continuously promote the increase of product knowledge and affinity.

Since independence, the Official Namibia Holiday & Travel Tourism Directory has been an invaluable tool to support our marketing efforts. For the past 22 years this publication

NTB South Africa Ground Floor, Pinnacle Building Burg Street, PO Box 739, Cape Town, 8000 Tel (+27 21) 422 3298 Fax (+27 21) 422 5132 Namibia@saol.com www.namibiatourism.com.na NTB Trade Representative in China c/o DPS Consulting Co. Ltd Room 201, Zhongguancun Development Buidling, No.3 Xiaoyunli, Chaoyang District Beijing 100025, China Tel (+86 10) 844 66463 Fax (+86 10) 658 22772 huhm@dps-china.com

has provided credible and updated information on Namibia to our tourism partners all over the world. As a trusted source, supported by credible local service providers we are confident to share the Namibia Holiday & Travel with investors, businesses, embassies, journalists, as well as travel agents and tour operators in source markets. Namibia is a country full of contrasts that amazes travellers from all over the world. The enormous dunes of the Namib Desert meet the rough coast of the Atlantic Ocean, rugged canyons are scattered amongst wild savannahs and verdant river landscapes. An incomparable range of game species can be observed in numerous National Parks and nature reserves, including of course the famous ‘Big Five’. Come and experience it yourself!

Digu //Naobeb CEO: Namibia Tourism Board

NTB Europe Schiller str. 42-44 60313 Frankfurt/Main, Germany Tel (+49 69) 133 7360 Fax (+49 69) 133 73625 info@namibia-tourism.com www.namibia-tourism.com NTB PR Representative in China c/o Oriental Gateway Consultancy Room 405, No.7, Building A, Lane300, Panyu Road, Changning District, Shanghai, 200052, P.R.C Tel(+86 21) 6280 1700 Fax(+86 21) 6280 1078 zhuzheng0312@yahoo.com www.namibiatourism.com.na

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TIPS FOR TRAVELLERS

SEASONAL TIPS | ACCOMMODATION | TIME FACTS | MONEY MATTERS | PHOTOGRAPHING PEOPLE | RESPONSIBLE TOURISM | LOCAL LINGO | TRAVELLING WITH CHILDREN | PUBLIC HOLIDAYS | HEALTH | NEIGHBOURING COUNTRIES | KEY TOURISM ASSOCIATIONS | NAMIBIA IN PRINT AND ON FILM


| TIPS FOR TRAVELLERS |

The Land of Open Spaces, as Namibia is affectionately known, with its undiscovered landscapes and unspoiled nature, makes for a perfect and widely diverse travel destination. The well-developed road infrastructure, the abundance of scheduled tours and charter companies, and the friendly welcoming people will ensure that your visit to Namibia is an unforgettable experience. Whether you’re in search of the perfect romantic breakaway, ultimate adventure or just wish to lose yourself in the wildlife, cultural diversity and mesmerising scenery reflecting Namibia’s untouched beauty, the following information and tips will leave you well equipped to explore even the remotest parts of the country. SEASONAL TIPS •

The best time to visit the capital and surroundings is between May and September, when it is cool and dry. In the rainy season from November to March it is hot and somewhat humid, sometimes with heavy rains. December to January is the main school holiday season in Namibia, when much of the population heads to the coast, and some of the smaller shops and restaurants in the interior might be closed. If you’re visiting southern Namibia and the desert areas surrounding Sossusvlei it is best to avoid the summer months, as temperatures can be extreme. The period between May and September is generally better and more comfortable for visiting, but keep in mind that in winter, especially at night, it can be cold. The climate at Lüderitz and the southern coast is hospitable from February to May, but quite cool and misty year-round, and particularly windy in August. From October to March is the best time to go to the coastal areas of Swakopmund, Walvis Bay and Henties Bay, as the weather is pleasant compared to

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the hot interior. When the dry easterly winds blow, however, it can also be very hot. The northern Skeleton Coast has much the same moderate weather, with mist, wind and very little or no rain all year round. For fishing enthusiasts, this area is best visited between November and March. In Kaokoland the best time to visit is from May to August, as it is dry and cool. The summer months bring extremely high temperatures and occasionally flash floods, as most rain falls between January and March. The best time to visit Etosha is from April to September when the temperatures are tolerably cool, especially at night. This is also the best time for game viewing, as many animals gather at the waterholes to drink. For bird-watching, on the other hand, summer is the best time to visit, as migratory birds flock into the park after the summer rains. The summer months are hot and humid in the northern regions of Kavango and Zambezi, but this is also the best time for birdwatching. Rains and seasonal flooding might make it difficult

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• • • •

to travel there, as some of the roads might be inaccessible. It is advisable to check the condition of the roads before embarking on a trip. The winter months from April to October are the best time to travel to the Zambezi Region for game viewing, as it is much cooler and drier then, with practically no rain. April and May are pleasant months in Namibia. This is usually when the last rains of the season fall, the air is fresh and free of dust, and the land is green, vibrant and full of new life. During the winter months from June to August the country cools down and nights can become quite cold. As it becomes drier, game migrates to the waterholes, and is easier to spot. By September and October it warms up again and game viewing in most areas is at its best, although there’s often a lot of dust around and the vegetation has lost its vibrancy. November is a highly variable month. Sometimes the hot, dry weather will continue, at other times it might be humid, the sky will fill with clouds, and the first thunderstorms and rains might occur.

ACCOMMODATION Any person intending to operate an accommodation establishment or conduct a regulated business in Namibia is required by law to be registered with the NTB. Before such registration is granted, the premises and facilities are inspected by a tourism official who recommends whether approval for registration should be granted or not.

Establishments are classified as: • Backpackers’ hostels • Bed-and-breakfast establishments • Campsites • Camping and caravan parks

• Guest farms and guesthouses • Hotels and hotel pensions • Lodges (other than tented lodges) • Rest camps

• Self-catering establishments • Permanent tented camps and tented lodges

The majority of resorts run by Namibia Wildlife Resorts (NWR) are situated in national parks. They consist of accommodation ranging from luxury flats to bungalows, tents, camping and caravan sites. Major towns have municipal caravan parks or rest camps. Community-based camps and lodges situated in conservancies comply with the concept of ecologically-oriented tourism, and have a low impact on the environment. Exclusive game lodges offer air-conditioned en-suite facilities, combining four-star luxury with nature and wildlife. Guest farms offer accommodation for visitors wishing to experience the warmth and hospitality of life on a farm or game ranch.

HEALTH

Malaria is potentially a serious disease that could be fatal if not treated timeously and properly. • • •

It is transmitted to people through the bite of a mosquito, usually after dark. It is prevalent primarily in the north of the country, mainly in summer during the rainy season. The risk of malaria can be reduced by using personal protection measures and prophylactics.

Take Note

If any flu-like symptoms are experienced on the way home, seek immediate medical attention and inform your doctor that you recently visited a malaria-prone area. Visit our website for more information on malaria and precautions that can be taken.

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| TIPS FOR TRAVELLERS |

MONEY MATTERS Currency and credit cards •

The Namibia dollar (N$) is fixed to and equals the South African rand (ZAR), which is also legal tender in Namibia. Please note: the Namibia dollar is not legal tender in South Africa. International Visa, Diners Club, American Express and MasterCard credit cards are generally accepted, while Speedpoint and ATM facilities assure quick and efficient service. Note: Petrol can be bought with internationally accepted debit or credit cards if the service station has point-of-sale devices.

Tax and customs Value-added tax (VAT) is levied at a rate of 15% on goods and services at the point of sale. Foreign visitors to Namibia can claim VAT on holiday purchases exceeding N$250 when they leave Namibia via Hosea Kutako International Airport and at the border posts at Ariamsvlei and Noordoewer. www.airports.com.na •

VAT on services rendered or goods consumed cannot be refunded. No VAT is payable on exports of goods when sold, consigned or delivered by the seller to the purchaser at an address outside Namibia. No customs duties are applicable within SACU (Southern African Customs Union) countries, these comprising Namibia, Botswana, South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland.

Firearms must be declared and need a temporary import permit, obtainable on arrival. Only hunting rifles with magazines not exceeding a five-round capacity may be brought into the country. The importation of handguns is prohibited. Formalities concerning trophies are handled by the professional hunter concerned, who contacts a forwarding agent to make arrangements for the trophy to be sent to the hunter’s destination.

Duty-free allowances While all goods and gifts acquired abroad or in a duty-free shop, including goods bought duty free on an aircraft, are subject to payment of customs duty and VAT when brought into Namibia, travellers may qualify for the following concessions: •

Certain duty-free allowances

A flat-rate assessment on goods brought into Namibia as accompanied baggage.

Visitors are allowed the following goods duty free: • 400 cigarettes • 50 cigars • 250 grams of cigarette or pipe tobacco • 2 litres of wine • 1 litre of spirits or alcoholic beverages • 50 ml perfume • 250 ml eau de toilette • New or used goods to the value of N$1 250

TIME FACTS Summer: From the first Sunday in September to the first Sunday in April – two hours in advance of Greenwich Mean Time. Winter: From the first Sunday in April to the first Sunday in September – one hour in advance of Greenwich Mean Time.

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TIPS FOR PHOTOGRAPHING PEOPLE • • •

• • • • • • •

Make friends with the locals. If you’re planning on taking photos of them in their private surroundings, it’s always best to have a local guide take you around to converse with them and overcome the barrier of photographer versus subject. Always ask before you photograph someone. Not everybody likes to have his or her picture taken, so avoid conflict by asking first. Some people will expect payment for having their picture taken. This includes the Himba and Herero people, who still dress traditionally and are thus worthwhile subjects. They spend considerable time and effort on their appearance and if you ‘steal’ their image without asking their permission and offering payment, it might make them angry and put you at a disadvantage. The best option is to ask them first and agree on a price before taking the photo. Young children are often fond of being photographed, but it’s always best to ask a guardian or parent first. Older people might be more hesitant to have their picture taken. Once again, with friendliness you will achieve more. If you take a digital photograph of someone, show it to him or her afterwards. Many people don’t own cameras and are amazed by the possibilities of technology. This gesture will make them warm to you, and might result in you taking a great photograph. If possible, try to send a printed copy of the picture to the person you’ve photographed. Those living in rural areas will truly appreciate it. But don’t promise to do so and then not deliver. If you’re not sure whether you’ll get round to sending the photo, rather not make the promise. Remember that it’s illegal to take photos of men and women in uniform, except when they are performing in a public parade, or something similar. Taking a picture of a police officer on duty is therefore out of the question. When taking photos at a cultural village, at a cultural performance, or on a pre-arranged photographic tour, it’s not necessary to ask permission. To be on the safe side, check with your guide or local companion first. When on an organised tour, many photo opportunities are pre-arranged, making it easy for you to just snap away, while leaving the formalities to your guide. Ask your guide about this if you’re not sure.

RESPONSIBLE TOURISM • • • • • • •

Respect the customs and traditions of your hosts. Support local people and their products by spending your money within the local economy. Bargain fairly. Don’t insult Namibians by turning them into beggars. Try to learn a new local word every day, and be open to friendship. Keep the realities of the economy in mind. Even though Namibia is a developing country, the hotels and lodges are graded according to international standards, hence prices will more or less tally with international prices. Namibians are very relaxed people, so please be patient with them!

Best-culture practice • • • • •

It is polite to begin conversations with a courteous greeting. If you wish to stay in a traditional village, request permission from the headman. If you want to draw water from a community well, permission must be sought. In a Himba village, it is disrespectful to walk between the sacred fire and the kraal (animal enclosure) or the headman’s hut. Show respect when approaching a traditional Herero or Himba grave, often indicated by an array of cattle horns.

LOCAL LINGO The following words are typical local vernacular, influenced by Afrikaans – still largely the lingua franca – and other indigenous languages. Using these words will do much to improve your communication with locals. aweh – said in excitement. The word has many meanings and uses, including hello, goodbye, and yes bakkie – a pickup truck biltong – dried and seasoned meat (like jerky), a popular snack braai – a barbecue. Braaing – a national pastime that traditionally entails turning the meat with one hand while holding a beer in the other – is taken very seriously bra/bru/boet – a male friend brötchen – a bread roll, offered with different toppings, to be eaten as breakfast, lunch, supper or a snack dorp – small town droëwors – dried sausage, a snack often eaten with biltong efundja – periodic flood in the Owambo regions, northern Namibia eish! – an interjection expressing resignation jol – to have fun, to party koppie – a small hill, not yet a mountain just now/now-now – meaning anytime within the next 50 years other than right at this moment

16

kapana – traditionally barbecued meat, usually sold in the townships and at the side of the road lapa – the thatched outdoor shelter used for shade from the African sun or to braai underneath when it’s raining lekker – nice, good, great, tasty, awesome mémé – respectful name for an adult female oshana(s) – shallow pools and watercourses in the Owambo regions, northern Namibia pap – traditional maize porridge plaas – farm potjie – a three-legged cast-iron pot used for cooking stews over the fire robot – a traffic light shebeen – an informal bar that’s open 24 hours sies – expression of disgust, disappointment, annoyance sussie/sister – female friend smiley – a goat’s or sheep’s head, cooked and ready for consumption sosatie – meat (traditionally lamb) and vegetables skewered on a stick, usually accompanying other meat on a braai táté – respectful name for a male vetkoek – deep-fried bread dough, often sold with kapana wors – spicy sausage for accompanying meat on a braai yoh – an expression of surprise


| TIPS FOR TRAVELLERS |

TIPS FOR TRAVELLING WITH CHILDREN • • • • • • • • •

Arrive at your destination in the early afternoon to give your children an opportunity to work off their surplus energy. Even in the middle of winter, it is warm enough to swim in the middle of the day. Children too young to take malaria prophylactics should not visit northern Namibia. We recommend itineraries that include fewer destinations, with more time to spend on activities. If the family is interested in conservation, make sure to include places with an education centre, rehabilitation programme or other conservation activities. Visits to ‘living museums’ are enjoyable for children, as guests are invited to join in the dancing and participate in everyday activities. Keep in mind that destinations can be quite far from each other and children might become bored or frustrated on the road, so make sure they have enough to keep them busy. It is also advisable to stop frequently to stretch your legs and admire the surroundings. Many accommodation facilities cater for children, but not all of them, so it is advisable to establish this when making a booking. Some guest farms have tame animals such as meerkats that children can pet and play with, while other establishments offer them the opportunity to come into contact with wild animals such as cheetahs and lions. Depending on the age of the children, adventure activities such as quad-biking, dune-boarding and dolphinwatching can be a lot of fun.

KEY PHRASES IN SOME OF THE LOCAL LANGUAGES Afrikaans Goeiemôre Hoe gaan dit? Goed dankie Asseblief Dankie Totsiens

Good morning How are you? Fine thanks Please Thank you Goodbye

Batswana Dumela Hello O kae? How are you? Ke a leboga Thank you Sala sentle Goodbye Caprivian Ma lumele sha!

I greet you!

Ni itumezi Thank you Na lapela Please Mu siale hande Goodbye

Kavango Morokeni! Hello! Na pandura Thank you

Owambo Wa lelepo nawa? Did you sleep well? Eee! Yes! Nawa! Well! Tangi unene Thank you very much Kalapa nawa Goodbye

Nama/Damara Matisa? Ayo Moro Gaiseha

How are you? Thank you Good morning Goodbye

San/Bushman Am thai? Mem ari gu Mem tlabe

How are you? I am thirsty I am hungry

Herero/Ovahimba Perivi? Are you well? Nawa Yes, well Okuhepa Thank you Kara nawa Goodbye

NAMIBIAN PUBLIC HOLIDAYS New Year’s Day:

1 Jan (2 Jan)

Workers’ Day:

1 May

Heroes’ Day:

Independence Day:

21 March

Cassinga Day:

4 May

Human Rights Day

Good Friday:

14 April

Ascension Day:

25 May

Christmas Day:

Easter Monday:

17 April

Africa Day:

25 May

Family Day:

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26 Aug 10 Dec (11 Dec)

25 Dec 26 Dec

17


LINK YOUR TRIP WITH A VISIT TO NEIGHBOURING COUNTRIES TO Botswana

Fly from Windhoek’s Hosea Kutako International Airport to Maun for a safari in the Okavango Delta OR Fly from Windhoek to Katima Mulilo (Mpacha Airport), for a safari in Chobe National Park and on to the Okavango Delta OR Link a self-drive safari through Namibia with a visit to the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park in South Africa, Botswana and the Kalahari in eastern Namibia.

TO South Africa

Fly from Windhoek to Cape Town or Johannesburg on any of the frequent daily scheduled flights

OR Link a self-drive safari to southern Namibia with a visit to the Richtersveld in South Africa OR Link a self-drive safari through Namibia with a visit to the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park in South Africa, Botswana and the Kalahari in eastern Namibia.

TO Zimbabwe

Fly from Windhoek’s Hosea Kutako International Airport to Harare or Victoria Falls OR Include Victoria Falls in a self-drive safari that includes a visit to the Zambezi Region.

TO Zambia

Fly from Windhoek’s Hosea Kutako International Airport to Lusaka on a scheduled flight OR Include Livingstone in a self-drive safari that visits the Zambezi Region.

TO Angola

Fly from Windhoek’s Hosea Kutako International Airport to Luanda OR Include Iona National Park, Angola, in a self-drive itinerary to northern Namibia.

SEE FOUR OF OUR FIVE NEIGHBOURS

Visit the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area and see Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. DID YOU KNOW? KaZa is the largest conservation area in the world! Visit www.kavangozambezi.org or see page 117 for more information.

Cross-border charges

The times, fees and conditions for cross-border charges are subject to change, with the fees changing at any time. For the latest information, refer to the website: www.rfanam.com.na. Take note: Visitors to neighbouring countries are strongly advised to contact the respective immigration offices to find out what their requirements are for entering.

TOURIST INFORMATION

Tourism promotion, the registration of accommodation establishments and tour guides, and the provision of tourist information are the functions of the Namibia Tourism Board (NTB), which has its offices in the Channel Life Building, Post Street Mall, Windhoek. Tel (+264 61) 290 6000, Fax (+264 61) 40 1401, e-mail: info@namibiatourism.com.na, website: www.namibiatourism.com.na. For further information on NTB offices abroad, see page 11.

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| TIPS FOR TRAVELLERS |

Opening times at border posts Noordoewer: Ariamsvlei: Buitepos: Wenela: Ngoma: Mata Mata: Sendelingsdrift: Dobe: Impalila/Kasane: Oshikango: Katitwe: Velloorsdrift: Klein Manasse: Oranjemund: Ruacana: Omahenene: Muhembo: Hohlweg:

open 24 hours open 24 hours open 07:00–24:00 open 06:00–18:00 open 07:00–18:00 open 08:00–16:30 open 08:00–16:30 open 07:00–16:30 open 07:00–17:00 open 08:00–19:00 open 08:00–18:00 open 08:00–16:30 open 08:00–16:30 open 06:00–22:00 open 08:00–19:00 open 08:00–19:00 open 06:00–18:00 open 08:00–16:30

NOTE: These opening hours correspond to Namibian summertime. During the winter months – April to September – watches must be moved one hour earlier.

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

19


KEY TOURISM-RELATED ASSOCIATIONS Federation of Namibian Tourism Associations (FENATA)

FENATA acts as an umbrella organisation for tourism associations in the private sector. As such it is the voice of the tourism industry, serving as a communication vehicle between Government and its members. This contributes towards effective partnerships and collaboration between the public and private sector, and on community level in the tourism sector. (+264 61) 23 0337, welcome@fenata.org, www.fenata.org Its members are: • The Namibian Professional Hunting Association (NAPHA) • Tour and Safari Association (TASA) • Hospitality Association of Namibia (HAN) • Namibian Academy for Tourism and Hospitality (NATH) • B&B Association of Namibia (B&BAN) • Car Rental Association of Namibia (CARAN) • Tour Guides Association of Namibia (TAN)

• Namibian Association for Community Based Natural Resources Management Support Organisations (NACSO) • Association of Namibian Travel Agents (ANTA) • Tourism Related Enterprises and Business Association (TRENABA) • Emerging Tourism Enterprises Association (ETEA) • Namibia Wildlife Resorts (NWR) • FNB – Tourism Desk • Namibian Association for Protected Desert Areas (NAPDA)

Hospitality Association of Namibia (HAN)

The Hospitality Association of Namibia has since its inception in 1987, grown from an initial 16 members to a total of close to 400 members. HAN represents the full spectrum of the hospitality industry, from hotels, to guest houses, guest farms, lodges, rest camps, restaurants, conference centres and catering services.Over the years, more and more tourism and hospitality related businesses also joined the Hospitality Association, making HAN a true umbrella-body and an important factor in the

tourism & hospitality industry of Namibia in general. (+264 61) 22 2904, info@hannamibia.com, www.hannamibia.com

Tour and Safari Association of Namibia (TASA) Founded in 1989, TASA is a voluntary private-sector body that acts on behalf of its members, encourages the development of responsible tourism in Namibia, ensures standards and reliability in the Namibian tourism industry and furthers the common interests of Namibian Tour Operators. (+264 61) 23 8423, info@tasa.na, www.tasa.na

Car Rental Association of Namibia (CARAN)

CARAN is a non-profit association established to protect tourists and the car-rental industry against substandard service. Car-rental companies must subscribe to minimum standards before they are accepted as members of the association. CARAN, through its members, undertakes to address problems concerning a vehicle rented from one of its members immediately. www.natron.net/caran

To promote & develop tourism in

With the people, for the peop le; to

NAMIBIA g et

her i

n H •

A• N

The Tour and Safari Association of Namibia (TASA) is...  ... a voluntary private­sector body that acts on behalf of its members to encourage the development of responsible tourism in Namibia, ensure standards and reliability in the Namibian tourism industry and further the common interests of Namibian Tour Operators.  

H•A•N members • offer a total of over 10 000 beds and close to 6 000 rooms in Namibia • enjoy special deals and rates from a number of companies and suppliers H•A•N offers • its members representation at all levels, official, commercial and internal • ongoing information flow and communication via electronic channels

Promotion Through a collective industry association effort, to promote and represent the views of its members and the Tourism Industry as well as assisting FENATA in resolving issues with the relevant  authorities. 

Get in touch: PO Box 11534  |  Klein Windhoek   28 Bismarck Street  |  Windhoek Telephone: +264­61­238423   Fax: +264­61­238424 E­mail: info@tasa.na

www.hannamibia.com 20

www.tasa.na

Marketing To support members in co­coordinated marketing activities at international travel fairs and by submitting up­to­date lists of members to the tourism industry and tourism promotion offices

Development To instill confidence among overseas Tour Operators, Tour Wholesalers, Travel Management Companies and tourists in dealing with a member of a recognized Association, companies and/or individuals subscribing to professionalism in conducting all aspects of tourism.


| TIPS FOR TRAVELLERS |

NAMIBIA IN PRINT AND ON FILM

Skeleton Coast, a book by renowned nature photographer and author, Amy Schoeman Namib – Secrets of a desert uncovered, by scientists Mary Seely and John Pallett Etosha – Celebrating a hundred years of conservation, by Hu Berry et al Birds of Namibia – A Photographic Journey, by Pompie Burger Birds of Namibia: The Journey Continues, by Pompie Burger Etosha, a film by Paul van Schalkwyk My Hungry Heart – Notes from a Namibian kitchen, by Antoinette de Chavonnes-Vrugt Life on a Table, by Antoinette de Chavonnes-Vrugt

The above-mentioned books are available through Venture Media: bonn@venture.com.na

MORE BOOKS AND FILMS ON NAMIBIA Healing Makes Our Hearts Happy, a book on the Ju/’hoansi-San of the Kalahari Desert, by Richard Katz An Arid Eden – A personal account of conservation in the Kaokoveld, by Garth OwenSmith A History of Namibia – from the beginning to 1990, by Marion Wallace and John Kinahan Vanishing Kings– The Lions of the Namib , a film by Will and Lianne Steenkamp Elephant Don: The Politics of a Pachyderm Posse, by Caitlin O’Connell Wild Horses of the Namib, by Mannfred Goldbeck and Telané Greyling The People of Namibia’s Zambezi Region, a historical perspective by Antje Otto and Mannfred Goldbeck Kalahari Dreaming, photography and text by Bernd Wasiolka

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

21


PLAN YOUR TRIP

ANNABELLE VENTER

GETTING AROUND | DRIVE | FLY | EAT | SHOP | TOUR | CAMP | ROUTES | ADVENTURE


| PLAN YOUR TRIP |

GETTING AROUND TRAVEL DOCUMENTS Foreign nationals must carry a passport that is valid for at least six months after the date of entry. A visa is required from all visitors except nationals of countries with which Namibia has the necessary visa abolition agreement. • No visas are required by bona fide South African passport holders travelling as tourists. • All other South African citizens, including business people, require visas. • Business visas are granted at the discretion of the immigration authorities. • Holidaymakers and tourists are welcome to remain in the country for 90 days. The process for a UNIVISA (a common EU Schengen-style visa) by RETOSA (the Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa) in conjunction with the relevant Southern African Development Community (SADC) documentation allowing the free movement of visitors from SADC countries within the SADC Region is still ongoing. www.mha.gov.na, www.retosa.co.za Visas can be obtained from the Ministry of Home Affairs, at Namibian embassies and the NTB office in Cape Town. Please note: • Immigration officials are authorised to grant duration of stay based on the information provided on the arrival form. • Tourists are advised to check their passports and documentation to ensure that the visa granted matches the duration of stay intended. • Visas cannot be obtained at points of entry. • Visas can be extended only by applying at a Home Affairs Office, with prescribed fees applying. • If visitors to Namibia have tourist/holiday visas, they are not allowed to engage in any employment while in the country. • Visitors wishing to work in the

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

country should apply for an employment permit in their country of residence prior to entry. This also applies to study permits.

TRAIN TRAVEL

Luxury train services provide scenic overnight journeys between Windhoek and Swakopmund with excursions along the way, and sevenday journeys to the Etosha National Park. Affordable train travel between Windhoek and all the main towns is offered by TransNamib’s Starline Passenger Service. Several South African trains visit the country on regular scheduled services. Situated in the Windhoek Railway Station building at the bottom of Bahnhof Street, the TransNamib Railway Museum is a veritable mine of information for railway enthusiasts, as well as for the general public.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT In Windhoek locals use a 24-hour taxi service, while a daily bus service provides them with transport to and from work. A scheduled bus service and private operators transport passengers in registered taxis to and from Hosea Kutako International Airport and the capital, while daily shuttle services transport guests between Windhoek and Swakopmund or Walvis Bay. Informal minibuses travel all over the country. A bus service (www. intercape.co.za) runs between major centres in Namibia and connects with Johannesburg, Cape Town, Pretoria, Upington and other towns and cities in South Africa. This service also travels between Windhoek and Walvis Bay, Victoria Falls and Livingstone. Another service travels between Windhoek and Katima Mulilo, Oshakati, and Lusaka two times a week, covering the Cape Town route three times weekly. There is also a twice-weekly service that travels from Windhoek to Gaborone. For listing and contact numbers for service providers, see www. travelnewsnamibia.com.

23


DRIVE TIPS FOR CAR RENTALS AND SELF-DRIVES

Namibia has an excellent road system that extends to just about every popular tourist destination in the country. However, the majority of the roads are gravel, and in the more remote areas they become tracks, which require careful driving, and for safety considerations, a second vehicle. These areas are not recommended for the inexperienced driver, for whom guided tours or organised safaris are recommended.

Which vehicles are the most suitable to rent? The main choices are: • Any 2WD with good ground clearance and standard high-profile tyres. • Any 4WD with suitable tyres as described above. • A camper van or motor home with suitable tyres as described above.

Important facts to consider • 4WD vehicles cost more to hire and run, but have good ground clearance and are normally fitted with tyres that are better suited to Namibian roads. • 2WD vehicles have less ground clearance and carry less. • 2WD camping cars come equipped with everything you’ll need. • 4WD camping cars also come equipped with everything you’ll need, but are more versatile than normal sedans or other two-wheel drive vehicles

24

equipped for camping. • Motor homes are usually better suited to tarred roads, as they tend to be topheavy and have poor ground clearance. NOTE: When you reserve a vehicle with a CARAN member, enquire about the class of vehicle for which you have been given a quotation. CARAN vehicles are classed in five categories, ranging from Class 1 representing the latest vehicles with the lowest mileage available for rent to Class 5 representing the oldest vehicles with the highest mileage available for rent. You will obviously pay more for a Class 1 vehicle than for a similar model Class 5 vehicle. Your final choice will be a question of where you intend travelling and your budget.

GENERAL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS • In Namibia we drive on the left side of the road. • The driver and all passengers must wear seatbelts. • You need a valid driving licence and must carry it with you when you are driving. If your driver’s licence is not printed in English, it is advisable to travel with an International Driver’s Licence. • Make sure you are fully insured. • Make sure the brakes of your vehicle are in good working order. • Your tyres must have the correct air pressure. • Always carry at least one spare tyre.

Take two, if possible. • Four-by-four vehicles are recommended when travelling through remote areas. • Carry a well-equipped first-aid kit. • Plan your trip carefully, ensuring that you have enough fuel for the journey. Fill your tank at every opportunity available, even though you may not be in immediate need. • Always carry water when you travel. • It is advisable to leave your itinerary with your tour operator, hotel or friends, so that in the unlikely event that you might become lost, authorities will be able to find you. • Make sure you have a current, authoritative map before you leave on your trip. When you leave the official roads marked on your map, there may be no road signs to direct you, and the condition of the roads may be poor. • Listen carefully to the safety briefing given by your car-hire company. Ask advice on the condition of the roads in the areas you plan to visit. • If your car has extra tanks for fuel and water, use them. • Watch out for animals crossing the road or grazing near the roadside. • Avoid travelling at night. Wildlife is most active at dusk, and the possibility of a collision at this time of day is vastly increased. • When entering any game park or other area where there are wild animals, read the safety guidelines provided. It is dangerous to leave your vehicle when you are in a wildlife area. • Destinations are far apart, so take regular breaks.


| PLAN YOUR TRIP |

TIPS ON TRAILER TOWING • Ensure that your trailer is in a good roadworthy condition. • The tyres fitted to your trailer should match the towing vehicle in size and should be in good condition, as they will travel the same roads. Having that extra spare for the vehicle may be a lifesaver. • Tyre pressure should be the same on the trailer and the tow vehicle. • It is advisable to have a break coupler that may be locked to de-activate the brake system. Excessive and unnecessary stress is placed on a trailer’s breaking system during severe off-road conditions. • Maintain a manageable and safe travelling speed at all times. • Pack the trailer to place a positive weight distribution of between 30 kg and 80 kg on the tow ball of the vehicle.

BEWARE OF FLASH FLOODS • Due to the erratic nature of Namibia’s rainfall, the rivers in the interior are ephemeral and usually dry. • Runoff occurs only when the intensity of a rainstorm is high or if it lasts long enough to produce runoff. • In terms of driving, all dry riverbeds should be considered as hazardous during the rainy season, especially when clouds are visible on the horizon. • Devastating flash floods can occur especially in the period between late afternoon and early morning. Visitors should therefore never drive along a dry riverbed or camp near the river in the rainy season.

DRIVING IN SAND • The keys to successful sand driving are momentum and tyre pressure. Momentum and speed stop the vehicle from becoming mired in the sand, while dropping your tyre pressure creates a bigger tyre ‘footprint’, spreading the vehicle’s weight over a larger area and giving you more grip. • Remember that fast cornering on soft tyres is highly dangerous, as you can roll the tyre off the rim. • Don’t forget to re-inflate when you are back on hard ground. • Never brake hard in soft sand. Your wheels will dig in and you’ll stop faster than you expect. Simply decelerate, as the loss of momentum will halt the vehicle. • Always stop on a downhill or on the flat. • Avoid wheel-spin – the vehicle will simply dig into the sand.

SELF-DRIVERS, TAKE NOTE • The Namibian landscape is extremely fragile, so please follow only welldefined tracks and roads. In certain areas, such as the gravel plains, a single set of tracks can remain visible for decades. Deviating off existing tracks not only spoils the scenery and enjoyment of others, but also destroys plants and small creatures. • Respect the culture and traditions of those inhabiting the area through which you are travelling. Disrespect causes resentment and ill feeling towards other tourists. • Bear in mind that assistance could be days away in the event of an unexpected breakdown. A minimum of two vehicles travelling together is, therefore, strongly recommended. • Engage four-wheel drive and manually lock front hubs (if required) before negotiating difficult terrain or steep inclines or declines. Inspect the terrain for obstacles and plan your route accordingly. • In sandy terrain, deflate the tyre pressure to about 1 kPa (front) and 1.2 kPa (rear). If the vehicle becomes stuck, remember that brute force will not get you out of trouble. If anything, you’ll become bogged down even more. Check whether the vehicle is engaged in four-wheel drive and the front hubs are locked, and clear the sand in front and behind the wheels. • Other options are to deflate the tyres a little more or jack the vehicle up and place stones or dead branches under the wheels.

SPECIAL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS FOR GRAVEL ROADS Not all gravel roads are the same. Be aware of this and drive accordingly. Take note of the following before you set out: • Punctures are common on gravel roads, so carry two spare tyres. • Do not exceed the prescribed speed limit. • Observe road traffic signs conscientiously, particularly those indicating a gentle or sharp curve ahead, and reduce your speed accordingly. • In dusty conditions it is advisable to switch on the headlights of your vehicle. • When there is oncoming traffic, reduce speed and keep to the left of the road as far as possible. • In rainy or wet conditions, beware of slippery roads, sections of the road that have washed away, and running and/or stagnant water at drifts and/or causeways. • Be on the lookout for animals, domestic and wild, at all times. • Be constantly on the lookout for the unexpected, such as loose and sandy patches, potholes or a sharp bend in the road. • Other hazards are dry-stream crossings and dips in the road. These are often eroded or rocky. • Be constantly on the alert, as road signs have sometimes been removed or run over. • Overtaking on gravel roads is dangerous. Draw the attention of the driver in front of you by flicking your headlights, indicating that you wish to overtake. • The simple rule when going into a skid is: skid left, steer left – skid right, steer right. Gently! Take your foot off the accelerator for a moment as the car is gently brought under control, and stay off the brakes! • Be careful when you approach the top of a blind rise, as there is often a slight bend just out of sight that could catch you off-guard. • The major hazards when driving on gravel roads are: driving TOO FAST, not concentrating, or taking a chance by overtaking ‘blind’ into the dust of another vehicle.

SPEED LIMITS: Tarmac: 120 km/h | Gravel: 80 km/h | Towns: 60 km/h www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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| PLAN YOUR TRIP - DRIVE |

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| PLAN YOUR TRIP - DRIVE |

LAND OF CONTRASTS AND SWEEPING VISTAS

8 Bessemer Street, Southern Industrial Area, Windhoek

info@namibiacarrental.com Office: +264 61 249239 Mobile: +264 81 122 2500

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| PLAN YOUR TRIP - FLY |

FLY FLY-IN ADVENTURES

A fly-in safari is the perfect option for first-time visitors with generous budgets and not much time. Flying in Namibia is not only about getting somewhere quickly; it’s about being treated to a bird’s-eye view from a most spectacular perspective. A mere twohour flight can cross desert dunes and expansive plains, glide along the coast with sand cascading into the Atlantic, and soar over rugged mountain ranges. Namibia asks to be viewed from the air and is well set up to accommodate such safaris. There are landing strips at almost every lodge, town and village. In fact, there are more than 300 known airfields in the country. Namibia’s northern coastline, which makes up a large section of the Skeleton Coast Park, is a prime example of how dramatically Namibia’s landscapes contrast one another. The centuries-old rock formations juxtaposed against the roaring dunes of the Namib Desert, create an otherworldly panorama, especially when your vantage point is from above. The northern section of the Skeleton Coast Park is restricted to fly-in safaris, a touring medium that easily provides one of the most popular adventure options in Namibia. Fly-in safaris to Kaokoland, the Kunene River environs and the northern section of the Skeleton Coast Park, provide visitors with the opportunity to explore an area where there has been little external contact or influence and often proves to be the experience of a lifetime. The region is far off the beaten track, so comparatively few tourists have the opportunity to visit this Namibian outpost. The relatively unexplored areas of the Kaokoland provide for a true adventure, as guests visit seminomadic Himba communities, search for the rare desert-adapted rhinos and elephants, and discover the rugged and mysterious landscapes. A fly-in safari to the north-west, most often departing from Windhoek, will take visitors across desert landscapes towards and up the coast, over fishing waters off Swakopmund, Wlotkasbaken and Henties Bay, providing a bird’s-eye view of shipwrecks and orange lichen fields all the way up to the Kunene River, the furthest point of the journey. This is by far the best way for a traveller

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to see a large part of a country in a short period of time as opposed to driving to these destinations, especially in a country such as Namibia where distances are vast and locations are few and far between. Fly-in safaris can also explore parts of the country that are mostly off-limits to the general traveller. With an aeroplane as your safari vehicle, it is possible to explore such areas from many different vantage points, the breathtaking views often becoming life-changing experiences that make for an added bonus. Companies that facilitate fly-in safaris and charters to the northwest include Skeleton Coast Safaris, WestAir, Scenic Air, African Profile Safaris, Sense of Africa, and many more.

AIR TRAVEL

The national carrier, Air Namibia: • Maintains direct international flights between Windhoek and Frankfurt on a daily basis. • Flies directly between Windhoek and Accra (Ghana), Lusaka (Zambia), Maun (Botswana), Luanda (Angola), Harare and Victoria Falls (Zimbabwe), and Johannesburg and Cape Town (South Africa). • Provides domestic flights to local destinations such as Walvis Bay, Katima Mulilo, Rundu, Lüderitz, Oranjemund, and Ondangwa. • Operates scheduled regional and international freight services to and from Namibia. • The Namibia Airports Company (NAC) provides and facilitates airport infrastructure, facilities and airport services. • The NAC owns and manages eight airports: Hosea Kutako International, Eros, Walvis Bay, Lüderitz, Keetmanshoop, Ondangwa, Rundu and Katima Mulilo. Foreign airlines providing a service to Windhoek are: • South African Airways • TAAG Angola Airlines • Condor • Qatar Airlines • KLM Royal Dutch Airlines • British Airways/Comair • Ethiopian Airlines

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| PLAN YOUR TRIP - FLY |

Flights tailored to suit your dreams. Corporate VIP Charters Charters & Fly-in Safaris Emergency Medical Air Evacuation

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www.westair.com.na reservations@westair.com.na +264 81 124 6813


| PLAN YOUR TRIP - FLY |

Adventure awaits

JOIN SCENIC AIR FOR FLEXIBLE, PERSONAL CHARTERS CATERED TO YOUR SPECIFIC NEEDS!

Windhoek Office: Tel: +264 61 249 268 Email: windhoek@scenic-air.com

www.scenic-air.com

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

Swakopmund Office: Tel: +264 64 403 575 Email: swakopmund@scenic-air.com

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| PLAN YOUR TRIP - FLY |

to Frankfurt and beyond

Our Route Map

New Destinations Gaborone Durban Starting on the 30 October 2016

Luanda

Lusaka Katima Ondangwa Rundu Mulilo

Victoria Falls

For Bookings Windhoek call.centre@airnamibia.aero Walvis Bay Call Centre: +264 61 299 6111 Book Online: www.airnamibia.com Luderitz Oranjemund

Cape Town

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Maun Gaborone

Johannesburg

Durban

Harare


| PLAN YOUR TRIP - FLY |

Ein einzigartiges Flug-Safari-Erlebnis mit der Schoeman-Familie

Namibias Skelettküste lässt geheimnisvolle Bilder vor dem geistigen Auge entstehen. Von Stränden, über die der Nebel wallt, von gebleichten Walknochen und rostigen Schiffswracks. Wir, die Mitglieder der Schoeman-Familie, sind hier zu Hause, und der Zauber der Skelettküste hat sich in unserer Seele verwurzelt. Gerne möchten wir Ihnen diese einzigartige Wildnis zeigen. Lassen Sie sich überraschen und entzücken.

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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ROUTES

NAMIBIA FOR FIRST-TIMERS

Deadvlei in the Namib-Naukluft National Park

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| FIRST-TIMER ITINERARY |

The Classic Namibia tour follows a circular route, signifying that there are no long distances between attractions and that there is no backtracking. Prepare yourself to be blown away by a new landscape on every leg of the journey. An abundance of wildlife in our number one national park, the deserted and hostile land of the skeletons, protected rock-art sites, towering red dunes and a ‘dead’ pan – these are a few of our top Namibian mustsees. The Etosha National Park, Skeleton Coast, Twyfelfontein and Sossusvlei tour could be either self-drive or undertaken on an organised basis.

Day 1:

After landing in Namibia, your first taste of the landscape will be from your vehicle as you drive the 40 km from Hosea Kutako International Airport to the capital, Windhoek. Book into your room, have a Windhoek Lager and rest your jet-lagged legs. A city or township tour in the afternoon is a good introduction to Namibia and its history and people. Alternatively, you can take a walk through Windhoek (see page 86) and explore the city on foot. Dinner at the world-famous Joe’s Beerhouse is recommended for a taste of Namibia’s much-acclaimed ‘nature’s reserve’ beef steaks from free-ranging cattle, or super-healthy gemsbok, kudu, zebra and crocodile meat.

Day 2:

The first leg of your journey is the 73-km drive northwards on the tarred B1 from Windhoek to Okahandja. A worthwhile stop is at the Mbangura Woodcarvers Market at the entrance of the town to meet craftspeople from the Kavango Region of north-eastern Namibia. For an energy booster and to savour our number-one delicatessen, try

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some biltong from Piet’s Biltong Shop. A further hour’s drive via the conspicuous twin peaks, the Omatakos, will bring you to Okonjima, home of the AfriCat Foundation.

Day 3:

Namibia’s world-famous Etosha National Park is the next destination. A good place to stop for lunch is Otjiwarongo, or Outjo further northwestwards along the C38. Entry to western Etosha is through Andersson Gate. Overnight in the park at Okaukuejo Rest Camp and enjoy late-night animal action at the famous Okaukuejo waterhole. Keep in mind that all roads in Etosha are gravel and suitable for sedan vehicles.

Day 4:

Once in Etosha, take a leisurely drive through the park, stopping at waterholes along the way to look at birds and animals, and to observe their behaviour. Halfway between Okaukuejo and Namutoni is the lookout point on the edge of the expansive white pan – which is the heart and essence of the park. This is the perfect place to take spectacular photographs. A good option is to have lunch at Halali and then head

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Spring

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Cuvelai and Etosha Pan

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Western area of park open to registered tour operators only Nomab Tobieroen

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Fort Namutoni Okerfontein

Giant Baobab Tree

Von Chudob Lindequist Kalkheuwel Gate

Springbokfontein

Okondeka

Rietfontein

Moringa Forest

Lake Guinas

Lake Otjikoto

Aus

Tsumeb

Andersson Gate

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Ozonjuitji m’Bari

Charl Marais Pan

Jakkalswater

Aasvoëlbad

Etosha Pan

Etosha National Park

Sonderkop

Teespoed Duiwelsvuur

Okawao

Rateldraf

Blinkwater Falls

Fort Sesfontein

Ovambo

Groot Okevi Klein Okevi

Dorslandtrekkers Monument

Re s

Rocky Point

Nehale Lya Mpingana Gate

Natukanaoka Pan

State Forest

A

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Kunene

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Rock Engravings

Fort Grootfontein

Hoba Meteorite

Khorab Memorial

Grootfontein

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Otavi

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Kamanjab N

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Axel Eriksson’s Grave

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Dune Point

Gamkarab Cave

Grootberg Pass

Outjo NTE NSFO FRA

Springbok Wasser Gate Koic hab

Salt Flats Palgrave Point

Petrified Forest

C39

Naulila Monument b & Uga Stone Tower

C39

Otjozond

Waterberg Plateau Park

Waterberg Wilderness Trail Waterberg Walks German & Herero Military Graveyard

C38

Otjiwarongo Dramatic Cliffs Burnt Mountain

Twyfelfontein Rock Engraving

C34 Hu

ab

Salt Flats

IN MTS 1553m

Vingerklip (Rock Finger)

Khorixas

Kalkveld Ugab

Salt Flats

Ugab River Gate Ogden Rocks

Lady Painting

Salt Flats

Bocock’s Bay Horing Bay

Rock Paintings

A

C34

I WITSCHIA EL W DRIVE

B2

ko p

Rock Sculpture Trail

2479m

2300m

E RG

BE

Sk a

Rehoboth

Gamsberg Pass

Lake Oanob Resort

Gaub Pass

C24

Leonardville

Dassie Trails

Us

ib

Spreetshoogte Pass

Kuiseb

Remhoogte Pass

b

da Tson

Kalkrand

1973m

NAUKL UF T

C19

Salt Flats

b

ha

uc

Tsa

Mariental

Hudup

S

Duwisib Castle

E

a good option. While the roads from Khorixas westwards are not tarred, they are scenically beautiful, and well worth the drive over rugged terrain.

R

T

Fallen Mukorob

Wild Horses of the Namib Prisoner of War Camp Memorial

Lüderitz Bucht

Musical Stone

1700m

Eagle Monument & Historic Buildings Löwen

Old German Fort

Naute Recreation Area

PL

AT

EA

Karas 2202m

U 1559m

S

ICTE RESTR

ES ACC

CC DA

Bogenfels

Spitzkoppe Fossil Trail

CH

T ED RESTRIC

Black Point

Quivertree Forest Giant’s Playground

Site of Veneration

O

Possession Is.

h

Fis

Schmelen House

-H

S A C CE S

Mooifontein Military Cemetery

IB

ED CT TRI RES

Tses

Take time to visit otherBerseba interesting features in the area, such as the Burnt Mountain, Petrified Forest and Organ Pipes – a mass of basalt slabs in a Bethanie ravine. This makes for a great geological Keetmanshoop outing and gives you the opportunity to meet and interact with the Damara people at their cultural village.

Great Tiras 1867m

U

Ghost Mining Town Elizabeth Bay Ghost Mining Elizabeth Bay Town

h

1586m

H

Diaz Cross Große Bucht

es nib Ka

Koichab Pan

Day 6:

Fis

Brukkaros

iep Konk

NO PUBLIC ACCESS

Salt Flats

1920m

ROOIRAND

Simaedjo Point

Pomona Is.

Gibeon

Hu am s

Spencer Bay Mercury Island

Albatross Is.

Hud up

SCHWARZRAND

Namib-Naukluft Park

After leaving Etosha through Andersson Gate, you will be travelling to Outjo on the C38. Turn west on the C39 to Khorixas for a visit to Twyfelfontein, Namibia’s first ever World Heritage Site. Twyfelfontein hosts Africa’s largest and most Lüderitz important concentration of rock Aus engravings in Africa. Spending the night in the surroundings would be Icaboe Island Marshall Rocks

Har dap

Gochas

Maltahöhe Zarishoogte Pass

NOTE: Another option is to enter from the eastern side of the park, through the Von Lindequist Gate near Namutoni. Spend the first night at the Namutoni Rest Camp, or at a lodge outside the gate. This route will take you from Otjiwarongo north-eastwards to Tsumeb, rather than from Otjiwarongo north-westwards to Outjo. It will take an hour longer from Windhoek, but

Day 5:

Stampriet

1895m

Namib Randthrough runs from east to west straight Nature Reserve the park to exit at Okaukuejo. Easter Cliffs

Cemetery at Nomtsas Fish

eastwards to the Namutoni Rest Camp, developed around the historical Namutoni Fort.

Easter Point

Fish Kub Memorial Hardap Recreation Resort

TSARISBERGE

D E

St Francis Bay

Olive Trail Waterkloof Trail

Naukluft Hiking Trail

Sesriem Canyon Hot-air Balloon Flights

Sossusvlei

Naukluft 4x4 Trail

ob Au

B M I N A

Meob Bay Black Reef

ob

nts

Tsondab Vlei

ss No

a Olif

C14

Conception Bay

Hollandsbird Island

36

EROS

Khomas

S KO

Salt Flats

Many visitors to Namibia say that no part of the desert is visually more dramatic than Sossusvlei.

Arnhem Cave

Auasberge

Kupferberg Pass

Zebra Pan

Black Cliff

Prayer mounds

ND

HA

Kuiseb Pass

Kuiseb Canyon

MIT

MIT

LA

Gob

WINDHOEK

ap

MIT P ER

PER PER

OM

CH

Germa

Witvlei

Fort

IT

C14

Namib-Naukluft Park

Sandwich Harbour

KH

HO AS

HOSEA KUTAKO (International Airport)

Usib

PERMIT

Walvis Bay Boundary Post, Nature ReserveKuiseb River

Bosua Pass

PERMIT

PE RM

Sweet Thorn Hiking Trail Daan Viljoen Game Park

Von François Fort

Tinkas Nature Trail

Wit-Nossob

B1

Tsaobis Leopard Nature Park

Namib Desert Park

Dune 7

Sandwich Harbour

Sw

Welwitschia Plains

Swa

Walvis Bay

Old Rhenish WalvisMission Bay Church & Hope Locomotive

Von Bach Recreation Resort

Powder Tower

op

ak

MIT

Swakopmund

n ha

Arandis

Goanikontes

Moon Landscape

Okahandja

Moordkoppie

D1992

Hot Springs K

B Rock Bay

Explore the coastal town of Swakopmund with its distinct German character and relaxed coffee-shop culture.

Karibib

Usakos

Erongo

Regimental Badges

The AfriCat Foundation is a non-profit orga­ni­ sation committed to the long-term conser­ vation of Namibia’s carnivores.

Okaharui War Memorial Ombo Ostrich Farm

Philips Cave

1728m Gross Spitzkoppe

M

Henties Bay

Ovikokorero War Memorial

2350m

Rock Arch

ru

aru

Om

B1

ERONGO

OPPE SPITZK

N

Cape Cross Diego Cão Cross Cape Cross Seal Reserve

Franke Tower & Roman Catholic Omaruru Church & Rhenish Mission House

b

wa

Ora

National West Coast Tourist Recreational Area

we n

sum Mes Messum Crater

Bandom Bay

The waterholes in the Etosha National Park guarantee rewarding and often spectacular game viewing.

Dinosaur's Footprints

2573mWhite

Durissa Bay

Brandberg

Ugab Guided Trail

Fish

Ambrose Bay

PE R

Ac ces s

Khaudum

JOUBERTBERGE Robbie's Pass

Oshikoto

at ak o

E

Kaokoland

Nakambale Museum & Church

Oponono Lake

Dorsland Trekkers Monument & Ruin

Gun ib

R

GI

S

MT

Om

Salt Flats

EN

F AF

Ongula Village Homestead Lodge

Ondangwa

Otjiv

K

O

T

KA

RA

SB

ER

G


| FIRST-TIMER ITINERARY |

Drive on the C39 through the desert landscape of north-western Namibia to the cool and often foggy Skeleton Coast, visiting the seal colony at Cape Cross along the way. The C34 southwards leads past Henties Bay and Wlotskasbaken, through the Dorob National Park with its lichen fields and still-intact shipwreck, before reaching Swakopmund. This stretch of road has a salt surface, which is tricky to drive on when wet, so drive slowly. This will ensure your safety, plus you’ll see more of the spectacular scenery.

Day 8:

Spend the day in the coastal town of Swakopmund with its distinct German character dating back to the colonial era of the previous century. With its coffee-shop culture, Swakopmund is the perfect place for relaxing after a hectic dose of admiring nature. If resting is not your thing, fear not. Swakopmund is Namibia’s adventure mecca. This is your opportunity to explore the dunes on a quad-bike, go shark fishing, angle from the beach, skydive from a light aircraft, or whizz down the dunes on a sandboard. Living Desert Tours, visiting the museum and aquarium, and

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT The rock engravings at Twyfelfontein are approximately 6 000 years old • Visit the Mbangura Woodcarvers market at Okahandja • Admire the dramatic vistas of Namibia’s southern landscapes • Discover the fauna and flora of the coastal strip

Mondesa Township Tours are all great for getting to know the area.

Day 9:

Wend your way southwards between the sea and the dune belt to Walvis Bay, Namibia’s main harbour town. Here you’ll find a world-renowned Ramsar site and a birder’s paradise, the Walvis Bay Lagoon, where a special bonus are the vast numbers of flamingos foraging for food in the shallows. Even more adventure awaits you, with options such as kite surfing, kayaking, 4x4 trips into the dunes, angling from a boat, day trips to visit the Topnaars in the Kuiseb River environs, township tours, a day visit to Sandwich Harbour, and dolphin cruises on the lagoon.

Day 10:

Take the C14 to Sossusvlei and stop just outside Walvis Bay to have your picture taken at Dune 7, the highest sand mass in the area. From here, drive through the Namib-Naukluft Park, past Vogelfederberg, across the Kuiseb River, and up the Gaub Pass. Stop at Solitaire for coffee and a slice of Moose’s renowned apple pie, and overnight at the foot of the petrified dunes. A sunset drive in the dune landscape of the central Namib is an absolute must.

Day 11:

You’ll need to be up and about before sunrise for the 64-km drive between

the high red dunes to Sossusvlei, entering the park at Sesriem and crossing the ephemeral Tsauchab River a few times. Beware of flash floods during the rainy season. Take a walk up and over the high dunes to visit Dead Vlei, a ghostly pan of cracked white clay featuring ancient skeletons of camel-thorn trees. Return to Sesriem for a stroll down Sesriem Canyon and a desert sundowner.

Day 12:

Your penultimate day in Namibia starts with an iconic balloon trip over the dunes as the sun rises, followed by a champagne breakfast in the middle of nowhere. Take in the beauty of the landscape, spot some desertdwelling animals, and take your last 100 photos to share with the family back home.

Day 13:

After a good breakfast, hit the road for the four-hour drive back to Windhoek. Take the C14 and C24 for a scenic picnic at the top of Spreetshoogte Pass, and soak up your last views of the Namib Desert. These roads are also gravel. Later in the evening, when you scale the steps of the aircraft that will take you back home, you’ll have a million awesome memories and plenty of tears in your eyes. Come back soon!

ANNABELLE VENTER

Day 7:

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37


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39


ROUTES

EXPLORE SOUTHERN NAMIBIA

The Fish River Canyon, the second largest canyon in the world

40


| SOUTHERN ITINERARY |

The south is a preferred option for travellers with their own wheels and time on their hands, as it is far and – if you want to do it justice – takes time and effort. Southern Namibia is characterised by vast, open landscapes with expansive vistas displaying a magnificent array of colour and textures. The ‘deep south’ forms part of the Succulent Karoo biome, one of the top biodiversity hotspots in the world. This alone makes it well worth a visit. The least densely populated area in Namibia, this is also where you’ll find peace and tranquillity at its very best.

Day 1:

Start your trip in Windhoek. We suggest you hit the road as soon after breakfast as possible, as the 482-kilometre journey to Keetmanshoop is a long stretch. Even though most of the magic awaits you south of the town, the Brukkaros Crater (accessible from the village of Tses, just north of Keetmans) makes for an interesting stopover if you’re into geological wonders. Once in Keetmans, grab lunch or picnic goodies – there are several places where you can do this – before heading out to the M29 to explore the Quiver Tree Forest. Then backtrack to Keetmans before taking the C17 to view Giant’s Playground and the Mesosaurus Fossil Site of filterfeeding amphibious reptiles that lived in the shallow seas of Southern Africa and South America 250–270 million years ago, resembling baby crocodiles with long snouts. These sites shouldn’t take you more than an afternoon to explore, and offer great picnic opportunities. Overnight in Keetmanshoop.

Day 2:

Go south on the B1 until you reach the C10 turnoff to Ai-Ais. From Ai-Ais you’ll be able to explore our

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greatest southern attraction, the Fish River Canyon, as well as the /Ai-/Ais Hot Springs, a resort that hosts a spa complex. Spend the rest of the day exploring the area before relaxing with a cold sundowner while enjoying spectacular views over the second-largest canyon in the world.

Day 3:

Take a day to absorb the grandeur of the canyon and the /Ai-/Ais Richtersveld Transfrontier Park. Hiking trails in and around the canyon, is the best way to gain a feel for this majestic geological phenomenon. See page 198 for activities in the area. (If you’re planning on doing the five-night canyon hike, you’ll need to adjust your itinerary accordingly.) If you’re into water sports, we recommend that you take a break from your itinerary and go to Noordoewer on our southern border to spend time in a canoe on the Orange River before heading back up into the dry landscapes of southern Namibia.

Day 4:

Take the road to Seeheim on the B4 and continue westwards until you reach the settlement of Aus. As you approach Aus, the scenery transforms

41


Okaharui War Memorial

Rock Arch

ru

aru

Om

Rock Paintings

Ombo Ostrich Farm

Philips Cave

A

1728m Gross Spitzkoppe

M I K

Walvis Bay

Rock Sculpture Trail

Bosua Pass

KH

2479m

Sk a

MIT P ER

Rehoboth

Lake Oanob Resort

Gaub Pass

Leonardville

C24

Dassie Trails

Us

ib

Spreetshoogte Pass

Kuiseb

Remhoogte Pass

dab

Tson

Salt Flats

Kalkrand

1973m

NAUKL UF T

Olive Trail Waterkloof Trail

Naukluft Hiking Trail

Hollandsbird Island

Sossusvlei

Fish

Mariental

Har dap

1895m

Gochas

Maltahöhe

C27

E

Fallen Mukorob

Hu am s

R

Easter Cliffs

Gibeon ts

Duwisib Castle

fan O li

Hudup

Namib Rand Nature Reserve

SCHWARZRAND

Namib-Naukluft Park

Hud up

Zarishoogte Pass

S

Easter Point

Cemetery at Nomtsas

Stampriet

B1

TSARISBERGE

D E

St Francis Bay

b

ha

uc

Tsa

Sesriem Canyon Hot-air Balloon Flights

Fish Kub Memorial Hardap Recreation Resort

ob Au

B M I N A

Salt Flats

Aranos

Naukluft 4x4 Trail

C19

Meob Bay Black Reef

ob

nts

ss No

a Olif

C14 Tsondab Vlei

T 1920m

es nib Ka

Spencer Bay Mercury Island

ROOIRAND

The Quiver Tree Forest can be viewed on Farm Gariganus, some 14 km northeast of Keetmanshoop.

GE ER

Gamsberg Pass

Conception Bay

Take a guided tour of the Rehoboth Museum to learn interesting facts and figures on Baster history.

EROS 2300m

B

S KO

HA

Kuiseb Pass

Fis

h

Tses

Brukkaros 1586m

Simaedjo Point Mooifontein Military Cemetery

NO PUBLIC ACCESS

Koichab Pan

C13 Wild Horses of the Namib Prisoner of War Camp Memorial

Lüderitz Bucht

B4

Lüderitz

h

Fis

Schmelen House

Diaz Cross Große Bucht

Bethanie

B4

Aus

Keetmanshoop Old German Fort

Site of Veneration

H U CH

1700m

PL

Possession Is.

U

E RG BE

MT

S

NS

RD

Salt Flats

Roastbeef Is.

Ai-Ais/Richtersveld Transfrontier Park

Restricted Area (Former Sperrgebiet)

Fish River Canyon Hiking Trail

T

K

Grünau

e

ESS

BLYDEVE

Holgat

The unique blend of history embodied in the coastal harbour town of Lüderitz reveals itself as you wander through the streets with their elaborate and distinctively quaint German architecture stemming from the diamond rush sparked in 1908.

a ng e p)

EAU RWACHT PLAT

Ho m

Hot Springs

Haib

There are also Prisoner of War camp ruins, and First World War bunkers in the vicinity to view. Overnight in the coastal town of Lüderitz.

Edward Cook Memorial & Historical Gateways

Or ie r (Ga

SOUTH AFRI CA

Wreck Point

Day 5:

O

GE

ng Ora (Gariep)

ACC

Alexander Bay

O

ER

C10

Richtersveld National Park

Oranjemund

The centre also gives you the opportunity to stretch your legs and indulge in a good cup of coffee. Twenty kilometres or so in a westerly direction, the wild horses of the Namib Desert can be spotted from the Garub viewpoint, a short drive from the main road. These legendary animals provide a brief glimpse into myth, mystery and a wild, free life.

Hot Springs

R

SB

Karasburg NO

S

Oranjemund

into streaks of burnished sand interspersed with grass in ‘forever’ vistas that offer rest to the eyes, and relief and splendour to the soul.

Fish River C37 Canyon Conservation Area

Rosh Pinah

T IC

ED AC CE S

G

Fish River Canyon

A AR

b

Cape Dernburg

HA

R ST RE

Eroded over many millennia, the Fish River Canyon is the second-largest natural canyon in the world.

ING

HU

ESS CC DA

Plumpudding Is. Bakers Bay Sinclair's Is.

KL

Konkiep

S

Bogenfels (Rock Arch)

2202m

1559m

ICTE RESTR

ES ACC

Black Point

B1

Karas

C12

EA

Pomona Is.

AT

Albatross Is.

Aro Lö

O

S A C CE S

Eagle Monument & Historic Buildings Löwen

we

Musical Stone

-H

ED CT TRI RES

Spitzkoppe Fossil Trail

Naute Recreation Area

IB

Ghost Mining Town Elizabeth Bay Ghost Mining Elizabeth Bay Town

T ED RESTRIC

The enigmatic little coastal town of Lüderitz is rich in German heritage and a great southern attraction.

Quivertree Forest Giant’s Playground

Kain a

Icaboe Island Marshall Rocks

Salt Flats

n

Great Tiras 1867m

Koës

Berseba

iep Konk

An intriguing feature of the Sperrgebiet are the legendary desert horses that can be seen from the Garub viewpoint.

42

1530m

Gobabis

Arnhem Cave

Auasberge

Kupferberg Pass

Khomas

Zebra Pan

Black Cliff

Prayer mounds

ND

B1

Kuiseb Canyon

IT

H

AS

LA

German Lazarette

Witvlei

Fort

WINDHOEK

IT

MIT PER M PER

OM

H OC

HOSEA KUTAKO (International Airport)

ap

PE RM

Namib-Naukluft Park

Sandwich Harbour

Tinkas Nature Trail

PERMIT

Walvis Bay Boundary Post, Nature ReserveKuiseb River

Von François Fort

PERMIT

Namib Desert Park

Dune 7

Sandwich Harbour

ko p

Sweet Thorn Hiking Trail Daan Viljoen Game Park

Usib

Old Rhenish WalvisMission Bay Church & Hope Locomotive

Tsaobis Leopard Nature Park

Welwitschia Plains

Swa

MIT

WITSCHIA EL W DRIVE

op

Sw

Wit-Nossob

Powder Tower

ak

Goanikontes

Moon Landscape

n ha

Arandis

PE R

Swakopmund

Von Bach Recreation Resort

Hot Springs

Regimental Badges Rock Bay

Rietfont

Omaheke

Okahandja

Moordkoppie

D1992

Erongo

B

Henties Bay | SOUTHERN ITINERARY |

Karibib

Usakos

Fish

N

Cape Cross Diego Cão Cross Cape Cross Seal Reserve

Vioolsdrif Noordoewer

Velloorsdrif Orange (Garie p) Velloorsdrif

The residual energy of the era is tangible at the intriguing old mining town of Kolmanskop on the outskirts of Lüderitz. Here the desert is in the process of burying the remaining artefacts of opulence, greed and dreams of wealth under its apricot-coloured sands. Walking up Diamantberg Street to the 1912 Felsenkirche (rock church) and looking down onto the town, you can imagine an affluent time of diamonds, champagne and finery. Although Kolmanskop can easily be accessed from Lüderitz, the

Onseepkans


| SOUTHERN ITINERARY | subsequent settlements of Pomona and Bogenfels lie abandoned and can be visited only on an organised tour. The highlight of the tour is Bogenfels, a massive rock arch that straddles the coastline, jutting into the sea. At an impressive height of 55 metres, it is as lofty as a 20-storey building.

Day 6:

Start the day with a morning trip to Diaz Point, where you can enjoy a light breakfast, before heading back to Aus. Take the C13 towards Helmeringhausen until it reaches the D707, on the border of the Namib-Naukluft Park. This road is recommended as one of the most scenically beautiful routes in the south, a description that is confirmed as swirls of apricot Namib Desert sand appear amidst the vegetation. Stop at the tiny settlement of Betta, to refuel and indulge in a fresh coffee

and sandwich. From here take the D826 for about 20 km until you reach Duwisib Castle. Depending on your time and mood, set up camp here; otherwise backtrack to Betta and undertake another scenic drive on the C27 through the NamibRand Nature Reserve. Overnight in the vicinity.

Day 7:

Spend the day taking in the magic of Sossusvlei. Along the 65-kilometre drive from Sesriem, climb the challenging slopes of Dune 45 for some spectacular shots of Dead Vlei. Then soak in the romance of a hot-air balloon excursion, or go on a scenic flight over the dunes, and when you return, explore Sesriem Canyon. If you’re a hiking fanatic, you’re in the right place. The Naukluft area

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offers trails for people of all levels of fitness. So make sure to add a couple of days to your itinerary to fit in a hike; it will be well worth the effort. See page 168 for details.

Day 8:

Enjoy a slow morning, have breakfast at leisure, and head back to Windhoek via the scenic Spreetshoogte Pass. TIPS: Air Namibia flies from Hosea Kutako International Airport to Lüderitz three times a week. Alternatively, rent a car here and set out on your journey to the coast.

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT An aerial view of dunes in the Namib Sand Sea, which is a World Natural Heritage Site • Admire the fantastic vistas from atop Spreetshoogte Pass • Diaz Point, with its stone cross, at Lüderitz

43


ROUTES

EXPLORE NAMIBIA’S COAST

44


| COASTAL ITINERARY |

The coastal strip is where the hot Namib dunes meet the cold Atlantic Ocean, with the road between Swakopmund and Walvis Bay acting as an excellent scenic example of just how dramatic yet pristine this marvel can be. The areas in and around the coastal towns of Swakopmund and Walvis Bay are the basis of Namibia’s adrenaline nucleus, hosting a wide range of activities that suit every taste. Swakopmund is Namibia’s premier holiday resort and can become crowded during school holidays and long weekends, so we recommend that you book well in advance. The strip falls within the Dorob National Park.

Day 1:

Departure from Windhoek. The 356km stretch of tarred road was recently widened and upgraded and is a pleasure to drive. Stop en route at the woodcarvers on the southern outskirts of Okahandja, for refreshments at the Wilhemstal or Namib Oasis (Usakos) farm stalls and finally at the small miners’ crystal stalls at the Spitzkoppe turn-off, 24 km outside Usakos. Make sure to reach Swakopmund in time for sundowners on the beach.

Day 2–5:

Spend your days in the dunes, on the beach, at the coast, fishing, quad-biking, horse-riding, admiring welwitschias, township touring, shipwreck spotting, traversing the moon landscape, taking an ocean cruise, coffee-shop hopping, or doing whatever tickles your fancy. Sandwich Harbour is definitely worth a visit, but you need a permit to enter the area, obtainable from MET offices. See page 180 for more activities in the surroundings. From Swakop, you can also take a day to explore the Henties Bay environs (see page 190), Cape Cross Seal Reserve, Wlotzkasbaken and the many smaller coastal settlements in between.

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The remainders of the Natal and Winston shipwrecks are found here. Messum Crater and the saltpans are interesting beacons in the area, while a selection of hiking trails offers plenty for the fit and energetic.

Day 6/7:

Take a slow drive back to Windhoek. If you’re up for a soul-enriching experience of nature, or like boulder hopping and mountain climbing, then we recommend you set up camp for a day or two at the Spitzkoppe.

ALTERNATIVE ROUTE Windhoek to the coast

An interesting alternative route from Windhoek to the coast leads westwards past the Daan Viljoen Game Park through the Khomas Hochland. This gravel road meanders through rugged hilly landscapes down the escarpment of the central plateau to the desert proper. An intriguing feature along this route is the once-resplendent Liebig Haus, its crumbling grandeur a reminder of a bygone era. It was built in 1912 on Farm Neu Heusis as a residence for the director of the Deutsche Farmgesellschaft (German Farmers’

45


Ugab River Gate gden Rocks

Durissa Bay

Brandberg

Ugab Guided Trail

Footprints

2573mWhite

Lady Painting

Salt Flats

| COASTAL ITINERARY | sum Mes Messum Crater

Bandom Bay

Bocock’s Bay Horing Bay

Franke Tower & Roman Catholic Omaruru Church & Rhenish Mission House

b

wa

Ora

National West Coast Tourist Recreational Area

2350m

Rock Paintings

A I B

K PE R

WITSCHIA EL W DRIVE

B2

Bosua Pass

PERMIT

Dune 7

Sandwich Harbour

PER M PER

Kupferberg Pass

C28

Khomas

Auasberge

EROS

2479m

2300m

Sk a

C26 E RG

BE

OS AK

H

Kuiseb Pass

Kuiseb Canyon

MIT

IT

OM

ND

WINDHOEK

Prayer mounds

IT

C14

Namib-Naukluft Park

Sandwich Harbour

KH

LA

Fort

Usib

Walvis Bay Boundary Post, Nature ReserveKuiseb River

PE RM

H AS

H OC

HOSEA KUTAKO (International Airport)

ap

Namib Desert Park

Sweet Thorn Hiking Trail Daan Viljoen Game Park

Von François Fort

Tinkas Nature Trail

MIT P ER

Stop at the small miners’ crystal stalls at the Spitzkoppe turnoff for some gemstone shopping.

Rock Sculpture Trail

PERMIT

As many as 200 000 South African fur seals gather at Cape Cross during the breeding season.

ko p

B1

Tsaobis Leopard Nature Park

Welwitschia Plains

Swa

Von Bach Recreation Resort

Powder Tower

op

Sw

C28

Walvis Bay

Old Rhenish WalvisMission Bay Church & Hope Locomotive

MIT

Moon Landscape

n ha

Arandis

Goanikontes

Okahandja

Hot Springs

ak

Regimental Badges

Swakopmund

Moordkoppie

D1992

B2

C34

Rock Bay

B2

Karibib

Usakos

Erongo

Ombo Ostrich Farm

Philips Cave

1728m Gross Spitzkoppe

M

Henties Bay

Okaharui War Memorial

Rock Arch

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a

Om

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Cape Cross Diego Cão Cross Cape Cross Seal Reserve

Ovikokorero War Memorial

ERONGO

E

OPP SPITZK

Rehoboth

C26

Gamsberg Pass

Lake Oanob Resort

Gaub Pass

Zebra Pan Dassie Trails

Black Cliff

Us

ib

Spreetshoogte Pass

Kuiseb

Conception Bay

The reed-fringed lagoon at Sandwich Harbour is a spec­ tacular and soughtafter destination.

Tsondab Vlei

Remhoogte Pass

ab

d Tson

Salt Flats

Kalkr

1973m

Naukluft

NAUKL 4x4 Trail UF T Olive Trail

Salt Flats

Ts

Hudup

R

T

Duwisib

Gibeon

Berse

iep Konk

Please note: Travellers should check the condition of these roads with Schmelen House the Automobile Association before Bethanie Prisoner of setting out. War Camp Memorial

Site of Veneration

Aus

H U IB

-H

Ghost Mining Town

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e nib Ka

The Gamsberg road joins the Castle Solitaire/Walvis Bay route, leads past H am the Kuiseb River with its uattractive s camping sites, and snakes through rolling hills and deep valleys to a spectacular lookout point with a 1920m view of the Kuiseb River and the cave where, to escape internment, two German geologists, Henno Martin and Hermann Korn, hid with Mooifontein Military their dog Otto during Cemetery World War II Great Tiras 1867m for more than two years. ROOIRAND

46

Diaz Cross Große Bucht

(C26). The scenery is increasingly dominated by the 2 347-metre-high 1895m Gamsberg. The mountain derived its name from the Khoekhoen word gan, Maltahöhe Hud meaning ‘shut’ or ‘closed’, referring up Zarishoogte Pass to the fact that the mountain obscures your view. SCHWARZRAND

E

No fewer than four passes lead down the escarpment to the desert, all affording splendid views over the Simaedjo Point pre-Namib and ultimately the Namib proper. They are gravel roads and need One of the most popular routes to to be negotiated with care, but for those Swakopmund and Walvis Bay is via with an adventurous spirit and suitable the spectacular Gamsberg Pass. To NO PUBLIC ACCESS vehicles they are highly recommended. accessSalt it, take the same route out of Flats Koichab Windhoek as when heading for the Pan Icaboe Island Marshall Rocks The most northern of these roads Us Pass, but turn left about 32 kmWild Horses the Namib leads from Windhoek past the Daan out of town, continuing on routeof49 Lüderitz Bucht Lüderitz

Fish

TSARISBERGE

S

Spencer Bay Mercury Island

Sesriem Canyon Hot-air Balloon Flights

Sossusvlei Viljoen Game Park, then dips and dives westwards through the rolling hills of the Khomas Hochland towards the Namib. Because of the steep gradient (1:5) of the Bosua Namib-Naukluft Pass, caravans should not be driven Park on this road, which is bestNamib travelled Rand Nature leads Reserve from east to west. The route past Bloedkoppie towards the coast. The Kupferberg Road is accessed by following Mandume Ndemufayo Avenue out of town, past Pioneers Park in a southerly direction, and then onto the Gamsberg road. The road leading over the Us Pass (gradient 1:10) is accessed via the D1982.

Cemetery at Nomtsas

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ha

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Society). In 1944 the South African government confiscated the farm Hollandsbird and subdivided it into smaller Island units, which were given to ex-soldiers after the Second World War. Liebig House was inhabited until 1955, after which St Francis it fell into disuse. It was subsequentlyBay plundered by vandals to become the ‘ghost house’ it is today. Also along Easter Point this route, on the farm Karanah, are the remains of the Von Francois Fort, built Easter Cliffs to protect the old wagon route between Windhoek and the coast.

B M I N A

Meob Bay Black Reef

Waterkloof Trail

Naukluft Hiking Trail

Fish Kub Memorial Hardap Recreatio Resort

Old Germ


| TOURISM & TRAVEL COMPANIES |

discovering namibia starts here info@staytoday.com.na | www.staytoday.com.na | +264 61 420 509

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

47


CAMPING

GINGER MAUNEY

COMMUNITY CAMPSITES ACROSS THE COUNTRY

A Himba settlement in the Hartmann’s Valley in northwestern Namibia

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| CULTURAL CAMPING |

The interesting and diverse cultures of the people of Namibia – their customs, traditions, languages and beliefs – have fascinated visitors for centuries. Namibia’s richness in cultural and natural heritage is the basis for the development of cultural tourism. Also referred to as community-based tourism, cultural tourism is particularly valuable because it gives local communities an alternative means of earning an income that benefits them directly. *Many of the below mentioned campsites are often difficult to get in touch with and information regarding them may vary through the course of the year.

NORTH-CENTRAL REGIONS 1 The Nakambale Museum and Restcamp in the village of Olukonda can be visited 14 km south-west of Ondangwa.

The Omauni Community Campsite is located at the Centre for Sustainable Forest Management, east of Okongo. 2

3 The Ombalantu Baobab Tree Campsite is situated on community land behind the brightly-painted open market in Outapi. It is a heritage site with a large baobab tree at the centre of the campsite.

Hippo Pools Campsite, 12 km west of Ruacana, has shady campsites situated under leadwood and mopane trees, with superb views over the Kunene River. 4

5 The Uukwaluudhi Traditional Homestead in Tsandi, the former home of King Josia Shikongo Taapopi, is an opportunity for guests to visit a traditional Owambo palace.

ERONGO REGION 6 Nestled between the huge boulders in the magnificent mountain world of the Spitzkoppe is the Spitzkoppe Rest Camp.

OMAHEKE REGION 8 Kambahoka Restcamp can be found next to the Aminuis Saltpan, 180 km southeast of Gobabis.

For a good Bushman/San experience in the extreme east of Namibia, visit Sãa Ta Ko close to the Botswana border. 9

Boiteko Campsite, positioned at the top of the hill in the Epukiro Roman Catholic Mission, is part of the Tswana village, Metsweding.

10

For those travelling to Bushmanland and the Tsumkwe area via Gam, Kaumbangere Restcamp, located 5 km south of Otjinene, makes for a good stopover.

11

OTJOZONDJUPA REGION 12 Accessible

from the C44, 87 km on the way to Tsumkwe, Omatako Valley Restcamp is a !Kung Bushman/San community campsite. South-east of Tsumkwe is the Djokhoe Camspite, with the Holboom baobab close by.

13

Further east is the Mukuri Camspite, situated in an area hosting several pans that attract birds and wildlife.

14

The Living Museum of the Ju/’Hoansi San provides an opportunity to view and learn about this subgroup of the San.

15

Ozohere Campsite is located between and around huge boulders under shady trees, on the banks of the Ugab River between Khorixas and Uis. 7

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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| CULTURAL CAMPING |

43 42

4

44

Oshikango

Omahenene

Ruacana

Uutapi (Ombalantu)

3

41 45

18

Cuangar

Ondangwa

5

Opuwo

Katitwe

2

Oshakati

Rundu

20

16

1

B8

B8

Namutoni

36

37

Khaudum National Park

22

B1

Etosha National Park

15

A I B

t as Co

M

35

12 Dobe

B8

13 14

Waterberg Plateau Park

Outjo Khorixas

rk Pa

33

Grootfontein

Otavi

Kamanjab

38

21 23

Tsumeb

Halali Okaukuejo

N

on et el Sk

39 40

17

19

Waterberg Wilderness Trail Waterberg Walks

Otjiwarongo

34 7

Kalkveld

Ugab Guided Trail Brandberg

11

B1

Omaruru

6

Dorob National Park

Karibib

N M I B

Arandis

Swakopmund

Walvis Bay

10

Okahandja

Von Bach Recreation Resort HOSEA KUTAKO

Sweet Thorn Hiking Trail Daan Viljoen Game Park

Tsaobis Leopard Nature Park

Rock Sculpture Trail

B2

EROS

Buitepos

(International Airport)

B6

Witvlei

Gobabis

WINDHOEK Auasberge

Namib Desert Park

Walvis Bay Nature Reserve

9

Rehoboth

Namib-Naukluft Park

Dassie Trails

26

B1

32

31

D E

Sossusvlei

Aranos

Hardap Recreation Resort Mariental

Naukluft Hiking Trail

Stampriet

Gochas

Maltahöhe

S E

R T

NamibNaukluft Park

Gibeon

30

Namib Rand Nature Reserve

Tses Berseba

Bethanie Aus

Koës

28 Klein-Menasse

Naute Recreation Area

27

Ai-Ais/ Richtersveld Transfrontier Park

Aroab

B1 Hohlweg

Fish River Canyon Conservation Area

Grünau Karasburg B3

e

ang Or

Mata Mata

29

Keetmanshoop

B4

Rosh Pinah

Brukktaros Mountain

24

Great Tiras

Lüderitz

8

Leonardville

Kalkrand B M I N A

This is just an approximate indication of where these establishments are situated

B2

Gross Usakos Spitzkoppe

A

Henties Bay

Sendelingsdrift

(Gariep)

Fish River Canyon Hiking Trail

Ariamsvlei

25

Oranjemund

Velloorsdrif

Vioolsdrif Noordoewer

Velloorsdrif

Copyright © Map Studio 2010

KAVANGO AND ZAMBEZI Mbamba Campsite has reedlined lapas situated on the banks of the Shamangwe tributary of the Okavango River.

Situated in the Bwabwata National Park is the Nambwa Campsite on the banks of the Kwando River.

Near the Nkasa Rupara National Park is the Wuparo Campsite, each site with its own reed and thatch ablution facility.

19

23

Salambala Campsite can be found in mopane woodland next to a small pan and waterhole.

24

16

N//goabaca Campsite is situated next to Popa Falls, a series of rapids in the Okavango River.

17

Chobe Community Campsite is owned and managed by the local conservancy and receives management support from the nearby lodge Chobe Camp.

20

Mafwe Campsite, another community campsite managed by the Living Culture Foundation, overlooks the Kwando River.

21

18

50

Treesleeper Camp is surrounded by tamboti, leadwood and buffalo-thorn woodland, with wooden decks built in the trees for optimal viewing.

22

HARDAP AND KARAS Brukkaros Campsite offers camping near Berseba in beautiful mountain surroundings. In the very south of the country, Warmbad Hotsprings Lodge is an interesting historical and cultural stopover.

25

Garies Restcamp provides a glimpse of Baster hospitality in an

26


| CULTURAL CAMPING |

KUNENE REGION

otherwise undeveloped area.

The Aba-Huab Campsite is a busy, bustling campsite located 9 km from the Twyfelfontein rock engravings.

33

Situated in a scenic rocky mountain area, the sites at Snyfontein Camp overlook an attractive section of the Fish River.

27

Doro !Nawas Granietkop Campsite, 20 km south-east of Twyfelfontein, offers exclusive, private sites in alcoves created by granite boulders.

34

28 ≠Nudi

Campsite is set amongst quiver trees and dolerite rock formations in the !Knob !Naub Conservancy.

Situated near the town of Kamanjab, Hoada Campsite is surrounded by golden-yellow grass and mopane trees, boulders and birdsong.

35

Situated northeast of Tses is Ganigobes Campsite, a basic facility with views over a riverbed.

29

Perched on a hill in the midst of mountains overlooking a dry river course, is the Khowarib Campsite.

36

Goamus Campsite is surrounded by the striking mountain landscape of Gibeon, a historical area where the Nama fought against and hid from the Germans.

30

The Figtree Campsite, situated close to the Sesfontein Conservancy office, consists of four large sites in a grove of ancient sycamore fig trees surrounding one of the six Sesfontein springs.

elephants, which often wander through the campsite. Providing affordable self-catering accommodation in the area, is Puros Bush Lodge, with Himba settlements close by.

40

Situated on the Khumib riverbank, the Marble Campsite is an attractive and well-equipped facility that represents a veritable oasis in the rugged surroundings.

41

The Okarohombo Community Campsite is shaded by giant ana trees in the remote Marienfluss Valley along the Kunene River, with the mountains of Angola looming on the other side.

42

37

Located in Maltahöhe, //Hai-Sores Campsite comprises six sites and several demonstration Nama huts.

31

32 Hoachanas

Campsite, 53 km from Kalkrand, is situated in the Hoachanas settlement, a historically important location for the Nama people.

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT

The Van Zyl’s Pass Campsite is only for those who are extremely well prepared for negotiating difficult and rough terrain to get there.

38

Fonteine Community Restcamp can be found in the Twyfelfontein area of Damaraland. It offers campsites to travellers passing through.

44

Puros Campsite is positioned on the banks of the Hoarusib River, stamping ground of Namibia’s desert-adapted

45

39

Hippo Pools Campsite • Granietkop Campsite • N//goabaca Campsite

At the Epupa Falls Campsite, spread out among waving makalani palms, water rushes toward the falls and fine mist hovers in the air.

43

House on the Hill is a self-catering stone cottage situated on a slope adjacent to the Marble Campsite.

CAMPING TIPS

Apart from the usual gear – tents, sleeping bags, cooking utensils, food, emergency supplies and a firstaid kit – consider packing the following to make your adventure more enjoyable: • • • • • • RON SWILLING

• • •

RON SWILLING

RON SWILLING

Binoculars for catching sight of free-roaming game. Toilet paper – handy in all sorts of emergencies. Hand sanitiser, as it can be difficult to find clean water or facilities in some places. Items for campsite fun, such as balls, kites, frisbees etc, especially when travelling with children. Insect repellent for those buzzing and flying annoyances. Books and magazines for when relaxing under a tree. Water, water, water – rather too much than too little. Remember, Namibia is a desert country. Rope, which can be used to pull your car out of thick sand or even as an emergency washing line. Sunscreen – with Namibia’s bountiful sunshine, it’s always a good move to cover your sensitive areas with a protective layer of UVA + UVB cream (at least factor 30). Locks and protective covering for your valuables. Holiday stories are just not the same when the camera disappears halfway down the line.

Also keep in mind: • Firewood should always be purchased in a prepacked form, not collected from the veld. • Take along a small hatchet, firelighters and matches, two powerful torches and plenty of spare batteries. • Vehicle spares should include a spare wheel (preferably two), air compressor or pump, tyre gauge, battery leads, towrope, shovel and basic toolkit.

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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LODGE GROUPS NATURALLY NAMIBIA | WILDERNESS SAFARIS | O&L LEISURE | JOURNEYS NAMIBIA | ONDILI LODGES | NAMIBIA WILDLIFE RESORTS | N/A’AN KU SÊ CONSERVATION JOURNEYS

NamibRand Nature Reserve in southern Namibia

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| NAMIBIAN LODGE GROUPS |

Namibia is home to dramatic sceneries, stunning vistas and endless horizons. From one corner of the country to the other, the topography and biodiversity transmute dramatically. From the wet wonderland of the Zambezi region, with its perennial river systems, to the large panoramic plains of the south that morph into canyons and mountain ranges, Namibia is an incredibly diverse and enigmatic land. Etosha National Park, the jewel in the crown of Namibia, is home to the famous Etosha Pan and teems with wildlife. At the heart and soul of this land of endless horizons lies the Namib Desert, the oldest desert in the world. With a host of lodges, hotels, accommodation establishments and campsites throughout the country, and 18 national parks encapsulating all of this African gem’s natural wonders, exploring Namibia should be on every traveller’s bucket list. Here are a few companies who pride themselves on offering a wide range of establishments, activities and circuits to visitors, so that no corner of this epic land is overlooked!

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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2 1 9 8 7 6 4

11 10 5

NATURALLY NAMIBIA Naturally Namibia is a collective of Namibia’s most character-filled independent experiences. Owner-run and original is the way we like it. We collectively agree on sharing a warm welcome, unsurpassed local knowledge and our pride in every element of service. 1

The Mushara Collection

7

Ai Aiba Lodge

2

Skeleton Coast Safaris

8

Etendeka Mountain Camp

Namib Sky Balloon Safaris

9

Ongava

See page 130 See page 33

3

3 4

4

6

AfriCat Namibia

The Olive Exclusive

11

Okonjima

See page 149 See page 149

Erongo Wilderness Lodge See page 160

JOURNEYS NAMIBIA

5 3 2

1

Journeys Namibia is a reputable management company that takes the strain off lodge owners by taking care of the day to day running of lodges. We have many years of experience in the tourism industry and share an intimate passion for Namibia’s unique landscape and its people. 1

Auas Safari Lodge

4

See page 101 2 6

Hoada Campsite See page 161

3

Grootberg Lodge See page 161

www.journeysnamibia.com 54

See page 131

10

See page 102

www.naturally-namibia.com

See page 160

Villa Margherita See page 194

5

See page 161

Shipwreck Lodge Hobatere Lodge

5

See page 132

6

See page 210

Fish River Lodge


| NAMIBIAN LODGE GROUPS |

1

WILDERNESS SAFARIS

5 3 2

Founded in Botswana in 1983, Wilderness Safaris is widely recognised as Africa’s foremost ecotourism operator. We give our guests life-changing journeys in some of the most remote and pristine areas in Africa and in so doing help conserve Africa’s spectacular biodiversity and share ecotourism’s benefits with rural people.

6 7

1

Serra Cafema Camp

5

Damaraland Camp

6

Desert Rhino Camp

7

See page 139 2

See page 139

See page 159 3

Kulala Desert Lodge See page 173

See page 159 4

Hoanib Skeleton Coast Camp

Little Kulala See page 173

Doro Nawas Camp See page 159

www.wilderness-safaris.com

XENIA IVANOFF-ERB

4

4 1

3

O&L LEISURE 2

Owned by the Ohlthaver & List Group, which was founded in 1919, O&L Leisure Hotels & Lodges is a proudly Namibian hospitality company. O&L Leisure is committed to offering our guests a unique, genuine sense-ofplace experience. It’s our warm, down-to-earth nature, and love of our country, that turns staying at our resorts into an unparalleled experience.

1

Mokuti Etosha Lodge

3

Midgard Country Estate

4

See page 128 2

See page 102

Strand Hotel Swakopmund See page 192

Chobe Water Villas See page 118

www.ol-leisure.com www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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N/A’AN KU SÊ N/a’an ku sê Conservation Journeys: Rudie and Marlice van Vuuren, with friends Chris Heunis and Jan Verburg, started the N/a’an ku sê Foundation in 2006 to protect and improve the lives of Namibia’s people and wildlife. “Our vision is an Africa where humans and wildlife can live and thrive together. Our mission is to conserve the land, cultures and wildlife of Namibia and rescue species threatened by an ever-shrinking habitat.”

2 1

3 4

1

N/a’an ku sê Lodge and Wildlife Sanctuary

3

See page 101 2

Utopia Boutique Hotel See page 101

Neuras Wine and Wildlife Estate See page 174

4

Kanaan N/a’an ku sê Desert Retreat See page 174

www.naturally-namibia.com

ONDILI LODGES & ACTIVITIES 5 6

4

3

2

1

Ondili Maeumbo is an expression from the Ovambo language that means: “I am at home“. We chose that name because it expresses exactly what we want for our guests: to feel at home, to feel at home in Africa, the cradle of mankind. Enjoy our hospitality in three of the most impressive landscapes of Namibia, the Kalahari desert, the Namib desert and the Erongo mountains. 1

Teufelskrallen Tented Lodge

4

Kalahari Red Dunes Lodge

5

Desert Homestead Lodge

6

See page 103 2

See page 173

See page 103 3

See page 173

www.ondili.de 56

Desert Homestead Outpost Hohenstein Lodge See page 159

Ti Melen See page 103


| NAMIBIAN LODGE GROUPS |

NAMIBIA WILDLIFE RESORTS Namibia Wildlife Resorts is a State owned enterprise, mandated to run the tourism facilities within the protected areas of Namibia. Its only shareholder is the Government of the Republic of Namibia; hence, it belongs to the Namibian people. NWR offers something for everyone – whether it is photography, nature, wildlife, landscapes, geology, camping, fishing, birding, history, culture or just the pure exhilaration of finding yourself surrounded by the essence of Africa – NWR is your willing partner and host.

2

7

1 3

6

5

4

10 11 12

1

Onkoshi Resort

11

Torra Bay

2

Dolomite Resort

12

Khorixas Camp

3

Okaukuejo Resort

13

Hardap Resort

4

Namutoni Resort

14

Sossus Dune Lodge

5

Halali Resort

15

Sesriem Campsite

Olifantsrus Camp

16

Duwisib Castle

Popa Falls Resort

17

Naukluft Camp

Waterberg Resort

18

Shark Island Resort

Gross-Barmen Resort

19

Fish River Canyon & Hobas Camp

8 9

17

See page 129 See page 129 See page 129 See page 129 See page 129

6

14

See page 129

15 16

13

7

See page 117 8

18

See page 148 9 20 19

See page 101 10

See page 161 See page 109 See page 172 See page 172 See page 172 See page 172 See page 210

See page 209

Terrace Bay See page 193

See page 193

20

/Ai-/Ais Hotsprings Spa See page 209

www.nwr.com.na www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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ADVENTURE

NAMIBIA HORSE SAFARI COMPANY

TIGERFISHING | GAME VIEWING | ROCK CLIMBING | HORSE-BACK SAFARIS | MOUNTAIN BIKING | 4X4 DESERT TRIPS

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| ADVENTURE IN NAMIBIA |

ADVENTURE CALENDAR JANUARY

• NERA Endurance Horse-riding season begins • Swakopmund Skydiving Club Desert Boogie

FEBRUARY

• Rössing Namibia Marathon • Nedbank Cycle Challenge • NMPF – Biathle or Triathle event – Windhoek

MARCH

• DTS Beach Volleyball Series starts • Pointbreak Open Water Swim • NMPF – Biathle or Triathle event – Swakopmund

APRIL

• Kuiseb Classic MTB • R&R Xross Country MTB • Nedbank Coast Cycle Classic

MAY

• Adventure Race Namibia 24Hour Ultra Marathon • Klein-Aus Vista MTB Challenge & Trail Run • Windhoek Light Namib Quest • Sahara Race

JUNE

• Dr Sam Nujoma Marathon • Oemf! MTB Challenge • Old Mutual Victory Race Oshakati

JULY

• Old Mutual Victory Race • Windhoek Lager Fish River Canyon Ultra • Namib Desert Challenge • Ugab Terrace MTB

AUGUST

• Otjihavera Xperience • Namib Grens MTB and Xtrail run • African Endurance Horseriding Championship • Nedbank Oshakati Road Cycle Race

SEPTEMBER

• Desert Knights MTB Tour • The Rock Marathon & MTB Challenge • Cycletech Spring Festival

OCTOBER

• Lucky Star Marathon • The Namibian Pick & Pay Cycle Classic • Lüderitz Speed Challenge • Mariental Triathlon

NOVEMBER

• 100 km of Namib Desert • The Desert Ultra • Harriers Movember Run • KCC 24-hour Mountain Bike

DECEMBER

• Nedbank Desert Dash • Jetty Mile • FNB Desert Triathlon

For more information on adventure activities and events, and to see our Namibian adventure map, visit www.travelnewsnamibia.com/plan-your-trip

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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TIGERFISHING “The tigerfish is Africa’s premier freshwater game fish. With its large razor-sharp teeth and torpedoshaped body, there is nothing quite like it out there. It is the ultimate high-speed killing machine. It’s a fierce and wily creature that demands respect from all forms of life that happen across its path.” – Haydn Willans of Tiger Fish Frenzy The major rivers of Namibia’s Zambezi Region – formerly known as the Caprivi Region – include the Zambezi, Chobe, Kwando, Linyanti and Okavango. This water wonderland is home to more than 84 species of freshwater fish. Culminating in what can only be described as a fisherman’s paradise, the region is undoubtedly the perfect location for a Namibian angling adventure. The waterway system consists of wide rivers, shallow sandbanks, islands, lagoons, raging rapids and isolated pools with calm waters. This part of the country is an ideal location for everything from fly-

60

fishing from the riverbanks to trawling from small fishing boats. Fishing in the region is done on a catch-and-release basis. While the wide variety of fresh-water fish – not one of which is an exotic or introduced species – is an appealing feature in its own right. The most important item at the top of the angler’s to-catch list is most certainly the feisty tigerfish. Throwing in your line and letting it draw behind a slow-moving boat, while lazily watching passing mukoros, with kingfishers flitting in and out of the river, makes for a relaxing day on the water. The relaxation gives way to pumping adrenaline when that line, laden with sardines, bulldogs or artificial bait, tightens and the heart-pounding struggle to pull in the fiercest fish of them all begins. Even the most experienced anglers often forget the basic tips of tigerfishing under the extreme extent of their excitement. The thrill of hunting the notoriously hard-to-capture ‘tiger of the Zambezi’

is what draws fishermen back time and time again, especially if they’re on a mission to capture the ‘one that got away’. Tigerfish are known for their aggressive temperament, supreme speed, aerobatic capabilities and steel-like jaws. They hunt in schools of like-sized fish, and have silver-striped bodies with brightred and yellow fins and tail, often reaching up to 10 kg in weight. But anglers take note: all tigerfish weighing over 2 kg are female and should be released. The good fishing spots often depend on the season. However, known hotspots are areas where there are deep pools, reed edges and, most commonly, fast-moving water. The location chosen will influence the choice of tackle, bait and lures. Most lodges and campsites along the river provide information, as well as eager-to-help guides who give expert advice and can provide fishing boats for their guests. Annual competitions are also a big draw card for adrenalin junkies and enthusiastic anglers in search of proper sport fishing.


ANNABELLE VENTER

| TOP ADVENTURES |

GAME VIEWING The Etosha National Park is an internationally known game reserve, famous for its abundance and variety of wildlife. More than 100 years old, the park boasts dramatically successful animal rehabilitation and conservation initiatives, and is your best option for a wide variety of animal sightings. The conservation efforts in the park over the past 100-plus years have led to the successful reintroduction and rehabilitation of animal species that had been eradicated from the area. Etosha is Namibia’s flagship national park and one of its most important tourism draw cards. These factors make it the perfect destination for the keen adventurer to enjoy Namibia’s abundance of game, whether exploring the park as a self-driver or as part of a tour group. There are several guidelines to keep in mind when setting off on your Etosha adventure. Game can be viewed from the comfort of your vehicle – next to the roads, on the plains or pans, and at waterholes throughout the park – as well as at waterholes in one of

the five rest camps. These are, from east to west: Onkoshi, Namutoni, Halali, Okaukuejo and Dolomite. All five of these rest camps have shops, restaurants and petrol-station facilities. Waterholes are great places for observing animals, especially during the dry season when the surface water in the depressions and pans has dried up. It is especially useful to consult the visitors’ animal-sightings books at the rest camps, and to ask park rangers for advice on recent sightings. Paying attention to animal behaviour at waterholes can also benefit those in search of predators, such as when antelope are gathered at one side, and checking the bushes or tree line at the opposite side for predators resting or hiding in the shade. Also keep in mind that different species of animals drink at different times of the day. Guidebooks to waterholes are stocked in the restcamp shops, enabling visitors to gain useful information on game viewing in the park. The early morning and late afternoon hours are considered to be the happy hours for animal spotting,

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so setting off early is always a good idea. Allow yourself plenty of time, so that you don’t miss out on great sightings such as lions, elephants, rhinos and possibly even leopards. The park is home to four of Africa’s Big Five. In fact, Etosha is frequented by more than 486 different species of vertebrates – including reptiles, birds and mammals – for spotting and ticking off lists. While three days will enable you to see the whole park, five days will be more rewarding, as it will allow you to explore this famous animal kingdom at a leisurely pace. There are specifically demarcated roads for tourists to follow. However, some of these roads are closed off during the rainy season, as they become too wet and muddy for standard vehicles. Visitors are furthermore advised to take extreme caution when driving on them and to stick to the speed limits, as the hazards of gravel-road driving are as prevalent in Etosha as everywhere else in Namibia, but have the added risk of unexpected animal roadblocks. Speeding can cause harm to wildlife and tourists alike.

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CHRIS BOTHA

MOUNTAIN BIKING Namibia’s central plateau running from north to south with an average altitude of between 1 000 and 2 000 metres – a rugged mountainous escarpment that descends in the west into the Namib Desert and in the east into the rolling hills of the Khomas Hochland west of Windhoek – provides many opportunities for exhilarating and truly tough mountain biking and cycling. Mountain bikers across the globe would agree that the main focal points of any ride are the trail, the terrain and the ever-challenging surroundings that play host to truly adventurous mountain-bike adventures. Technical sections in routes, hard climbs, and often dangerous, rocky terrain are all elements that lure adventure junkies and extreme sports enthusiasts. Namibia’s geographical diversity makes it the perfect location for a wide variety of such ‘gnarled’ routes. Mountain bikers and cyclists, both local and from abroad, flock to the rocky outcrops and steep passes in the country to get their fix. One of the most popular regions of Namibia, the ‘deep south’, has become home to many biking adventures in recent years. The

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rocky terrain and rolling hills here are interspersed with long, flat stretches of gravel, making for ideal mountain-bike and cycling locations. Mountain biking in the south ranges from short self-guided trips to longer safaris and cycling events. With striking vistas and challenging mountain routes, the /Ai-/Ais/Richtersveld Transfrontier Park hosts cycle challenges and cycling tour groups alike. It is a unique environment for adventure sport activities, having spectacular mountainous scenery, a remote wilderness character and the presence of a major river within a desert environment. Routes have been established along the edge of the Fish River Canyon, while well-maintained gravel roads here allow for beautiful rides through the pristine and untouched landscapes. Two of the major cycling events held in the south are the Fish River Marathon and Cycle, where participants can choose between a 104-km or 54-km cycle, and the annual multi-stage MTB event, Desert Knights Cycle Challenge, combining five days of cycling, some of

it at night under the full moon, with one day of canoeing on the Orange River. There are numerous mountain bike events throughout the year in various parts of the country. The most popular ones are the Nedbank Cycle Challenge in February; the Klein-Aus Vista MTB Challenge, Windhoek Light Namib Quest and Kuiseb Classic MTB in May; the Otjihavera Xperience in August; the Desert Knights Cycle Challenge in September; the nine-day Cycling Namibia and Namibian Pick & Pay Cycle Classic in October; the 100 km of Namib Desert and Cycletec Spring Festival in November; and the famous Nedbank Desert Dash in December. Increasing numbers of cycling enthusiasts are attempting to push their limits by searching for more challenging mountain-bike adventures. In 2014 a group of cyclists even went head to head with the 300-metre high dunes of the Namib Desert in the Snow-2-Sand Fatbike Experience. Companies that facilitate guided tours in various parts of the country include Mountain Bike Namibia, H&I Adventures, DAS Bike Shop Adventure, Mabaruli Safaris and Be Local Tours.


C.J. VAN DER WESTHUIZEN

| TOP ADVENTURES |

ROCK CLIMBING Few people are aware of the many rock-climbing challenges Namibia has to offer. As hikers and climbers discover ever-more areas, the sport is becoming increasingly popular, both with locals and with visitors from abroad. The Spitzkoppe, at 1 728 metres, was first ascended in 1946. Since then it has attracted hundreds of climbers every year. As one of Namibia’s most recognisable landmarks, and often referred to by climbers as the Matterhorn of Africa, the Spitzkoppe rises above the dusty pre-Namib plains of southern Damaraland as if out of a mirage. Considered a climber’s paradise, the Spitzkoppe and surrounding areas – including the Pondok [also spelt Pontok] Mountains (because they resemble the rounded Damara huts called pondoks) – boast over 30 natural and 30 sport climbs. Sport climbing entails routes that are secured with bolts, whereas natural climbing involves unsecured climbing techniques or ‘free climbing’. In Namibia, climbing routes are rated in accordance with the Ewbank system as measured in technical difficulty, exposure to the climber, length, quality

of rock, protection and other smaller components – the higher the rating, the more difficult the route. Popular climbs in the Spitzkoppe surrounds include the route Goldfinger (21) on Rhino Horn, a very sought-after climb that is well bolted. The South West Wall is home to many popular routes such as Watersports (20), the South West Wall Route (24), INXS (24) and Herero Arch (26). Then there’s Nothing in Moderation (25), a route Alex Honnald (a popular American rock climber best known for his free solo ascents of big walls) free soloed in September 2013. Along the highest peak of the Pondok Mountains – Pondok Spitz – you’ll find the route To Bolt or Not To Bolt (18), a five-star climb that’s not excessively difficult. Sugarloaf Mountain also has great bolted routes. A guidebook entitled Spitzkoppe and Pontoks Namibia by Eckhardt Haber contains all the route information of the area. To date, the highest peak of the Spitzkoppe has been reached by climbers more than 600 times. Members of Namibia’s rock-climbing community form part of the MCSA (Mountain Club of South Africa), which has a Namibian charter. The club facilitates

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and engages in mountaineering, climbing of all types including boulder climbing, hiking, international expeditions, mountain search and rescue, training, the conservation of mountain areas, and the procurement of access for mountaineering. Although the Spitzkoppe surroundings are considered to be the most popular climbing destination in Namibia, there are many other areas for climbers, including Omandumba in the Erongo Mountains, Aussenkehr on the southern border of Namibia and the Midgard country estate, 90 km northeast of Windhoek. There are a few climbing areas within 20 km of Windhoek, but these are usually on privately-owned property where the right of admission is reserved. The climbing company, Urban Friction, facilitates climbs in popular spots throughout Namibia. No experience is needed to join these climbing tours, and they are open to everybody, from amateurs to professionals. MCSA Namibia hosts regular outings to Spitzkoppe during winter. Dates for scheduled climbs can be found on the MCSA Namibia website: www.mcnam.org.

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NAMIBIA HORSE SAFARI COMPANY

HORSE-BACK SAFARIS The Namib-Naukluft Park is famous for its wide-open spaces, massive dunes, endless grassy plains and variety of desert-adapted wildlife. One of the most exciting ways of exploring this unique part of Namibia is most certainly on horseback. The area allows for unrestrained riding that will enable you to truly appreciate the rich biodiversity and free-ranging plains game found here. The wild inhabitants in this – one of the most scenic desert landscapes in the world – are much more accepting and less hindered by human intrusion when you are on horseback than when using any other form of transportation. A horseback safari truly is the best way to get up close and personal with nature. Horseback safaris in the NamibNaukluft Park often entail travelling along established horse trails into the surrounding plains and watercourses, over dunes and mountain paths, with passing gemsbok and springbok grazing languidly around you. Trips vary from sundowner and breakfast rides to sleep-outs that can extend from one to six day trips, depending on the

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establishment. Such sleep-outs cover distances ranging from 20 km to 50 km a day, and are usually accompanied by advance teams, which set up camps to welcome the riders at the end of a long day’s journey. Evenings on sleepout rides are spent under a dazzling canopy of stars – something that the unpolluted Namibian night sky can offer par excellence. Rides are tailored to suit each rider’s ability, thus offering adventure for beginners ranging through to wellestablished riders. To make the most of the horseback safaris though, riders are advised to be fit and healthy. Confidence in the saddle will make this adventure all the more enjoyable and allow for better riding experiences and more choices of terrain and thus locations to visit. There are several companies that provide horseback adventures in the area, including Desert Homestead & Horse Trails and the Namibia Horse Safari Company that facilitates rides at Wolwedans, both in the NamibRand Nature Reserve. Horse trails at BüllsPort into the Naukluft

Mountains and Klein-Aus Vista environs, traversing the Sperrgebiet Rand Park, are also available. The Namibia Horse Safari Company also offers a number of additional riding opportunities in other parts of the country, including the Namib Desert Ride from Khomas Hochland to the Atlantic coast; the Greater Fish River Canyon Ride along the edge of the world’s second-largest canyon; the Damara Elephant Ride, to search for the desert-adapted elephants in Damaraland and along the Skeleton Coast; and outrides at River Crossing Lodge, 3 km outside Windhoek. Other trips available in and around Windhoek include six-to-eightday rides at Okapuka Lodge with Okapuka Horse Safaris and a variety of trips and lessons offered by Equitrails Namibia, situated 15 km north of Windhoek. The Namibia Endurance Ride Association (NERA) holds endurance competitions across the country throughout the year, while other equestrian sports such as show jumping and dressage are organised by the Namibian Equestrian Federation.


| TOP ADVENTURES |

4X4 DESERT TRIPS From the insanely steep rocky plateau climbs of the Namib-Naukluft Park to the monstrously high fun sand dunes of the Namib Desert and the slip-sliding mud tracks through the teeming-withwildlife Etosha National Park there is literally a trail for every 4x4 driver’s skills level and interest. There are numerous opportunities to explore off-the-beaten track 4x4 destinations in Namibia. With the versatile and rugged landscapes of the Kalahari in the east, the uninhabited expanses of Kaokoland in the northwest, and the Namib Desert’s giant sand dunes along the coast beckoning adventurers and adrenalin junkies alike, Namibia is a 4x4 off-roader’s greatest challenge and most epic quest. Although there are many areas of the country that provide for great off-road adventures, the coastal strip – spanning 1 570 km with the Atlantic Ocean to the west and the Namib Desert with its towering dunes and unexplored landscapes to the east – is by far the most beautiful and most challenging expedition for an off-roader to undertake. Trails in the Dorob National Park offer a wide

choice of 4x4 tracks for adventure seekers. There are a few popular off-road vehicle (ORV) zones in the dune belt between Swakopmund and Walvis Bay for short day trips. Two of the most popular 4x4 trails and destinations along the strip are Sandwich Harbour and the Skeleton Coast Park. A permit is needed to enter both these areas. Permits can be obtained from the Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) and Namibia Wildlife Resorts (NWR) offices. It is advisable to travel with an experienced operator/guide, as the terrains can be hard to navigate and often serve up unexpected surprises. There are numerous tour groups that can be joined in this region. These 4x4 experiences are offered either as guided or self-drive tours. Concession tours have gained a great deal of popularity over recent years, and companies with concessions to certain areas can take you and your vehicle into regions of the coastal strip and national parks that are otherwise inaccessible to the public.

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Companies catering for the needs of would-be desert conquerors include Uri Adventures, Desert Magic Tours, Namab Desert Tours, Turnstone Tours Namibia, Sandwich Harbour 4x4, Dolphin Tours Namibia, Omalweendo Safaris, Westcoast 4x4 Namibia, Unique Tours & Safaris, and Coastway Tours Lüderitz, among others. These companies have a wide selection of set tours and itineraries, but often also cater for more specialised tours. Popular set trips along the coastal strip include trails from Lüderitz to Walvis Bay, through what used to be known as Diamond Area No 2, visits to Conception Bay, Meob Bay and Sandwich Harbour, as well as trips from inland destinations such as Sossusvlei and Solitaire to the coast. Popular off-road adventures in other parts of the country include the Dorsland Trek 4x4 tour, Kalahari Bush Breaks 4x4, Klein-Aus Vista 4x4 route, Naukluft 4x4 Trail, BrandbergWest 4x4 Route, Omaruru River 4x4 Route, Doros Crater 4x4 Route, Messum Crater 4x4 Route and the extremely challenging Van Zyl’s Pass, to name but a few.

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CULTURES THE PEOPLE OF NAMIBIA • 14 regions • 13 different ethnic groups • 16 languages and dialects


THE PEOPLE OF KAVANGO AND ZAMBEZI THE KAVANGO Forming the border between Namibia and Angola for more than 400 km is the Okavango River, lifeline of the Kavango people, who make a living from fishing, cattle farming and cultivating sorghum, millet and maize on the wide fertile plains on either side. Closely related to the Owambo, the Kavango also originate from the large lakes of East Africa. Archaeological diggings place the arrival of early Kwangali settlers around the 1600s, although the VaGciriku, VaSambyu and Hambukushu might have arrived later. They first settled near the Kwando River in Angola, moving south of the Okavango River between 1750 and 1800. Today the Kavango people consist of five individual tribes, namely the Kwangali, Mbunza, Shambyu, Gciriku and Mbukushu, each inhabiting an area of its own along the southern bank. The Kwangali and Mbunza tribes have similar social practices, such as preparing young boys for manhood and young girls to take care of a household. The two tribes speak the same language, namely Rukwangali. The split between the Shambyu and Gciriku tribes occurred when they were settled on the southern bank of the Okavango River 47 km east of Rundu,

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opposite Rundjarara. The languages spoken by these tribes, Rushambyu and Rugciriku, are very similar. The Mbukushu, who speak Thimbukushu and live in the eastern part of Kavango, differ socially and ethnologically from the other four tribes. Each tribe is ruled by a traditional chief or chieftainess, assisted by headmen. The chief has the overall ruling power over his tribe and custodial power over the land that falls within the jurisdiction of that tribe. Like most other groups in northern Namibia, the Kavango social organisation is based on the matrilineal system. This penetrates all spheres of social life, in particular family law, the law of inheritance and succession, the marriage system, political structure and traditional religious system. The traditional economy in Kavango is based on a combination of horticulture (pearl millet, referred to locally as mahangu, sorghum and maize) and animal husbandry (cattle and goats). Today, thousands of young Kavangos work as migratory labourers on farms, in mines and in urban centres. An important local industry is woodcarving. Bowls, masks, ornaments, furniture and other functional items are produced for the tourist and other markets. Woodcarvings ranging from animals to carved doors are also sold at

the Ncumcara Craft Shop, 35 km south of Rundu in the Kavango Region. Much of the rapid population growth in Kavango has been the result of immigration from Angola.

Social structure and lifestyle The fifth Living Museum, the Kavango Living Museum, was opened in 2011 in the Kavango Region at Samsitu Lake, 14 km west of Rundu. It represents a traditional village of the Kavango people, who have lived in this area for centuries. With the demonstration and preservation of the fishing and land-cultivating culture of the Mbunza an essential part of its interactive programme, the main focus of the Mbunza Living Museum is to provide visitors with a detailed insight into traditional, pre-colonial culture.

THE ZAMBEZIANS Of about 90 000 Zambezians, previously known as Caprivians, recorded in the 2011 census, 86 000 live in East Zambezi, which borders on Angola, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Botswana, and 4 000 in scattered settlements in West Zambezi. There are two main tribal groups, the Fwe in the west and the Subia in the east. The vast majority of Zambezians


| THE PEOPLE OF NAMIBIA | live along the riverbanks next to the major roads; or in and around the main centre Katima Mulilo and the villages of Sibinda, Sangwali, Linyanti, Chinchimane, Bukalo, Ngoma and Isize. In addition to hunting and fishing, Zambezians till the soil, planting maize, millet, beans, sweet potatoes, groundnuts, pumpkins, melons and sugar cane. They are also gatherers and pastoralists, with well-structured usage of the communal grazing areas. Their isolation and remoteness from the rest of the country are largely responsible for their continued dependence on this traditional subsistence economy. Most Zambezians are linguistically related to the Lozi and Makololo of Barotseland in Zambia. The Valozi are the descendants of the Kololo Kingdom, established by Chief Sebetwane of the Bafokeng (originally from the Orange Free State in South Africa), who crossed the Zambezi River in 1838 and overpowered the Luyi. The largest Zambezian tribal groups are the Masubia and Mafwe. Other tribes are the Mayeyi, Matotela, Mashi and Mbukushu. As a result of their historical social interaction with Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana, the majority of Zambezians speak English as a second language. In addition, many of the men worked for some time on mines in Johannesburg, and hence learned to speak Fanagalo. This is the only region in Namibia where Afrikaans is spoken minimally.

Social structure and lifestyle Within communal areas there are different levels of traditional authority. In eastern Zambezi each village has a headman, generally the most senior male member. He advises the senior headman, who represents several villages. The senior headmen act as local representatives on the tribal council or kuta, over which the ngambela (chief councillor) presides. The kuta is the highest legislative, administrative and judicial body in the tribal area. In western Zambezi, traditional authorities are less structured, but are similar in that authorities range from the local village headmen to a chief who is in charge of a large area. In Zambezian society the family is the most important socioeconomic unit. Families usually live in villages. Two systems are distinguishable in the social organisation. The Masubias are patrilineally oriented, while the Mafwe reflect distinct matrilineal features in their rules of succession. The form

of government consists of hereditary chieftainships, one for the Masubia and one for the Mafwe. Most Zambezians are subsistence farmers who make their living on the banks of the Zambezi, Kwando, Linyanti and Chobe rivers. Land is cultivated under a system of individual right of occupation as allocated by the people’s authorities. Grazing and veld products are used on a communal basis. In addition to fishing and hunting, a significant but not exclusive element of the local economy, they keep cattle and cultivate the land. When the Zambezi and Chobe rivers come down in flood, more than half of Zambezi east of the Kwando may be under water. During this period Zambezians use their mokoro (dug-out canoes) to traverse the routes normally used by trucks and pedestrians.

Crafts in Zambezi In the Zambezi Region baskets are still used by women in the mahangu fields when harvesting and winnowing their grain, which has enabled many women to create a vibrant and successful craft industry and establish a valuable source of income. Situated 118 km west of Katima Mulilo in Kongola on the road that leads to West Zambezi, the Mashi Tourism Hub is a centre for selling crafts produced in the conservancies of the area. The centre offers a great variety of different items, such as the unique khwe fruit collection baskets of West Zambezi, once used to carry fruits from the field, and the open East Zambezi baskets used when harvesting crops and sifting millet and maize flour. Necklaces made from mbono and other seeds are also for sale here. Once ground and boiled in oil, the mbono seeds were used as a lotion for skin and hair. The crocheted bags were introduced when there weren’t sufficient palm leaves for weaving. They are made from narukuku, fibres taken from fields and soaked in water. Reed mats and woodcarvings are to be found in this stylish craft centre. Information on local produce, tourism attractions and the well-appointed community campsites is displayed at Mashi. An informative poster display provides an opportunity to find out more about the conservancies, community forests and parks in the area, the flora and fauna, history, topography and details about the culture, basket-making and other traditions in the region.

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The tourism hub offers an outlet for the work of over 300 craftspeople, among them men who make the woodcarvings. The baskets and beadwork are done by the women, enabling them to bring an income into the household that pays for their children’s school fees and clinic costs, or possibly a larger purchase such as a cow. The craft shop also allows the women to improve their skills and, most importantly, to keep the traditional skills of basket weaving alive, as many 21stcentury western-world items replace the implements and vessels once used in everyday life. A colourful event takes place each year in August at the Mashi Crafts market in Zambezi. The Mashi Crafts Festival provides an opportunity especially for craftmakers, primarily women, from all over Zambezi to adorn their brightest and finest chetenges and show off their artistry. They compete for prizes and present traditional dances and plays to their colleagues and guests. A tourism information centre was established a few years ago as an additional leg to the business.

Potters of the Zambezi The Zambezi is home to many fine potters, due to their free access to clay soils and wood for the ovens. Because the region lies sandwiched between Botswana, Angola and Zambia, the Zambezian craft-makers are influenced by an active crafts industry in neighbouring countries. The Zambezian artists have possibly been more receptive to the western notion of producing art for art’s sake than artists in other regions, as can be seen in their sculptural guns and bicycles carved from wood. While traditional pottery is produced in Owambo and Kavango, the art of the potter in Zambezi has evolved over time. Beautiful pots with spherical bodies and slender necks are created, often with intriguing patterns and interesting firing techniques, making them much sought-after by collectors.

Community forests While Namibia isn’t commonly associated with woodlands, forests and forest management, in Zambezi pristine forests cover large areas of land. As well as providing livelihoods for many of the rural poor, these forests are essential as the safekeepers of the water-support system and wildlife habitats of the country. In 2004 the Namibian Government

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established the Community Forestry Programme in the north, targeting forest, woodland and savannah areas owned by local communities. The premise is that if local people are obliged to manage their community forests sustainably, they will in turn receive the right to manage and market forest products and other natural resources to generate income. This combination of conservation and business opportunities is a driving force in poverty reduction and enhancement of rural livelihoods.

CULTURAL FESTIVALS The Zambezians celebrate their traditional culture at the end of August with the Zambezi Regional Cultural Festival. Traditional dances, music, food, values, language, handicraft products and customs are celebrated as tools of uniting people from different ethnic groups. The festival stresses that local culture should be promoted and practised in schools, as young people are crucial for keeping cultures alive

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT Zambezians take to their mokoros to start fishing long before the sun rises • A Kavango medicine man in traditional dress • Basket weaving is still a popular craft and integral skill in Zambezi/Kavango culture

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elsewhere in the world. The annual Masubia Cultural Festival takes place in July at Bukalo, the traditional headquarters of the Masubians, about 40 km east of Katima Mulilo. The festival brings together Masubians from Namibia, Botswana and Zambia. According to Masubian tradition and culture, the ceremony is a way to draw memories from people with Masubian ancestors coming together to share historical memories and cultural and developmental ideas. The ceremony also serves as an opportunity in which all Masubiaspeaking people present gifts to their chief as required by their culture. The current Masubia chief is His Royal Highness Munitenge Kisco Liswani III. About 25 cultural groups from the Zambezi Region, Botswana and Zambia entertain festival-goers at the Lusata Cultural Festival, presented by the Mafwe people and popularly referred to as Lusata. Activities include cultural dances by various groups, church choirs blessing the attending crowd with their singing, and a few sketch performances. The highlight of the day is when the current Chief, George Simasiku Mamili VII, steps forward to address his people.

Rounded off with traditional Lusata dishes, this event is well-attended by chiefs, delegates and tourists from all corners of the globe. The festival takes place in October at the Lusata headquarters of Chinchimane, about 70 km south of Katima Mulilo.

THE LIVING MUSEUM OF THE MAFWE Opened in 2008, this Living Museum is an authentic open-air museum where guests can learn about the traditional culture and original lifestyle of the Mafwe, demonstrated and described with great dedication, with translations into English by the guide. Most of the programmes are interactive, with the Mafwe enjoying it when the visitors try to weave a traditional net and taste their meals. Visitors can spend the night close to the museum in a basic bush camp, or stay in one of the surrounding accommodation establishments. The museum, independently managed by the Mafwe of Singalamwe, is situated on a scenic hill with a view over the Kwando River. It also hosts a craft shop.


| THE PEOPLE OF NAMIBIA |

Ekipas are ornamental buttons made from ivory or bone

THE OWAMBO - PEOPLE OF THE NORTH The people referred to collectively as the Aawambo live in central northern Namibia and southern Angola. In about 1550, migrations of these people, who have a common origin and culture, moved southwards from the Great Lakes in East Africa and settled between the Kunene and Okavango rivers. Today four of these groups live in the Cunene Province in southern Angola and eight in northern Namibia, the latter representing just over half of Namibia’s population. The Kwanyama constitute the largest of the eight Owambo tribes. The others are the Ndonga, Kwambi, Ngandyela, Kwaluudhi and Mbalanhu, and the smaller the Nkolonkadhi and Unda. The Owambo languages are Bantu in origin. They are closely related to one another and are commonly understood by Oshiwambo speakers. The Kwanyama and Ndonga languages have been developed into written languages. Traditionally called Ovamboland and today loosely referred to as Owambo, the highly populated northern region of Namibia was divided into the Omusati, Oshana, Ohangwena and Oshikoto regions following independence in 1990.

According to the 2011 population census, the Ohangwena Region has the second-largest population in the country, and Omusati Region the third largest. While the majority of Namibia’s Owambo live in these four so-called O regions, many have migrated southwards to other parts of the country. Since 1870, following the advent of the Finnish Mission in Owambo, and subsequently the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches, Christianity has played a major role in the lives of the Owambo people. Today more than half of the population has some link with these denominations. The Finnish Mission Church developed into an independent Owambo/ Kavango Church, which also has adherents among the Kavango people of the north-east. In the pre-colonial structure of Owambo society there was a king and headmen in each of the seven Owambo groups. Judicial powers were vested in village and regional courts, with the highest court being the Supreme Court of the King, where the King was assisted by his headmen. This system reflects influences from the great medieval states of central Africa characterised by the sacred king having almost unlimited power.

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Social structure and lifestyle

Today only three of the Owambo clans – the Ndonga, Ngandjera and Kwaluudhi – still recognise their kings and are ruled by chiefs-incouncil. The rest have a system of senior headmen forming a council and administering their tribes by joint action. An important function of these officials is the regulation of the system of land ownership. About a quarter of the Owambo regions has been claimed by individual landowners, each occupying farms of several thousand hectares. Owambo houses are traditionally of the rondavel type, mostly surrounded by palisades and often connected by passages. Cattle kraals usually form part of the complex, which is surrounded by cultivated lands. The Owambo practise a mixed economy of agriculture, mainly mahangu (pearl millet), sorghum and beans, and cattle husbandry, supplemented by fishing in shallow pools and watercourses called oshanas. Traditional land is utilised according to traditional right of occupation usually acquired by payment of cattle to the ‘owner’ of the ward (omkunda). Grazing and utilisation of veld and bush products are

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communal but subject to the laws of the people. Trading runs in the Owambos’ blood, as is borne out by the more than 10 000 stalls, cuca shops and numerous locally owned shopping complexes in the region. Large numbers of Oshiwambo people now work in other parts of the country, so that today’s workforces in the mining and fishing industries consist primarily of Owambo people. Most senior civil servants and political leaders speak Oshiwambo. Home industries such as dressmaking, wood carving, pottery and basketry provide an income for many Owambo women, who traditionally cultivated the land and raised the children. Today Owambo women are increasingly entering the labour market as nurses, clerks, shop assistants and teachers. The most striking feature of the traditional Owambo social system is the predominance of matrilineal descent, which determines the laws of inheritance and succession, as well as post-marital residency. In recent years, as a result of external factors such as the Christian doctrine, migrant labour and economic independence, there has been a distinct shift towards a patrilineally organised society. The Owambo people have always played an active role in politics. Namibia’s ruling party, SWAPO (South West Africa People’s Organisation), started as a non-violent pressure group referred to as the Owambo People’s Organisation. It was led by Andimba Herman Toivo ya Toivo and Samuel Shafiishuna Nujoma, the man destined to become the first president of an independent Namibia.

CULTURE AND CRAFTS Historical landmarks

A good opportunity to learn about Owambo culture firsthand is by visiting the Uukwaluudhi Traditional Homestead at Tsandi in the Omusati Region. Uukwaluudhi, one of very few traditional kingdoms still in existence, is occupied by the King of the Tsandi area, which falls within the Uukwaluudhi Conservancy. Trained local guides take visitors through the homestead, pointing out the customs and history of these complex family homes. The Nakambale Museum and Restcamp is a community-based

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tourism institution established at Olukonda in 1995 by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Namibia (ELCIN). It offers exhibitions on the premises of the National Monument, where the Nakambale Church was built in 1870 when the first Finnish missionaries settled in Owambo. The church is flanked by the Nakambale Cemetery, where Finnish missionary Martti Rautanen, some of his family members, and a number of traditional leaders were laid to rest. Guided excursions to sites of interest such as the Oponono Lake, Omandongo mission station, Onoolongo cattle post and Ombagu grass plains are also offered. Visitors are treated to traditional Owambo food, music and dancing. A visit can be arranged to the historical Omuguluwombase, where the guerrilla warfare waged by SWAPO forces for Namibia’s independence was launched.

Cosmetics and hairstyles

For generations women in the Oshana, Ohangwena, Omusati and Oshikoto regions of north-central Namibia, where the marula tree is an abundant natural resource, have been harvesting the fruit. They extract the oil and use it as a taste enhancer in traditional chicken and mahangu dishes, and cosmetically as a moisturiser for their skins. Today the oil of this traditional African food source is being processed and exported as a high-value ingredient for overseas cosmetic products. Namibia is the first Southern African country to export marula oil to Europe. Elaborate hairstyles were particularly prolific among the Owambo, differing from tribe to tribe and characterising the different stages of a woman’s life. Girls in the largest Owambo group, the Kwanyama, wore variations of the elende hairstyle, attained by rubbing a mixture of fat and olukula (a powder made from the crushed root of wild teak) into the hair and lengthening it with leaf fibres and strands of sinew. Cowrie shells were fixed to the ends of these strands of hair.

Pots, quilts and beads

A few years ago six women in the Onenongo village 20 km northwest of Oshakati combined their knowledge and skills to form the Ndilimani Pottery Group. The

women use clay collected from the oshanas (flood plains) close to their underground pottery studio. The pots can be bought at the Tulongeni Craft Market on the northern side of the Omuthiya village, 90 km south of Ondangwa. Initiated by Hollander Maggy Kukler in 1999, the Ekwatho Quilt Craft project provides a livelihood to Owambo women in Okuryangava in Katutura, Windhoek. Designs for the quilts are based on four small blocks in two exchangeable colours, from which any number of new designs can be made. Onyoka, traditional necklaces made from mussel shell beads, play a prominent role in the adornment of Oshiwambo women. New babies are welcomed into the world with a string of onyoka, and throughout their lives Oshiwambo women wear onyoka whenever they want to look smart, especially when attending weddings, christenings and funerals.

Traditional jewellery

Ekipas are ornamental buttons made from ivory or bone that were worn by Owambo women in earlier times. Displayed at the back on two leather straps hanging down from the waist, the number of ekipas worn gave an indication of the woman’s status and the wealth of her husband. Ekipas were carved into oval, round, square, multi-cornered or oblong forms with a raised centre, resembling a tiny beehive or rounded pyramid. They were usually engraved with a border in different geometric patterns around the outer edge. Some were fashioned from hippopotamus tooth or bone, and less frequently from vegetable ivory. Today ekipas have become intrinsically and unmistakably Namibian. The ekipa is currently regarded as a cultural artefact that can be sold as a personal belonging in terms of the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). The Ministry of Environment and Tourism has placed a temporary moratorium on the sale of elephant ivory. This affects all artefacts made from ivory, including old as well as new ekipas. The objective of the moratorium, which came into force in 2008, was to give the Namibian Government the opportunity to sort out the technicalities of buying and selling ekipas legally.


| THE PEOPLE OF NAMIBIA |

Literacy programme

Just north of Ondangwa, the literacy programme of Nghuoyepongo is presented, providing tuition in English, mathematics and braille. Most members who are part of the Nghuoyepongo programme suffer from a disability. After class, members of the group weave baskets, which are sold at the annual Ongwediva Trade Fair that takes place in August.

COMMUNITY-BASED TOURISM

A visit to the four north-central Owambo regions provides an opportunity to meet the Oshiwambospeaking people, who comprise approximately half of the Namibian population. This distinctive part of the country is characterised by makalani palms, oshanas (depressions of water that fill up annually during the rainy season, providing the inhabitants with an ample fish supply), mahangu (pearl millet) fields and fenced traditional homesteads. Here visitors can experience the local culture, taste the food and visit the traditional homesteads of these friendly and courteous people. Travelling through the area

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can be done with ease, as there is a comprehensive network of wellmaintained roads. It also provides a linkage with the rest of Namibia, making a good circuit if travelling from the northwest or Epupa Falls to the Zambezi/Kavango Region or into Etosha via the King Nehale Gate, only 44 km from Namutoni. The Nakambale Museum and Restcamp in the village of Olukonda, 14 km southwest of Ondangwa, consists of the old Finnish mission house (now a museum), a highroofed church and a demonstration traditional Ndonga homestead, with its mopane-pole palisade and huts connected by a labyrinth of passages. Accommodation is available in five tented huts, the traditional huts of the homestead, or at camping sites. A craft shop displays and sells crafts produced in the area. The Uukwaluudhi Traditional Homestead in Tsandi, the former home of King Josia Shikongo Taapopi, is an opportunity for guests to visit a traditional palace. Worlds apart from European palaces, the royal homestead is a typical Owambo homestead, surrounded by a mopane-pole palisade. This African-style palace offers a unique cultural experience, incorporating the customs, beliefs and accommodation style of the Oshiwambo-speaking people into the royal residence. Local crafts of the area can be bought at a

craft shop. The hand-made and attractively decorated paper from the OnankaliOmahangu Paper Project is produced by a twelve-member co-operative, located 55 km south-east of Ondangwa. The paper is made using stalks and leaves of mahangu (pearl millet), a staple in north-central Namibia. Recycled paper is added for a lighter colour. Once the paper is made, it is silk-screened with African designs from the San Ekoka artist group. This unique product range includes bookmarks, cards, notebooks, conference folders, loose sheets of paper and magnetised fridge notepads. A further 30 km south, in the town of Omuthiya, Tulongeni Craft Market is brightly painted in orange, yellow and green and surrounded by mahangu fields. The craft shop is an outlet for locally produced crafts, such as baskets woven from palm fronds by the Nyeka ye Pumba group, Onankali paper products and Ndilimani Pottery. Commiphora wood goblets and animals, traditional funnel-shaped fishtrap baskets and Ombalantu wire products are produced here. The Community Forest at Omauni covers an area of 750 km2, with the campsite located in the Centre for Sustainable Forest Management. Rustic furniture is manufactured and sold at the centre.

Various spices on dipslay at the Outapi Open Market • Owambo women dance in their pink skirts which have become popular fashion

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GINGER MAUNEY

A Himba homestead in the Hartmann’s Valley near the Kunene River

THE HIMBA - THE LAST TRUE NOMADS ORIGIN AND GEOGRAPHY The Himba, Tjimba and other Herero people who inhabit Namibia’s remote north-western Kunene Region are loosely referred to as the Kaokovelders. Herero in terms of origin, language and culture, they are semi-nomadic pastoralists who tend to trek from one watering place to another. They seldom leave their home areas and maintain, even in their dress, a tradition of their own, on which other cultures have made little impression. For many centuries they have lived a relatively isolated existence and were not involved in the long struggle for pasturelands between the Nama and the Herero to any noteworthy extent. The largest group of Kaokovelders is the Himba, semi-nomads who live in scattered settlements throughout the Kunene Region. Tall, slender and statuesque, they are characterised especially by their proud yet friendly bearing. The women especially are noted for their unusual sculptural beauty, enhanced by intricate hairstyles and traditional adornments. The homes of the Himba are simple, cone-shaped structures of saplings, bound together with palm leaves, and plastered with mud and dung. The men build the structures, while the women mix the clay and do the plastering. A fire burns in the headman’s hut day and night, to keep away insects and provide light and heat. A family may move from one home to another several times a year to seek grazing for their goats and cattle. Men, women and children wear body adornments made from iron and shell beads.

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SOCIAL STRUCTURE AND LIFESTYLE Head and hair ornamentation In the Himba culture, ornamentation of the head and hair traditionally featured prominently, and in many parts of Kaokoland still does. A young girl typically has plaits (ozondato). Once she has completed her puberty ceremony, she wears the ekori headdress made from tanned sheep’s hide or goatskin with three leaf-shaped points, often decorated with iron beads. Himba males also wear different hairstyles, such as the single plait, the ondato, worn by young boys down the back of the head; the two plaits, ozondato, worn by Himba men of marriageable age; and the ombwiya head-dress, a scarf made from fabric covering the hair and decorated with an ornamental band. A Himba woman spends as much as three hours a day on her toilette. First she bathes, then she anoints herself with her own individually prepared mixture of butter fat, herbs and ochre. This mixture not only protects her skin from the harsh desert sun, but also keeps insects away and prevents her body hair from falling out. She uses another mixture of butterfat, fresh herbs and black coals to rub on her hair, and ‘steams’ her clothes regularly over the permanent fire. Virtually all tour operators to this remote region take their guests to Himba settlements to meet these extraordinarily resilient and physically beautiful people who have retained so much of their traditional culture. In Kaokoland Himba women make unusual, finely woven baskets with beautiful sculptural shapes. Traditionally they used these baskets to store milk or

fat, and in many areas still do. Shapes vary from a bottle with a neck and narrow mouth to a deep pail. Most have a leather handle with iron-beaded decoration so that they can be hung in the ondjowo (dwelling). Bowl-shaped baskets are also made and used for winnowing the grass seeds collected from ants’ nests. Some years ago locals in the north-western Kunene Region started harvesting the golden resin that falls from the resilient omumbiri tree (Commiphora wildii), resulting in the initiation of the Commiphora wildii Resin Project. The resin, used traditionally by Himba women as a perfume, is harvested and exported to Europe, where it is used in the preparation of primarily French perfumes.

Hizetjitwa Festival The Hizetjitwa Indigenous Peoples Organisation (HIPO) introduced its first two-day cultural festival in August 2011. Consisting of traditional performances by the Himba, Zemba, Tjimba and Twa tribes, it was held in an open area on the outskirts of Opuwo in the Kunene Region. There are about 2 000 HIPO members from 85 registered villages in the region. HIPO is an organisation that works towards helping indigenous people in Namibia and Angola to retain their culture and values, meet the challenges of contemporary society and improve their living conditions. The festival is an annual event.

COMMUNITY-BASED TOURISM For those visiting Purros along the Hoarusib River, the Marienfluss, the


| THE PEOPLE OF NAMIBIA | flush toilets. Guided trips to a nearby Himba demonstration village and the surrounding areas are offered. Close to Puros Campsite is the Puros Bush Lodge, which offers accommodation to travellers who do not want to camp. This is a self-catering lodge with en-suite accommodation in six twinbedded rooms. A family room with twin beds and a bunk bed is also available. At the Puros Traditional Village striking Himba women of varying ages dressed in traditional attire and covered in red ochre are willing to show you the various Himba rituals, offering snippets of interesting Himba information and intriguing demonstrations. A shop stocked with Himba crafts sells Himba jewellery, makalani palm kernels carved into key rings, baskets, beadwork and bracelets. Situated approximately 200 km from Opuwo, the Marble Campsite is an attractive and well-equipped facility that is a veritable oasis on the rough roads of the area. Its five sites all have their own kitchen counter and barbecue area, and share a stylish communal ablution block made of local stone and thatch. Two hiking trails routed around the camp and a visit to a Himba village offer alternatives to resting and relaxing. A joint venture between the Orumpembe Conservancy and local entrepreneur and artist, Trevor Nott, House on the Hill is a self-catering stone cottage situated on the hill adjacent to the Marble Campsite. Conservancy Safaris – Namibia (CSN) enables the discerning traveller to Namibia to make a real difference by improving the future of five remote communities which collectively own the local company and which receive all profits. Thus the CS-N is helping to ensure a future for wildlife in some of the most spectacular landscapes in the world. Nearly 2 000 Himba and Herero people

in the far north-western Kunene Region benefit from these operations through their membership of five conservancies – Marienfluss, Orupembe, Santitatas, Okonjombo and Puros. A further jewel in the crown is Etambura Camp. Co-owned by CS-N and the Orupembe Conservancy and set on a hilltop with magnificent 360-degree views, the camp has five tented units, each with its own en-suite bathroom and private deck area. www.kcs-namibia.com.na

HIMBA CRAFTS Traditional jewellery In Namibia, as in other countries, the tradition of adorning the body goes back thousands of years. Today it is primarily the Himba who still adorn themselves with traditional jewellery. Both men and women wear large numbers of necklaces and arm and leg bracelets made from ostrich eggshell beads, grass, cloth and copper. Iron-oxide powder with its shiny effect is worn like western glitter, while ochre mixed with fat is rubbed into the skin to give it a warm terracotta glow. The large white shell worn on the breast by Himba (as well as Owambo and Herero) women is called the ohumba. When travelling through Namibia’s rural Kunene Region, an especially visible form of folk art is the hand-carved makalani palm nut, referred to as vegetable ivory. Carvers transform the kernel into distinctive and decorative buttons, which are sold as simple ornaments or featured in formal and informal jewellery, and in functional items such as key rings and bottle openers. The carved nuts usually depict animals – elephant, rhino, giraffe, gemsbok and springbok – or topical themes such as the Namibian flag and domestic scenes.

GINGER MAUNEY

Hartmann Valley surroundings, Opuwo, and Epupa Falls via Sesfontein, there are several community campsites in the area. Perched on a hill surrounded by mountains with a river running below, the Khowarib Campsite, 33 km south of Sesfontein, is a well-positioned and attractive community facility consisting of four private sites. Each has a lapa area with a basin (and tap) and a railwaysleeper counter top. Guided visits to the Anmire Traditional Damara Village and the Bushman paintings are offered. If you’re well prepared and set on travelling the difficult terrain of Van Zyl’s Pass into the Marienfluss, then Van Zyl’s Pass Campsite provides a good stopover. The camp is situated 20 km before the pass, near the village of Otjihende. Take note that this route should only be undertaken by those experienced in four-wheel driving. At the Epupa Falls Campsite, spread out under makalani palms, water rushes toward the falls and fine mist sprays into the air. The campsite is within walking distance from the falls. The Kanamub Mountain Camp, 24 km from Sesfontein en route to Purros, is positioned against a mountain between huge granite-gneiss boulders with a spectacular view of the surrounding countryside. It is situated under a large rocky overhang, with a tap, kitchen counter and shower built into a boulder alcove of rock walls, and a donkey boiler providing hot water. For those driving on to Purros, a four-wheel drive vehicle is necessary for the sandy roads. The Puros Campsite is positioned on the banks of the Hoarusib River, home to the desert-adapted elephants, which often wander through the campsite. Six sites are positioned under large camelthorn trees, each with its own private ablution block with hot water and

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Herero women in tradtional dress at the annual Heroes’ Day parade

THE HERERO - FROM THE GREAT LAKES OF EAST AFRICA The Herero are a pastoral cattle-breeding people who migrated to Namibia several centuries ago. It is believed that they formerly lived in a country with water and reeds, known as Roruu, before migrating further south. No one has, however, succeeded in tracing this legendary African marshland. According to oral tradition, they moved southwards from the great lakes of East Africa, crossed into presentday Zambia and southern Angola, and arrived at the Kunene River in about 1550. After inhabiting Kaokoland for some 200 years, a large splinter group led by Maendo migrated further south, leaving the Himba and Tjimba tribes behind. They reached the Swakop River valley towards the middle of the 18th century. During the 19th century they moved eastwards, eventually establishing themselves in the northern-central areas of the country. In the first half of the nineteenth century, the Herero and Mbanderu were still living in family units headed by an omukuru. The absence of a political structure can be attributed to the system of dual descent. A person’s status in the family hierarchy, the place of abode, and traditions, are determined by the paternal line, oruzo. Control and distribution of all movable property, on the other hand, is determined by the

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maternal line, eanda. The matriclans exert control over most people’s property, especially cattle, and supervise the application of traditional laws of inheritance. The localised patriclans, on the other hand, take responsibility for sacred objects and the holy cattle (ozohivirikwa), the exercising of authority in the family, succession of chiefs, priesthood, ancestral fires and the ritual food taboos. The colonial wars and Herero German war of 1904–1907 resulted in a drastic decrease of the Herero population. Under General Lothar von Trotha and his infamous Vernichtungsbefehl (proclamation of extermination), a large number of Herero were massacred. Left without land and cattle, the survivors practically disintegrated as a group. Many fled to Bechuanaland (Botswana). When South Africa took over administration of South West Africa in 1915, the refugees began to return and were gradually allocated home areas such as Aminuis, Epukiro, Waterberg East, Otjohorongo and Ovitoto.

Social structure and lifestyle Despite the suppression of their traditional culture, confiscation of tribal lands and the restrictions of labour laws, the remaining Herero managed to keep their bonds of family life, tribal

solidarity and national consciousness alive, as is demonstrated by the annual Herero Festival on Maharero Day in August when various units of paramilitary organisations parade before their leaders in full dress through the streets of Okahandja. Similarly, the Mbanderu and the Zeraua tribes honour their captains at festivals in Gobabis and Omaruru respectively. In the nineteenth century, under the influence of the wives of the missionaries, Herero women developed the voluminous Victorian-style dresses that the more traditional of them wear to this day. The distinctive headdress with its two points symbolises cattle horns. Today, Herero-speaking Namibians number over 130 000. They can be subdivided into the following groups: the Herero proper, with the traditional chiefdoms of Maharero (Okahandja), Zeraua (Omaruru) and Kambazembi (Waterberg); the Ndamuranda; the Tjimba Herero of Kaokoland (Kunene Region); the Mbanderu, who live in eastern Namibia, especially in the Gobabis District and the reserves of Epukiro, Otjombinde and Omongua (known more commonly by the Nama name, Aminuis); the Himba of the Kunene Region (see above); and other smaller factions in northern Kunene and south-western Angola. Their language


| THE PEOPLE OF NAMIBIA | belongs to the Bantu group of languages.

Herero headdresses The traditional ekori headdress of adult Herero women consisted of a threepointed leather cap with a veil in front, usually worn rolled up. This ekori differs in shape from that of the Himba, and has higher points. After the advent of the missionaries, an older Herero woman’s ekori was replaced by the otjikaeva, a headscarf made from fabric, still worn today as a triangular otjikaeva by older Herero women, the two lateral points representing cattle horns, cattle being central to the Herero culture.

CULTURAL ACTIVITIES The Omaheke Region is home to different language groups, with festivals giving them the opportunity to display their different cultures. Participants are mostly pupils from primary and secondary schools in the area showcasing their different cultural performances to onlookers.

Theatre group As a side project, the Living Culture Foundation also supports the Herero theatre group, Erari. The group performs a play based on the history, culture and traditions of the Herero people who moved to the Waterberg area in the 19th century, offering the spectator access to information on this interesting group of Namibians and creating curiosity and craving for further insight. The play is performed every Wednesday in Okakarara, near the Waterberg, on the premises of Steps For Children, as entertainment

for visiting tourists. A traditional meal is served afterwards. Steps for Children runs a kindergarten, soup kitchen, sewing room, computer school and internet café, a bicycle sales and workshop, and supports schoolchildren with their homework. www.lcfn.info

Okaepe Living Museum and School Project Okaepe is a small village located 54 km east of Okakarara off the tarred road (D3822) in the direction of Coblenz. Inspired by headmistress, Batseba Rukero, children of the primary school in Okaepe village have been trained to entertain tourists with traditional dances, games and songs, ceremonies and scenes from everyday life. Performances depict the traditional Herero way of life, the close relationship of the Herero with their cattle, the bravery of the herders when defending their herds against predators and Herero wedding ceremonies. Tours are undertaken to the San community where visitors learn about the San history and way of life.

Community-based tourism Located in the small settlement of Okakarara, the Okakarara Community Cultural and Tourism Centre was inaugurated in August 2004 during the 100 years commemoration of the Battle of Ohamakari, fought in the early liberation struggle of Namibia’s indigenous people. The centre serves as a link between present and past, and between visitors and residents, and works towards enhancing a common

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future in and around the traditional lands of the Herero people. The site hosts a café and kiosk, a small souvenir shop and a dialogue circle for meetings and team-building exercises. Camping sites are also available. Kambahoka Restcamp, situated next to the Aminuis saltpan, 180 km south-east of Gobabis, consists of seven campsites, each with a table and barbecue area, and basic facilities. Visitors are informed about cultural aspects such as the significance of the ‘sacred fire’, an essential facet of the traditional Herero household, for spiritual well-being and connection with the ancestral spirits. Activities offered at Kambahoka include San/Bushman, Batswana and Bakalahari singing and dancing, a walk in the pan and a trip to the site of a former German camp in the HereroGerman war of 1904. For those travelling to Bushmanland and the Tsumkwe area via Gam, Kaumbangere Restcamp located 5 km south of Otjinene makes a good stopover. The rest camp has four bungalows, one rondawel, a campsite, and bar and restaurant that serves meals on request. Kaumbangere offers a cultural tour to Otjinene where guests are able to see how the local people live, including how they prepare their food and make the sour milk they favour. They also offer a historical tour to Ozombu zo vindimba, a significant site for the Herero people, as it served as a German base during the HereroGerman war of 1904, and from which Adrian Dietrich Lothar von Trotha made his famous proclamation against the Herero people.

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San communities still live a hunter-gatherer lifestyle

THE SAN – NAMIBIA’S EARLIEST INHABITANTS The earliest known inhabitants of Namibia are the San (Bushmen), who belong to the Khoesan peoples. Generally short in stature, they have light yellowish-brown skins, while their language, which differs among the different groups, is characterised by numerous clicking sounds. These hunter-gatherers – which include the Ju/’Hoansi, Kxoe and !Kung – roamed the vast plains of Southern Africa for thousands of years before migrants armed with weapons and searching for new land on which to graze their animals and plant their grain, drove them further and further east into the Kalahari Desert. Most San people now live or work on farms in eastern Namibia or live in remote communal areas in Otjozondjupa and Omusati. There are approximately 35,000 San people in Namibia. The wealth of rock paintings and engravings found in mountains and hills throughout Namibia bear witness to the Bushmen’s former habitation in many parts of the country. The oldest rock art dates back some 28,000 years. Examples are the famous White Lady painting of the Brandberg and the rock engravings at Twyfelfontein, one of the richest collections in Africa.

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Social structure and lifestyle Renowned as great storytellers, the San express themselves eloquently in prose, music, mimicry and dance. Their simplest instrument is the hunter’s bow, strung with animal hair and played with a hollowed-out melon or an empty tin can as a sound box. Moth cocoons filled with stones or seeds are attached around their ankles to provide rhythm while they dance. The San are divided into three groups: the Hai||om (who traditionally inhabited Etosha) in the northern districts of Otavi, Tsumeb and Grootfontein; the Qgu (!Kung) and Ju/’Hoansi in Bushmanland and the Gobabis District; and the Khoé or Mbarakwengo in West Zambezi. While a small number of these legendary people still practise their traditional, nomadic lifestyle, the majority lead a settled existence in villages, having been influenced by Western culture, economies and lifestyles.

Traditional San crafts For centuries, the San have adorned themselves with beadwork. Glass beads were traded or new beads were fashioned from ostrich eggshell. The

techniques of making jewellery and other items such as collecting bags from animal skin, have changed little. Production of such items is often shared. Beads, for example, are carved by the men and threaded by the women. Most materials used, such as seeds, segments of porcupine quills, nuts, roots and berries, are collected in the bush. Functional items, such as bags traditionally used for collecting wild fruit and berries, or storing tobacco and matches, are made from softened antelope skin. Crafts produced in the Omaheke Region are marketed by the Omaheke San Trust, an organisation that provides a livelihood to hundreds of marginalised Bushman families living in the region. G!hunku Crafts is situated next to the Nyae Nyae Conservancy office in Tsumkwe, well positioned for tourists to stop by on their way to Botswana or the Khaudum National Park. This is a community-based craft project selling traditional San ostrich eggshell and tamboti-wood jewellery, amongst other traditional items. The striking Art-i-San beaded artwork and ostrich-eggshell jewellery made by San communities in the Omaheke


| THE PEOPLE OF NAMIBIA | Region can be bought from the Namibia Craft Centre in Windhoek. Started in 2008 as a small project to provide an alternative source of income to rural poor and marginalised San women, Baraka Beads combines the existing artistic beading skills of the Ju/’Hoansi San with modern, contemporary designs.

LIVING MUSEUMS Living open-air museums where visitors can learn about the traditional culture and original way of life of Namibia’s indigenous peoples are truly ‘Living Museums’. The aim is to generate an income for the community involved and to keep traditional, rapidly vanishing cultures alive by showing and demonstrating traditional dances, music instruments and habits. The first such facility established in Namibia was the Living Museum of the Ju/’Hoansi-San at Grashoek, which opened in 2004. The San living in this area are the only Bushmen still allowed to hunt traditionally. Apart from learning about the ancient culture of the Ju/’Hoansi, native to the Kalahari Desert for thousands of years, the focal point is experiencing a real hunt with hunters from the Living Museum. The traditional bow hunt with poisoned arrows, digging out springhaas (spring

hares) and porcupines, and catching guinea fowls, korhaans and other birds in snares for food was never halted. In 2010 a second one, the Living Hunter’s Museum of the Ju/’HoansiSan, near Tsumkwe, was opened. This museum also gives visitors to the former Bushmanland tribal area first-hand experience of the traditional hunter-gatherer lifestyle of Namibia’s earliest ancestors, and the opportunity to meet traditionally dressed Ju/’Hoansi-San people, and learn about their culture through demonstrations of what it takes to survive in the wild armed with only a bow and arrow, a digging stick and an intimate knowledge of the environment passed down for generations. Accommodation is provided at the Elephant Song Campsite. A basic campsite is situated in a glade in close proximity to the Living Museum and Craft Shop, a worthwhile stop in the middle of the Kalahari. Apart from the fascination that an indigenous San lifestyle holds to visitors, the attraction of this area lies in its unspoilt nature. It provides a true bush experience, as there are no ablution facilities and no running water or electricity. Programmes include bush walks with hunting, snaring, tracking and collecting bush food; singing, dancing and games around the fire; demonstrating how traditional

Bushman crafts are made; action days; and two-day walks into the wild, guided by Bushmen.

COMMUNITY-BASED TOURISM Situated off the C44, 87 km on the way to Tsumkwe, Omatako Valley Restcamp in the Otjozondjupa Region is a !Kung Bushman/San community campsite offering bushwalks on which traditional bush food and medicines are pointed out and tracking knowledge is shared. Added attractions are a village tour visiting houses around the campsite, and viewing traditional singing and dancing. Tsumkwe is situated in the middle of the Nyae Nyae Conservancy, where residents have the right to manage their wildlife and natural resources themselves. South-east of Tsumkwe is the Djokhoe Campsite, situated near the Holboom Baobab, and further east is the Mukuri Campsite. The area has several pans that attract birds and wildlife. For a good Bushman/San experience, Sãa Ta Ko in the extreme east close to the Botswana border, is situated a short drive past the Corridor 13/Motsomi town. Bush walks, a visit to the San demonstration village, and singing and dancing are the highlights of a visit to the campsite, as is the opportunity to have a San experience on San land.

BELOW The San still practice a century-old tradition of intricate beadwork. Beads used for making jewellery and crafts are made most often from glass and eggshell.

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THE DAMARA – AN ENIGMATIC RACE The origins of the Damara people are an enigma to anthropologists. One of several puzzling aspects is that while they differ physically from the Nama and Hai||om people, they also speak the Khoekhoegowab language. Another is that although they are dark skinned, in most other respects they differ from other people of Bantu origin in Namibia. Traditionally the Damara community consists of a number of subdivisions called haoti. These are clusters of clans and extended families that were formerly concentrated in specific areas, consisting of about eleven subgroups. The Hai||om had the widest geographic distribution in Namibia, ranging from an extensive area surrounding the Kuiseb River, southeast of present-day Walvis Bay, up towards the Swakop River; the central parts of the country from Rehoboth and Hoachanas to the Khomas Hochland, west of Windhoek; and especially the area where they are concentrated today, namely the environs of Outjo, Kamanjab, Khorixas and Brandberg. The names of various Damara groups were mostly geographic references, for example the Tsoaxüdaman, the Swakop Damara or Dâuredaman, and the Brandberg Damara. The Damara were ousted from their

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traditional areas by the advancing Nama and Herero. In German colonial times they settled in the Okombahe environs. In 1973 an area of approximately 4.7 million hectares was proclaimed as Damaraland, with Khorixas as its administrative capital. Following independence, this area became part of the Erongo Region. According to the latest census (2011), about 150 400 people live here, 42 400 more than in 2001.

Social structure and lifestyle Before the arrival of the white settlers, the Damaras’ way of life was similar to that of the nomadic San insofar as they lived from hunting and veldkos. There is also ample archaeological evidence that they kept small herds of stock, especially goats, for centuries. The small family group formed the nucleus of socioeconomic activities. At the heart of their religion lay the so-called ‘sacred fire’, associated mainly with their hunting activities. In addition, they practised small-scale horticulture, growing primarily tobacco and pumpkins, and mined and smelted copper, trading with articles made from copper and soapstone. Nowadays rural Damara people cultivate corn and vegetables, while livestock production has become an

important source of income. Many work on commercial farms; others in mines, with some making a living from small mining in the Erongo Region. A relatively large number are employed in urban centres as teachers, clerics and officials. Some of Namibia’s most eloquent and influential politicians are Damara, notable examples being President Hage Geingob, and the former speaker of the National Assembly, Dr Theo-Ben Gurirab, also a former Prime Minister.

The Damara Living Museum The first traditional Damara project was established close to the worldfamous rock-engraving site of Twyfelfontein, where a group of Damaras built a Living Museum to show their pre-colonial dress styles and demonstrate their ancient traditions. The museum features a village with a range of huts, livestock, demonstrations of singing, dancing and games, craft-making and a blacksmith’s shop in which traditional iron tools are produced. On an interesting bush walk, visitors are shown trapping and snaring methods, and different bush food. The museum is located 8 km east of Twyfelfontein, off the D2612.


| THE PEOPLE OF NAMIBIA |

Damara Festival The two-day annual Damara Festival takes places during November at Okombahe in the Dâures Constituency. It is aimed at commemorating deceased Damara leaders and raising awareness of Damara traditions among the younger generation through the inclusion of cultural performances. Chief Justus //Garoëb is currently serving as King of the Damara clan. He was officially crowned in 1993, after serving as acting chief from 1976 to 1993 as part of an arrangement with the late Damara King, David Goreseb.

Community-based tourism In the Erongo Region in central Namibia, mountains jut into the sky in earthly magnificence, begging exploration. Here visitors will find the Brandberg, the highest mountain in Namibia, which peaks at 2 573 metres (Königstein) and is famous for its San/ Bushman rock-art paintings, especially the famous White Lady. The Spitzkoppe massif, a group of rounded granite mountains situated 60 km north-west of Usakos en route to Swakopmund, is both a popular rock climbing and camping destination. With its main peak resembling the famous Swiss mountain, it is often referred to as ‘The Matterhorn of Africa’.

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT

currently being upgraded, but are still open for visitors. Excursions are offered with local community guides from the Twyfelfontein Information Centre to view the 2,000-plus rock engravings at Twyfelfontein, a site declared a National Monument in 1952 by the government of the time, and as Namibia’s first World Heritage Site in 2007 by UNESCO; the two colourful geological curiosities, the Burnt Mountain and Organ Pipes; and the Petrified Forest, a collection of fossilised pieces of tree trunks (lying scattered among a stand of small welwitschia plants) that was declared a National Monument in 1950. En route to these features is the Aba-Huab Campsite, a busy, bustling campsite located 9 km from the Twyfelfontein engravings. With a bar, pool table, restaurant and communal ablutions, this privatelyowned facility is for campers who like social interaction. Fifteen sites are positioned on one side of the road and three more private ones on the other. The majority of the sites overlook the Aba Huab riverbed. Two enchanting campsites are Doro !Nawas Granietkop Campsite, 20 km southeast from Twyfelfontein off the D2612, and Hoada Campsite off the C40 Grootberg Pass, near the town of Kamanjab. Each has three campsites nestled among the granite boulders, with showers and toilets sheltered by the rocky features.

RON SWILLING

XENIA IVANOFF-ERB

A Damara woman in traditional dress • Performers at the Living Museum demonstrate a traditional game played with rocks

The Dâureb Mountain Guides offer excursions from the base of the Brandberg to view the White Lady painting in the Maack’s Shelter overhang, during which they also provide interesting information on the flora and fauna of the mountain. The paintings that can be seen on the massive Brandberg are estimated to be between 2 000 and 4 000 years old. In the heart of the old mining town of Uis, 42 km to the south, the Uis Information Centre gives advice about the area and in particular about the Brandberg, the Dâureb Mountain Guides and the walks offered to view the rock paintings. Dâureb Crafts stocks items handmade by women from the community, while Vicky’s Coffee Shop, open daily from 8:00– 17:00, makes a pleasant stop for a tasty cappuccino, muffin, salad, light meal or omelette. Nestled between the huge boulders in the magnificent mountain world of the Spitzkoppe in the Gaingu Conservancy is the Spitzkoppe Rest Camp. Run by the local community, the camp offers 12 private campsites with basic facilities, surrounded by quiver trees, acacia, shepherd’s and butter trees, and set against a blue sky and ochre rock. A small restaurant offers simple meals on request and the bar sells cold drinks, beer and a few snacks. Simple showers and flush toilets are positioned near the entrance. If you’re in need of a soft bed, there are two bungalows, each with two rooms. The facilities are

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XENIA IVANOFF-ERB

THE NAMA – DENIZENS OF THE SOUTH The only true descendants of the Khoekhoe in Namibia are the Nama, whose ancestors originally lived north and south of the Orange River. Eight Nama tribes were already living north of the river when Jager (father of Jan Jonker) and Jonker Afrikaner crossed it with the Afrikaner tribe. The Afrikaners and four other tribes represent the so-called Oorlam group, which entered the country during the nineteenth century. Pushed continuously northwards by a rapidly advancing white farming community, the Nama, led by the famous Jan Jonker Afrikaner, settled further north in the southern and central parts of the country. Another important Nama chief was the nephew of Jonker Afrikaner, Hendrik Witbooi, who was an early resistance leader against European colonisation. His face is portrayed on the Namibian dollar note, and a statue, erected in his honour in the Parliament Gardens in Windhoek, stands among other statues of historical figures. As pastoral nomads, the Nama traditionally had little need to build permanent structures. Their beehiveshaped rush-mat houses were ideally suited to their lifestyle. The concept of communal land ownership still prevails with all tribes, except for the =|Aonin or Topnaars, whose !nara

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fields are the property of individual lineages. Today most Nama live in permanent settlements. They have adopted western lifestyles and the Christian religion, and work within the formal economy. The Nama have much in common with the San. They are comparatively light in colour and generally short in stature, with certain distinctive characteristics, such as the women’s small and slender hands and feet. They also share their linguistic roots with the San, speaking with distinctive clicks. The Khoekhoegowab Dictionary with an English– Khoekhoegowab Index, compiled by Professor Wilfrid Haacke and Eliphas Eiseb, was published in 2004.

Social structure and lifestyle Traditionally the Nama are cattle farmers. Their socioeconomic unit is the patrilineal family group, which functions within the wider Nama group. The individual groups originally functioned separately under chiefs and councillors who sometimes united against a common enemy such as the Herero but often clashed with one another. With the entry of the Herero and their intrusion into the pasturelands of the Nama, a fierce and prolonged conflict arose between these

two groups. The struggle was brought to an end by German colonial forces in the late 1800s, and home areas such as Berseba, Bondels, Gibeon (Krantzplatz), Sesfontein, Soromas and Warmbad were placed at the Namas’ disposal. Numbering approximately 117 000, the Nama consist of thirteen tribes or groups. These are the !Kharkoen (Simon Kooper), |Hôa-|aran (also referred to as //Aixa-//ais meaning Angry Nation), =|Aonin (Topnaar), Kai//Khaun, Khauben (Rooi Nasie), |Hai-|Khauan (Berseba tribe), Oorlams (Vaalgras), //Haboben (Velskoendraers), Kharo-!oan (Keetmanshopers), //Khau/gôan (Swartbooi), !Gami-=|n˜un (Bondelswarts), |Khobesen (Witbooi), //Okain (Groot Doders) and Kai|khauan or Gaikhauan (Lamberts). Nama people have a natural talent for music, poetry and prose. An example of a traditional dance is the well-known Nama stap. Numerous proverbs, riddles, tales and poems have been handed down orally from generation to generation. Nama praise poems range from impromptu love songs and formalised praise of heroic figures, to songs of the animals and plants in their environment. Nama women are highly skilled in needlework. Their embroidery


| THE PEOPLE OF NAMIBIA |

Dancing, sewing and embroidery In the Naukluft environs an insight can be gained into the lifestyle of the Nama people by visiting the small community at Nabasib, halfway between Mariental and Maltahöhe. To help alleviate poverty, the guest farms and the community have formed the Naukluft Foundation. The Foundation supports the Nabasib School Choir and dance group by providing material for the Nabasib women to make the waistcoats and traditional dresses they wear when they perform. The Nabasib kindergarten, pre-primary and school is also supported by the Foundation. To preserve the art and tradition of sewing and embroidery in the south, local entrepreneurs have initiated several projects, including Gibeon Folk Art. A craft typical of southern Namibia is the kaross, a rug or blanket made from skins sewn together, formerly worn by Khoesan people, and nowadays used as bed coverings or on the floor. These typicallyNamibian leather blankets can be bought when driving in the southern region along the B1, often draped over fences, especially in the vicinity of Duineveld. While springbok pelts are the most popular, goat, sheep, jackal, seal, kudu, blesbok and gemsbok hides are also used. In addition to karosses, carpets, cushion covers, waistcoats, jackets, traditional dresses, handbags and place mats are also manufactured. One of the techniques applied is patchwork, at which the people of the south excel. In Keetmanshoop, the Empowering People in Need group is

a non-profit organisation that employs traditional Nama skills of sewing and embroidery. The Wake Centre, where these crafts are produced and can be purchased, is situated in the Tseiblaagte Township. These crafts can also be bought at the Namibia Craft Centre in Windhoek and at Klein-Aus and Amber Moon in Swakopmund. The Maiteko Cultural Group in the Hardap Region started off by performing Setswana cultural dances and songs for entertainment in the local community. It was founded to develop a culture of unity amongst the youth and to make the Aranos youngsters aware of their cultural background and roots. Another cultural group is Ama Buruxa, established in 2001 at the Daweb Junior Secondary School in Maltahöhe. The Ama Buruxa song-and-dance group consists of Nama children aged between 12 and 18 years. Their repertoire is aimed at strengthening and keeping Nama traditions alive and has led to the establishment of a regional cultural festival, which resulted in the production of a CD.

Community-based tourism Stopovers en route to the main tourist attractions in the south provide an opportunity to meet the interesting people of the south. Ten kilometres from Berseba is Bruckaros Campsite in beautiful mountain surroundings. With minimum facilities, and no running water, the attraction here is the scenic landscape. In Keetmanshoop, Adonai Tours offers an introduction to Nama culture and an opportunity to experience some of the highlights of the south. The tours visit the Keetmanshoop township, Tseiblaagte, to view Nama singing and dancing, taste typical local food, learn about traditional dress and participate in a Nama wedding. In the very south is Warmbad Hotsprings Lodge, an interesting historical and cultural stop if you’ve already visited the Fish River Canyon and are exploring other areas of Namibia. The attractive reception area in the renovated officers’ barracks consists of a restaurant that serves light meals, and a conference room. Further down the road are the newly built accommodation facilities comprising three family bungalows, each with two

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bedrooms and an en-suite bathroom, two bungalows with five separate rooms, each containing a bedroom and en-suite bathroom, four small slate and thatch beehive rondawels (circular thatched rooms) and a small camp ground. A short distance away is the hot spring after which Warmbad was named. The Warmbad area is inhabited by the Bondelswarts or !Gami-nun, one of the 13 Nama groups living in Namibia. The small museum in Warmbad, housed in the renovated German jail, displays information on the guerrilla wars fought between the Bondelswarts and the Germans based there in the early 1900s. A number of new community campsites and information centres have been built over the past three years. The following campsites have basic facilities: Snyfontein Camp with eight sites overlooking an appealing section of the Fish River; ≠Nudi Campsite with seven sites amongst quiver trees and dolerite rocks; Ganigobes Campsite, situated north-east of Tses; Goamus Campsite, situated in the striking mountain landscape of Gibeon; // Hai-Sores Campsite, with six sites and several demonstration Nama huts; and Hoachanas Campsite, 53 km from Kalkrand on the C21. The Asab Tourist Centre, positioned on the side of the B1 road in Asab, 36 km south of Gibeon, provides more information.

XENIA IVANOFF-ERB

and appliqué work, regarded as a traditional art form, consists of brightly coloured motifs inspired by the rural environment and lifestyles of the Nama people. The content of the work is often expressive and humorous. The traditional patchwork dresses that the Nama women wear are especially typical. Two projects in the south which co-ordinate these talents and market the products are anin, situated on a farm between Uhlenhorst and Hoachanas, and Gibeon Folk Art in the village of Gibeon. Kaross floor rugs or blankets made with skins of domestic animals or antelope are a speciality of the area. They are produced by Namas as well as Basters, and are sold by vendors along the main tarred road leading south.

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PAUL VAN SCHALKWYK


WINDHOEK, SURROUNDINGS & CENTRAL EAST • Windhoek is Namibia’s capital and largest city • It is known by the traditional names of /Ai//Gams (Khoekhoe for ‘hot springs’) and Otjimuise (Otjiherero for ‘place of steam’) • Windhoek is the economic, social, cultural and political centre of Namibia • There are many historical sites of colonial German heritage, which contrast the contemporary architectural styles of modern buildings www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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WINDHOEK & SURROUNDINGS AND THE CENTRAL EAST The Windhoek, Surroundings and Central East Region is dominated by its capital, a small bustling city with an estimated population of 340 900 (based on the 2011 census). Windhoek lies in an airy basin in the central highlands, surrounded by the Auas Mountains in the south-east, the Eros Mountains in the northeast and the Khomas Hochland in the west.

Windhoek is often described as a city with a ‘continental’ atmosphere. This can be ascribed to its architecture – historical buildings dating back to German colonial rule – as well as to its cuisine, culture, dress codes and educational institutions. At the same time Windhoek has the colour, sounds and tempo of a modern African city. Pavement displays of African drums and woodcarvings from the north contrast with elegant shops offering sophisticated Swakara garments and Namibian gemstones set in individually designed jewellery. While some shops display clothing, silver and glassware imported from Europe, others stock casual and colourful garments from West Africa. Because of the many hot springs in the area, Windhoek was initially known as Ai-gams (correctly spelt /Ai //Gams to indicate the click sound), a Nama word meaning ‘firewater’, ‘steam’ or ‘smoke’, and Otjomuise, a Herero word meaning the ‘place of steam’. The Nama captain, Jan Jonker Afrikaner,

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gave the town the name it carries today. In the early 1840s Afrikaner settled where the most powerful spring reached the surface. It is thought that in a moment of nostalgia he named the place after Winterhoek, the farm in the Cape where he was born. During the German colonial administration the town was called Windhuk, which was subsequently changed to Windhoek. Public transport in the city consists mainly of taxis, while a bus service transports passengers between Katutura and Khomasdal to Windhoek and its various suburbs.

WALK THROUGH WINDHOEK If you’re keen on walking and would like to orient yourself in the capital, a leisurely circular route starting and ending at the golden Independence Museum in Robert Mugabe Avenue will give you a good idea of what the city has to offer, and will give you a glimpse of Namibia’s cultural diversity.

ACTIVITIES AND ADVENTURES Take a walk through Windhoek, find your bearings, meet the locals, see all the main attractions and exercise those jet-lagged legs Visit the Namibian Craft Centre to stock up on goodies for those who stayed at home, and get a sense for traditional artworks Have a picnic in the Parliament Gardens, admire the age-old trees and get acquainted with the history of the adjacent ‘Ink Palace’ Go on a bicycle tour through the ‘Kasi’ and see how the majority of Windhoek’s population spend their days, try out some kapana and the locally brewed concoction called oshikundu


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The walk should take you between three to four hours to complete, but be advised to wear a comfortable pair of walking shoes and a hat, especially if it’s summer. Allow extra time for refreshments and pit stops en route. After a visit to Namibia’s new Independence Museum, dedicated to the Namibian liberation struggle, make a stopover at the neighbouring Alte Feste (old fort), built in the early 1890s to protect the new settlers in Windhoek and provide accommodation for members of the Schutztruppe. Opposite, in the historical Emma Hoogenhout building, are the administrative headquarters of the National Museum of Namibia. Further south along Robert Mugabe Avenue, on the right, is the Office of the Ombudsman, built in 1906 as a residence for senior government officials and converted into offices following independence. Take a sharp turn right into Sam Nujoma Avenue, and at the first traffic light, do a quick detour to the right into Rev. Michael Scott Street to look at the Supreme Court building, the only development after independence that reflects an African, albeit northern African, style of architecture. Having viewed this imposing building, head back to Sam Nujoma Avenue and proceed down to Independence Avenue. On your right you will be greeted by Namibia’s first five-star accommodation establishment, the Hilton Windhoek, which was opened in 2011. On your left in front of the Municipality Building is the statue of Curt von Francois, commander of a small force of Schutztruppe, who established the Alte Feste as his headquarters in Windhoek in 1889, and who is regarded by some historians as the city’s founder. Go one more block further down and turn left into Tal Street, where you will find the Namibia Craft Centre in the Old Breweries Building. The best example of handiwork by Namibia’s craftspeople can be viewed and purchased here, and the Craft Café offers delectable refreshments. From here return to Independence Avenue and meander northwards until you reach the Gustav Voigts Centre. Built in the early seventies and conveniently central, the Gustav Voigts Centre offers a great deal more than convenience stores and banking facilities, such as outlets for handcrafted jewellery, Swakara garments, camping and safari gear, curios and hand-made souvenirs, maps and

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books and other utility stores. The historical Wecke &Voigts store can be found here. The centre is flanked by the Carl List Mall, also a great place for shopping or a cup of tea. From the Gustav Voigts Centre, cross Independence Avenue at the first set of traffic lights, taking note of the crafts displayed on the corner, then cross Fidel Castro Street to Zoo Park. Here you will see a curious two-metre-high stone column sculpted by well-known Namibian artist, Dörte Berner. The monument marks the place where the remains of elephant bones were excavated in the fifties, now on display at the Geological Survey Museum near Eros Airport. Also in the park is the Witbooi Memorial, unveiled in 1897 to commemorate the lives of soldiers lost in battles fought between Schutztruppe and the legendary Nama chief, Hendrik Witbooi. When you reach the complex of concrete fountains, cross Independence Avenue for a short detour down Post Street Mall. Completed shortly after independence, the Mall has a large number of shops and boutiques and is a favoured venue for street vendors selling rural art, African-style clothing, curios and jewellery. While the new structures blend with Windhoek’s historical German architecture, bright colours such as blue, pink, cerise and purple give them a modern and lively appearance. Town Square, an addition to the Mall, offers more dining and shopping opportunities. Developed around one of Windhoek’s oldest hotels and accessible from the Mall is the genial Kaiserkrone Shopping Centre with its palm trees, beer garden, restaurant with seating outside and variety of shops and stalls. Mounted on steel columns and adding special interest to the Mall is the Gibeon Meteorite Fountain, where 31 of the original 77 Gibeon meteorites are displayed. The Gibeon meteorite shower occurred in southern Namibia south-east of Gibeon, and is the largest known shower of its kind in the world. Return to Independence Avenue, cross to the Main Post Office, turn right into Daniel Munamava Street and then left into Lüderitz Street, proceeding down the hill until it runs into Independence Avenue again. On your right you will pass the Public Library, then the Magistrate’s Court and, on the corner with John Meinert Street, the Old Supreme Court. The bronze kudu mounted on a high stone plinth on the corner to your left is a landmark

often used by locals when giving directions. From here you turn right into Independence Avenue, cross at the traffic lights, and at the next set of lights, veer left into Bahnhof Street. At the bottom of Bahnhof Street on the right is the historical Windhoek Railway Station, built in 1912/1913. In front of the building is the narrowgauge locomotive, and on the first floor is the TransNamib Railway Museum, well worth a visit. Double back up Bahnhof Street, cross Independence Avenue and proceed eastwards until you reach Robert Mugabe Avenue, having taken note of the Turnhalle Building on the right-hand corner. On the opposite corner is the FrancoNamibian Cultural Centre (FNCC),

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Windhoek was initially known as /Ai //Gams, a Nama word meaning ‘firewater’, ‘steam’ or ‘smoke’ • The Independence Museum • The Christuskirche, or Christ Church, in the city centre • Stock up on arts and crafts at the Post Street Mall

one of the most important players in Namibia’s cultural scene. When you proceed southwards down Robert Mugabe to where it crosses John Meinert Street, you will find the National Art Gallery of Namibia, well worth a visit to see the Permanent Collection established and owned by the Arts Association Heritage Trust, which features historical and contemporary Namibian art. Next door is the National Theatre of Namibia, and opposite the Namibia Scientific Society, where a wide selection of authoritative publications on the country published by the Society can be purchased. Up the hill on Robert Mugabe (on the right) is the former State House, a renovated version of the original house occupied by the former South West African administrators and now the official residence of Namibia’s prime minister. At the top is the Christuskirche or Evangelical Lutheran Church, one of the city’s most striking landmarks, built from local sandstone and completed in 1910. Its design was influenced by Romanesque, neo-Gothic and Art Nouveau styles, and its stained-glass windows were donated by Kaiser Wilhelm II. To the east of the church is the famous Tintenpalast, meaning Ink Palace. This


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| WINDHOEK AND SURROUNDINGS | is Namibia’s original Government Building, completed in 1914 in time for the first session of the Landesrat. Since then it has housed a series of successive administrations and governments. After independence it was renovated to accommodate the current Namibian Parliament. In front of the Tintenpalast is the Parliament Gardens, a great place for relaxing with a book under age-old trees. When you’re done in the garden, walk back to the Independence Museum from where you started.

NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND LIBRARY The National Archives and the National Library of Namibia share a modern archival building with spacious reading rooms at 1 Eugene Marais Street, near the well-known Kenya House. Both institutions are open to the general public. The National Archives of Namibia hold the memory of the nation, with about 7 km of shelving filled with government records dating back to the beginning of German colonisation

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Hosea Kutako International Airport is a 30-minute drive east of the capital • The Alte Feste Fort, which now houses museum exhibits • The Heroes’ Acre is an official war memorial • The Tintinpalast and Parliament Gardens • The old Windhoek railway station

in 1884. Computerised registers make it easy to search for people, places and subjects. Apart from government records, a variety of private papers are preserved in the collection, some of them dating back to the pre-colonial times of the mid-19th century, as well as some 15 000 indexed photographs, 6 000 maps and plans and posters, and a film, video and oral history collection. Of particular interest are the correspondence books of the famous Namibian leader, Captain Hendrik Witbooi (1835–1905), a treasure whose international importance is recognised by an inscription on the Unesco Memory of the World register – one of very few African items on that list. The National Library of Namibia keeps the largest collection of Namibiana, that is publications from and about Namibia, in existence. This includes the very first travel report of Namibia by the Frenchman Le Vaillant, published

in 1790; an almost complete collection of all Namibian newspapers since the first one appeared in 1896; and books on Namibia published in 50 languages and in 80 countries. Namibian-published and archival heritage is also preserved by two private scientific societies. The Namibia Scientific Society in Windhoek, which publishes a scholarly journal, maintains a reference library on Robert Mugabe Avenue opposite the National Theatre. The Society of Scientific Development in Swakopmund maintains not only the well-visited Swakopmund Museum, but also the Sam Cohen Library and Otavi Railway Station. Both libraries are open for research and include archival material, photographs and maps.

BOTANICAL GARDEN The National Botanical Garden of Namibia (NBGN) in the heart of Windhoek is undoubtedly one of the capital’s gems. Situated on the slopes of a hill that forms a natural divide between the city centre and the suburb of Klein Windhoek, it was proclaimed a conservation area in 1969. In 1990 the National Botanical Research Institute (NBRI) moved to the site above the garden. Since then, the Botanical Garden has become a versatile paradise of greenery and flowers, providing sanctuary to many small creatures and birds. Wandering along the paths you can learn about plants from Namibia’s other regions, identifying them by their nametags, and rest on a bench while enjoying the peace and watching the visitors to the birdbaths. The entrance to the grounds is at the NBRI, 8 Orban Street. The garden is open on weekdays during office hours (8:00 to 17:00). A tour is conducted on the first Saturday of each month by a member of the Botanical Society of Namibia, Tel (+264 61) 202 2014. The tour starts at 8:00.

SPORT AND RECREATION With over fifty types of sport being practised in Namibia, Windhoek has plenty to offer sports enthusiasts. Spectator sports are soccer, rugby, cricket and netball, while popular games are tennis, squash, bowls and golf. Mountain biking has become a sought-after sport, and triathlons, motocross, motorbike racing and athletics take place on a regular basis.

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For keeping fit, there are gymnasiums, aerobic classes and dance studios at various venues in the city, while the mountains surrounding Windhoek are excellent for hiking and mountain biking. Indoor recreation includes snooker and billiards. The Windhoek Country Club Resort on the outskirts of Windhoek has an outstanding golf course.

DAY TRIPS FROM WINDHOEK There are several recreation resorts and guest farms close enough to Windhoek in the Central Region for day and weekend excursions. These include the Daan Viljoen Game Park, the Gross-Barmen Hot Springs Resort about 100 km north-west of the capital, the Von Bach Recreation Resort 65 km off the B1 to the north (a popular venue for aquatic sports and freshwater angling enthusiasts), and the Hardap Recreation Resort, 250 km south of Windhoek.

Von Bach Recreation Resort Accessible from the B1 from Windhoek to the north, sign-posted about 3.5 km south of Okahandja, the Von Bach Dam and Game Park extends over an area of 43 km2. The facility, proclaimed in 1972, has become a popular venue for aquatic sports such as water-skiing, yachting, windsurfing and boating. The dam is popular among freshwater angling enthusiasts, as it has been stocked with large-mouth bass, blue kurper and small-mouth yellow-fish. Carp and barbel also occur here. Visitors can explore the surrounding nature reserve on foot. While gameviewing opportunities are limited, kudu, baboon, Hartmann’s mountain zebra, gemsbok and red hartebeest are seen here. Facilities at the dam, which are on a 50-year lease by Tungeni Investments and have recently been completely revamped, include 22 en-suite bungalows, 12 campsites, picnic sites for day visitors, and the Daw Restaurant that overlooks the dam. Activities include taking a ferry ride on the dam, cruising in a canoe, and fishing.

Gross-Barmen Hot Springs Resort About 100 km north west of Windhoek off the B1, the Gross-Barmen Hot Springs Resort is another popular

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day and weekend destination. The main feature of this facility is the large dome-shaped and glassenclosed thermal hall, which houses a communal bath of steaming spring water (65˚C). Under management of Namibia Wildlife Resorts (NWR), the resort was closed in November 2010 for renovations. Now that it has been completed, it caters for health and beauty enthusiasts as well as for fitness, leisure and adventure fans.

Hardap Game Reserve Built in the 1960s with a capacity of 320 million cubic metres and a surface area of 25 km2, Hardap is Namibia’s largest dam. The 252 km2 game reserve and recreation resort were proclaimed in 1968. Accessible from the B1, Hardap lies 250 kilometres south of Windhoek, and 45 kilometres west of Mariental. After more than 5 years the Hardap resort, situated at Hardap Dam outside Mariental, reopened its doors to the public in 2016. The resort had been closed for some much needed repairs and upgrades. The revamped establishment, along with swimming pool, restaurant, 5 VIP bungalows, 15 family chalets and 30 bush chalets, is now ready for guests. A national club championship and two international angling championships are arranged at Hardap every year. Namibia, South African and Zimbabwean anglers come take part in the competitions.

TOWNS CLOSE TO WINDHOEK Okahandja Directly north of Windhoek lies Okahandja, a town of great significance to the Herero people because it was once the seat of the famous Chief Samuel Maharero. Every year on 26 August – with the exception of 2011 when it was held in Gobabis, and referred to as Heroes’ Day – thousands of Hereros converge on the town to pay homage at the graves of their great chiefs. Some of the women are dressed in traditional red and black, others in green and black, while the men wear full military regalia, complete with medals. Visitors are welcome to view this rich and colourful ceremony. According to historian Dr H Vedder, the name Okahandja comes from Herero and means ‘small widening’, the place where the rivers meet. The earliest records of the town date back to 1844 when the first two missionaries

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arrived there. The year 1894, however, is regarded as the birth of the town, as Okahandja became a military- base in this year and a fort was built. On 26 August 1923, Chief Samuel Maherero was laid to rest in Okahandja at a funeral attended by approximately 2 000 people. Since then this day has been celebrated annually at Okahandja by the Herero people. The town is an important centre for woodcarvers from the north. They practise their ancient skills at the woodand-thatch Mbangura Woodcarvers Market next to the main road, both at the entrance and at the exit of the town. Also at the main entrance to the town, right next to the service station, is a biltong, coffee and gift shop that makes for a good pit stop. Okahandja is also a good place to buy biltong, at CLOSWA and Piet’s Biltong.

Gobabis The largest town east of Windhoek is Gobabis, an important cattle-ranching centre. A monument of a bull welcomes visitors at the entrance to the town. Gobabis is the gateway to the TransKalahari Highway, linking Namibia to Botswana and South Africa. The completion of this highway resulted in the development of several new tourist lodges in the surroundings. Gobabis developed around a mission station established in 1856 by Friederich Eggert of the Rhenish Missionary Society. In the latter half of the 1800s and the early 1900s, several- conflicts flared up between the Mbanderu and Khauas Khoekhoe, as well as between the settlers and the indigenous people. The Gobabis district was proclaimed by the German authorities in February 1894, and in June the following year, Gobabis was occupied by a German garrison. While the military fort, built in 1896/7, has long since disappeared, one of the few buildings dating back to that era is the field hospital, or Lazarette, which has been declared a national monument. Of special interest is the Gobabis Museum, recently rehoused by the Museum Association of Namibia in the old library building with a grant of N$20 000 from the Federal Republic of Germany. The new museum was established with the support of Eberhard and Elfriede Einbeck, the couple who ran a private museum in Gobabis for many years. The Uakii Wilderness & Gobabis Info and Coffee Shop in Gobabis is the

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT The beautiful mountainous landscapes that surround the capital • You can have a true safari experience just a stone’s throw from the capital at Oanob Dam • Wooden carvings are popular take-home souvenirs and can be bought at various outlets and open-air markets • Hardap Dam, home to the newly renovated Hardap Resort, is both a recreation resort and game reserve

only tourism information office in the Omaheke Region. It offers services such as bookings, tour facilitator services, a coffee shop, Internet facilities, camping and ‘information with a warm smile’. In 2011 the former Horizons Hotel was revamped and renamed the Kalahari Convention Centre, becoming the first black-owned hotel in the Omaheke Region. Another first for the region and the country, was the construction of the first house made up of tightly packed sandbags, instead of bricks, held together by a timber framework. This innovative and eco-friendly concept was used when building the kitchen for the Omuhaturua Primary School hostel and is part of an overall scheme by the Catherine Bullen Foundation to develop a canteen, kitchen and outdoor recreation area at the primary school. Approximately 100 kilometres north-east of Gobabis, the Harnas Wildlife Foundation and Guest Farm is one of the few wildlife orphanages and welfare centres in Southern Africa. The foundation focuses on the rehabilitation of neglected, abused and abandoned wild animals, while the guest farm provides a variety of accommodation. South-east of Windhoek is the historical town of Dordabis, where cattle farmer and local businessman Michael Krafft of Farm Ibenstein has taken on the massive task of renovating the historical buildings of Dordabis. The Krafft family has lived in the Dordabis environs for many years. Michael is the grandson of August Stauch, the diamond pioneer of Kolmanskop, who developed Dordabis as a trade centre in the 1920s. Michael has restored the old stone house – one-time residence of August Stauch and his wife Ida – to its former glory and uses it to accommodate hunters. He has also restored several other historical buildings, such as the dairy and


NAMIBIA WILDLIFE RESORTS

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LAKE OANOB RESORT

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| WINDHOEK AND SURROUNDINGS | abattoirs built in the 1920s. Four kilometres from Dordabis, producers of karakul carpets can be visited at Ibenstein Teppiche. Also in this area is the farm Peperkorrel, where the well-known Dorka carpets are made. Peperkorrel also houses a sculpture studio, with works by local artist Dörte Berner.

Leonardville, Aranos, Stampriet, Gochas Situated south of Gobabis, Leonardville is a small town that used to be the main settlement of the Kai|khauan sub-tribe of the Orlam Nama until their military defeats against the Shutztruppe in

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT The Khomas Hochland Hiking Trail north-west of the capital • A lot of the areas surrounding the capital is utilised as farmland • Beware of wildlife crossing the road when travelling by car • Stop to take a picture at the Tropic of Capricorn • The central east is Namibia’s cattle farming mecca

1894 and 1896. Further south, in the vicinity of Mariental, the C20 heads east into the Kalahari Desert towards the small cattle town of Aranos, where the popular Aranos Hotel was recently comprehensively renovated. En route it passes Stampriet, a small settlement where, sustained by artesian water flowing in from the Kalahari, fruit and vegetables are cultivated. At Stampriet, the C15 heads south along the Auob River towards Gochas. Along this route lie a number of battle sites and memorials dating back to the 1904–1907 war of resistance against the Germans.

Rehoboth Some 88 km south of Windhoek, amongst a relatively dense acacia woodland of camel-thorn, sweet-thorn and candle-pod acacia, is the historical town of Rehoboth. It is inhabited by the Baster community, descendants of people of mixed parentage who trekked across the Orange River under their leader Hermanus van Wyk and settled at Rehoboth in 1870. The history of the Rehoboth Basters is recorded in the Rehoboth Museum, established by Namibian anthropologist and archaeologist, Dr Beatrice Sandelowsky. Displays detail the cultural heritage of the Basters and archaeological finds in the area, such as an open-air burial site. Representing

a vital component in the preservation of Rehoboth’s past, displays of mineral and volcanic rocks give an insight into the geological formations on the African continent in general and in Namibia in particular, while fossil remains provide a glimpse into the development of man on the continent. Augmented by the many historical items representing the lives and stories of this interesting people, the reference library contains further reading on the national heritage of the Rehoboth Volk. In earlier times a camel-thorn tree referred to as Kaptein’s Tree was the venue for the meetings of the Kapteinsraad, an equivalent of Chief’s Council. Just west of Rehoboth is Oanob Dam, which supplies Rehoboth with water. Overlooking the dam are picnic places with barbecue facilities, a restaurant, bungalows and a number of walking trails. Oanob is a favoured venue for day and weekend outings, for locals as well as bird-watchers and water-sports enthusiasts. An area of some 8 400 ha referred to as the Acacia Forest and well-known for its large camel-thorn trees (some estimated to be 2 000 years old) lies within the municipal boundaries of Rehoboth. The possibility of proclaiming the area as a community park is being considered.

Mariental Situated 178 km south of Rehoboth off the B1, Mariental is a small, quietly flourishing market town. The nearby Hardap Dam is the largest reservoir in Namibia and provides water for irrigation, enabling the cultivation of animal fodder, as well as some fruits and vegetables. A local ostrich abattoir caters for this increasingly important industry, and what survives of the karakul trade in the south is centred around Mariental. Sitting astride the main route into the Kalahari and Namib deserts, Mariental also services the needs of farmers in these areas. Mariental is home to a large number of Namaspeaking people, descendants of the early Khoi inhabitants of Namibia.

KHOMAS HOCHLAND When travelling in a circular route in the Gamsberg surroundings, the scenery is spectacular, especially along the Gamsberg, Spreetshoogte and Remhoogte passes. Dominating the landscape 120 km south-west of Windhoek and

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characterised by its conspicuous cap of weather-resistant quartzite sandstone is the Gamsberg, a large table-topped mountain that rises some 500 metres above the surrounding Khomas Hochland. At a height of 2 347 metres, it is Namibia’s fourth-highest mountain. The plateau is regarded as an outstanding site for astronomical observations, as the night sky is unusually clear and the absence of towns and the resultant darkness of the surroundings makes it an ideal location from which to study the stars of the southern hemisphere. Many of the farms in the environs are involved in tourism, and can be visited to have a meal, spend a night or two, or simply relax over coffee and cake. Hakos Guest Farm is situated above Gamsberg Pass on the C26, 135 km from Windhoek and 240 km each from Walvis Bay and Sesriem. Nestled against the Hakos Mountains, Hakos Guest Farm offers incomparable views. An observatory, run by the IAS (International Amateur Observatory Society) to keep Gamsberg accessible for astronomy, is situated on the farm and guided stargazing sessions form part of the Hakos experience.

The Windhoek Green Belt Landscape The Windhoek Green Belt Landscape is one of five Protected Landscape Conservation Areas launched in 2011, each including a state protected area at its core. With the other PLCAs – around Waterberg Plateau Park (18 763 km2), Sossusvlei (5 730 km2), Fish River Canyon (7 621 km2) and Mudumu (2 047 km2) in north-eastern Namibia – almost sixteen thousand square kilometres are under protected management. These are demonstration sites, but the longterm vision of the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism is to expand such areas into a large-scale network in order to address the loss of habitat and other threats to species, to conserve biodiversity, ecosystems and to establish corridors to sustain viable wildlife populations. Close to Windhoek the PLCA covers 760 km2 in the Khomas Hochland plateau west of the capital. The area includes several state and freehold farms used for cattle, game farming, hunting and tourism, and has the Daan Viljoen Game Park at its core. For more information on the project, for lists of bird, plant, trees and animal species as well as information on tourism projects visit www.landscapesnamibia.org.

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HENTIE BURGER

EAT IN WINDHOEK

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| WINDHOEK AND SURROUNDINGS |

Windhoek offers an eclectic variety of restaurants, cafés, coffee bars, bistros and delicatessen that cater for most tastes, including those of adventurous gourmets interested in savouring local specialities, light eaters looking for a simple lunch or quick snack, and vegetarians. Gourmet and fine dining: • • • • • • • • • • •

The Gourmet The Olive Exclusive The Taste Academy La Bonne Table NICE, Namibian Institute for Culinary Education Wine Bar The Stellenbosch Wine Bar & Bistro The Stellenbosch Tasting Room Bolster The Weinberg Craft restaurant Jojo’s Music and Arts Cafe

Italian: • •

Sicilia Restaurant Sardinia Blue Olive

O’ Portuga Kubata Restaurant O’ Pensador Paguel

Garnish Restaurant

Thai: •

Thai Cafe

Chinese: • •

Chez Wou Yang Tze Chinese Restaurant

Hotel Restaurants: • • • • • • •

On the Edge at Hotel Thule Leo’s at the Castle at the Heinitzburg Dunes Restaurant Ekipa Restaurant at the Hilton Kokerboom Restaurant at the Windhoek Country Club Roof of Africa Welwitschia Restaurant at Safari Court Hotel

Traditional African: • • •

La Marmite Garlic & Flowers Epata

• • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

Indian:

Xwama Cultural Village Otjikaendu Den Fusion Papeta

À la carte restaurants and bars:

• •

Portuguese: • • • •

• • • •

Bush Bar Gruesome Twosome Bistro Boiler Room @ The Warehouse Theatre Andy’s Pastelaria Lua de Mel Eagle’s Pub and Restaurant Cordon Bleu Restaurant The Ivy Grill House 4 Seasons Restaurant Berty’s Landing Bauern Stube Family Restaurant Arebbusch Restaurant Zenso Lounge Bar & Restaurant Primi Piatti Newscafé The Social La Brocanté Wimpy Embaixador Restaurant Klein Windhoek Guesthouse Centrum Lounge Piccolo Café and Lounge The Aloe Restaurant

Steakhouses: • • • • • • • •

Joe’s Beerhouse Mountain Eagle Spur Grand Canyon Spur Santa Fé Spur Dros Peppercorn Grill & Steakhouse Texas Steak Ranch Zum Grünen Kranz Steakhouse

Sushi and Seafood: • • • • •

Sushi Bar at NICE Haiku Sushi & Wine Bar Daisho Sushi Bar Fishmonger’s Ocean Basket

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Pizza: • • • • • • • •

St Elmo’s Scooters Panarottis Debonaires Bodega Pizzeria Jokers The Little Italian Pizzeria Col’Cacchio

Coffee Shops and Bistros: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The Stellenbosch Market The Joy of Food Flaunt Daytime Bistro Rucola Café & Bistro Bean there Slowtown Coffee Roasters Out to Lunch Wilde Eend Bistro Fresh ‘n Wild at Utopia Lemon Tree Restaurant The Tea Pot Craft Café Old Continental Café Eros Coffee Shop Mugg & Bean, Maerua and The Grove Wecke &Voigts Kaffee Bar Square Café Hartlief’s Shop & Rooftop Bistro Café Schneider Ins Wiener Tornado Food & Drinks Sonja’s Kaffeestube Trixi’s Coffee Shop Food Lover’s Market Caffé Brazza Dulcé Café MoJoe’s Coffee Lounge Vintage Coffee Shop & Restaurant Street Cuisine Yaeli’s Bistro Jonnos Bistro Brewed Awakenings Happy Me Vida e Café Kauai JoJo’s Music and Arts Café Krisjan’s Bistro

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Heroes’ Acre on the southern edge of Windhoek

HERITAGE SITES The capital of Windhoek has many historical sites that are well worth a visit, so take a day or two to learn more about the city’s diverse legacy. Here are a few tips to enthuse you about exploring heritage sites in Windhoek.

9 ROBERT MUGABE AVENUE

10 24

12

26 15

INDEPENDENCE AVENUE

13

6

14

5

1

19 20

16 17

7

FIDEL CASTRO STREET

8

11

18

22

27

21

SAM NUJOMA AVENUE

23

ROBERT MUGABE AVENUE

25

2 28 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE

3

4

* This is just an approximate indication of where these establishments are situated

Heroes’ Acre The Old Windhoek Cemetery

12

2 3

The Old Location Cemetery

14

Roman Catholic Cathedral Gibeon Meteorites

4

The Oudstryders Memorial

15

The Zoo Park relics of prehistoric

5

Elisabeth House

6

The Windhoek Railway Station

7 8

1

9 10 11

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13

The bronze kudu statue

21

The Office of the Ombudsman

22

The Supreme Court

23

Old German School Building

24

Old Prison Building

elephants

25

The Ten-man House

15

The War Memorial

26

The Erkrath-Gathemann-Kronprinz

The Turnhalle Building

16

Christuskirche

The National Archives of Namibia

17

The Independence Museum

18

The Emma Hoogenhout Building

19

The Equestrian Statue

St George’s Cathedral The Former State House Tintenpalast

20

Alte Feste

facades 27

The Heinitzburg, Sanderburg and Schwerinsburg castles

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The Cross of Sacrifice


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ART AND CULTURE HOTSPOTS Windhoek has an active and lively community of art and crafts people, and a diaspora of cultural enhancers. Whether you’re looking for live music, unique artworks, or a taste of local culture, you’ll find it all within the boundaries of the city.

Theatres in Windhoek present plays, cultural evenings, comedy performances and live music, local and from further abroad. • Warehouse Theatre • National Theatre of Namibia

• Namibia Scientific Society

• Ster Kinekor in Maerua Mall and

• National Archives of Namibia

• The Grove Mall of Namibia

• Windhoek Public Library • National Museum of Namibia • Alte Feste Museum

• FNCC

• Owela Museum.

• Goethe Centre

• TransNamib Railway Museum

• College of the Arts • Performing Arts Department of

• Geological Survey Museum

the University of Namibia (UNAM) Galleries where exhibitions are held regularly and art can be viewed and purchased:

• Museum Association of Namibia • Windhoek City Museum Cinemas and Film Houses: • AfricAvenir. Its website lists the

• National Art Gallery of Namibia

catalogue of the Namibia Movie

• Katutura Community Art Centre

Collection.

Windhoek has numerous bars and nightspots where music is played until all hours of the morning. The annual Bank Windhoek Arts Festival promotes Namibian amateur and professional productions and art exhibitions, while the annual /Ae//Gams Arts and Cultural Festival showcases the best of local arts and culture, usually at the end of March. The Windhoek Carnival is held in April and showcases traditional German culture.

• Franco-Namibian Cultural Centre • FNCC Gallery • House of Art • Omba Gallery • Pure & Simple Gallery Shop • Namibia Craft Centre Museums, libraries and historical centres: • National Library of Namibia

CULTURE IN KATUTURA

Katutura, the sprawling suburb on Windhoek’s northern outskirts some 10 km from the CBD, is a diverse, lively and historical place to visit. It was established in the 1950s as part of South Africa’s Apartheid policy of divide-and-rule. Several operators give visitors the opportunity to learn about the history, development and people of Katutura. Most tours stop at places of interest such as the Old Cemetery, the Single Quarters where contract workers used to live, the open-air markets, Bicycle Empowerment Network Project, shebeens, and the Penduka Development Project, which provides an opportunity for women in rural areas to improve their lives through self-development.

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THE N/A’AN KU SÊ FOUNDATION Meet Marlice van Vuuren, the girl who was born to love the Namibian bush and dedicate her life to the conservation of the magnificent animals and people who make this “Land God made in Anger” the unique country that it is. Marlice grew up surrounded by the orphaned and injured animals on her parents’ farm where, for more than 30 years, all creatures in need of desperate care have found a haven and the loving touch they so desperately need. Together with Rudie van Vuuren and invaluable friends, she founded the N/a’an ku sê Lodge and Wildlife Sanctuary in 2006, Namibia’s only charity lodge - a place where the conservation of wildlife, landscapes and cultures are closely interlinked. The N/a’an ku sê Sanctuary is a paradise nestled deep in the bush, where orphaned animals are raised with dedication, their natural needs being carefully considered, tending away from the feeling of “captivity” – instead creating an environment where their instinctive behaviours are nurtured and encouraged. Only those carnivores too ill, abused or habituated remain at the sanctuary that is N/a’an ku sê. This is done purely for their safety and survival chances. The release of the powerful cats, both

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cheetahs and leopards, forms a top priority at N/a’an ku sê – “returning wildlife to the wild” being the mantra that forms the backbone of our projects. www.naankuse.com N/a’an ku sês’ on-site research team constantly accumulates vital data in the continued effort to reduce human-wildlife conflict. N/a’an ku sê passionately believes that landowners and large carnivores can co-exist in Namibia. Natural release sites are becoming fewer and fewer, with farmland taking over much of this arid country. Free-roaming cheetahs and leopards form an integral part of this intensive research, with these wild cats being trapped, collared, released and tracked – giving us the chance to share their behaviour and movements with concerned landowners. The program is hugely successful and gaining popularity with landowners all across Namibia. N/a’an ku sês’ story and all of Namibia’s conservation efforts are being screened on national television - a long awaited moment. Conservation and sustainability efforts within our beautiful yet fragile environment are being voiced and addressed publicly. The aim? To spread awareness and inspire the younger generations to fill those vital gaps in the world of conservation.

... so much more than just a sanctuary. N/a’an ku sê embodies passion, vision and innovation; makes dreams come true, saves lives and adds value to the same, whether it be humans or animals. After enjoying immense popularity and achieving phenomenal ratings in our neighbouring country, South Africa, with the television series “Groen Namibia”, the creators of this innovative series, Rudie and Marlice van Vuuren, brought the successful TV franchise to our very own shores, showcasing Namibia’s incredible conservation efforts on NBC1. This Namibian Breweries sponsored series, Wild Jobs Namibia, stars Rudie and Marlice, and sees them meeting those passionate and dedicated individuals who are steeped in the world of Namibian conservation. A personal touch, emphasizing the beauty, ingenuity and sheer perseverance of Namibia’s conservation heroes, has made “Wild Jobs Namibia” a viewing gem. Desert Rain Films, closely linked to the N/a’an ku sê Foundation and exceedingly proud to be in a position to support the vital conservation efforts that this foundation embodies, embraced the chance to facilitate the fascinating, sometimes arduous, yet wholly gratifying filming experience.


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Utopia Boutique Hotel Tel (+264 61) 21 1299, Cell (+264 85) 588 7704 Reservations: reservations@utopiaboutique.com Email: reservations@utopiaboutique.com, Web: www.utopiaboutique.com Located in the heart of the Capital Windhoek in: Corner of 66 Nelson Mandela Avenue and Barella Street, Klein Windhoek, Windhoek, Namibia

This N/a’an ku sê owned business-meets-leisure Boutique is unique to the otherwise standardised accommodation offered in the heart of Windhoek. The modern, up-market Utopia Boutique Establishment now offers serene rooms and luxurious suites situated amidst beautiful, green lush gardens. It is also conveniently situated in the most tranquil suburb, Klein Windhoek. Utopia combines business and leisure in a modest, unseen manner, simultaneously welcoming all modern travellers and tourists in need of relaxation. Boasting 12 standard rooms, 1 luxury self-catering unit and 6 luxurious suites, the Utopia Boutique Hotel creates a perfect hideaway making you feel at home away from home. 19

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N/a’an ku sê Lodge and Wildlife Sanctuary PO Box 99292, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 30 7338, Cell (+264 81) 859 4608, Fax (+264 61) 30 7337 Email: lodge@naankuse.com, Web: www.naankuselodge.com Directions: Just 45km outside Windhoek in an easterly direction (towards the international Airport) on the MR53. GPS Coordinates: South: -22° 21’ 51.82” East: 17° 22’ 44.80”

On a 3,200-ha reserve near the Hosea Kutako International Airport and central Windhoek we offer Carnivore Feeding Tours, Bushman stories, stargazing dinners, cheetah experiences and the ‘Behind the Scenes’ tour. You have a choice of staying in one of our six individual chalets or family villas. We offer a dining area where we serve award-winning cuisine, stunning views, a bar and a swimming pool ­– in short, a delightful blend of rich ethnicity and modern luxury. The N/a’an ku sê Lodge is the only Charity Lodge in Namibia, with all the profits going back to our charitable projects. 6

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Auas Safari Lodge PO Box 91045, Windhoek Reservations Tel (+264 61) 22 8104 Lodge Direct Tel (+264 61) 24 0043 Email: auassafarilodge@journeysnamibia.com Web: www.auas-safarilodge.com

Located in African savannah embraced by the Auas Mountains, Auas Safari Lodge celebrates landscape and animals. A 45-minute drive from Hosea Kutako International Airport, the lodge provides an ideal place to start and end your Namibian visit. Guided walks and game drives are a highlight, with giraffe, waterbuck, kudu, wildebeest and ostrich frequenting the sprawling savannah. Fourteen bungalows provide a comfortable retreat, while the thatched lapa and turquoise swimming pool are favourite places to relax. Dinner is served indoors or on the patio under a starlit sky. Friendly staff, magnificent scenery and intriguing wildlife merge to impart the sweet taste of Africa. 14

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Gross-Barmen Resort P/Bag 13378, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

Gross-Barmen has always been a popular destination for people living in Windhoek, Okahandja and the surrounding areas. Over the past three years the resort has undergone major renovations and upgrading aimed at putting it on par with all the other Namibia Wildlife Resorts (NWR) establishments around the country. The resort now offers state-of-the art spa and wellness facilities, a conference centre and upgraded bungalows and restaurant, and improved indoor and outdoor swimming pools. For those looking for a home away from home for weekends and holidays, Gross-Barmen is the place to go. 43

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The Olive Exclusive 22 Promenaden Road, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 38 3890, Fax (+264 61) 23 4971 Email: info@theolive-namibia.com Web: www.theolive-namibia.com, www.bigsky-namibia.com

The Olive Exclusive – the first ultra-luxurious sanctuary of its kind in the Namibian capital – is cool, contemporary and stylish, but beats with a warm heart and authentic African soul. Its sleek, modern lines are complemented by organic textures, natural furnishings, an eco-friendly approach and dedicated personal service. The seven suites are individually decorated so that each reflects a different region in Namibia. Each has its own lounge area with fireplace and dining room, enabling private dining. Wide glass doors open onto spacious decks where you can relax on a shady day bed, enjoy al fresco lunches or, if yours is a premium suite, take a dip in your own private plunge pool. Elegant, inspired, never formal. 7

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Midgard Country Estate Central Reservations Tel (+264 61) 431 8002 Email: midgard.res@ol.na, Web: www.ol-leisure.com

Midgard Country Estate is an ideal family hide-away, a first or last stop for international visitors, the perfect venue for intimate meetings, team-building events or weddings. Acquired in 1937, Carl Werner List originally farmed the 12.000 hectare estate, developing this private and intimate world into a household name in Namibia. Midgard Country Estate was born. Today we invite our guests to enjoy the tranquillity, while marveling at the pioneering German Settler spirit which gave birth to it all. “Midgard”, a word found in Old Norse, Middle English and High German languages, has varying meanings, but is popularly thought to mean “A paradise where the earth rises again, fertile and green, creating a protected world and a safe empire for the people”. 46

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Belvedere Boutique Hotel 76 & 78 Dr Kwame Nkrumah Road, Ludwigsdorf, Windhoek Tel/Fax (+264 61) 25 8867 Cell (+264 81) 127 2037 Email: belvedere@afol.com.na, Web: www.belvedere-boutiquehotel.com

A home away from home – only better! Conveniently situated in Ludwigsdorf, the Belvedere Boutique Hotel is an exclusive, up-market sanctuary for modern-day business travellers and tourists alike. Hosted by Herman Davin, you will be accommodated in 18 individualised rooms, with a luxurious living area, sparkling pool, stylish lounge with flat-screen television, a music centre, wooden deck, big swimming pool and splash pool, floodlit tennis court, artificial putting green. An honesty bar. We can assist with bookings at various top-class restaurants in town. We provide the perfect balance between tranquillity and professionalism. 18

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Kalahari Red Dunes Lodge PO Box 113, Kalkrand Bookings: Tel +264 (0) 61 24 0020, Email: reservations@redduneslodge.com Tel (+264 63) 26 4003, Fax (+264 63) 26 4029 Email: info@redduneslodge.com Web: www.redduneslodge.com, www.ondili.com

Kalahari Red Dunes Lodge is a veritable Luxury of Solitude that offers its visitors abundant space and privacy. The main house consisting of a reception area, lobby, restaurant, bar, pool and shaded deck is situated in a dry vlei (pan). A 120-metre-long boardwalk connects the main building with the chalets. These are nestled around the vlei, which is often frequented by game. Each chalet has a tented and stone-and-thatch roofed section, as well as a private terrace. During the nature/game drives and nature walks, visitors are given the opportunity to experience the breathtaking beauty of the Kalahari with its up to 30-metre-high red dunes and huge variety of game. 12

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Teufelskrallen Tented Lodge PO Box 113, Kalkrand Bookings: +264 (0) 61 24 0020 Tel: +264 (0) 63 264003 E-Mail: reservations@teufelskrallenlodge.com Web: www.teufelskrallenlodge.com, www.ondili.com

Situated on the first Kalahari dune from the western side, Teufelskrallen Tented Lodge offers visitors a panoramic vista across the endless plains and stretches of typical Kalahari dunes. The comfortable, fully furnished tents all have a large viewing deck and an own private bathroom. A short boardwalk connects the tent with the bathroom. The ‘old’ farmhouse, located three kilometres away from the tents, hosts the reception area, restaurant and swimming pool. On nature walks and nature and game drives, guests will experience the breathtaking beauty of the Kalahari Desert with its sinuous, red dunes up to 30 metres high, and the wide variety of game. 6

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Ti Melen Schuckmann Street, Avis, Windhoek Bookings Tel: +264 (0) 61 24 0020 Tel: +264 (0) 81 1467233 E-Mail: timelen@iway.na www.timelen.com, www.ondili.com

Ti Melen, a quiet and peaceful haven surrounded by nature, offers the advantage of being only 5 minutes by car from the city centre of Windhoek. Situated on a small hill, it offers its visitors a beautiful view of the surrounding mountains. Here you can unwind or do some bird watching in the beautiful and tranquil garden, or cool down in a small pool with Jacuzzi. Internet (WiFi) access and the use of a pool table are complimentary. For the more active guest, the beautiful Avis Dam, only 5 minutes on foot from Ti Melen, offers ample opportunity for relaxed strolls or longer hikes. The international airport is only 40 km away. 4

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Eningu Clayhouse Lodge PO Box 11558, Windhoek Tel (+264 64) 46 4144, Fax (+264 64) 46 4155 e-mail: info@eningulodge.com Web: www.eningulodge.com

Space and tranquility – creativity, style and inspiration – archaeology and art – fine food and good company… This is Eningu, the Clayhouse Lodge in the Kalahari. Eningu is a window on the Kalahari Desert, providing a creative view from a place of style and beauty. It is a lodge imbued with warmth, handcraft and art, nestled in camel-thorn savannah where the last rocky outcrops of the central Namibian highlands dip their jagged edges into deep red sands, creating the gentle ripples that are the first dunes of the Kalahari. Eningu Clayhouse Lodge, situated on Farm Peperkorrel, offers nine private, individually styled guestrooms, a swimming pool with whirlpool, a rooftop sundeck, a lounge, indoor and outdoor dining areas, an archery range, a wine cellar, a souvenir shop and much more. Complete your stay with a visit to the Home of Sculptures by Dörte Berner, an internationally recognised sculptor. 6

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GocheGanas Nature Reserve & Wellness Village Tel (+264 61) 22 4909, Fax (+264 61) 22 4924 Email: reservations@gocheganas.com, Web: www.gocheganas.com

GocheGanas, a perfect BEGINNING and a superb ENDING to your Safari and Adventure in Namibia. A luxurious PRIVATE NATURE RESERVE and WELLNESS VILLAGE, nestled on a hilltop, surrounded by majestic mountains. Sweeping views onto the 6 000 hectare pristine wilderness - an awesome Namibian landscape from your private luxurious ACCOMMODATION - 16 totally private thatched chalets. Only 29km from the capital city of Windhoek and 76km from the international airport. The GocheGanas Wellness Village boasts a top of the range selection of wellness treatments, products and services with 11 specialist treatment rooms featuring state-of-the-art equipment. A large variety of special packages and wellness treatments are offered, ranging from outdoor massages to de-stress and detoxification packages as well as personal training and nutritional consultations. See full details hereunder. Other spa facilities include a crystal bath, hydrotherapy bath, a vichy shower, as well as an indoor swimming pool under a cathedral like masonry vault, an outdoor swimming pool on the Oasis Peninsula affording breathtaking views, a Granite Bath (cave sauna), Kneipp showers and also a fitness gym, fruit and juice bar. 32

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Düsternbrook Safari Guestfarm Tel (+264 61) 23 2572 Cell: (+264 81) 864 3000, Emergency Cell: (+264 81) 124 1662 Email: info@duesternbrook.net, Web: www.duesternbrook.net

Düsternbrook Safari Guest Farm (14 000 ha), with its renovated colonial buildings (1908) is situated 50km northwest of Windhoek and 90km from the international airport. We are en-route to Etosha National Park and Swakopmund. Düsternbrook is the first guest farm in Namibia. Its setting overlooks a dry river bed and unspoiled surrounding scenery. Activities in the afternoon: a cheetah and leopard drive and a game drive. In the morning: An early mountain drive and/or horse riding. Hiking: different short trails (1 to 6 hrs); Start and end of the new 90 km (6 days) Khomas Hochland Hiking Trail. Enjoy our big swimming pool in summer. Our private nature reserve offers 15 different species: oryx, kudu, giraffe, zebra, impala, klipspringer, warthog, eland, springbok, steenbok, wildebeest, hartebeest, ostrich, hippo, baboon etc. and a rich bird life. Accommodation: (31 beds) from basic to luxury, from DBB to self-catering, all in separate and individually furnished guest rooms or luxury tents. For nature lovers we offer remote chalets situated at water spots (3 and 5 km from the farmhouse). Camping: 12 sites of which 4 with 24/7 electricity. Day visitors are welcome. We participate in the Namibia Eco award. In 2015 we have been awarded 5 flowers (the highest degree). Criteria: conservation, water, waste and energy management, appropriate construction and landscaping, guiding, staff development, social responsibility and human welfare. The traditional guest farm is family run with a typical hearty Namibian hospitality. Come and enjoy this authentic farm as one of your possible highlights especially at the beginning or end of your stay in Namibia.

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Hotel Heinitzburg 22 Heinitzburg Street PO Box 458, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 24 9597, Fax (+264 61) 24 9598 Email: heinitzburg@heinitzburg.com Web: www.heinitzburg.com

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100 Years Heinitzburg 2014

This castle, built at the turn of the 20th century by Count von Schwerin for his fiancée Margarethe von Heinitz, offers accommodation in plush romantic elegance. Perched high above Windhoek, Leo’s Restaurant offers spectacular vistas of the city lights below, not to mention unrivalled African sunsets. Savour masterfully prepared game dishes and relish fine wines from Namibia’s largest private wine cellar. Family Raith is looking forward to welcome you at Hotel Heinitzburg! 16

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Casa Blanca Cor. Gous & Fritsche Street, Pionierspark, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 24 9623, Fax (+264 61) 24 9622 Email: Casablanca@afol.com.na

Welcome to Casa Blanca, an oasis of easy and carefree living! With its Spanish-style architecture and tranquil garden, this boutique hotel pension provides relaxed accommodation for business travellers and tourists alike. Our à la carte restaurant is open six days a week Sunday to Friday (for resident guests only). Its welcoming ambience and inside seating makes it a perfect place for travellers and locals alike. Come and relax at our private bar and outdoor lounge area with friends, family or business associates. The pension hotel provides complementary gym facilities and a swimming pool area. Come and enjoy our warm hospitality and personalised service. 16

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Okapuka Ranch PO Box 5955, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 25 7175, Fax (+264 61) 23 4690 e-mail: okapuka@iafrica.com.na Web: www.okapuka-ranch.com

Sometimes dreams do come true, and Okapuka Ranch is living proof of this. 29 rooms and a suite offer stunning views onto the bush and mountain landscape - as do the Park Restaurant, serving local game specialties, and the Hyena bar, where peacefully grazing antelope may be observed from close up. Activities include game viewing, mountain drives, hiking, sunset drives and others. With an award winning wine cellar, a secluded wooden mountain cabin, and a conference room, the ranch offers various venues to make your event private, unique and special. 30

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Hakos Guest Farm PO Box 5056, Windhoek Tel/Fax (+264 62) 57 2111, Cell (+264 81) 277 4535 Email: info@hakos-astrofarm.com, Web: www.hakos-astrofarm.com

• Guided introduction to the night sky – after dinner • Viewing the sun with a telescope by day • Astronomical Observatories/Telescopes for hire to amateurs • International Amateur Observatory (IAS) for members: www.ias-observatory.org • Day-light Observatory Tours: An informative tour of the different observatories, their instruments and their use • Gamsberg Tour: minimum six-hour 4x4 day tour to the Gamsberg-Plateau 2.347 m • Rhino viewing / Game drive 135km from Windhoek on C 26, 235km from Walvis Bay. 277 km from Sossusvlei. 14

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AVANI Windhoek Hotel & Casino PO Box 2254, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 280 0000 Fax (+264 61) 22 2260 Email: windhoek@avanihotels.com Web: www.avanihotels.com/windhoek

Escape the everyday and enter a world of luxury! Wrap yourself up in comfort in your sophisticated modern room, or flirt with Lady Luck a little on the Sands Casino floor; our state of the art conference rooms make business better than usual, while the Oasis Bar is there to help you wind down after a long day; enjoy the gourmet side of life at the Dunes Restaurant or dip a toe into the exotic at the Wellness Centre – simply stated, life has never been so good! Book your taste of the good life at the AVANI Windhoek Hotel and Casino today! 173

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River Crossing Lodge PO Box 97448, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 40 1494, Fax (+264 61) 24 3079 Email: reservations@rivercrossing.com.na, Web: www.rivercrossing.com.na

Just two kilometres outside Windhoek on a pristine game farm, River Crossing Lodge offers sumptuous accommodation in 20 private chalets. With high-pitched corrugated roofs, wide balconies and gorgeous pots of geraniums, the German architecture rediscovers nuances of a bygone era of farm life. Pamper yourself with beautiful views, exquisite cuisine produced with produce from our gardens, beauty treatments and massages to revitalise and sooth. We are environmentally friendly, offer unparalleled service and a selection of function venues, and train aspirant Namibians to make a cuttingedge contribution to lodge operations. In fact, there’s very little that’s not possible at River Crossing. 20

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Otjimbondona PO Box 11013, Windhoek, Namibia Cell (+264 81) 243 5478, Anita Slaney, (+264 81) 127 4358, Wilfried Slaney Email: welcome@otjimbondona.com Web: otjimbondona.com

Cradled amongst camel thorn trees with vistas of undulating Kalahari landscape, Otjimbondona offers those seeking tranquillity, exclusivity and luxury the ideal African holiday. Situated 120km south east of Windhoek and 80km from the Hosea Kutako International Airport on a 3000-hectare Private Nature Reserve on the fringes of the Namibia Kalahari basin, this boutique retreat is the perfect getaway to relax and unwind. The Manor House is the original homestead of the Slaney family, which was built in 1923 and now consists of a large lounge, dining area and infinity pool with deck boasting breathtaking views over the surrounding bush veld. The Manor House holds a historical charm, which invites intimacy, tranquility and the romance of a bygone era. Stay in one of the four luxurious Villas offering modern comforts, each decorated to depict a different theme and offering complete privacy to complement the romantic setting. This is a home from home experience where you can enjoy delicious al-fresco dining, ultimate flexibility whilst viewing giraffe, plains game and numerous bird species on nature walks, game drives or on a mountain bike. 159 21

Ombo Rest Camp PO Box 368, Okahandja Tel (+264 62) 50 2003 / (+264 81) 206 2791, Fax (+264 62) 50 3768 Email: omborestcamp@africaonline.com.na Web: www.ombo-rest-camp.com

Ombo Rest Camp offers you a peaceful retreat just outside of Okahandja. Our self-catering bungalows are fully equipped with airconditioners, kitchen and barbecue facilities, and each bungalow offers safe and secure parking. Guests are welcome to stay on a B&B basis, or enjoy dinner at our A-La-Carte Restaurant, which is open daily from 8h00 to 14h00 and serves dinner on request. Dishes include everything from ostrich and crocodile to traditional Namibian Omajovas, during the rainy season. Ombo Rest Camp’s campsites have power points, hot showers and their own barbecue areas and backpacker rooms adjacent to the campsites can also make use of these facilities. Daily Ostrich & Crocodile Tours can be enjoyed between 9h00-12h00 and 14h00-16h00, or you can choose to watch game at our waterhole from the comfort of your bungalow or the restaurant. We also offer a hiking trail and nature walk for birding enthusiasts. Day visitors welcome. 7

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Onjala PO Box 90938, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 25 9325 Cell (+264 81) 122 7171 Email: res@onjala.com, Web: www.onjala.com

Situated only 75 km north-east of Windhoek and 45 km from Hosea Kutako International Airport, this easily accessible and child-friendly lodge invites you to relax and enjoy the serenity of the surroundings in peace and tranquility. Stargazing with one of the worlds best Zeiss refractors, game drives, a wellness centre with an exquisite Bush-Spa and two swimming pools are just a few of the activities you can choose from. Uniquely designed rough natural stone en-suite double rooms and freestanding bungalows, tucked away in the bush, as well as luxurious and private Panorama Suites offer quality accommodation in a warm and creative African ambience. Transfers between the lodge, the airport and Windhoek can be arranged on request. 8

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Windhoek Country Club Resort PO Box 30777, Pioneerspark, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 205 5911 Fax (+264 61) 25 2797 Email: windhoek@legacyhotels.co.za Web: www.legacyhotels.co.za

The four-star Windhoek Country Club Resort & Casino is the final word in luxury and entertainment in Namibia. Exceptional service, luxury accommodation and a uniquely tranquil setting have ensured that this resort maintains its premier position in the Namibian tourism industry. Situated on the outskirts of Windhoek, it is a short drive from any business meeting or cultural shopping expedition. Bordering on a championship 18-hole golf course, the hotel is every golf enthusiast’s dream. The resort has much to offer in terms of relaxation and entertainment – from outdoor sports and games such as tennis and a central Water World and gambling at the Desert Jewel Casino, to a hair-dressing salon and variety of shops. The elegant poolside Kokerboom Restaurant offers a lavish array of international dishes. Alternatively, a light meal can be enjoyed on the restaurant terrace. 159

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Vondelhof Guesthouse Puccini Street 2, Windhoek PO Box 40730, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 24 8320, Fax (+264) (0)88 61 4352 Email: nht@vondelhof.com, Web: www.vondelhof.com

Vondelhof is a small and homely guesthouse, located in a quiet area and only a five minutes walk from city centre. The spacious and comfortable rooms are individually styled and decorated with an African touch. The different room types cater for both individual travellers, families and businesspeople. Although the emphasis is on elegant simplicity, all rooms have the modern amenities discerning travellers have come to expect. 8

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Lake Oanob Resort PO Box 3381, Rehoboth, Namibia Tel (+264 62) 52 2370, Fax (+264 62) 52 4112 Email: reservations@oanob.com.na Web: www.oanob.com.na

Situated on 6200 hectares in the beautiful Hardap Region and only 100 kilometres south of Windhoek, Lake Oanob Resort is a unique resort featuring spacious luxury chalets, cosy rooms and unique campsites. Open all-season, Lake Oanob Resort offers superb lake views, genuine, heart-felt hospitality and is the perfect place to relax and be invigorated. Some activities you can enjoy year-round include nature drives, hiking, boat rides, canoeing, aqua cycling, pool bar, swimming in our outdoor pools or in the lake. 10

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Hardap Resort P/Bag 13378, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

Situated about 260 km south of Windhoek, the Hardap Resort encompasses Namibia’s largest dam, Hardap, which is on the Fish River. In terms of accommodation options at the resort, there are VIP rooms, family and bush chalets, dormitory and camping sites. Other amenities and facilities include a swimming pool, conference facility, restaurant and shop. Hardap is well known as an angler’s paradise, with annual competitions held regularly for enthusiasts. But few know that the small Hardap Game Reserve is a haven for black rhino and that the dam and surroundings accommodate one of Namibia’s most strategic great-white-pelican breeding colonies and a thriving freshwater fish institute that is supporting the country’s growing aquaculture industry. 50

www.tala.com.na For fine art prints & image library contact: elmarievr2@icloud.com, Cell +264 (0)81 277 3334

Visit the new TALA stock image library at www.talanamibia.photoshelter.com

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KAVANGO & ZAMBEZI

• Top activities are fishing, game viewing and bird-watching • The regions are home to five of Namibia’s parks • Local artists and craftspeople abound • The area enjoys the highest rainfall in the country

PAUL VAN SCHALKWYK

• The north-east is rural Namibia at its best

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KAVANGO & ZAMBEZI The lure of the area is its wild and untamed quality, which gives visitors a peek into authentic African lifestyles. Perennial rivers and expansive floodplains, lush tropical vegetation, an abundance of game and birds, and scattered settlements provide a complete change of scenery from the rest of the Namibian landscape. The 500-kilometre tarred Trans-Caprivi Highway provides easy access to the region.

THE KAVANGO EAST AND KAVANGO WEST REGION The Okavango River and its broad floodplains make the Kavango East and Kavango West regions considerably greener than the rest of Namibia. The river forms a natural boundary between Namibia and Angola for more than 400 km and is the lifeline to the Kavango people, who make a living from fishing, tending cattle and cultivating sorghum, millet and maize.

Rundu The main town in the Kavango Region is Rundu, situated on the banks of the Okavango River. This is the home of Namibia’s well-known Kavango woodcarvers. Their ancient craft, handed down over generations, is a flourishing industry today. Wood carvings are made and offered for sale at the Mbungura Woodcraft Cooperative, which has its main workshop and office in the town. Another

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worthwhile stop is the Rundu Open Market, to taste some local delicatessen and experience the unique culture of the region. Here you’ll also find the Kavango Basket Project, providing a source of income for local women. A worthy tourist attraction is the Kavango Open Africa Route, extending from Katwitwi to Mohembo, and incorporating the Mahangu and Khaudum national parks in the south. The route, which runs parallel to the Okavango River, includes communal conservancies and community campsites, craft outlets, accommodation establishments and facilities providing essential tourism services. Rundu Airport is situated 5 km south-west of the town. Air Namibia offers flights from Windhoek to Rundu four times a week. Thirty kilometres east of Rundu is the Sambyu Museum, an art and crafts facility displaying woodcarvings and traditional crafts from the Kavango Region and southern Angola, and stone tools found locally.

Mangetti National Park Previously managed as a game camp for breeding rare and endangered species such as black and white rhino, the Mangetti conservation area was proclaimed as the Mangetti

ACTIVITIES AND ADVENTURES Take a sunset cruise on the Zambezi River Visit the Living Museum of the Mafwe and learn more about the local population Do some wildlife watching in one of the five surrounding parks Appreciate arts and crafts, next to the road, or at any of the craft outlets in the region Take to the river in a canoe trip with a qualified guide


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B8

D3403

Ncaute a Kh

Tamsu Mangetti

Tsintsabis

D3016

08 D29

3

D330 6

ko

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D2

874

Lianshulu Lodge Grootfontein 874 D2

5

Luhebu

Nkasa Lupala Tented Lodge

C44

6

AasvoĂŤlnes

Grootboom Tsumkwe(Giant Baobab Tree)

Quankwa Dobe

80

3

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D3301

D38

D3300

00 D2

3

80

36

D28

D2830

Rietfontein Axel Eriksson’s Grave

Otjituuo

Klein Dobe

Dorsland Trek Baobab

Chobe Water Villas

This is just an approximate indication of where these establishments are situated. C42

Nhoma Soncana Waterhole

303

Taranga Safari Lodge

D2

Otjihaenena

Bush Lodge

Nhoma

Xaudum

Nambwa Tented Lodge D3

84 8 D2

Fort Grootfontein 2a

Hoba eteorite

2c

a4

Nhom

3

D2844

Susuwe Island Lodge

Om

8 84 D2

M73

Caprivi Collection

Kano Vlei

2b

D3311

2

Maroelaboom

C44

Popa Falls Resort B8

Dussi Waterhole

Sikereti

Samagaigai

D330

C42

Maanlig

D2893

Abenab 1

D2848

D2845

D2858

21

D30

3022

D3016

D2898

D2855

D3039

Khaudum Game Park

Elands Drink Waterhole Karakuwisa

C83

meb

Mururani

Holboom

D2

D

3302

Djokwe D3303

D3016

D30 17

D3047

Giant Baobab Tree

D3312

Charles Hill

Khaudum Doringstraat Waterhole

D2868

e

udum

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National Park in 2008 to protect its wildlife and vegetation and provide tangible socioeconomic benefits to local communities through careful tourism development. Situated some 100 km south-west of Rundu in the Kavango Region, the park extends over some 420 km2 and is managed jointly by the Ukwangali Traditional Authority and the MET. Animals seen here include eland, blue wildebeest, African wild dog, leopard and hyaena. Additional species such as common impala, gemsbok, kudu, giraffe and Burchell’s zebra were translocated through the Enhancing Wildlife-based Economy in Rural Areas Project from the Etosha National Park and the private sector.

THE ZAMBEZI REGION Formerly referred to as the Caprivi, the Zambezi Region is a fertile wilderness of riverine forests, flood plains, swamps and open woodland created by a complex network of rivers and relatively high summer rainfall. For freshwater angling enthusiasts, canoeists and whiteriver rafters, Zambezi offers much excitement and challenge. Well over 400 of Namibia’s bird species occur in this part of the country, and the region is steadily gaining a reputation as a retreat for birdwatchers, nature lovers and specialist travellers. It is also of growing interest to scientists studying the wetlands system and its flora and fauna. Formerly known as Itenga, Zambezi was ruled by the Lozi kings until it became part of the British Protectorate of Bechuanaland, today’s Botswana. In 1890, at the Berlin Conference, Germany acquired the territory, named it after the German Chancellor General Count Georg Leo von Caprivi, and added it to German South West Africa. The capital of the then Caprivi was Schuckmannsburg (renamed as Luhonono in 2013) until about 1933, when it was moved to Katima Mulilo, a name that means ‘put out the fire’. Katima Mulilo has since become a busy tourist centre and gateway to Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe and the Chobe National Park in Botswana. Travelling from Ngoma on the B8, a 64-km stretch takes visitors along the Chobe River to Impalila Island, from where a high lookout point offers views of Namibia, Zambia, Botswana and Zimbabwe. The link for these attractions is the 500-kilometre TransCaprivi Highway, a wide, tarred road that has replaced the dusty gravel tracks of the past. The route runs

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through a region of which one third is a floodplain, and where the population is small and the human impact limited. Providing access to three state-protected game reserves, it lies in the geographic heart of the KavangoZambezi (KaZa) Transfrontier Conservation Area. Read more on KaZa further down in this section.

Katima Mulilo The largest town in Zambezi, Katima Mulilo, lies on the banks of the Zambezi River, at the crossroads of Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana and Angola. It beats with the pulse of Africa and is a microcosm of Zambezi, a place where seven different languages and many more dialects are spoken, with traditional villages bordering the town and open markets resonating with more modern conveniences. Dirt tracks and freshly paved roads in the centre of Katima Mulilo lead you to a mixture of old and new shops, banks and small businesses. An interesting feature of the town is the water-flushing public toilet housed in the hollowed-out trunk of an ancient baobab tree. In the centre of Katima Mulilo a large, vibrant African market provides a glimpse into the daily lives of Namibians in this lively town. Zambezi pots and baskets are noted for their distinctive beauty and symmetry. The fine workmanship of the Zambezians can be seen in the crafts offered for sale at several outlets, including the Caprivi Art Centre, situated next to the hospital in Katima Mulilo; the Katima Craft Centre next to the open market in Katima Mulilo; the Ngoma Crafts Centre near the Ngoma border post where travellers cross into Botswana; the Mashi Crafts at Kongola; and at the Lizauli Traditional Village, where a programme of traditional music and dance gives visitors an insight into Zambezian culture. The Zambezi Waterfront Tourism Park on the banks of the Zambezi River is a government initiative aimed at stimulating socioeconomic development. In addition to providing accommodation, it also promotes community tourism through cultural activities such as traditional dances, woodcarving, weaving and basketry. Tutwa Tourism and Travel provides information on the region and organises activities and tours. The Baobab Bistro is a great place for a meal, and also provides information on what to see and do in the area. If you’re looking for entertainment on

the banks of the Zambezi River, Bezi Bar is a favoured hangout for locals and visitors alike. The Katima Mulilo Airport is situated 20 km outside the town within two hours’ drive from Victoria Falls and not more than four hours’ drive from the Okavango Delta in Botswana. Air Namibia offers flights to Katima Mulilo four times a week. Tutwa Tourism and Travel www.tutwatourism.com

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Blue-cheeked bee-eaters, Merops persicus, can be found along most riverbanks in the region • A sausage tree, Kigelia africana • The Zambezi region is home to over 35 large game species • Two Malachite Kingfishers, Alcedo cristata, sharing a meal • Due to a lack of surface water, most species congregate along riverbanks to quench their thirst • A hamerkop, Scopus umbretta

PARKS IN ZAMBEZI Mudumu National Park Centred on the Mudumu Mulapo fossil river course, this vast 1 010 km2 expanse of dense savannah and mopane woodlands bordered in the west by the Kwando River, was proclaimed a national park in 1990. Dense mopane woodlands are at the core of Mudumu, the combination of forest and water ensuring a wealth of wildlife. The park is home to small populations of sitatunga and red lechwe, while spotted-necked otter, hippo and crocodile inhabit the waterways. During a game drive, animals likely to be encountered are elephant, buffalo, roan antelope, kudu, impala and Burchell’s zebra. The park is alive with more than 400 species of birds. Of particular interest are slaty egrets, Hartlaub’s babblers, greater swamp-warblers (in the papyrus swamps), chirping cisticolas, and swamp boubous. Other noteworthy species include black coucals (an intra-African migrant), coppery-tailed and Senegal coucals, wattled cranes (floodplains) and rosy-throated longclaws. In the backwaters and swamps, African pygmy-geese and comb duck (between September and April), Allen’s gallinules (between December and April), and African and lesser jacanas are found. The infrastructure and facilities of the park were upgraded in 2012.


| KAVANGO & ZAMBEZI |

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Nkasa Rupara National Park The 320 km2 Nkasa Rupara National Park, proclaimed in 1990, has the distinction of being the largest wetland area with conservation status in Namibia. The park is characterised by a complex network of channels, reed beds, ox-bow lakes and tree-covered islands, with the focal point on Nkasa and Lupala, two large islands in the Kwando/Linyanti River. During the dry season the islands can be reached by road, but after the rains, 80% of their surface area becomes flooded, cutting them off from the mainland.

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Cape Buffalo populations thrive in the woodlands of the area • Hippos are a common sight in rivers and along riverbanks • Visitors enjoying the rapids at Popa Falls • A red lechwe bull peeking through the reeds

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The same bird and animal species occur in Nkasa Rupara as in the Mudumu National Park. For campers who like to rough it, Nkasa Rupara offers basic campsites at Mparamura/Nzalu and Lyadura in the east and south-east of the reserve, on the banks of the Kwando. Please note, these sites have no facilities, so visitors have to be completely self-sufficient in terms of water, food and fuel. Four-by-four vehicles are necessary here.

Bwabwata National Park In 2007 the former Caprivi Game Park, proclaimed in 1966, was incorporated into the 6 100 km2 Bwabwata National Park, inclusive

of the Kwando or Golden Triangle, and the Buffalo and Mahango (the former Mahango Game Park) core areas. This heralds a new generation of parks in terms of an integrated approach towards park management. Bwabwata was designed not only to protect the environment, but also to generate income for the country. The central area of the park is being zoned for community-based tourism, including trophy hunting, human settlement, and development. Cattle movement is controlled to prevent the spread of diseases, and communities living in the park or neighbouring areas are given conditional tourism rights to establish – either on their own or in joint ventures – tourism facilities within the park confines.


| KAVANGO & ZAMBEZI | Bwabwata has three distinct areas: the perennial Okavango and Kwando rivers, their riparian vegetation and floodplains characterised by reedbeds, floating grass mats and woodlands with jackal-berry, mangosteen, apple-leaf, knob-thorn and wild-date palm; a parallel system of drainage lines (omiramba) that run west-north-west or east-south-west; and deep windblown Kalahari sands that form dunes between 20 to 60 metres high and support deciduous woodlands dominated by seringa, Zambezi teak, wild teak and several wild raisin and bushwillow species. The park is sanctuary to 35 large game species – including elephant, buffalo, impala, reedbuck, red lechwe, sitatunga, hippo, giraffe, zebra, wildebeest, Chobe bushbuck, tsessebe, and sable and roan antelope – and numerous small-game species. Predators such as lion, leopard, cheetah and African wild dog also occur in Bwabwata. Because there is no surface water, most species congregate along the Okavango and Kwando riverbanks and at the Malombe and Ndwasa pans in the north-east. Visitors are cautioned that there are crocodiles and hippos in the river. Bwabwata takes its name from a village in the park, and refers to the sound of bubbling water. It forms part of the 278 132 km2 KavangoZambezi (KaZa) Transfrontier Conservation Area, the world’s largest conservation area. The infrastructure and facilities of the park were upgraded in 2012.

Popa Game Park Rushing rapids, melodious birdsong and the rustling leaves of shady, riverine trees are sounds that typify Popa Game Park. Located on the Okavango River opposite the Bwabwata National Park, Popa Falls is famous for its lush setting and the

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sound of the rapids cascading down the rocky descents in the river. Over 400 species of birds have been recorded here. Tigerfish, threespot and green-headed tilapia are just some of the game fish that occur in the Okavango River, making it a popular destination for anglers. Popa Falls Camp (managed by NWR) was renovated in 2014.

BASKET TRADITIONS A basket-making tradition has survived in Kavango and Zambezi, where the time-honoured baskets still used by women in the mahangu fields for harvesting and winnowing their grain are ideal containers for transporting goods when on foot and for storing the grain in homesteads. The revival of inherent traditional skills, seemingly rendered redundant by modern times, and the acquisition of new skills in marketing and sales, have enabled women especially to create a vibrant and successful craft industry. Although baskets vary from region to region, they are generally made from the leaves of the makalani palm, Hyphaene petersiana, using the coil technique. Shades of brown, purple and yellow are obtained by boiling the leaves, bark and roots of various shrubs and trees with the strands of prepared palm leaves. Musemes, the Lozi name for reedfloor mats, are made from papyrus by Zambezian women. Each reed is halved lengthwise and dried in the sun to allow the inner pith to shrink, thus making the reed curl inwards, which makes it more durable. The reeds are then sewn together tightly, using string made from the locally grown mafuu (mother-in-law’s tongue) and narakuku plants.

KAVANGO ZAMBEZI TRANSFRONTIER CONSERVATION AREA In 2011 a treaty was signed at the SADC Summit in Luanda, Angola, by the Presidents of the republics of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe, which formally and legally established the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KaZa TFCA). Spanning over 444 000 km 2 (similar in size to Sweden), KaZa is the world’s largest conservation area. It includes about 40 formally proclaimed national parks, game reserves, community conservancies and game management areas in Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Namibia has designated the Bwabwata National Park, Mudumu National Park, Nkasa Rupara National Park, Khaudum National Park, Mangetti National Park, Caprivi State Forest and Conservancies, and community forests between and around these protected areas for inclusion in the KaZa TFCA. Over 400 bird species have been recorded in this area. A key objective of a TFCA is to join fragmented wildlife habitats into an interconnected assortment of protected areas and trans-boundary wildlife corridors. This will facilitate and enhance the free movement of animals across international boundaries. The KaZa TFCA incorporates the largest contiguous elephant population on the African continent, while it also includes some of the world’s renowned natural features and tourist attractions, such as the Victoria Falls and Okavango Delta, the largest Ramsar Site in the world.

Popa Falls Resort P/Bag 13378, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

With its perennial rivers, magnificent indigenous riverine forests, expansive floodplains and reed-lined channels, Popa Falls Lodge is the ideal destination from which to explore the Bwabwata National Park, comprised of the former Caprivi, Kwando, Buffalo and Mahango core areas. Over 450 bird species and a wide variety of wildlife species – including elephant, hippo, water buffalo, crocodile, red lechwe, reedbuck, roan and sable antelope and the elusive sitatunga – can be viewed here. The main viewpoint of the ‘falls’ – a series of cascades created by a quartzite ledge that splits the river into numerous channels – is from the lodge. 13

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Nambwa Tented Lodge Tel (+264 61) 400 510, Cell (+264 81) 125 2122 Email: marketing@africanmonarchlodges.com, reservation@africanmonarchlodges.com Web: www.africanmonarchlodges.com

Nambwa Tented Lodge, is within the heart of KAZA and the only lodge uniquely situated inside the Bwabwata National Park. The lodge offers ten luxurious tents nestled high in the majestic Jackalberry, Sausage and Knobthorn trees. Respecting the elephants’ right of way, the lodge is built in exquisite comfort above the African wildlife. Our unquenchable desire to create the most authentic African experience takes you drifting down the unspoilt Kwando River. Explore the fauna and flora up close and personal on a bush walk or a game drive with our experienced guides or paddle through the safe backwaters of the Kwando River in a traditional hand crafted mokoro. A visit to a traditional village allows you the opportunity to understand the local life and culture of our people. The famous Horseshoe Lagoon is the ideal spot for a sundowner after a riveting game drive. Soak up the breathtaking sunsets together with hippos and large herds of elephants silhouetted in purple hues over the water. An exclusive night drive to view the nocturnal wildlife takes you back home where a bubble bath awaits you. Nambwa Lagoon Camp, the exciting new addition to Nambwa Tented Lodge, was launched in September 2016. The camp offers five Meru style tents nestled along the banks of the Kwando River, next to Nambwa Tented Lodge, with a view across the vast floodplains beyond. In March 2017, African Monarch Lodges opens Kazile Island Lodge, situated on a private island on the banks of the Kwando River. Kazile offers ten Meru tents nestled within a Mangosteen forest. The tents overlook the Kwando River as well as the expansive floodplains between the Island and Horseshoe Bend.

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Chobe Water Villas Central Reservations Tel (+264 61) 431 8002 Email: chobe.res@ol.na Web: www.ol-leisure.com

Chobe Water Villas is an exclusive and intimate boutique lodge on the banks of the Chobe River, located on the eastern tip of the Caprivi Strip of Namibia. Situated only 15 minutes by River Safari Boat from adventure town of Kasane in Botswana. Guests can enjoy the spectacular views of the world re-nowned Chobe National Park and Sedudu Island. Chobe Water Villa’s promises guests a warm Namibian welcome. We offer 16 free standing water villas located at or over the Chobe Water River. 16

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Nkasa Lupala Tented Lodge Reservations: Tel (+264 61) 22 4712 Lodge: Tel +264 (0)81 147 7798 Email: info@nkasalupalalodge.com Web: www.nkasalupalalodge.com

Located on the banks of one of the many channels in the Kwando-Linyanti river system is Nkasa Lupala Tented Lodge. This unique Namibian wetland paradise in eastern Zambezi was proclaimed as Mamili National Park in 1990 and recently renamed Nkasa Rupara NP. The Lodge offers ten Luxury tents with en-suite facilities and is 100% powered by solar energy. Be ready to experience a truly eco-friendly holiday in one of the most exclusive and unknown parks of Namibia. This is sustainable tourism at its best! The Italian owners/managers will be warmly welcoming you! 10

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| KAVANGO & ZAMBEZI | 5

Caprivi Collection Central Reservations Tel (+264 61) 224 420, Fax-to-Email (+264) 886 305 99 Email: reservations@caprivicollection.com Web: www.caprivicollection.com

Caprivi Collection comprises of exclusive safari retreats for the discerning traveler in the remote Eastern Caprivi/Zambezi Region of Namibia in Southern Africa. All properties are situated either on river islands or along perennial river banks, on private concessions inside conservancies or national game parks and have traversing rights in excess of 300,000 hectares, equivalent to the size of Belgium, through pristine unspoiled natural wildlife areas which form part of the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA) spanning Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Angola. Our properties offer the quintessential African Wildlife travel experience with a vast program of various activities to choose from without compromising on the creature comforts that our guests have come to know and expect.

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Taranga Safari Lodge Reservations: (+264 64) 461 677, Lodge: (+264 66) 257 236 Email: info@taranganamibia.com Web: www.taranganamibia.com

Taranga Safari Lodge is one of a very few luxury bush camp lodges in the Rundu-Kavango region. With 2 Delux and 8 Classic Luxury open fronted riverbank tented cottages, situated amongst tall riverine trees and a green Campsite, guests are offered ample opportunity to take in the sights and sounds of the African bush with views across the river into the nearby flood plains and, during season, the lily covered wetlands. The Okavango River, which is home to crocodile and hippo, flows from west to east past the lodge on its journey towards the Okavango Delta. There are daily guided river safaris taking you out for an adventure; an early sunrise cruise through the rising early morning river mist or a late afternoon sundowner or fly fishing. You may plan to go on a bushwalk, traditional village tour or choose to celebrate the end of a lazy day by spending memorable time at night stargazing by the fire pit. The large wooden decks offer a private and idyllic location for those wishing to unwind. You’ll find a swimming pool at the main deck to keep everyone cool or allow you to just relax and enjoy the African sun. 8

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PAUL VAN SCHALKWYK

PAUL VAN SCHALKWYK

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ETOSHA & OWAMBO • Etosha was first proclaimed a game reserve in 1907 • Today’s Etosha National Park spans over 22 912 km2 • The Etosha Pan covers 23% of the surface area of the park • It is the largest saltpan in Africa, visible even from space • The park hosts 114 mammal species and 340 bird species www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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ETOSHA NATIONAL PARK AND OWAMBO The internationally renowned Etosha National Park – undoubtedly Namibia’s most popular tourist attraction – is the heart of the north-central region. The park serves as the ultimate stopover before heading on to the arid north-west, the water-rich north-east, or the largely unexplored culturally rich Land of the Owambo People. Due to the constant maintenance of the infrastructure – including the completion of the tarred road between Rundu in the Kavango Region and Elundu in Ohangwena – the region is easy to navigate and allows travellers a glimpse of rural roadside life. Slowly opening up to tourism, the northern-most region of Namibia plays host to our largest population group, the Owambo.

ETOSHA NATIONAL PARK

Etosha owes its unique landscape to the Etosha Pan, a vast, shallow chalkywhite depression of approximately 5 000 km2 that forms the heart of the park. Once a large inland lake fed by rivers from the north and east, it dried up 120 million years ago as continental drift changed the slope of the land and the course of the tributaries. A series of waterholes along the southern edge of the pan guarantee rewarding and often spectacular game viewing. In good rain years the pan fills with water draining southwards from Angola via a delta-like system of shallow rivers and oshanas, drying out in the winter to become an austere expanse of white cracked mud, shimmering with mirages and upwardspiralling dust devils. What we call Etosha today was proclaimed as Game Reserve No 2 in

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1907 by the then German Governor Frederich von Lindequist. With subsequent additions it became the largest game reserve in the world, covering a vast area of ±80 000 km2. For political considerations its size was progressively diminished, until by 1975 it had been reduced by 77 per cent to its present surface area of 22 912 km2. Nevertheless, it is still one of the largest game reserves in Africa. Of the 114 mammals species found in the park, several are rare and endangered, such as black rhino and cheetah, and the lesser-known blackfaced impala, which is endemic to north-western Namibia and southwestern Angola. Etosha’s current population of black rhino represents one of the largest growing populations of black rhino in the world. Other large mammals in the park include elephant, giraffe, blue wildebeest, mountain and plains zebra, hyaena and lion. Cheetah and leopard

complete the trio of ‘big cats’. Antelope species range from kudu, gemsbok and the large and stately eland, to the

ACTIVITIES AND ADVENTURES Spend time game-viewing at any of Etosha’s waterholes Learn about life in the northern regions at the Nakambale Museum Support the traditional dancers and musicians at the Tsumeb Arts Performance Centre Sleep over in a traditional village at the Ongula Village Homestead Lodge Indulge in birding in the Etosha National Park and surrounding areas


| ETOSHA NATIONAL PARK AND OWAMBO |

Ondjiva

Ombala-io-Mungo

D3

State Forest

Oshikuku

Ogongo

61

D3

Tsandi

C35

Oshakati

D3

61

2

9

Oshana

Etilyasa

puwo

Omusati

rs uin

6 D2

D28

Goreis

Ongava

5

Etosha Heights

D3004

D2 5

12

4

D30 17

6

41

D2483

4

334

Ondumbo

D

C22

D245

47

D3712

5 71 D3

D2 Kaalkop

D2454

C30

Etjo

D2

D23 19

338

D3

03

D2

Hebron

D38

Lady Painting

Kameelberg

Kalkveld

Otuwe www.travelnewsnamibia.com

D2359

2573m White

Omatjete

B1

1 80

Dinosaur's Footprints D2404

Sukses

Osire D2459 D2

D2138

Brandberg

44

Avond

D3805

Okakarara

C22

D

1

80

D3

46

Ugab Guided Trail

D23

D2339

51 D23

Ugab

Brandberg West

Ozondati

7

Dramatic Onguma Cliffs Game Reserve Ozondjache

D2511

Otjihorongo This is just an approximate indication of where these establishments are situated Eremutua

Erundu

C33

41

Omahoro

Sorris Sorris

8

5

C42

Etosha Village

Otjiwarongo

24 04

D2

Waterberg Wilderness Trail Otjahevita Waterberg Walks German & Herero Military Graveyard

Otjenga

D24

Okaukuejo Resort

Okave

5

12

Waterberg Hobatere Lodge D2433 Plateau Park

Heuningberg 7

5

Epupa

05

25 Otjitasu D

1

Halali Resort

Orusewa

D26

Doros

Hu

4

B1

2

51

D2

Otjikango

D2476

ab

Burnt Mountain

2743

C38

D2

D2

Twyfelfontein Rock Engravings

2c

2f

C35

Namutoni Resort D D235

Onkoshi Resort 62 8

2b

C39

6

The Mushara Collection

D2752

D2

04

3 80

Dolomite Resort

Gainatseb Vingerklip (Rock Finger)

3

62

D3

2a

2e

A

C39 FR Olifantsrus Camp

D2

804

D28

8

Khorixas

4

Naulila Vrindskap Monument b & Uga Stone Hartseer Tower

4

80

D2

Esere

D2902

Okaputa

46

5

Petrified Forest

D274

2d

C39

1553m

D2775

262

Cauas

3

Mokuti Etosha Lodge D

TS

Outjo

Nugubaes

D2

14

8

Rietfontein Axel Eriksson’s Grave

6 80

D28

80

77

D2633

Fransfontein

M NTEIN NSFO

D2

D2

Tutara

C43

D3236

Platveld

D2

36 D32

C40

D2809

Komukanti

47

D2670

1

Gamkarab Cave Neina

D2

6

66

D2

69

Otjihaenena

D2612

46 D26

696

Otjikondo

D2650

Hohental

D28

For Grootfo

Kombat

10 D28

D2

D2869

0 78 D2

Otjitambi C35

B8

Elefanteberg

D30

Hoba Meteorite

Schumannsthal Hermanstal Gross-Otavi

Otavi

3

D287

22

C42

D2807

D2

0

C39

D2782

D2430

D2671

D2710

Tsobis

Khorab Memorial

D27 8

2

94

7

66

D265

65

21

D30

Ghaub B1 Cave

D2895

D2779

Jakkalsberg

Om

C38

Tsumeb

Bobos

804

695 C40

Kamanjab

C40

Aus

D3

D2

Weissbrünn

7

D3039

Lake D3043 Guinas Lake Guinas Otjikoto

D3028

D2

3

Mon Desir Biermanskool

Rock Engravings

C83

Andersson Gate

4

D2695

B1

3

D3031

76

e nd

bo

Gagarus

Okaukuejo

2c

Tsintsabis

Rietfontein

D251

7

7

D300

2f

Moringa Forest

5

D269

3 1

Von C38 Chudob Lindequist Kalkheuwel Gate

Springbokfontein

Okondeka

8

2e

D2866

Charl Marais Pan

69

D2

Om

6

Ozonjuitji m’Bari

Fort Namutoni Okerfontein Namutoni

25

Otjovasandu

Etosha National Park

Sonderkop

Teespoed Duiwelsvuur

Jakkalswater

Etosha Pan

D30

Okawao

Aasvoëlbad

Baadjie

Grootberg Pass

Ovambo D3001

D3047

2d

Dolomietpunt

Rateldraf

Grootberg

Oshivelo

2b

D3007

2a C35

Bergsig

Nehale Lya Mpingana Gate Andoni

D3028

Duineveld

r

t s

Western area of park open to registered tour operators only Nomab Tobieroen

C43

êreldsend

Oshikoto

Onyati

Cuvelai and Etosha Pan

Okatjiura

Kowares

Palmwag

D3603

Groot Okevi Klein Okevi

0 71

06 D37

e

Ekoko

B1

Natukanaoka Pan

State Forest

Otjondeka

Dorslandtrekkers Monument

Blinkwater Falls Warmquelle

Khowarib

Olukonda Nakambale Museum & Church

C35

D3

Otjomatemba

la

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D2761

8 Otjitunduwa D370

3

D3

C45

Oshititu

Omulunga Okankolo

605

Otjitoko

katumba

Ombombo

Okongo

D3

D3710

BERGE

D3604

Oponono Lake

C41

D3709

C43

Ondangwa

Onaanda

C45

Ohangwena

Oshigambo Ongula Village Homestead Lodge Oniipa

C46

61

Okahao

State Forest

Epembe

Ongwediva

D3

C41

Ondobe

B1

Omundaungilo

Elundu

Eenhana

Ohangwena

Engela

Okatana

612

6

Oshikango

Ongenga

602

Onesi

D3617

D3608

Okalongo

D3609

Ehomba

Oshikango

D3608

11 D36

02

C46

Uutapi (Ombalantu)

D3

Mahenene

Ruacana

D3622

Ruacana Falls

oisdrift

ANGOLA

Naulila

Calueque

46

0

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FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Elephants drink up to 100 litre of water per day • The leopard (Panthera pardus) is one of the five “big cats” of Africa • The giraffe is the tallest land animal in the world • The Etosha Pan, the massive white expanse, in dry season • Lions (Panthera leo) on the edge of the pan

diminutive Damara dik-dik. Smaller mammals include jackal, bat-eared fox, honey badger, warthog and the ubiquitous ground squirrel. For the greater part of the year (the dry season) Etosha’s animals and birds are dependent on about 30 springs and waterholes. These provide excellent game viewing and photographic opportunities. A good policy before setting out is to enquire from camp officials what the current game movements are. During the rainy season, the bird life at the main pan and Fischer’s Pan is well worth viewing. Etosha’s vegetation varies from dwarf shrub savannah and grasslands, which occur around the pan, to thorn-bush and woodland savannah throughout the park. Eighty per cent of all Etosha’s trees are mopane. West of Okaukuejo is the well-known Sprokieswoud – Fairy, Phantom or Haunted Forest – the only location where the African moringa tree, Moringa ovalifolia, grows in a flat area. Etosha is open throughout the year and is accessible by tarred roads via the Andersson Gate on the C38 from Outjo, the Von Lindequist Gate in the east from Tsumeb on the B1, the Galton Gate in the west from Kowares on the C35 and the King Nehale Gate located on the Andoni plains just north of the Andoni waterhole, which provides access from the north-central Owambo regions on the B1 from Onyati.

REGULATIONS IN THE PARK • Gates are open from sunrise to sunset • Entry fees are payable at the tourist camp reception offices • Stay inside your vehicle • Never drive off the tourist roads • Remain within the speed limit of 50 km/hour • Do not make unnecessary noise

Birding in Etosha

Tsumeb

About 340 bird species occur in Etosha, about one third being migratory, including the European bee-eater and several species of wader. Larger birds include ostrich, kori bustard and greater and lesser flamingo, of which tens of thousands congregate on the pan to breed during a good rainy season. Ten of Etosha’s 35 raptor species are migratory. Those most commonly seen are lappet-faced, white-backed and hooded vultures, while sightings of the Cape, Egyptian and palm-nut vultures have been recorded. There are eight species of owl, including the pearl-spotted owlet and southern white-faced scops-owl, and four species of nightjar.

Accessed from the B1 and situated about 96 km from the Von Lindequist Gate, the town of Tsumeb was founded in 1905. While initially closely linked to the mining industry, operations have been scaled down considerably. The colourful jacarandas, flamboyant trees and bougainvillea that line the town’s streets have earned Tsumeb the title of Namibia’s garden town. The history of the town is depicted in the Tsumeb Museum, where a comprehensive collection of rare minerals can be viewed. An interesting facet of the Tsumeb Museum is the Khorab Room, displaying a collection of restored cannons and other armaments dumped into Lake Otjikoto by retreating German forces shortly before the signing of the Khorab Peace Treaty. It is estimated that at least 30 cannons and 4 500 boxes of ammunition were plunged into the lake. The museum is housed in the former German Private School Building, constructed in 1915, and is today a national monument. The Tsumeb Arts and Crafts Centre, situated in the main street, is run by an educational trust promoting traditional arts and crafts. An African style, open-air market on the outskirts of Tsumeb gives small traders the opportunity to sell their wares. The Arts Performance Centre is another popular attraction in Tsumeb. The Centre presents concerts, African dance, music, and typical plays from the north of Namibia for tourists. The Tsumeb Cultural Village, also known as the Helvi Mpingana Kondombola Cultural Village – named after founding president Sam Nujoma’s mother – is located in the southern outskirts of town. This community project is presented as an open-air museum, while exhibits display the life, history and culture of the majority of Namibians. The centre also hosts a curio shop and bungalows for overnight guests. The oldest building in town is the Otavi Minen und Eisenbahn Gesellschaft (OMEG) Minenbüro, completed at the end of 1907, while the Second Director’s House, erected in 1912, serves as the second-oldest building. The latter still houses some of the original furniture and retains its original appearance. St Barbara’s

GATEWAYS TO ETOSHA Outjo Located amidst a cluster of low hills is the town of Outjo, an important cattle-ranching centre and regarded as Etosha’s gateway to the south. Situated on the C38, Outjo is about 100 km from the Andersson Gate. The history of the town and surroundings is depicted in the Outjo Museum, where the focus is on gemstones and wildlife. The museum is housed in Franke House, built in 1899 for the German commanding officer, Hauptmann Franke. Other places of interest are the Naulila Monument, erected in 1933 to commemorate the 12 soldiers who lost their lives on 18 December 1914 under Major Franke; and the Water Tower, constructed in 1900 to provide fresh water for German soldiers, their horses, and the hospital. Bäckerei Outjo, a good place to stop for refreshments, offers tasty German delicatessen, while The Farmhouse, which is open from breakfast to dinner has a shaded beer garden. The regional tourist information centre, Etoscha i Büro, is situated in Hage Geingob Street. Besides providing information on the town and surroundings, it also sells a large variety of local gemstones. Etoscha i Büro Tel (+264 67) 31 3072 Outjo Tourist Centre Tel (+264 67) 31 3244 www.farmhouse-outjo.com

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Roman Catholic Church, which was built in 1913, is one of the town’s most prominent landmarks. Popular places to dine at or stop for a refreshment include the Etosha Café & Beergarten, Sindano Court, and Cosmos Nursery. The Tsumeb Airstrip meets International Civil Aviation Organisation standards and is the closest commercial airstrip to Etosha National Park. In October the town hosts its annual Copper Festival, linking back to its history as a mining town.

THE TRADITIONAL LAND OF THE OWAMBO PEOPLE

A large percentage of Namibia’s inhabitants live in the Omusati, Oshana, Ohangwena and Oshikoto regions between the Etosha National Park and Namibia’s northern border with Angola. After the capital, this region has the largest urban concentration of people in the country. The major portion of these four regions, which have a total surface area of just over 56 100 km2 - consists of communal farming land, that is land where there is no individual ownership or demarcation - and where the majority of the inhabitants live from subsistence farming. Life on the vast plains of these essentially agricultural regions depends on the seasonal efundja, the floods that feed the rivers and oshanas. The latter are flat, shallow depressions, many of which light up with copious growths of white lilies soon after they have filled with water in the rainy season. The origin of these waters is the highlands of Angola. After a long journey southwards, the Cuvelai River disperses its contents into many channels, covering the sandy flats of southern Angola and spreading into northern Namibia to form a large expansive delta of rivulets and oshanas. These, in turn, provide drinking water to humans and animals, protein in the form of fish and a habitat that supports large numbers of aquatic birds. The essentially flat landscape is characterised by huge spreading marula trees and sporadic stands of the tall makalani palm, Hyphaene petersiana. Sap is tapped from the growing tip of the stems of these palms and left to ferment into a potent drink called

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palm wine. The fruit of the makalani palm takes two years to mature, and has a white, bony kernel. Referred to as vegetable ivory, the hard kernel is suitable for carving small ornaments, jewellery and curios. The best time of the year to visit these regions is April or May, after the rains. By this time the roads are suitable for driving on, the heat of the summer has abated, and the wetlands still host many water birds, such as cranes, storks, ducks, herons and small waders.

TOWNS NORTH OF ETOSHA

north and has considerable industrial potential. The Ondangwa SME Start-Up and Tourist Information Centre is a good place for visitors to find their bearings and gain access to information on the surrounding area. Call the Ondangwa Town Council at 065 24 0101 to be transferred to the centre. In close proximity to the town, at Olukonda, is the oldest building in northern Namibia, the Nakambale Mission House. A new concept for Namibia, the Ongula Village Homestead Lodge, allows visitors the opportunity to experience authentic village life at an Owambo homestead.

Oshakati, Ongwediva, Ondangwa Owambo’s two main centres, Oshakati and Ondangwa, are in the Oshana Region. These two bustling towns have the same informality and happy-go-lucky character as urban centres throughout much of Africa. Their main streets are lined with a haphazard arrangement of residential houses and shops, and the traffic varies from donkey carts to the latest in luxury four-wheeldrive vehicles. The Oshakati Omatala (open market) is the largest in Namibia, and is a big tourist attraction in the north. The Tulipamwe Sewing Project in the main street of Oshakati – marked by the vibrant pink materials on display – is a great place to learn about traditional Oshiwambo attire and buy yourself some unique clothing. The Ongwediva Trade Fair has been held annually since 1995. Apart from an array of local stands, it also hosts exhibitors from Botswana, South Africa, Ghana, Kenya and Zimbabwe. Situated across the road from Ongwediva Medi Park, Bennie’s Entertainment Park and Lodge is a popular meeting place that provides leisure activities in many forms. Afrika Stadt Haus is another good place to enjoy a meal or a drink. The town hosts two modern shopping malls, which feature the most popular fast-food restaurants, including a Silver Wolf Spur, and an assortment of retail outlets. Since independence, the OshakatiOngwediva-Ondangwa complex has experienced dramatic urban growth. The complex plays an increasingly important commercial role in the

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT The black rhino is also known as the hook-lipped rhino. The black rhino is a browser and their hooked top lip aids this • The African Elephant (Loxodonta) live in matriachal family groups • Plains Zebra, also known as the common zebra or Burchell’s Zebra, have a lighter shadow stripe in between the sharp dark dashes across its body • Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus)

Situated in the Omusati Region, west of the Oshana, is the newly opened Uukwaluudhi Safari Lodge from which guests can further explore the Owambo culture through visits to the Uukwaluudhi Royal Homestead and Museum at Tsandi. Situated about 85 km from Opuwo, Uukwaluudhi Safari Lodge also offers the opportunity to learn more about the nomadic Himba people living in the area. Air Namibia conducts flights to and from Ondangwa, twice daily, seven days a week.

Mahangu Festival and Championship

The annual Mahangu Festival and Mahangu Championship, locally known as Oshipe, and held after the harvest in August/September, is hosted in the region of the Overall National Crown Champion, which includes all the northern and northeastern regions, where mahangu (a kind of pearl millet) is the staple food for many. The festival creates a platform for mahangu farmers to share ideas, motivate each other, and engage in healthy competition while showcasing their products. Important topics of discussion include the


GERHARD THIRION

ANJA DENKER

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improvement and modernisation of mahangu production by introducing new technologies and cultivation methods, and by improving soil fertility. The festival is organised by the Namibian Agronomic Board.

MAIN TOURIST ATTRACTIONS IN OWAMBO

Tourism in this vast flat region, typified by oshanas, makalani palms and herds of cattle, used to be virtually non-existent. However, these days it is steadily increasing. The area has a rich and interesting cultural and historical tradition, which can be explored by visiting some of the sites in the surroundings. In Oniipa (just outside Ondangwa), craftspeople at the Dorkambo Teppiche Co-operative produce hand-woven carpets from 100% pure karakul sheep wool. The town also hosts the historical Onandjokwe Lutheran Hospital, named after its

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first female nurse, and built in 1911 by the Finnish Missionary Society. It is still in use today, serving as the primary health-care facility for the Onandjokwe District. The Eenhana Heroes’ Memorial Shrine depicts the history of the liberation struggle, and acknowledges the courage of the People’s Liberation Army of Namibia (PLAN) combatants and civilians who supported them. The main attraction at the Ombalantu Baobab Heritage Centre is a huge Baobab tree estimated to be around 800 years old. During tribal wars the tree served as a post office, chapel and hiding place. The centre, located in Outapi, also offers camping sites laid out under the tree, a small kiosk, a craft centre and facilities for day visitors.

Otjikoto and Guinas lakes A unique underwater dumping site located 24 km north-west of Tsumeb in the Oshikoto Region had its origins in 1915 when retreating German forces

Mokuti Etosha Lodge Central Reservations: Tel (+264 61) 431 8001/3 Email: mokuti.res@ol.na, Web: www.ol-leisure.com

Mokuti Etosha Lodge in Namibia is the perfect venue for travelers wanting to explore the famous eastern side of Etosha National Park. Known for its excellent and diverse wildlife encounters, this Namibian icon has become a popular destination resort for international, Namibian and SADC visitors. As the closest lodge to Etosha National Park, Mokuti is only four minutes drive from the eastern Von Lindequist Gate near the historical Namutoni Fort and is located on its own private 4 000 hectare nature reserve, which shares a common border with Etosha National Park. Our Rooms are available as Standard, Luxury and Luxury Family-Rooms. 106

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dumped their military equipment into Lake Otjikoto during the South West Africa Campaign. Many years later it was discovered by members of the Windhoek Underwater Club, who realised that the armaments and weaponry dated back to the First World War. What’s left of these interesting relics can be inspected by qualified divers. Today the majority of the armaments are on display in the Tsumeb Museum. The 130 metre-deep Lake Guinas, which lies north-west of Otjikoto, is noted for its beautiful setting and the dark inky-blue colour of its water. However, since it is on a farm, permission to view it needs to be obtained from the farmer. Visitors to Namibia who are qualified divers are welcome to join club members on a journey of underwater exploration to view these two interesting curiosities. A rare, mouth-breeding species of tilapia or dwarf bream is found in both these subterranean lakes.


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Etosha National Park - Namibia Wildlife Resorts PO Box 13267, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

2a Dolomite Camp is in the previously restricted western third of the

2b Onkoshi Camp is an exclusive, low-impact environmentally

park, where animals abound. Built by hand atop a dolomite ridge, Dolomite offers panoramic views unique in Etosha. The ecologically designed thatch-roofed chalets blend into the mountaintop, creating a sense of being one with nature. Three of the twenty chalets are deluxe, with their own plunge pools. One chalet was designed for the physically challenged. There is a large pool at the camp, with several pavilions and other structures, such as a fireside boma for game viewing, dining, and relaxing. There are more than fifteen waterholes in the vicinity of Dolomite Camp and game drives are organised to venture into areas of the park that have been closed to visitors for fifty years. Distances between Dolomite Camp and the other rest camps in Etosha are Okaukuejo Camp (180 km), Halali Camp (250 km), Namutoni Camp (320 km) and Onkoshi Camp (350 km).

friendly upmarket accommodation facility on the eastern edge of the Etosha Pan. Built on elevated wooden decks, it offers 15 units (30 beds), a restaurant and bar area, and an infinity pool overlooking the pan. Guests enter the park at Namutoni. The road between Namutoni and Onkoshi Camp, which was previously only accessible by NWR vehicles, is now open to guests, who can drive through with any vehicle. The road is situated on a secluded peninsula overlooking the immense Etosha Pan and Onkoshi Camp is completely out of view of current tourist routes. It offers a pristine, tranquil and unique experience to its guests. Activities include professionally guided game drives.

2c Okaukuejo is located 17 km from the southern entrance of

2d Halali is situated at the base of a dolomite hill, amongst shady

the park. The rest camp is famous for its floodlit waterhole where visitors can observe at close quarters a spectacle of wildlife congregating and interacting. The waterhole experience has been enhanced by reducing disturbance in this area. Five of the waterhole chalets are premier double-storey units with a balcony overlooking the waterhole. Accommodation suits every need, from premier bush chalets overlooking the waterhole to family chalets, bush chalets and double rooms.

mopane trees. A flood-lit waterhole which is viewed from an elevated vantage point provides exceptional wildlife viewing day and night. Accommodation units have sliding doors to the outside, allowing visitors to experience and benefit from the natural surroundings. The largest swimming pool in the park provides a welcome respite. Other facilities include a restaurant, bar, shop and fuel station. Accommodation is in family chalets, two- and four-bed bush chalets, and double units.

2e Olifantsrus, a historical site in Etosha National Park, situated

2f Namutoni is located on the eastern side of the Etosha National

in the less utilised western section of the park, approximately 60 kilometres from Galton Gate, has become the newest campsite in the world-renowned park. And it boasts what some describe as the greatest wildlife observation hide in southern Africa. Olifantsrus Camp is situated conveniently between the Galton Gate entrance at the western side of Etosha National Park, and Okaukuejo – one of the park’s oldest accommodation sites. The campsite consists of 10 camp sites with a maximum group of 8 people per site.

Park. It centres around an old German Fort, overlooking the King Nehale waterhole. Namutoni has been redeveloped to highlight the fort itself, which is a National Monument. Privacy for each unit has been enhanced. Accommodation is in comfortable double rooms or bush chalets. Camping sites are also available.

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The Mushara Collection PO Box 1814, Tsumeb Tel (+264 67) 22 9106 Email: mushara@mushara-lodge.com Web: www.mushara-lodge.com

Booking Office: Tel (+264 61) 24 1880 Email: reservations@mushara-lodge.com

Located only 10 km from the Von Lindequist Gate on the eastern boundary of the Etosha National Park, The Mushara Collection is ideally situated for visitors to the world-famous game reserve.

Mushara Lodge Mushara Lodge consists of ten spacious chalets, one family unit, a room for three, and two single rooms. The thatched public area houses a small library with a good selection of books, a bar with an extensive wine cellar, an airy lounge complete with welcoming fireplace for winter evenings, a dining area, and a well-stocked curio shop. A great deal of attention has been paid to the décor, an eclectic blend of traditional African and modern works of art mixed with more traditional paintings.

Villa Mushara Villa Mushara, designed with exclusivity in mind, comprises only two exclusive villas, creating an ideal retreat from the stresses of modern-day life. With its aura of tranquillity and contemplation, Villa Mushara is a place that will leave you yearning for more long after your departure.

Mushara Outpost Mushara Outpost accommodates 16 guests in custom-built tent-like wood-and-canvas structures nestled on the banks of an ancient dry riverbed, known as an ‘omuramba’ in the Herero language. Mushara Outpost is all about old-fashioned hospitality and a warm, friendly and personalised service provided on the doorstep of the wonderful Etosha National Park. The main house at the lodge has been styled like an old farmhouse with high walls, a corrugated-iron roof and a large wrap-around veranda facing north-east to take advantage of the shade. The ambience is similar to that of a well-lived-in house – friendly and extremely comfortable with a light feel to it.

Mushara Bush Camp Mushara Bush Camp accommodates 32 guest and eight children in custom-built tent-like structures, offering a down-to-earth bush-camp experience and providing an exceptionally affordable base for independent travellers and families en route to explore the magical Etosha National Park. The main structure is thatched and has a true bush-camp feel to it. The early evenings are spent around a campfire for guests to exchange stories of the day’s wildlife sightings. Mushara Bush Camp is your optimal family destination on the doorstep of one of the world’s top wildlife havens. 17

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Ongava PO Box 58, Okaukeujo Tel (+264 83) 330 3920 Email: hello@ongava.com Web: www.ongava.com

Nestled in the mountains and plains, Ongava Game Reserve provides visitors with the ultimate in accommodation, offering comfort, luxury and a connection to the earth. Each lodge on Ongava has its own unique style, layout and atmosphere; but all offer the same wonderful sense of luxurious seclusion. Built from local materials in traditional fashion, they blend tastefully into the surrounding landscape, allowing visitors to feel at one with nature.

Little Ongava Designed for privacy, luxury and intimacy with the land, Little Ongava is set on a high hill with pristine views across the plains. A boardwalk meanders over rocks and trees, connecting the beautiful main lounge and dining area with one of three secluded en-suite thatch-roofed bungalows. Each bungalow is like a home, featuring a large sitting room with a fireplace, a private deck, infinity pool and sala. The overall impression is one of pure natural indulgence indoors, surrounded by untamed nature outdoors. Facilities at the villa include a private plunge pool & sala, air conditioning, wi-fi service in rooms, sitting room & viewing deck, veranda, fireplace and bar-fridge. Your lodge experience includes a thatched/outdoor dining area with waterhole views, a dedicated guide and game drive vehicle. Activities on site include Bird watching, Game drives, Game viewing, Nature walks, Rhino approaching and the Photographic hide.

Ongava Lodge Ongava Lodge is one of Namibia’s premier lodges on one of the country’s most important private game reserves. Perched on a ridge with seemingly endless views across the plains, Ongava Lodge’s fourteen air-conditioned brick, rock and thatch chalets, each with en-suite facilities, offer a relaxing retreat in the African bush. Gather at the main thatched dining area and enjoy a drink at the bar while watching wildlife congregate and interact at the floodlit waterhole. Your lodge experience includes a thatched dining area and bar plus waterhole views, wi-fi service in the lounge, swimming pool, curio shop, a dedicated guide and shared game drive vehicle. Activities on site include: Bird watching, Game drives, Game viewing, Nature walks, Rhino approaching, Photographic hide.

Ongava Tented Camp Immersed in the African Mopani bush, Ongava Tented Camp is a natural extension of this wild, wonderful landscape. Eight large, comfortable walk-in tents with views across to a prolific waterhole are evocative of this classic African safari. Tents are en-suite with double basins, plus indoor and outdoor showers. Your lodge experience includes stone/thatched dining area, bar & deck with camp fire and waterhole views, curio shop, swimming pool, a dedicated guide and shared game drive vehicle. Activities on site include Bird watching, Game drives, Game viewing, Nature walks, Rhino approaching.

Andersson’s Camp Family friendly Andersson’s Camp, named for Charles Andersson, the Swedish explorer who first described the Etosha Pan, takes the past and moves it decidedly forward. Turning an old homestead into an acclaimed eco-camp, Andersson’s offers 20 cosy en-suite Meru-style safari tents, a relaxing dining area, a swimming pool and a waterhole with a water level photographic hide to complete the camp where guests feel truly at home in the bush. Your lodge experience includes an outdoor dining area with waterhole views, curio shop, swimming pool, water level photographic hide. Activities on site include Bird watching, Game drives, Game viewing, Nature walks, Photographic hide.

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Etosha Heights Namibia Safarihoek Lodge Tel (+264 67) 312 521 Cell (+264 81) 149 1280 or (+264 81) 278 3976 Reservations Email: annemarie@rhinotrek.net or safarihoek@rhinotrek.net Web: www.etoshaheights.com

The new Safarihoek Lodge is situated on a well-established 60,000ha property sharing a 70km boundary with Etosha National Park. An establishment and property filled with surprises, adventures, expansive panoramas, a wide range of biodiversity and a divine peacefulness. Join us and ‘Be Part of our Pride’! 11

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Hobatere Lodge Reservations Tel (+264 61) 22 8104 Email: hobatere@journeysnamibia.com Fax: +264 (0)88625903 Web: www.hobatere-lodge.com

Hobatere Lodge is strategically located 65 km north of Kamanjab on the western border of the Etosha National Park. The lodge has an airstrip and is situated in a concession area of 8,808 ha which is home to a wide selection of game, including elephant, giraffe, eland, and Hartmann’s zebra. The lodge offers the visitor the opportunity to experience game drives in open vehicles. Early morning and night drives are part of the activities on offer. Many nocturnal animals, such as aardvark, cape fox, bat-eared fox, aardwolf, genet and many more can be encountered. The lodge belongs to the #Khoadi //Hoas Conservancy. One of the primary objectives of the lodge is to increase the benefits to the local community, reducing human-wildlife conflict and also conservation of the area. 18

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Etosha Village Taleni Africa Reservations: Tel: (+27 21) 930 4564, Fax: (+27 21) 914 9930 Tel: (+264 67) 333 413 (for last minute reservations only) E-mail: reservations@etosha-village.com, Web: www.etosha-village.com Location: C38 on the Outjo - Okaukuejo Road, GPS Coordinates: S19°21’ 20.5” E015°56’ 19.4”

Situated only 2km from the Andersson entrance gate to Etosha National Park, Etosha Village uniquely combines affordability with comfort, style and exquisite cuisine. 45 Luxury individual suites offer a fully airconditioned bedroom with a unique semi-open en-suite bathroom and a patio to enjoy the beauty that surrounds you. Two small children (under 12) can be accommodated with their parents on a fold-out sleeper couch in the unit. Facilities include an unique open-plan bar with big screen television, 2 sparkling pools plus a kiddie pool, a restaurant with delectable cuisine as well as a fully stocked utility and curio shop. Enjoy exciting activities including guided walking trails, stargazing sessions, sundowner drives and excursions to Etosha National Park. 45

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Onguma Game Reserve PO Box 24046, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 23 7055, Fax (+264 61) 23 5677 Email: reservations@onguma.com Web: www.onguma.com

Sharing the eastern border of the Etosha National Park, Onguma Game Reserve is a beguiling mixture of sophistication and relaxation, of elegance and the earth. In the local Herero language, Onguma means ‘the place you don’t want to leave’, and the 34 000-hectare reserve certainly lives up to its name.

Onguma The Fort - iconic luxury The Fort, unlike any other, is built in a perfect spot to give guests a stunning sunset view across Etosha Pan and the waterhole. The Moroccan inspired Fort consists of 12 mini-suites and one Sultan suite, all completely private and about 50 metres apart, each with a bar fridge, a fireplace and air-cooling system. The spacious bathroom has an inside and an outside shower. From every area of the room, wooden decks lead you to the outside seating area with sun loungers for relaxing and enjoying the extraordinary view across the Pan.

Etosha Aoba Lodge – for a secluded bush-lodge experience Etosha Aoba is an intimate, relaxed bush lodge with a natural character that gives guests a taste of wilderness and yesteryear-safari style. Featuring thatched roofs, slasto floors and wooden furniture, the 11 bungalows and central area are surrounded by nature and a small waterhole. The down-toearth friendly character of the lodge and staff introduces you to the true spirit of the Namibian bush. A well stocked wine cellar compliments hearty meals served under the stars.

Onguma Bush Camp - ideal for families Onguma Bush Camp offers guests a stunning waterhole around which the main guest areas are positioned, ensuring there is something to see while enjoying every meal. Thatch, wooden decks and canvas ensure the feel of Africa is experienced by all the senses. The 16 rooms provide varied accommodation for singles, couples and families. Since the camp is fenced, it is perfectly suitable for families, allowing little ones to stretch their legs while parents relax around the pool.

Onguma Tented Camp – the ultimate in safari chic Onguma Tented Camp has a stunning main building and seven tents providing private, exclusive tented accommodation. The seven spacious tents extend the U-shaped design, allowing both for privacy and for fantastic views across the waterhole. Each tent was designed with attention to detail and has an indoor and an outdoor shower, a gorgeous modern interpretation of an old zinc bath, a separate toilet, two stone basins and a private sitting area with uninterrupted views of the waterhole.

Onguma Tree Top Camp – up among the tree tops Onguma Tree Top Camp is small and intimate, especially designed for those travellers who like to truly experience the bush in all its raw splendour. The camp, with only four tents, was built on wooden stilts amongst the tree tops with full views over one of the most beautiful waterholes on Onguma Game Reserve. It is ideal for small groups or families travelling together and can be booked in its entirety – with private chef, host and guide. What better way to experience the wilderness?

Onguma Tamboti Campsite -the ultimate in luxury camping Newly built Tamboti campsite boasts a lovely restaurant overlooking the waterhole - for days when you just want to relax and enjoy a hearty meal. The 15 campsites are well placed to offer privacy and each one is equipped with generous private ablutions and ample plugs for charging cameras and equipment. The swimming pool and small supply shop ensure campers want for nothing! Game drives can be booked at reception.

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PAUL VAN SCHALKWYK PAUL VAN SCHALKWYK

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KAOKOLAND & THE KUNENE RIVER • The region hosts one of the largest waterfalls in Africa • It is the stamping ground of the world-famous desert-adapted elephant • The semi-nomadic Himba call this arid land home • The area is a geological wonderland • It has off-the-beaten-track destinations aplenty www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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KAOKOLAND, THE KUNENE RIVER, AND THE HIMBA Kaokoland extends from the Kunene River southwards across a sparsely populated and harsh environment down to the Hoanib River. The area holds a special allure for lovers of remote and wild places to negotiate its challenging and rugged terrain in four-wheel-drive vehicles. Attractions include the desert-adapted elephants, scattered Himba settlements, the impressive Epupa Falls, offthe-beaten-track destinations such as the expansive Marienfluss and Hartmann valleys, the wild and beautiful Khowarib Schlucht, and Witbooisdrift, site of a Dorslandtrekker monument.

KAOKOLAND’S FAMOUS ‘DESERT ELEPHANTS’ The African elephant, a strong and majestic giant, is a key feature on the plains, in the forest and across landscapes in Africa. In remote parts of northwestern Namibia, these gentle giants have adapted to survive in harsh desert conditions. In Kaokoland the desert-adaptedelephant home ranges cover as much as 3 000 km2, with the animals trekking up to 200 km in search of water. It was thought initially that these elephants were a different species to the African elephant, Loxodonta africana, because they had longer legs, were taller and had larger feet. However, because they have less to eat than their Etosha counterparts, they don’t carry the same body mass, and therefore appear to be taller and have longer legs. However, they do have larger

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feet, an environmental adaptation caused by their walking primarily on soft sand all their lives. Loxodonta africana africana, is a desertadapted subspecies, which occupies home ranges, rotating as the season changes to where food and water can be found. Herds are led by a matriarch, who is usually the oldest female and has accumulated as much as 30 years’ experience of the climatic conditions in her home range. By definition, desert-dwelling elephants occupy an arid habitat for at least part of the year and have special behavioural characteristics, large annual and seasonal ranges, and a social structure and daily activities suited to an arid environment. When feeding, these denizens of the desert take far greater care than their relatives in Etosha. They hardly ever fell trees, break fewer branches and debark much less than other elephants. Whereas adult elephants on average drink between 100–200 litres of water

ACTIVITIES AND ADVENTURES Track the desert-adapted elephant and rhino with a qualified guide Visit a Himba settlement Cool off in a rock pool at Epupa Falls Camp on the banks of the Kunene River Take your 4x4 and tackle a proper off-road challenge Enjoy the abundance of birdwatching on offer Take to a canoe on the river with a qualified guide Test your mountain bike out on the rugged terrain of the region


| KAOKOLAND, THE KUNENE RIVER AND THE HIMBA |

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a day, in Kaokoland they drink only once every three or four days. During droughts they dig deep, narrow holes (gorras) in dry riverbeds with their tusks, trunk and feet to find water.

THE DESERT LIONS’ FIGHT FOR SURVIVAL Another curiosity of the area is the remarkable desert-adapted lion. With approximately 120 of their kind left, the desert lions are a rare group of carnivores that have adapted to survive in one of the harshest, most unforgiving landscapes on earth. With their numbers dwindling as poaching and human encroachment threaten their future, sightings are few and far between. For more information on the desert lions of the Namib visit www.desertlion.info.

EPUPA FALLS

With its scenically beautiful surroundings, Epupa is one of Namibia’s prime tourist destinations. The falls are a series of cascades where the Kunene River drops a total of 60 metres over a distance of about 1.5 km, separating into a multitude of channels and forming a myriad of rock pools. It is possible to swim in these pools, but keep a lookout for crocodiles! Enhanced by richly coloured rock walls, variety of trees including wild figs, baobabs and waving makalani palms, spectacular sunsets and perennially flowing waters, the Epupa area offers much to see, do and experience. Bird-watching is rewarding, especially for the rare Rufous-tailed Palm Thrush. Also seen are Bee-eaters, African Fisheagles, Kingfishers ranging from the Giant to the tiny Malachite Kingfisher, Rosy-faced Lovebirds, Paradise Flycatchers, Turacos, Bulbuls, Hornbills and Rollers. Scattered settlements of Himba are an especially interesting feature of the area.

OPUWO

Although officially declared as a town only at the end of 2000, Opuwo has long acted as the capital of the Kunene Region, and as the gateway to Epupa Falls and the land of the Himba people. The town itself doesn’t offer much for the tourist, except in the form of hand-made jewellery and other crafts, which can be found on the streets and at the open market. The Kunene Craft Centre is also a good place to stock up on souvenirs from the area. Opuwo has well-stocked

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grocery shops, Internet Cafes, a post office, banks, fuel, a hospital, and everything else a traveller might need. Opuwo is connected to Kamanjab and Windhoek by a tarred road that is in excellent condition. There’s an airfield in town, managed by the Opuwo Country Hotel.

The Ovahimba Living Museum A newly opened living museum now allows visitors to discover the mysteries and wonders of Ovahimba culture. An exhilarating, energetic demonstration the living museum gives you opportunity to learn about the intriguing traditional life of the Himba people. This includes their dress, food and craft (wood carving and metal work). Guests learn about how the homestead is built, with the Holy Fire at its heart, where all the important communication with the ancestors takes place. They also have the unique opportunity to sit in a hut with a bevy of Himba women learning about their intricate beauty rituals. The Ovahimba Living Museum opened officially in November 2016 and is the sixth of its kind. The museum can be found on the C43, 40 km north of Opuwo.

Ruacana Falls At 120 metres high and 700 metres wide, the Ruacana Falls on the Kunene River is one of the largest waterfalls in Africa. However, for most of the year the waterfall is dry, due to the Ruacana Hydropower Plant upstream, which meets more than 50% of Namibia’s electricity requirements.

CAMPING ON THE KUNENE

Amidst spectacular scenery and splendid solitude, the Okarohombo Community Campsite on the banks of the Kunene River offers four separate campsites under giant Ana trees. A very exclusive camping spot is Enyandi Camp, located at the junction of the Enyandi and Kunene rivers. The camp is accessed from the road between Swartbooisdrift and the Epupa Falls, and only seasoned 4x4 drivers in well-equipped vehicles should attempt to drive there. As far as amenities go, there is no water other than from the river. The camp is managed by the Kunene Conservancy. The Hippo Pools Campsite, accessible from the C46 road leading from Oshakati, is located 37 km west of Ruacana, within

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT One of the mysterious Lone Men of the Kaokoland, a rock and wire statue, made by an unknown artist • Namibia’s famous Desert-adapted Elephants

the sound of the Ruacana Falls in the Kunene River. It has well-appointed ablution blocks, and each campsite has its own braai facilities. Guided walks are offered to view the falls and the NamPower hydroelectric power station.

The Mysterious Lone Men The Kaokoland has long been described as a forelorn and mysterious place, often called the Wild West of Namibia. But, a new mystery has recently emerged, one that adds to the atmosphere of this fascinating desert wilderness: the Lone Men of Kaokoland. Nearly lifesized rock sculptures of men have started appearing across the area in the last year. Made from the rock prevailing in the area, they blend in perfectly with their surroundings and take on different poses, catching you by surprise with their lifelike gait or posture. One figure sits on a hill top, surveying the arid landscape, another one – referred to as the Dapper Stapper – strolls across the stony plains carrying a bundle on the end of a stick like an old-time traveller, another appears to be deep in thought, while yet another strides across the rugged land with a strong sense of purpose. Each figure has an aluminium disc attached to it, with a number and a message as to where it is going. The sculptures have been spotted along the road on the routes between Puros in the south, Van Zyl’s Pass in the east, Otjinungua in the north and the Skeleton Coast Park in the west.

TIPS FOR VIEWING DESERT ELEPHANTS • Avoid areas where the animals might feel trapped. • Don’t stop your vehicle in their migration path. • Drive slowly and keep your noise levels down. • Keep to existing roads and tracks. • Stay in your car when encountering an elephant herd. • Don’t camp at waterholes; use nearby campsites instead.


RON SWILLING

| KAOKOLAND, THE KUNENE RIVER AND THE HIMBA |

1

Hoanib Skeleton Coast Camp PO Box 6850, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 27 4500, Fax (+264 61) 23 9455 Email: info@wilderness.com.na Web: www.wilderness-safaris.com

The Hoanib Skeleton Coast Camp is found in one of the most remote areas of Namibia, straddling the Palmwag area and Skeleton Coast National Park. The stunning camp is set within an intriguingly diverse landscape offering eight luxurious en-suite tents. Guests have the chance to explore the dramatic rugged landscapes, dry riverbeds, soft sand dunes and a series of phenomenal oases in search of remarkable desert-adapted wildlife, as well as take a scenic flight (weather permitting & only 3 night stay) that reveals the wonders of the harsh Skeleton Coast with its enormous seal colonies and fascinating shipwreck remains. 8

2

Serra Cafema PO Box 6850, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 27 4500, Fax (+264 61) 23 9455 Email: info@wilderness.com.na Web: www.wilderness-safaris.com

Undoubtedly one of the most remote camps in southern Africa, Serra Cafema is located in the extreme north-west of Namibia on the banks of the Kunene River in the Hartmann’s Valley. Serra Cafema is an intimate, peaceful camp inspired by the area’s Himba people, with a unique mix of rustic and luxury elements, and nestled amongst shady albida trees. Accommodation consists of eight riverside wood, canvas and thatched villas on spacious, elevated decks blended smoothly into the picturesque surroundings. Each tent has an en-suite bathroom, ceiling fan and mosquito nets. One of these rooms is an intimate, luxurious honeymoon villa with exceptional views, while another accommodates a family. The Ozonganda, or main area, comprises indoor and outdoor dining areas, sunken lounge, library, curio shop and swimming pool, all sharing views of the Kunene River. 8

3

Kunene River Lodge Tel (+264 65) 68 5016, Fax (+264 65) 27 4301 Reservations: Tel: (+264 61) 22 4712 Email: info@kuneneriverlodge.com Web: www.kuneneriverlodge.com

Kunene River Lodge lies on the banks of the Kunene River 64kms west of Ruacana. Accommodation in air-conditioned Deluxe Rooms, A-frame chalets or beautiful riverside campsites. Discover the beauty, peace and tranquility of Kunene River Lodge, on the banks of the mighty Kunene river, overlooking Angola. A shining jewel in the heart of a vast African wilderness. Experience the thrill of White-Water Rafting, seek out rare bird species, meet local Himba people to learn about their culture, and wind down to the pace of the river during a Sundowner or Birding Cruise. Discover traditional Namibian hospitality, drink and dine while relaxing on the river deck and rest in comfortable wellequipped accommodation. Discover `A Piece of Paradise´. Discover Yourself! 13

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WATERBERG, KHAUDUM & SURROUNDINGS

• The Waterberg Plateau rises 200 metres above the surrounding savannah • The Hoba Meteorite is the largest known meteorite in the world • Tsumkwe and surroundings are home to Namibia’s earliest ancestors • Dragon’s Breath is the world’s largest known underground lake

ELZANNE ERASMUS

• Dinosaur footprints are found on top of the plateau

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WATERBERG, KHAUDUM AND SURROUNDINGS Rising as an island of colour some 200 metres above the surrounding African bush and savannah, the Waterberg Plateau, with its flamboyant brick-red sandstone formations and lush green vegetation, is without a doubt the main draw card of the region. Other attractions are the Hoba Meteorite, the Otjihaenamaparero dinosaur footprints and the Dragon’s Breath underground lake. Tsumkwe, the main town in Bushmanland and home to a large percentage of Namibia’s Bushman population, is the only place in the immediate area where fuel is provided.

WATERBERG PLATEAU PARK The 405.39 km2 Waterberg Plateau Park was proclaimed in 1972 as a reserve for endangered and protected species. The history of the park began on 15 June 1956 with the declaration of two portions of the plateau as natural monuments. This came to pass after representations were made to the then SWA Administration by the Kameradeschaft Ehemaliger Deutscher Soldaten, members of the Scientific Society, the Monuments Commission, and other interested parties. The two areas – the Omuverume Plateau and the Karakuwisa Mountain Range – were, however, divided by farms that had been allocated to farmers in the past. The Omuverume Plateau is probably the only sandveld vegetation type that developed for many centuries without being disturbed, due to the vertical cliffs and flora there having reached a

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unique stage of climax development. Interestingly enough, the original motivation for the proclamation of the entire Waterberg Plateau as a park was to create a reserve for eland. It was reasoned that ‘there are about 800 eland in the Waterberg area that move from farm to farm and cause a nuisance. As soon as the farmers obtain ownership of the game on their land, the future of these eland will be in jeopardy because the farmers do not tolerate eland on their land’. How wrong this statement proved to be! It was only when farmers were granted ownership of their game, that game populations in the country began to flourish and increase. The Waterberg Plateau Park of today is home to some 25 game and over 200 bird species. Rare species such as roan and sable antelope, Cape buffalo and tsessebe occur in large numbers. Species such as black and white

ACTIVITIES AND ADVENTURES Become acquainted with the Bushman people Learn more about wild-cat conservation Explore the depths of Dragon’s Breath underground lake Behold Hoba, the largest meteorite in the world Try your hand at birding in the park Endeavour to find and view as much game as possible with a guided tour in one of the national parks Explore the parks and surroundings on a proper 4x4 off-road and camping adventure


| WATERBERG, KHAUDUM AND SURROUNDINGS | Ondjiva

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rhino are also firmly established on the plateau. The vegetation changes dramatically from acacia savannah at the foot of the plateau to lush, green sub-tropical dry woodland with tall trees and grassy plains at the top. Ten fern species have been recorded at the Waterberg, of which one is endemic to Namibia and Angola. There is also an impressive range of flowering plants, including the conspicuous flame lily, Gloriosa superba. Dinosaur tracks embedded in sandstone can be seen on top of the plateau. On the site of the historic Battle of Waterberg, at the foot of the plateau, a graveyard serves as a reminder of a turbulent period in history. Schutztruppe (German soldiers) who died in the battle fought between the Herero and German colonial forces in 1904 are buried here. At the eastern extremity of the park is the Okatjikona Environmental Education Centre, a facility run by the Ministry of Environment and Tourism that provides the opportunity for visiting groups, mainly schoolchildren, to learn about the importance of environmental conservation. The superb natural beauty of the Waterberg can be explored by vehicle on a guided game-viewing tour, on foot by means of guided wilderness trails, on a four-day self-guided wilderness trail, or along easy walking trails.

DINOSAUR FOOTPRINTS

HOBA METEORITE

The small town of Grootfontein serves the surrounding cattle-ranching community and is the last centre on the road to Rundu and the far north-east. Its history and character are personified in its coat of arms by depictions of the Hoba Meteorite, a palm tree, kudu, eland and cheetah. The Herero name of the town – Otjiwanda Tjongue – means leopard’s crest, and these secretive, nocturnal cats still occur in the surroundings. Due to the relatively high rainfall and large number of springs in the area, the San and Damara who lived here during the first half of the 19th century called the place Gei-/ ous, which translates as Grootfontein (Afrikaans for large spring). A historic fort from the German era, built in 1896, houses the Grootfontein Museum with its extensive mineralogical collection, ethnical display – including an extensive exhibition on the Himbas – implements for making ox wagons, utensils used in the Kavango Region and an exhibition

The largest known meteorite of its kind in the world, Hoba Meteorite, lies in a shallow depression on the farm Hoba-West, about 20 km west of Grootfontein. The 50-tonne mass of nickel and iron is between 100 to 300 million years old. It crashed to earth some 30 000 to 80 000 years ago. Discovered by Jacobus Hermanus Brits in the 1920s, it has periodically been subjected to vandalism. Measures to protect the meteorite were taken in the 1980s in a joint venture between Rössing Uranium Ltd and the National Monuments Council. A stone amphitheatre was built around it to allow for convenient viewing, with a museum wall at the entrance displaying information about the meteorite. An interesting variety of birds such as Kalahari robins and several species of waxbills inhabit the surroundings, and there are barbecue facilities at the site.

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Tracks of a two-legged, three-toed dinosaur can be viewed 29 km north of the town Kalkveld on the farm Otjihaenamaparero. The cluster of small, shallow indentations in the rock surface – declared a national monument in 1951 – is estimated to be 150 million to 185 million years old. Visitors are required to pay a fee, and overnight and picnic facilities are provided on the farm.

featuring the German colonial Schutztruppe. The museum, which was recently revamped, celebrated its 30th year in 2013. It hosts an annual Christmas market on the last weekend of November, as well as movie nights throughout the year. Housed in the same building in Eriksson Street is the Tourist Information Centre. Close by is the fountain that gave rise to the town’s name, encircled by the Tree Park with its collection of exotic trees.

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT

DRAGON’S BREATH On the farm Harasib, 46 km northwest of Grootfontein off the C42 to Tsumeb, is the world’s largest known underground lake. It lies about 60 metres below ground level in a cave referred to as Dragon’s Breath, an enormous cavern of solid rock accessed from above using ropes and caving equipment. The lake has crystal-clear water and a surface area of almost two hectares. It is currently accessible only to professional cavers and divers. On the same property is Harasib Lake, where a group of cave divers, reaching depths of 147 metres in July 2012, set a new record.

TOWNS IN THE REGION Grootfontein

Leopards are graceful and powerful big cats closely related to lions, tigers and jaguars • Tracks of a two-legged, threetoed dinosaur can be viewed 29 km north of the town Kalkveld • A herd of blue wildebeest • The roads in Khaudum National Park are poorly maintained due to difficult accessibility. You won’t be able to travel more than 20-30 km/h • A female Greater Kudu • African Wild Dog (Lycaon pictus)

Providing a break from fast foods, Coffee Bloom in Hidipo Hamutenya Street serves balanced, home-cooked meals, cakes and light refreshments, and sells small gifts and jewellery. Situated in the Grootfontein district, north-east of the homestead of the Keibeb Farm, is a large baobab tree that was declared a national monument because it was regarded as the largest of its kind in the commercial farming area. On the farm Rietfontein is the grave of Axel W Eriksson, well-known traveller, hunter and pioneer of South West Africa during the second half of the 19th century. Grootfontein Museum/ Tourist Information Centre Tel (+264 67) 24 2456

Otavi The small towns of Otavi, Grootfontein and Tsumeb demarcate the socalled Maize Triangle, a relatively high-rainfall area with a flourishing agriculture sector centred mainly around the cultivation of maize and lucerne, some of which is under irrigation. While the town itself doesn’t offer much in terms of tourist attractions, the surroundings do. The Khorab Memorial – about 3 km from Otavi and dating back to the First World War – marks the spot where a ceasefire was signed at Khorab on 9 July, 1915. On the farm Ghaub, 35 km northeast of Otavi, a historical mission station built in 1895 was converted


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IAN GLENDINNING

RON SWILLING

JACO VENTER

FELIX MARNEVECKE

ANNABELLE VENTER

| WATERBERG, KHAUDUM AND SURROUNDINGS |

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| WATERBERG, KHAUDUM AND SURROUNDINGS | into Guest Farm Ghaub. There is much of interest in the surroundings, including the Ghaub Caves, remarkable for their stalactites, and Bushman paintings, which have been declared a national monument. The Fourways Stopover at the intersection leading to Tsumeb and Grootfontein hosts a refuelling station, car wash, biltong shop and butchery, takeaway outlet, chicken-and-chips shop, pizzeria, fresh vegetable market, and a small nursery. There are also braai facilities for truckers, and the Camel Inn Restaurant and Bar, which is open seven days a week for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Otjiwarongo The town of Otjiwarongo, a Herero word meaning ‘a good place’, is an important centre for cattle ranching. It is situated about 250 km north of Windhoek, on a slope amid undulating plains. An interesting feature in the town is the Otjiwarongo Crocodile Ranch, where crocodiles are bred. The crocodile ranch offers additional attractions such as birds, rabbits, tortoises and snakes. Light meals, including crocodile delicacies, can be enjoyed on the patio. The AfriCat Foundation, a non-profit organisation committed to the longterm conservation of Namibia’s large carnivores, is based at Okonjima. On the road leading there, is the Rare and Endangered Species Trust (REST) headquarters, originally founded to help conserve the Cape vulture, but later expanded to support other sensitive species representing biodiversity within the land ecosystem of Namibia. Omaue Information Tel (+264 67) 30 3830 Also in the area, albeit north of Otjiwarongo, is the headquarters of the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF). The Cheetah

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Elephants at Erindi Private Nature Reserve • The cheetah is the world’s fastest land mammal • The Khaudum National Park is a densely wooded wilderness reserve that borders Botswana in the east • The Waterberg Plateau supports a wide diversity of flora and fauna • Hoba Meteorite • A male Greater Kudu • Lilac-breaster Roller (Coracias caudatus) • Dik-diks stand at about 30-40 cm at the shoulder

Conservation Fund is the world’s leading organization dedicated to saving the cheetah in the wild. Founded by Dr. Laurie Marker in 1990, CCF has created a set of integrated programs aimed at addressing the principle threats to the cheetah. Using this research as an underpinning, CCF has created a set of integrated programs that together address the threats both to the cheetah and its entire ecosystem, including human populations. CCF operates from the principle that only by securing the future of the communities that live alongside the cheetah can you secure a future for the cheetah. Helping people helps cheetahs. In addition to being a world-class research and conservation facility, CCF is open to the public every day of the year except Christmas Day. Visitors to CCF can enjoy a variety of activities and experiences, including: • Centre Tours – A walking tour of our main facility and an introduction to the cheetah’s, dogs and livestock that live at the centre • Cheetah Drive - Take a drive through the Elandsvreugde cheetah enclosure in search of some of the female cheetah who live here at CCF. An experienced guide will be on hand to ensure you have a great time and explain how cheetah such as Samantha, Rosie and Solo came to be here at CCF • Cheetah Runs – see our resident cheetahs stretch their legs on our lure course and experience the wonder of seeing the world’s fastest land animal in action. • Behind the Scenes - Accompany a CCF Cheetah Keeper through the expansive cheetah camps and assist in the daily care of some of CCF’s centre cats.

OKAKARARA COMMUNITY CULTURAL AND TOURISM CENTRE Located in the small settlement of Okakarara, the Okakarara Community Cultural and Tourism Centre (OCCTC) was inaugurated in August 2004 during the 100-year commemoration of the Battle of Ohamakari, fought in the early liberation struggle of Namibia’s indigenous people. The centre serves as a link between present and past, as well as between visitors and residents, and works

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towards enhancing a common future in and around the traditional lands of the Herero people. The site hosts a café and kiosk, a small souvenir shop and a dialogue circle for meetings and team-building exercises. Camping sites are available. Tel (+264 67) 31 7603/7604

Tsumkwe The main town in Bushmanland – home to the Bushman/San people – is Tsumkwe, located 56 km east of Grootfontein. Further south and east is a vast expanse of wooded savannah where animals such as roan antelope and elephant roam. A distinctive tree found in the area is the baobab, recognised by its grotesquely fat trunk. There are no organised camping facilities in Bushmanland. Exclusive tours to introduce visitors to the Bushmen and their vanishing way of life are offered by several safari companies. Groups usually leave from Tsumkwe, visit the Khaudum National Park, and are introduced to Bushman communities such as the Jungkwa or Ju/’Hoansi. Depending on the tour company, the Bushmen act as hosts, demonstrating skills such as tracking and food gathering, and sharing their knowledge of local customs and beliefs with their guests. Several tour operators offer guided tours to traditional San villages in the area. The itineraries include bush walks with San trackers, who demonstrate hunting, snaring and tracking skills, and how bush food is collected. Ninety per cent of the proceeds generated by these tours remains with the Bushmen. The general dealer at Tsumkwe can usually supply petrol and diesel, but this may not always be the case. If travelling towards Tsumkwe, be sure to rather fill up with petrol at Grootfontein and Tsumeb and also carry extra jerry cans of fuel. It is also recommended to stock up with provisions and to carry extra water.

KHAUDUM NATIONAL PARK The Khaudum National Park is a densely wooded wilderness reserve that borders Botswana in the east and can be explored only in 4x4 vehicles. It is the only conservation area in

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Namibia where the northern Kalahari sandveld biome is protected. The Khaudum Nature Reserve was proclaimed in 1989. In February 2007, the 3 842 km2 reserve was given national park status and its name was adapted accordingly. The wilderness harbours several big-game species and a multitude of birds. However, as a result of the dense vegetation, game viewing in the Khaudum requires considerable patience. Large animals found throughout the park are elephant and giraffe, while predators are lion, leopard, spotted hyaena, and

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side-striped and black-backed jackal. African wild dogs also occur here. Game numbers vary considerably, as Khaudum is unfenced, enabling the animals to follow their natural migration routes. Khaudum is the stronghold of Namibia’s roan antelope. Other animals seen here are kudu, steenbok, gemsbok and blue wildebeest, while tsessebe, hartebeest, eland and reedbuck occur in the central areas. About 320 bird species have been recorded at Khaudum. Rare species include

Coppery-tailed and Senegal Coucals, Bradfield’s Hornbills, Rufous-bellied Tits, Black-faced Babblers and Sharptailed Starlings. Please note: A minimum of two 4x4 vehicles per group are allowed to travel in the park. There are two campsites, Sikereti and Khaudum, the latter of which has recently been upgraded. You are advised to bring your own drinking water, wood, fuel and provisions. In the Kavango Region petrol is sold only at Tsumkwe, Bagani, Divundu, and Rundu.

Waterberg Camp P/Bag 13378, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

The Waterberg Plateau, towering some 200 metres above the surrounding landscape, is one of the most spectacular features of the northern region. Nestled along the base of the cliffs, amongst towering trees, the Waterberg Resort offers comfortable premier bush chalets, two- and four-bed bush chalets and double rooms. Amenities include a restaurant, bar and kiosk, housed in the historic Rasthaus originally built in 1908, and a shop, swimming pool and camping site. Guided drives are offered daily to the plateau, which is managed as a breeding area for rare and endangered species such as rhino, buffalo, sable and roan antelope. The natural beauty of the area can also be explored on foot. 68

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Waterberg Guest Farm 149 Farm Okosongomingo, Otjiwarongo District Tel (+264 81) 751 4866 Email: reservations@waterbergnamibia.com, Web: www.waterbergnamibia.com

The Waterberg Guest Farm is located on a 42 000 ha private cattle farm called the Ranch ‘Okosongomingo’. It is situated at the foot of the famous Waterberg Plateau. There is a swimming pool which guests can use to cool off on those hot days and next to that is a traditional lapa and bar which is perfect for outdoor dining and just enjoying a few drinks. The wooden deck and floodlit waterhole are an ever popular after-dinner meeting place. Accommodation is set in either the original 1930’s manager’s house or in bush bungalows built out of local materials. Alternatively guests can occupy one of the secluded bush bungalows which are about 160m away from the main part of the guest farm. These are equipped with en-suite bathrooms, and an indoor and outdoor shower. Activities to be enjoyed include hiking, visits to the Cheetah Conservation Fund and the ‘little serengeti’ game drive where guests could spot wildlife such as leopard, giraffe, jackals, kudu, oryx, steenbok, klipspringer, dik-dik, caracal, baboon, hartebeest, warthog, free-roaming eland herds and more. 4

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| WATERBERG, KHAUDUM AND SURROUNDINGS |

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Okonjima – home of the AfriCat Foundation Okonjima Lodge Tel (+264 67) 68 7032/33/34 Emergency Cell: (+264 81) 127 6233 Fax (+264 67) 68 7051, (+264 67) 30 4565 Email: info@okonjimalodge.com Web: www.okonjima.com

The AfriCat Foundation Tel (+264 67) 30 4566 Email: info@africat.org Web: www.africat.org

Welcome to Okonjima, home of the AfriCat Foundation - your perfect leopard & cheetah safari in Namibia. West of the Waterberg Plateau, the vast plains are occasionally broken by the remnants of ancient Sandstone outcrops, which once covered large areas of northern Namibia. Nestled among the Omboroko Mountains lies Okonjima - a Herero name meaning Place of the Baboons. Okonjima Nature Reserve (22000ha) will be the high-light of your Namibian Safari! Both Okonjima & AfriCat are dedicated to creating conservation awareness through education; Environmental education at all ages and levels, rehabilitation and reintroduction programmes, provides solutions to human-wildlife conflict issues and conducts constructive wildlife research. OKONJIMA activities include tracking rehabilitated carnivores on foot; visiting the AfriCat Carnivore Care & Information Centre; tracking leopards from a game-viewing vehicle. OKONJIMA also offers a guided Bushman Trail. Birding and Game drives. Learn about Namibia’s carnivores and their fight for survival, and the Human-Wildlife Conflict challenges that face both man and carnivore.

The grand AFRICAN VILLA, be hosted and pampered in your private Bush Villa.

The select, private BUSH SUITE, for you and your family or friends exclusive.

The luxury BUSH CAMP, old style Safari under thatch.

PLAINS CAMP The Barn, the dining and

OMBOROKO CAMPSITE, private with a

lounge area, the pool and the curio-shop

“cool” pool.

ACTIVITIES, an experience and an insight.

AfriCat’s Carnivore Research and Care

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AfriCat’s Environmental education – Conservation through education

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TWYFELFONTEIN, BRANDBERG & DAMARALAND

• The region hosts Twyfelfontein, Namibia’s first World Heritage Site • It is home to the ancient Damara people • It offers Arts and crafts aplenty • The region is dominated by the Brandberg, Namibia’s highest mountain • Rock paintings and mineral deposits abound in the surroundings www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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TWYFELFONTEIN, BRANDBERG AND DAMARALAND The highlight of this region is Twyfelfontein – Namibia’s first World Heritage Site – with its wealth of rock engravings. Other special attractions are the majestic Brandberg with its treasure trove of ancient Bushman rock art and daunting rock-climbing challenges, the Petrified Forest, Burnt Mountain, Organ Pipes, the Spitzkoppe, and the Erongo Mountains.

TWYFELFONTEIN AND SURROUNDINGS Namibia’s first World Heritage Site (status awarded in 2007), Twyfelfontein (meaning doubtful fountain), is a massive, open-air art gallery that is of great interest to international rock-art connoisseurs. The 2,000-plus rock engravings, estimated to be 6,000 years old, represent one of Africa’s largest and most noteworthy concentrations of rock art. It is believed by many that the creators of the rock art were the medicine people or shamans, who incised their engravings as a means of entering the supernatural world and recording the shaman’s experience among the spirits. The rock-engraving process could prepare the shaman for a state of trance by the repetitive chipping and concentration of energy. Etched into the rock are thus stories within stories, eternalised as our legacy of the past. Close by is the Petrified Forest, where a cataclysmic event millions of years ago deposited giant tree trunks

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that subsequently turned to stone. Today the Namib’s living fossil plant, Welwitschia mirabilis, grows among these prostrate fossilised trunks. South of Twyfelfontein is the Burnt Mountain, a panorama of desolation with coloured rocks contrasting vividly against the grey-black surroundings. The Organ Pipes, a mass of basalt slabs in a ravine gouged out by a river, is another geological curiosity in the area. South-west of Twyfelfontein is Doros Crater, where fossil remains have been found among the rocks.

KHORIXAS AND ENVIRONS

Khorixas, the unofficial capital of the former Damaraland, is a useful stopover for refuelling your vehicle and stocking up on basic supplies. Although the town itself has little to offer, the surroundings feature rare and unusual stone formations, ancient rock engravings and strange geological wonders, tempting geologists and many other travellers to the region. Near the hot-water spring at Warmquelle is Sesfontein Fort. A

desolate and rapidly disintegrating ruin for many years, it has been reconstructed and equipped to accommodate tourists. Sesfontein derives its name from the six fountains

ACTIVITIES AND ADVENTURES Admire 6 000-year-old rock engravings at the Twyfelfontein World Heritage Site Stock up on locally sourced crystals at the craft market near the Spitzkoppe Buy a marble souvenir at the Karibib Marble works Go arty in Omaruru Visit the Damara people at their Living Museum Go on a horse-back excursion with guided tours through the area Take part in one of the annual endurance running or cycling events held in the area


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that have their source in the vicinity. The palm trees at the fort were planted by German police officers who manned it to combat weapon smuggling and elephant-and-rhino poaching. Close by is Signal Hill, a lookout point, where a heliograph station was constructed by German troops.

Finger rock Dominating the landscape when travelling westwards en route to Khorixas, 95 km west of Outjo, is the Ugab Vingerklip (Finger Rock) situated amongst the rugged Ugab Terraces. About 35 metres high, this distinctive monolith was moulded into its curious shape by erosion spanning many millennia.

KAMANJAB Although not offering much in terms of tourism, the small settlement of Kamanjab’s Pots of Hope project is well worth a visit. Here, a group of rural women and young people combine their skills to create unique, hand-made pottery items. Founded by Alexia /Naris, the project supports poor, stigmatised and abused women and girls, providing them with an alternative means of income based on their creative skills. The girls and women create products ranging from vases, tea sets and milk jugs, to garden pots, goblets and plates. Contact Alexia at 081 288 4581.

MESSUM CRATER Fine specimens of the desert plant, Welwitschia mirabilis, can be seen at the Messum Crater south-west of the Brandberg. Between 132 and 135 million years old, Messum has a diameter of 18 km. Messum is regarded as a volcanic feature that forms part of the Goboboseb Mountains to the northeast. It dates from the Etendeka period and, according to geologists, was the source of many of the intrusive and quartz-like extrusive rocks found in the area today. The crater was named after Captain W Messum, who was an explorer of the coastal regions of Southern Africa, which he surveyed from the ocean between 1846 and 1848. While driving to the Messum area you should, however, not overlook the lichen fields. Scientists marvel at the composition of lichens. Rather than plants, they are organisms that represent a mutualism between algae and fungi.

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THE BRANDBERG The imposing Brandberg massif is a challenge to rock climbers, especially its peak, Königstein, which at 2 573 metres is the highest point in Namibia. The Brandberg is famous for the rock painting known as the White Lady, which can be seen on an overhang in Maack’s Shelter, named after the surveyor who discovered it in 1917. Maack’s Shelter lies in the Tsisab Gorge, a wild and beautiful ravine located amongst a vast jumble of rocks that are remnants of many ancient landslides. Although the figure of the White Lady, surrounded by paintings of numerous animals, has faded over the years, a pilgrimage to see it is well worth the effort. The walk, which takes about one hour along a well-marked route, should not be undertaken at midday. The paintings at the Brandberg rock-art site are estimated to be between 2,000 and 4 000 years old. This massive outdoor gallery has been nominated for proclamation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Acacia montis-usti trees, conspicuous in the Brandberg valley, are endemic to this region. Visitors to the Brandberg are advised to make use of the services provided by the Dâureb Mountain Guides, who take them on excursions up the mountain on a day trip or longer camping expeditions. The National Heritage Council (NHC) of Namibia recently announced the following regulations: • A letter of permission issued by the NHC is required by a person or group before hiking and camping on the mountain. In order to obtain a letter simply contact the NHC in Windhoek requesting permission. Their number is 061 244 375 and they are located at 52 Robert Mugabe Avenue in Windhoek. • You need to indicate the number of days you will stay and how many are in the group. • A permit is required for any other activities such as research or filming. • A guide is required for your entire stay. The NHC provides the guide after you have received the permission letter. According to them it’s for your entire stay on the mountain and the heritage area. For more information contact the National Heritage Council directly at www.nhc-nam.org or +264 61 244 375.

OMARURU Omaruru in central Namibia is a splendid example of a town that

continues to reinvent itself and thrive in the process. Having evolved in recent years as a haven for an active artists’ community, it is a small town with big ideas. Like many towns in Namibia, it originated as a mission station. The missionary Hugo Hahn was the first European to set foot here. When

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT The Brandberg is the tallest mountain in Namibia • Rock art at Twyfelfontein is over 6 000 years old • Rock formations at the Spitzkoppe are a geologist and photographer’s dream • The aardvark is a medium-sized, burrowing, nocturnal mammal • Rüppel’s Korhaan (Eupodotis rueppelli) • Damara people making fire in the traditional way

Omaruru was besieged by Herero forces during the Herero/German war, it was freed by Captain Victor Franke and his men. The Franke Tower, built to commemorate this event, was inaugurated in 1908. The oldest building in Omaruru, the Old Rhenish Mission House, now serves as the town museum. At the Namibia Stone Processing plant, items from local marble and granite are manufactured. In 1907 Omaruru acquired an official municipality. By this time Willi Wronsky had built his residence, today’s Wronsky House, at the north end of Main Street; the small Roman Catholic Church on Main Street had been built and dedicated; and the Omaruru River had run above ground for the entire winter, most unusual in this dry part of the country. Every year the artists’ community of Omaruru presents an Artists’ Trail. Over the first weekend in September, open studios and outdoor exhibits draw visitors to Namibia from around Southern Africa and beyond. During 2009 the Omuntu Garden was opened with an exhibition of over 50 sculptures by five Namibian sculptors. The creator of Omuntu, Hanne Alpers, maintains the garden as a permanent display area for sculptural art. Omuntu means ‘human being’ in Oshiwambo. The Main Street Café is open for breakfast and lunch. It specialises in home-cooked items, including cheese, cheesecake and sausages made with locally sourced ingredients.

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| TWYFELFONTEIN, BRANDBERG AND DAMARALAND | gallery and workshop where visitors can watch award-winning woodcarvers in action. In an open-air studio, they transform weather-worn roots and trunks into unique sculptures of animals, varying in size from 10 cm to 10 metres high. Kashana Landhaus is a group of buildings on the banks of the Omaruru River initiated by local

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT The Spitzkoppe is a group of rounded granite mountains situated north-west of Usakos • Rhino tracking encounters are offered by a number of lodges in the area, the profits of which are plunged back into black rhino conservation efforts • Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill (Tockus leucomelas) • A desert-adapted elephant • Gemsbok (Oryx gazella) • A desert-adapted black rhino (Diceros bicornis bicornis)

artists to accommodate studios and creative outlets such as the jewellerydesign workshop of German-trained goldsmith Annette Meyer, and Heavenly Herbs, a shop devised by local artist, Hanne Alpers, who also owns the Naua Naua Art shop and gallery on the same premises. Urte and Kalli Dörgeloh of Dörgeloh Chocolates practise a time-honoured German tradition, producing a fine range of handmade chocolates. Employing original Omaruru recipes and vintage moulds dating back to the early fifties, the Dörgelohs use only the finest ingredients, including local dates, rosella, kumquat, oranges, choc-mint and honey, making their products truly Namibian. Since June 2004, the Kristall Kellerei in Omaruru has been manufacturing its own brandy. It is the only manufacturer of Namibian brandy for the market, and also produces wines, which compare favourably when measured to international standards. A range of Schnapps is produced from prickly pears, prosopis roots, lemons and, naturally, grapes. Well worth a visit is Grow Namibia, a company that encourages sustainable development through recycling paper, glass and waste metal and converting it into new and interesting products.

Rock paintings The area surrounding Omaruru is rich in rock paintings. Paula Cave contains interesting specimens, although they have weathered away to some extent

due to the lighting of fires inside the cave. At Etemba there are six main sites with rock paintings. The largest of these is the Etemba Cave, where a large number depict humans and other animals.

SPITZKOPPE The Spitzkoppe is a group of rounded granite mountains situated north-west of Usakos, en route to Swakopmund. A favourite with climbers, the Spitzkoppe peak – affectionately known as Namibia’s Matterhorn because of its resemblance to the famous Swiss mountain – was first climbed in 1946. The Spitzkoppe group peaks at 1 728 metres above sea level. Seventy metres above the surrounding gravel plains are Sugarloaf Mountain and the Pondok Mountains (resembling the rounded Damara huts called pondoks). Rising 600 metres above the Kaokoveld plains, the main inselberg (island mountain) of the Spitzkoppe is approximately 700 million years old. After good summer rains, tall grass blows across the plains and small pools of water collect on the granite rocks of the mountain in shallow hollows. The group also has a minor peak, Little Spitzkoppe, which extends into the Pondok Mountains. On the eastern side is Bushman’s Paradise, with a walk up the steep incline made possible by the use of a fixed steel cable. Remains of San/Bushman paintings can be seen in the overhang. Unfortunately they, like most rock art in the Spitzkoppe area, have been vandalised. Other rock paintings can be seen at the Small Bushman’s Paradise and Golden Snake sites. At the Spitzkoppe turn-off, where the D1918 meets the B2, is the popular Ûiba-Ôas Crystal Market. Here the local community sells a variety of crystals, gemstones and minerals. The market is open seven days a week.

THE ERONGO MOUNTAIN AND TSISEB CONSERVANCIES Incorporating the Erongo Mountains and western escarpment, the Erongo Mountain Nature Conservancy extends over approximately 200 000 hectares, encompassing one of the most environmentally diverse areas in Namibia, and including cultural artefacts such as rock paintings, rock

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engravings and prehistoric settlements. The region harbours high densities of leopard and brown hyaena. The members of the conservancy are committed to reintroducing species that formally inhabited the area, such as black-faced impala and black rhino. In terms of endemic species, the Erongo environment is one of Namibia’s hotspots, as it hosts a vast array of endemic and near-endemic plant, reptile, bird and mammal species. These include the Angolan dwarf python, white-tailed shrike, Hartlaub’s francolin, Ruppell’s parrot, rockrunner and Hartmann’s zebra. Rare species that have found refuge in the Erongo Mountains include the peregrine falcon and booted eagle. The striking black eagle can also be seen breeding in the mountains. The 8 083 km2 Tsiseb Conservancy in the Uis and Brandberg environs is the second-largest conservancy in Namibia. The small town of Uis has a MultiPurpose Information Centre, with a coffee shop and Internet facilities, enabling travellers between Swakopmund and Etosha to access information about the entire region and to book tours with the Dâureb Mountain Guides to climb the Brandberg.

KARIBIB Known for the marble produced at a nearby quarry, the small town of Karibib lies en route to Walvis Bay and Swakopmund. The marble and granite mined at the Karibib Marble Works is used commercially for tombstones and to enhance public buildings and private homes in Namibia. It is also exported to countries such as America, China, Italy and Thailand for building purposes. An interesting place to visit in Karibib is the Henckert Tourist Centre on the main street, an ideal refreshment stop for travellers between Windhoek and Swakopmund. The Navachab Gold Mine south-west of the town was established in 1987, two years after the discovery of gold on Navachab Farm. The gold is of a relatively low quality, however, as 750 000 tonnes of rock must be processed every year to make the enterprise viable. Brought to life by the construction of a railway line between Swakopmund and Windhoek, one of the oldest buildings in Karibib, the Rösemann Building, was built in 1900. It serves as an excellent example of the German architecture of the period, and is still in use today, housing a bank and

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some shops. The Hotel Zum Grünen Kranze, situated in Main Street and built in 1913, was one of six hotels in the town during the German colonial period. Hälbich House serves as the only reminder of the firm G Hälbich & Co (founded in 1873), the oldest trading company in the history of Namibia, and an integral role player in the development of Karibib. Another interesting building is Haus Woll, constructed with granite and marble sourced from the area. It was built at the beginning of the 20th century as a residence for Georg Woll. Other heritage buildings of interest are the Kubas Station Building, a white marble building erected in 1900, serving as a station building for the German State Railway until 1914; and the Proviantamt (Provisions Office), built in 1911 as a quartermaster’s store. The latter is currently in use by the Karibib Marble Works. The Karibib main road is one of the few thoroughfares in the country featuring a well-preserved and almost intact

BELOW The imposing Brandberg massif is a challenge to rock climbers, especially its peak, Köningstein

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group of colonial buildings dating to the 20th century. Situated at the northern edge of the town, is Kaiserbrunnen, a water reservoir and drinking trough built in 1906. The well has since dried up.

OTJIMBINGWE South of Karibib is a small, dusty, almost-forgotten village called Otjimbingwe, a name thought to mean ‘place of refreshment’ and referring to a spring in the Omusema River. Yet Otjimbingwe was proclaimed the administrative centre of the then Deutsch-Südwest-Afrika during German occupation. A mission station was established here in 1849, and the first church was built in 1867. Historical features in the town include the Hälbich Trading Store, Rhenish Mission Church, the Powder Magazine erected in 1872 to protect the local population against attacks by the Nama, and the old Windmill, which generated power for the wagon factory belonging to the Hälbich family. After Curt von Francois moved his garrison to Windhoek in 1890, the town began to fall into decline, and when the railway line between Windhoek and Swakopmund was completed in the

early 1900s, Otjimbingwe was bypassed and soon fell into obscurity.

USAKOS The small sun-baked town of Usakos, nestled in the valley of the Khan River, developed around a station on the old narrow-gauge railway built in 1900. Beyond Usakos is the Trekkopje Battlefield, site of one of the most important battles fought during the short-lived 1915 campaign involving South African and German forces. The Erongo Mountains north of the town are renowned for the rock art found at sites such as Philipp’s Cave, named after Emil Philipp, who owned farm Ameib when the cave was discovered. One of the most striking examples of prehistoric art, the White Elephant, is found in this rock shelter. A popular picnic spot for visitors to Ameib is a collection of giant boulders referred to as Bull’s Party. Philipp’s Cave can be reached only on foot, a walk that takes about 45 minutes. A popular stopover for visitors to and from the coast, the Namib Oasis farm stall, is well known for its homemade biltong and droëwors, home-cooked meals and handmade gifts.


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Damaraland Camp PO Box 6850, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 27 4500, Fax (+264 61) 23 9455 Email: info@wilderness.com.na, Web: www.wilderness-safaris.com

Damaraland Camp is situated in the Torra Conservancy – an inspirational community partnership in one of the most pristine wilderness areas in Namibia. It is characterised by sensational views of the surrounding desert plains, ancient valleys and distant peaks of the Brandberg Mountains. New technology blends with ancient construction methods to create innovative, eco-friendly luxury in the desert, with the camp’s 10 elevated adobe-styled, thatched units. The annual cycle of rainfall dictates the seasonal movement of wildlife along the Huab River, which game drives attempt to uncover. Desert-adapted elephant, gemsbok, kudu, springbok, and occasionally lion, cheetah, and black rhino are seen. 10

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Doro Nawas Camp PO Box 6850, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 27 4500, Fax (+264 61) 23 9455 Email: info@wilderness.com.na, Web: www.wilderness-safaris.com

A joint venture between Wilderness Safaris and the Doro !Nawas community, Doro Nawas Camp sits atop a rocky hill commanding spectacular views of the Etendeka Mountains to the north, the red sandstone cliffs of Twyfelfontein in the south, and the plains of the dry Aba-Huab River below. Accommodation comprises 16 units that blend into a dramatic landscape of table-top outcrops, small canyons, dry riverbeds and grassland vistas. The camp provides an excellent base from which to experience phenomenal scenery, the acclaimed desert-adapted elephant herds that move through the area seasonally, and the spectacular rock engravings of Twyfelfontein World Heritage Site. 16

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Desert Rhino Camp PO Box 6850, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 27 4500, Fax (+264 61) 23 9455 Email: info@wilderness.com.na, Web: www.wilderness-safaris.com

Lying amongst the rolling, rocky hills of the vast Palmwag Concession, the area around Desert Rhino Camp is known for its tranquil, minimalist beauty, surprising wealth of arid-adapted wildlife and the largest free-roaming black rhino population in Africa. Accommodation consists of eight raised Meru-style canvas tents with verandas taking in the sweeping views dotted with scattered euphorbia and ancient welwitschia plants, and the dramatic Etendeka Mountains. Adventurous rhino tracking activities take place daily in conjunction with Save the Rhino Trust – Wilderness Safaris and Desert Rhino Camp guests thus support this NGO in its vital work of protecting this endangered species. 8

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Hohenstein Lodge PO Box 72, Usakos Bookings: Tel +264 (0) 61 24 0020, Tel: +264 (0) 64 53 0900 E-Mail: reservations@hohensteinlodge.com Web: www.hohensteinlodge.com, www.ondili.com

The Hohenstein represents the impressive western edge of the Erongo mountain range. In the evening, spectacular sunsets above the desert plains bathe the mountain in a fantastic red light. Have a drink on the terrace and enjoy this exceptional view. Accommodation is offered in 14 spacious en-suite rooms, each with a safe, and a shady terrace. The reception area and restaurant are located in the main building, which is connected to the swimming pool and bungalows by paved walkways. Two of the rooms are wheelchair-friendly. Children of all ages are welcome. Activities: 2-day adventure package ‘ABSOLUTE ERONGO’, hiking trails, birdwatching, excursions to the mineral miners at Hohenstein Mountain. 14

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Erongo Wilderness Lodge Big Sky Lodges – Reservations Office: Tel (+264 61) 23 9199, Cell (+264 81) 383 5991 Email: info@erongowilderness-namibia.com Lodge: Tel (+264 64) 57 0537, Cell (+264 81) 878 1610 Web: www.erongowilderness-namibia.com, www.bigsky-namibia.com

In a secluded valley of the Erongo Mountains, you will find twelve luxury tented chalets in a dramatic setting of granite boulders and breathtaking views. Raised wooden walkways and natural stone steps connect the chalets to the main area, where the restaurant, lounge, swimming pool and sundowner deck invite you to relax and unwind. Delicious and original meals, including sumptuous breakfasts and freshly-baked breads and pastries, are complemented by the spectacular setting. Nature provides compelling reasons for visiting this unique environment. Many rare, endemic and unusual animal, bird, and plant species thrive here, making this one of Namibia’s most diverse and wildlife-rich areas. 12

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Etendeka Mountain Camp Big Sky Lodges – Reservations Office: Tel (+264 61) 23 9199, Cell (+264 81) 383 5991 Fax (+264 61) 23 4971 Email: info@Etendeka-Namibia.com Web: www.Etendeka-Namibia.com, www.bigsky-namibia.com

Following the signing of the groundbreaking joint-venture agreement with the neighbouring communities, the decision was made to completely rebuild and relaunch Etendeka Mountain Camp. The new, uniquely different dining area will remain true to Etendeka’s long-standing and award-winning commitment to eco-friendly values. In the foothills of the Grootberg massif, set amidst magnificent scenery and the ancient Etendeka lavas of northern Damaraland, the ten new en-suite Meru tents have been refitted with luxury mattresses and 100% cotton linen. Necessary comforts have not been overlooked, with the bathrooms also benefiting from a makeover, while the traditional, open-air bucket showers still hold pride of place. At Etendeka, wildlife has acclimatised to a precarious existence amongst the towering basalt mountains and dry mopane-shaded river courses of the Kunene Region. A strong focus is on walking activities. 10

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Ai Aiba Lodge Big Sky Lodges Reservations: Tel: +264 (0)61 239199, Cell: +264 (0)81 3835991, Fax: +264 (0)61 234 971 Email: info@aiaiba-namibia.com, Web: www.aiaiba-namibia.com Lodge: +264(0)64 570330

Situated between Usakos and Omaruru amidst massive granite boulders overlooking the magnificent Erongo Mountain range is Ai Aiba Lodge. The Erongo Region is one of the most environmentally diverse areas in Namibia, hosting an array of endemic and near-endemic plant, reptile, mammal and bird species, as well as a wealth of cultural artefacts. Twenty thatched-roof twin bedrooms, tastefully appointed with en-suite shower, offer the visitor a unique, luxurious African experience. The restaurant with its panoramic view, bar and crystal-clear pool nestling among the rocks add to the natural tranquillity of the surroundings. Co-ordinates: S2130 76.2 E01534 39.2 20

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Khorixas Camp P/Bag 13378, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

In the heart of the arid central Namibia, between Swakopmund and the Etosha National Park, lies Khorixas Lodge, a port of call that provides a relaxing environment for travellers weary after a day’s exploration. Near Khorixas is the Burnt Mountain, Petrified Forest and the famous rock-engraving site at Twyfelfontein, which achieved World Heritage Status in 2007. The lodge offers 29 bush chalets, two family chalets, a house for self-caterers, 10 single rooms, a camping site and a restaurant. Khorixas can be reached from Windhoek by taking the B1 northwards, turning onto the C38 from Otjiwarongo through Outjo and then the C39 to Khorixas. 32

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Grootberg Lodge PO Box 91045, Klein Windhoek Lodge: Tel (+264 67) 33 3212 Reservations: Tel (+264 61) 22 8104 Booking Email: grootberg@journeysnamibia.com Fax to Email: (+264 88) 63 5551 Web: www.grootberg.com

Perched on the rim of the Etendeka Plateau, the Grootberg Lodge stands sentinel over the Klip River Valley. Fourteen rock-and-thatch chalets and two family units gaze out over the gorge, where Black Eagles hunt just below your private deck. Twelve thousand hectares have been set aside by the #Khoadi //Hoas community for conservation and tourism and it is through this pristine wilderness that you meander either on foot or by car to encounter the inhabitants of this remote biosphere. Activities on offer include tracking the elusive desert elephant, a Damara cultural tour, as well as educational guided walks to discover the myriad of smaller mammals, birds, reptiles, insects and plants that exist here.

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Hoada Camp PO Box 91045, Klein Windhoek Reservations: Tel (+264 61) 22 8104 Fax to Email: (+264 88) 63 5551

Lodge: Tel (+264 67) 33 3212 Booking Email: hoada@journeysnamibia.com Web: www.grootberg.com

Hidden among large granite boulders and Mopani trees, Hoada Campsite offers travellers a serene home in the wilderness. The area is rich in a variety of animal species, and offers spectacular views with a number of hiking trails and 4×4 tracks to explore. We also offer mountain bike trails, with a guide. This sensational landscape is a natural habitat of Namibia’s uniquely adapted desert elephant. These, and a number of larger plains game, reptiles and invertebrates are abundant on the Grootberg Plateau. At night, uncountable stars offer a spectacular sight. The campsite was designed to be as eco-friendly as possible. The hot water system works in combination with the braai area to warm the water for your shower as you prepare your food. Light and sound pollutions is virtually non-existent due to the absence of electric light and power points. The Hoada Campsite is situated 25km east of Grootberg Lodge or 75km on the C40 west from Kamanjab, in the #Khoadi //Hoas Conservancy, Damaraland. The Grootberg lodge activities are also available for campers. Activities can only be booked on arrival and depending on availability. 10 32

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Vingerklip Lodge Tel (+264 61) 25 5344 Tel (+264 67) 29 0319, Fax (+264 67) 29 0318 Email: vingerkl@afol.com.na

One of the most dramatic rock formations in Namibia – the 35-metre-high pillar of rock referred to as the Finger of Stone – stands proudly above a valley in the ancient landscape known as the Ugab Terraces. Nestling in this timeless valley, Vingerklip Lodge warmly welcomes its guests. A sheltered sundowner veranda affords breathtaking views of the surrounding countryside and the unmatched splendour of a Namibian sunset. Fine wines and refreshing, locally brewed beer are served, complementing our gourmet cuisine and buffet in the spacious dining room. The lodge offers two swimming pools where guests can while away lazy afternoons. 11

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Mowani Mountain Camp Booking Office: Visions of Africa PO Box 40788, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 23 2009, Fax (+264 61) 22 2574 Email: mowani@visionsofafrica.com.na, Web: www.mowani.com

Between the Ugab and Huab rivers in southern Damaraland lies a vast, beautiful and unspoilt wilderness of unsurpassed desert scenery, unusual geological formations, interesting archaeological sites and a unique variety of desert fauna and flora. Africa has always been recognised for its uniqueness, and now Africa-uniqueness recognises Mowani Mountain Camp! The harshness of the countryside is complemented by the luxurious softness and pure comfort of the camp interiors. Inside and outside blend harmoniously as the dining-and-lounge area opens out, capturing the cooling south-westerly breeze, ensuring that you are never too far from the breathtaking scenery. An enormous flat boulder serves as a sundowner spot, affording guests spectacular vistas of the Aba-Huab Valley, the tabletop mountains and cone-shaped peaks in the distance, and the majestic Brandberg. A manmade rock pool, carved skilfully out of the surrounding stone, blends in perfectly with the natural surroundings. An adjacent wooden deck entices visitors to relax and soak up the sun. Guests are housed in luxury rooms and suites, each with its own en-suite bathroom with shower and washbasin. The fastidious attention to detail ensures that the African theme is visible in all elements of the rooms. Individual verandas encourage guests to linger while admiring the unspoilt wilderness of the surroundings. Activities include daytime guided game and nature drives and excursions to the ancient Twyfelfontein rock-engraving site. Guest can also take a self-guided walk in the area. 2

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Camp Kipwe Booking Office: Visions of Africa PO Box 40788, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 23 2009, Fax (+264 61) 22 2574 Email: kipwe@visionsofafrica.com.na, Web: www.kipwe.com

Blessings come in all shapes and sizes, and Camp Kipwe has all the features of a blessed camp in Damaraland. The camp is nestled among boulders, facing out onto superb scenery. Incorporating stone, small red basalt rocks and mopane branches, it has a natural organic feel. The nine air-conditioned rooms (and one spacious suite) are round in shape – an unusual and appealing novelty – and the outside deck chairs are perfectly placed for admiring the view. The partially open bathrooms adjoining the bedrooms have boulder, cement and rock walls, and roofs of rough mopane branches, introducing a local Damara touch. Showering under the stars and a waxing moon is a simple magical experience we partake in much too rarely, and at Kipwe we are given the opportunity to luxuriate in starlight. A small swimming pool built into the rocks and a 360-degree viewpoint of breathtaking beauty, are two attractive outdoor features. Activities at the camp include nature drives with the possibility of seeing desert-adapted elephants; excursions to Twyfelfontein a short drive away to view the thousands-of-years-old huntergatherer rock engravings and self-guided walks. 10

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Ameib Guest Farm Email: ameib@erongosafaris.com

A renowned guest farm within the Erongo Mountain Rhino Sanctuary North of the small town Usakos on the road from Windhoek to Swakopmund lies the Erongo Mountain, an old volcano rising 2 319 metres above sea level. Here, on private land, the Erongo Mountain Rhino Sanctuary Trust was founded, aimed at establishing a private game reserve of approximately 200 000 hectares in and around the Erongo Mountains. Within the sanctuary elephant, black rhinoceros, leopard, brown hyaena, giraffe and many other species occur, amongst them the endemic black-faced impala, Hartmann's zebra and Damara dik-dik. There is abundant bird life at Ameib, including the black eagle, peregrine falcon and several endemic species such as Hartlaub's francolin and Monteiro's hornbill. The guest farm is situated at the foot of the southern crater rim, against a magnificent backdrop of sheer granite outcrops. Ameib is synonymous with unique settings and intriguing features. Visit the famous Bull’s Party rock formations and Philipp’s Cave with its well-known rock paintings. On game drives black rhino, giraffe and other rare wildlife can be seen amidst stunning landscapes. Within walking distance to the farmstead, open water attracts many birds. Day visitors are welcome. Accommodation is in 11 en-suite double rooms and a camping site. 11

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SOSSUSVLEI & THE NAMIBNAUKLUFT PARK • Sossusvlei is Namibia’s second-most popular tourist attraction • The dunes at Sossusvlei are up to 325 metres high • The Namib-Naukluft Park is home to the famous Welwitschia mirabilis • The Naukluft Mountain massif is a geologists’ paradise • The Sandwich Harbour Lagoon is fed by fresh water

PAUL VAN SCHALKWYK

seeping from an inland aquifer

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SOSSUSVLEI AND THE NAMIB-NAUKLUFT PARK Proclaimed in 1979, the Namib-Naukluft Park is an amalgamation of several areas into one integrated reserve. It is the largest conservation area in the country and home to one of Namibia’s top tourist attractions, the legendary Sossusvlei, a spectacular white pan surrounded by some of the highest sand dunes in the world.

On 22 March 1907, German Governor Frederich von Lindequist proclaimed three nature reserves, one of which was Game Reserve No 3 in the central Namib Desert. Renamed as the Namib Desert Park in 1962, this tract of scenically beautiful desert was amalgamated with the Naukluft Mountain Zebra Park (proclaimed in 1968) and unoccupied state land in 1979, and proclaimed as the Namib-Naukluft Park. Portions of the Diamond Area as far south as the Aus/Lüderitz road were subsequently added, which virtually doubled its size to 49 768 km2, making it the largest conservation area in Namibia, the largest game park in Africa and fourth largest in the world. The top attraction in the park and one of the country’s major tourist destinations, second only to the Etosha National Park, is Sossusvlei,

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renowned for its spectacular, desiccated white pan surrounded by majestic star-shaped dunes with deep, warm hues, and close by, the eerie Dead Pan with its bleached skeletons of ancient camel-thorn trees. Other features in the NamibNaukluft Park are Sesriem, the Welwitschia Trail, Sandwich Harbour, the Naukluft Mountains and the Kuiseb Canyon.

NAMIB SECTION This section is situated in the central and southern Namib Desert. Ostrich, springbok and gemsbok are conspicuous especially on the desert plains, while Hartmann’s mountain zebra, klipspringer and baboon frequent the canyons of the Swakop and Kuiseb rivers, and leopard and African wild cat move in and out of the Kuiseb Canyon. Larger predators

ACTIVITIES AND ADVENTURES Take on Dune 45 or Big Daddy and marvel at the beauty of Sossusvlei from a higher vantage point Hike through NamibRand, Namibia’s largest private nature reserve Explore the natural wonders of the Namib-Naukluft Park Learn about dune flora and fauna at Gobabeb Enjoy the wonders of stargazing under the magnificent African night sky Take a balloon ride over the dunes of Sossusvlei at sunrise


Philips Ameib Cave

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Kuiseb Canyon

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Gaub Pass

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Heide

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Remhoogte Pass

dab C14

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Desert Homestead Lodge

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Sesriem Campsite

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Sossus Dune Lodge

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Desert Homestead Outpost Simaedjo Point Kanaan N/a’an ku sê Desert Retreat

Kulala Desert Lodge

Neuras Wine and Wildlife Estate

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Duwisib Castle

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Hammerstein Lodge

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Sossusvlei Lodge

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Desert Camp

C14 Desert Quiver Camp

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Sossus Oasis Campsite

16

Helmeringhausen Wolwedans Collection

C27

1920m

Great Tiras 1867m

NO PUBLIC ACCESS

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Mooifontein Mooifontein Military Cemetery

1

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Wild Horses of the Namib Prisoner of

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Büllsport

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Rietoog

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1973m

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PERMIT

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NAMIBIA

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Von Bach Recreation Resort

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West Ugab Guided Trail

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Ugab River Gate Ogden Rocks

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Schmelen House

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found here are spotted and brown hyaena, and smaller predators blackbacked jackal and bat-eared fox. An intriguing host of small creatures have adapted to survive in the Namib dunes. The fog-basking beetle, Onymacris unguicularis, drinks water by positioning itself on the crest of a dune, dropping its head and extending its hind legs. Its back serves as a condensation surface for fog, which forms droplets and slides downwards towards its mouth. An intriguing ‘thermal dance’ is performed by the shovel-snouted lizard, Meroles anchietae, to cope with the extreme heat radiating from the dune surfaces. The Gobabeb Training and Research Centre on the banks of the Kuiseb River has an international reputation for researching Namib ecology. Gobabeb now also has accommodation facilites hosting guests from around the world.

SOSSUSVLEI Many visitors to Namibia say that no part of the desert is visually more dramatic than Sossusvlei with its monumentally high dunes. These gigantic star-shaped mountains of sand – one of the largest was measured from the base as 325 metres high – are a sought-after topic for artists and photographers. The warm tints of the sand contrast vividly with the dazzling white surfaces of the large deflationary clay pans at their bases. One of these, referred to as Dead Pan, is a large ghostly expanse of dried white clay, punctuated by skeletons of ancient camel-thorn trees, carbon-dated as being between 500 and 600 years old. Sossusvlei’s mountainous dunes lie at the end of an erosional trough formed by the Tsauchab River. They are shaped by strong multidirectional winds, primarily the southwester, and have three to five sinuous crests, which meet at the highest point to give them their characteristic star shapes. Visitors are allowed access to Sossusvlei only between sunrise and sunset. The first 60 km of the road from Sesriem to Sossusvlei has a permanent surface and is suitable for sedan cars, whereas the last fivekilometre stretch of sandy track is negotiable by 4x4 vehicles only. A shuttle service is available for people who do not want to hike the last 5 km.

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Sesriem Canyon

The permit office complex for entry to Sossusvlei and other destinations in this section of the park is at Sesriem. Four kilometres south from here is Sesriem Canyon, where the erosion of many centuries has incised a narrow gorge about 1 km in length. At the foot of the gorge, which plunges 30–40 metres, are pools that become replenished after good rains. Sesriem derives its name from the time when early pioneers tied six lengths of rawhide thongs together to draw water from these pools. To early inhabitants, the gorge was an important water source in an otherwise waterless area. Even during very dry times there is water in the upper reaches of the canyon, where the deep clefts reduce evaporation. The Tsauchab River flows through the Sesriem Canyon and continues down to Sossusvlei.

Maltahöhe About 110 km west of Mariental on the C19 en route to Sossusvlei is the small town of Maltahöhe, named by Hauptmann Henning von Burgsdorf, who supervised a police station of the German colonial administration there in 1895. He named the settlement after his wife, Malta. About 35 km north of Maltahöhe, on the farm Sandhof, lies an enormous salt pan that is usually bone dry, except in good rainy seasons. If the pan reaches a depth of over 15 cm, shoots break miraculously through the surface of the shallow water, seemingly out of nowhere, and burst into bloom. For hundreds of hectares, as far as the eye can see, a shortlived vista of iridescent amaryllis lilies appears in an ephemeral blaze of pink, purple and white. But, as soon as the flowers have formed, they wither, and an almost biblical horde of elephant beetles descends and devours them within the space of a few days. The single weekend in which the lily season falls, usually in January or February, is a hectic one for Maltahöhe. When on the way to attractions such as Sossusvlei and Sesriem, many visitors elect to stay in the Maltahöhe Hotel, one of the oldest country hotels in Namibia. The cemetery at Nomtsas, some 45 km north of Maltahöhe, contains the graves of some German pioneers and is a national monument.

SANDWICH HARBOUR The reed-fringed lagoon at Sandwich Harbour, situated 48 km south of Walvis Bay at the foot of towering ivory-coloured dunes, is a spectacular and sought-after destination. The lagoon, referred to in old texts as Sandfisch Haven, is a former bay that became silted up over the years. Today especially anglers, ornithologists, photographers and nature lovers visit Sandwich. The Sandwich area has a strange mystique, enhanced by the legend that buried somewhere in the dunes above the high-water mark is a ship with a rich cargo of ivory, gold and precious stones. This treasure has been searched for by many fortune hunters, but to date has eluded all. The lagoon is fed by fresh water seeping from an inland aquifer, and is a sanctuary for large numbers of coastal and freshwater birds. It is also an important breeding ground for a variety of fish species. Sandwich Harbour was proclaimed a RAMSAR site in 1995. It is one of five such protected wetlands in Namibia. Permits to visit Sandwich are obtainable from the MET offices in Swakopmund, Walvis Bay, Sossusvlei and Windhoek. Please note that Sandwich is accessible only by 4x4 vehicles; that in certain areas angling and vehicles are prohibited; that angling is not allowed from 25 January to 15 April; and that overnight camping is not allowed here.

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT

The most distincitve features of the Gemsbok are its long, rapier-shaped horns and striking black and white facial markings • Deadvlei is a large ghostly expanse of dried white clay, punctuated by skeletons of ancient camel thorn • One of the most exciting ways to explore the NamibRand Nature Reserve is on horseback • The Waterkloof route in teh Naukluft Park, is a 5 km hiking trail • Fairy circles are most common along the edge of the Namib Desert • There are four hiking routes to choose from in the Naukluft

NAUKLUFT SECTION The Naukluft section of the park was created to serve as a sanctuary for Hartmann’s mountain zebra competing with livestock for grazing on farms. With its massive and varied rock formations, Naukluft is a geologist’s paradise. The intermittent layers of horizontally folded igneous


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NAMIBIA WILDLIFE RESORTS

ANNABELLE VENTER


| SOSSUSVLEI AND THE NAMIB-NAUKLUFT PARK | 4576), Walvis Bay (064 20 5971) and Windhoek (061 284 2111). Permits are also available at Sesriem.

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT The NamibRand Nature Reserve is free of fences and allows wildlife to roam in their natural habitat • A mythical fairy circle • Amaryllis lilies bloom after good rains near Maltahöhe • Duwisib Castle, built by Baron von Wolf in 1908 • Explore the white pan with petrified camel thorn trees at Deadvlei on foot

rock, quartzite, dolomite and shale are impressive with their giant symmetrical patterns. Five different vegetation communities within the park ensure a wealth of tree and shrub species, and a variety of aloes. Animals found at Naukluft in addition to Hartmann’s mountain zebra are kudu, gemsbok, klipspringer, duiker, steenbok, leopard, baboon, black-backed jackal, bat-eared fox, African wild cat, caracal and aardwolf. Naukluft’s steep cliffs are nesting grounds for various cliff-breeding bird species, including Verreaux’s eagles.

Permits for Namib-Naukluft Permits for the Namib-Naukluft Park are available at Ministry of Environment and Tourism permit offices in Swakopmund (064 40

NAMIBRAND NATURE RESERVE What originated as a dream to extend the frontiers of the Namib Desert by integrating a large number of former sheep farms and rehabilitating the land into a sanctuary free of fences and other farm paraphernalia became the NamibRand Nature Reserve during the second half of the 1980s. Many facets of the Namib Desert are represented at NamibRand, creating a living tapestry of colour and contour that makes it a visual utopia for artists and photographers. Game species found on the reserve include gemsbok, giraffe, mountain and plains zebra, springbok, red hartebeest, bat-eared fox, spotted hyaena, Cape fox and African wild cat. In the more rocky areas, kudu, klipspringer, baboon and leopard, while the dunes harbour a rich and diverse microfauna of lizards, beetles and spiders, and even the elusive golden mole can be found. The reserve is also home to a rich variety of birds – over a hundred species have been recorded on NamibRand. The NamibRand Nature Reserve of today comprises 15 farms and extends over an area of some 202 000 hectares, making it one of the largest private nature

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reserves in Southern Africa, and is also an International Dark Skies reserve. Situated on the reserve are the Namib Desert Environmental Education Trust (NaDEET) Centre, and the NamibRand Desert Research & Awareness Centre.

DUWISIB CASTLE About 72 km south west of Maltahöhe, situated amongst rolling red hills, is Duwisib Castle, a solid rectangular structure of red sandstone with battlements and turrets on its corners. Built by the legendary Baron von Wolf for his American wife, Jayta, the castle was completed in 1909. Most of the construction materials, including the furniture and fittings, were shipped all the way from Germany, off-loaded at Lüderitz and transported to Duwisib by ox wagon. The interior of the castle and much of its original furniture and artworks can be viewed. Accommodation in the surroundings is provided at the Duwisib Castle Campsite, managed by Namibia Wildlife Resorts (NWR), and a privately-managed guest lodge. After months of renovations by an internal team, NWR officially reintroduced Duwisib Castle back onto the market on 1 August 2014 with the purpose of giving individuals the opportunity to be accommodated in a 19th-century castle.

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Naukluft Camp PO Box 13267, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

The Naukluft section of the park was created to serve as a sanctuary for Hartmann’s mountain zebra, which are endemic to Namibia. Other wildlife includes kudu, gemsbok, klipspringer, duiker, steenbok, leopard, baboon, black-backed jackal, bat-eared fox, African wild cat, caracal and aardwolf. Naukluft’s steep cliffs are nesting grounds for various cliff-breeding bird species, including Black eagles. Five different vegetation communities within the park ensure a wealth of tree and shrub species, and a variety of aloes. With its massive and varied rock formations, Naukluft is a geologist’s paradise. The intermittent layers of horizontally folded igneous rock, quartzite, dolomite and shale are impressive with their giant symmetrical patterns. The camp offers 6 modern guest rooms and 21 camp sites. This area is a nature lovers playground where guests can enjoy hiking trails, 4x4 trails, nature walks and bird watching. 6

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Duwisib Castle PO Box 13267, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

Replete with history and romance Duwisib castle is an ideal stopover for visitors’ en route to the South of Namibia.It is a historical site and a national monument, which is a convenient stopover when traveling from Sesriem and Sossusvlei. German Baron Von Wolf built the castle for his American bride Ms. Jayta Hum- phreys in the early 1900s. Apart from being a gift of love, the castle was a dream turned into reality for Baron Von Wolf, who planned on breeding racing horses in this Semi-Desert environment. Unfortunately, his dream was short-lived as he was killed during World War I in Germany. His wife returned to America, leaving the castle with most of its contents behind. The museum houses a collection of 18th and 19th century antiques,armour and paintings. 5

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Sesriem Campsite PO Box 13267, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

At the entry to Sossusvlei is Sesriem Canyon, where centuries of erosion have incised a narrow gorge about 1 km in length. At the foot of the gorge, which plunges 30 to 40 metres, are pools that become replenished after good rains. Sesriem derives its name from the time when pioneers tied six lengths of rawhide thongs (riem) together to draw water from the pools. Explore the Sesriem Canyon from this great and scenic campsite. Sossusvlei is the reason you are staying here! The dunes are best seen early in the morning or late in the afternoon. Elim Dune – a petrified dune near the Sesriem Camp provides a popular spot to watch the sunset (for those not rushing back from a late afternoon visit to Sossusvlei). 24

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Sossus Dune Lodge PO Box 13267, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

Sossus Dune Lodge offers guests an evocative and life-changing experience. Situated within the park, guests will benefit from being able to reach Sossusvlei before sunrise, and to stay until after sunset, and on their return after an exhilarating day, to relax in the tranquillity and splendour of the Namib Desert, under the spectacular African sky. Sossus Dune Lodge offers professional guided tours to fully unleash the beauty and biological diversity of the desert environment to visitors. 25

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Kulala Desert Lodge PO Box 6850, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 27 4500, Fax (+264 61) 23 9455 Email: info@wilderness.com.na Web: www.wilderness-safaris.com

Kulala Desert Lodge boasts magnificent views of the famous sand dunes of Sossusvlei, breathtaking mountain scenery and vast open plains. Set in the 37 000-hectare Kulala Wilderness Reserve bordering the Namib-Naukluft Park, there is an abundance of space and silence. Accommodation at Kulala Desert Lodge comprises 23 thatched and canvas ‘kulalas’ with en-suite bathrooms and verandas. Bedrolls are placed on the flat rooftop for guests to sleep under the myriad stars of Namibia’s clear skies. Activities offered include early-morning guided drives to Sossusvlei. 23

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Little Kulala PO Box 6850, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 27 4500, Fax (+264 61) 23 9455 Email: info@wilderness.com.na Web: www.wilderness-safaris.com

Little Kulala is a luxurious desert retreat situated in the private 27 000 ha Kulala Wilderness Reserve – the gateway to Namibia’s Sand Sea with its towering dunes and clear starry skies. Accommodation consists of 11 climate-controlled, thatched “kulalas” which merge impeccably into the desert landscape, each with private plunge pool, both indoor and outdoor showers and a rooftop star bed for romantic star gazing. An elegant entertainment area includes a library, wine cellar, craft boutique, lounge and dining areas. 11

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Desert Homestead Lodge PO Box 113, Kalkrand Bookings: +264 (0) 61 24 0020 Tel: +264 (0) 63 29 3301 E-Mail: reservations@homestead.com.na Web: www.deserthomesteadlodge.com, www.ondili.com

The Desert Homestead lies three kilometres north-west of the C19 and D854 roads junction, approximately 32 km south-east of Sesriem. The wide grassy valley is sheltered by the Nubib, Tsaris and Naukluft mountains with a view reaching the distant dunes of the Namib Desert in the west. In this exquisite position, we offer simple but stylish accommodation in thatched chalets designed with the fragile beauty of this remarkable environment in mind. The Desert Homestead will ensure you an unrivalled respite from the desert extremes. Tranquil surroundings, alfresco dining, delectably fresh farm cuisine, refreshing dips in the pool, stunning sunsets and sunrises are the basic pleasures at our lodge. 21

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Desert Homestead Outpost PO Box 113, Kalkrand Bookings: +264 (0) 61 24 0020 Tel:+264 (0) 63 683828 E-Mail: reservations@homestead.com.na Web: www.deserthomesteadoutpost.com, www.ondili.com

The Desert Homestead Outpost is situated 30 km south-east of Sesriem, the entrance to the Namib-Naukluft National Park, on a private nature reserve bordering the Unesco World Heritage Site “Namib Sand Sea”. It is the ideal starting point for trips to Sossusvlei, Dead Vlei and the Sesriem Canyon. Other exciting activities offered by the Lodge are Horse Safaris, Scenic Drives and the Namib Mountain Trail, a guided walk from Desert Homestead Lodge to Desert Homestead Outpost. Hot Air Balloon Rides can be arranged on request. Nestled against the west side of the Namib Mountains, guests can enjoy a magnificent panoramic view over the vast open plains. The lodge offers 11 individual thatch roofed comfortable and cosy chalets and an exclusive suite.The unique location in the vastness of the nature reserve offers complete peace and tranquillity. 12

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Kanaan N/a’an ku sê Desert Retreat Tel (+264 63) 68 3119 Email: kanaan@naankuse.com, Web: www.kanaannamibia.com Directions: Approximately 550km south of the capital Windhoek, on the D707. GPS Coordinates: South: 25° 55’ 4.9692” East: 16° 8’ 3.6816”

This enchanting reserve borders the Namib-Naukluft Park with its breathtakingly photogenic dune belt to the west and the Tiras Mountains to the east. Kanaan N/a’an ku sê Desert Retreat is situated on 33 000 ha of unspoilt nature. Contrasting landscapes are never-ending, with rippled sand dunes glowing in the magical light of sunrise and sunset. Stay in one of our 8 en-suite luxury canvas tents surrounded by a most beautiful scenic setting. Enjoy a sun downer on your own private wooden deck and get spoiled in the Restaurant area being served home cooked meals and refreshing drinks after a long hot day in the desert. Kanaan is ideal for wildlife enthusiasts, photographers, geologists and hikers, or simply for those wanting to get away from it all. 8

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Neuras Wine and Wildlife Estate Tel (+264 63) 29 3417 Email: neuras@naankuse.com, Web: www.neuraswines.com Directions: Approximately 270km south west of the capital Windhoek and 60km away from the Sesriem gate, on the D850. GPS Coordinates: South: -24° 27’ 42.92” East: 16° 14’ 12.24”

Our unique winery is set on the edge of the Namib Desert in the foothills of the majestic Naukluft Mountains. We produce an exclusive amount of bottles of red wines a year - of our delicious Shiraz, Neuras Triple Cultivar Blend, Neuras Triple Clone Shiraz and Namib Red Blend. Since 2015 Neuras has proudly broadened its product rage with a matchless first ever Namibian Brandy and a Dessert Ruby Red. Choose to stay in a rustic stone chalet or one of our luxury units accommodating 3 or 4 persons. Experience a Neuras cellar and vineyard tour, taste our wines, or join our field researcher team on unforgettable excursions. We can also arrange an outing to see the Tschauchab River, Sossusvlei or the Honey Canyon. Spend a night at the Neuras Wine & Wildlife Estate perfectly situated just 1 hour away from the gate leading to Namibia’s’ most visited Landmark – Sossusvlei Namibia. 8

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Hammerstein Lodge PO Box 250, Maltahöhe Tel (+264 63) 69 3111 (Lodge Direct Email: hammerst@hammerstein.com.na Web: www.hammerstein.com.na

A hearty welcome to Hammerstein Lodge! Visitors have a choice between bungalows equipped for self-catering, camping or full board and lodging. Would you like to get up close and personal with wild cats? At Hammerstein you will have amazing encounters with our leopard, caracals and tame cheetahs. We are situated on the C 19, between Maltahöhe and Sesriem, 65 km from the Sossusvlei entrance gate. Hammerstein is an ideal stopover for travellers­ to southern Namibia. 56

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Sossusvlei Lodge Taleni Africa Reservations: Tel (+27 21) 930 4564, Fax (+27 21) 914 9930 Tel (+264 63) 29 3636 (for last-minute reservations only) Email: reservations@sossusvleilodge.com, Web: www.sossusvleilodge.com GPS Coordinates: S24°29’ 12.1” E015°48’ 15.0”

Situated at the Entrance Gate to the Namib Naukluft Park, Sossusvlei Lodge offers direct access to the towering red sand dunes, the famous pan of Sossusvlei, the scorched black trees of Dead Vlei and the remarkable depths of the Sesriem Canyon. The 45 individual luxurious accommodation units are carefully laid out to perfectly blend in with the magnificent surrounding natural environment. Each fully air-conditioned unit has a patio, en-suite bathroom with shower and a spacious bedroom under canvas with adobe-style plaster walls to give the visitor a distinctive sense of being close to nature. Facilities include a sparkling pool, bar, beer garden and an al fresco terrace where one can enjoy exquisite food, award-winning wines and magnificent views of the floodlit waterhole. The Sossusvlei Lodge Adventure Centre offers a range of activities to explore the area’s natural beauty. 45

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Desert Camp Taleni Africa Reservations: Tel (+27 21) 930 4564, Fax (+27 21) 914 9930, Tel (+264 63) 68 3205 (for last-minute reservations only) Email: reservations@desertcamp.com, Web: www.desertcamp.com GPS Coordinates: S24°28’ 57.7” E015°50’ 02.2”

Desert Camp is situated only 5 km from the entrance gate to Sossusvlei and Sesriem Canyon in the Namib Naukluft Park. Nestled under centuries old thorn trees, Desert Camp offers an unsurpassed view over the desert landscape and surrounding mountains. The 20 affordable, twinbedded units under canvas are equipped with an en-suite bathroom, shaded veranda with fitted kitchenette, barbeque, power points and a fold-out sleeper couch suitable for 2 small children (under 12). Facilities include a fully stocked bar with big screen television, a sparkling swimming pool and 2 communal boma-areas. Fresh food supplies can be ordered daily. Meals and exciting desert activities can be booked at the nearby Sossusvlei Lodge. A fully stocked shop, fuel and an Internet café are available at the Sossus Oasis Service Station a mere 5km down the road. 20

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Desert Quiver Camp

Taleni Africa Reservations: Tel (+27 21) 930 4564, Fax (+27 21) 914 9930 Tel: (+264 63) 29 3611 (for last minute reservations only) Email: reservations@desertquivercamp.com, Web: www.desertquivercamp.com GPS Coordinates: S24°29’ 14.2” E015°50’ 20.9”

Desert Quiver Camp uniquely combines modern self-catering accommodation with comfort and style. Conveniently located a mere 5km from the entrance gate to Sossusvlei, the inspiring scenery characterised by granite outcrops, spectacular views and roaming wildlife will captivate your senses. The 24 twin-bedded self-catering accommodation units features a fold-out sleeper couch to accommodate 2 small children (under 12), an en-suite bathroom with shower, a shaded patio with fitted kitchenette, barbeque and a wooden bench for seating. Utility boxes with most utensils needed are available at reception and fresh food supplies can be ordered daily. Facilities include a fully stocked bar with a big screen television, a sparkling swimming pool and 2 communal bomaareas perfect for groups travelling together. Meals can be enjoyed at the nearby Sossusvlei Lodge restaurant and their Adventure Centre offers a range of exciting desert activities to explore the area. A fully stocked shop, fuel and an Internet café is available at the Sossus Oasis Service Station. 24

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Sossus Oasis Campsite Taleni Africa Reservations: Tel (+27 21) 930 4564, Fax (+27 21) 914 9930 Tel (+264 63) 29 3632 (for last-minute reservations only) Email: reservations@sossus-oasis.com, Web: www.sossus-oasis.com GPS Coordinates: S24°29’ 20.5” E015°48’ 04.6”

Perfectly positioned at the Entrance Gate to Sossusvlei and Sesriem, the Sossus Oasis Camp Site offers 12 individually shaded sites, each equipped with its own toilet and shower facilities, kitchen wash-up basin, barbeque and electricity points. Enjoy the unsurpassed views over the desert landscape, surrounding mountains and Elim Dune or relax in the sparkling pool found in the centre of the camp site. Facilities within walking distance includes a fully stocked shop with groceries, toiletries, drinks, ice, clothing, curios, internet café, fuel, diesel and a tyre workshop at the Sossus Oasis Service Station. At the adjacent Sossusvlei Lodge one can book meals at the restaurant and exciting activities to explore the area at their Adventure Centre. 12

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Wolwedans Collection NamibRand Nature Reserve PO Box 5048, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 23 0616, Fax (+264 61) 22 0102 Email: info@wolwedans.com, Web: www.wolwedans.com

Wolwedans is more than a mere collection of camps. It’s a collection of dreams. Its ethos lies in setting an example in sustainability and continually fulfilling its commitment to the conservation of the NamibRand Nature Reserve. Wolwedans nestles into the dunes, set against a backdrop of extraordinary natural beauty. Located in the heart of the NamibRand Nature Reserve, our portfolio of camps provides the perfect base from which to explore vast stretches of awe-inspiring and undisturbed nature. Each camp is designed with the best interests of our guests at heart. For your home at Wolwedans you have a choice between the spacious and unique comfort of the Dune Camp, the more elaborate Dunes Lodge and Mountain View Suite, the quietly secluded Private Camp and our exclusive Boulders Safari Camp. No matter where you opt to stay, warmth and personalised service – embraced by a commitment to care for guest and nature alike – are our hallmarks. Wolwedans provides an intriguing window for you to experience the desert’s elusive grandeur and breathtaking beauty. If you are an open-minded and nature-loving individual in search of a distinctive desert experience far off the beaten track, Wolwedans is for you.

Dunes Lodge

The Dunes Lodge is perched on top of a dune plateau, overlooking panoramic vistas in all directions, capturing the desert in a most memorable way. The building style is a combination of wooden structures, large canvas blinds and windows that open up to the desert. The lodge reflects the ambience of a tented camp, but provides the comfort and protection of a permanent building. The lodge sleeps 20 and each of the nine spacious en-suite chalets sports a private veranda, connecting you to vast stretches of untouched desert. Sleeping with your canvas blinds open is just like sleeping under the stars.

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Dune Camp

Positioned on the edge of a 250-metre high dune, the Dune Camp sleeps a maximum of 16 guests in a totally unspoilt setting. Guests stay in deluxe tents pitched on wooden platforms. A spacious deck, allowing for safe sleep-outs under the stars and an en-suite bathroom make for a civilised camping experience. Whilst the lodge accommodates guests in need of relaxed comfort and space, the camp provides a more down-to-earth experience. Its unique atmosphere courts the young and more adventurous traveller.

Private Camp

Situated in a quiet and idyllic valley, this splendid suite caters exclusively for six guests. It is the perfect getaway for honeymooners and individuals seeking uncompromising privacy and solitude. The Private Camp – a combination of wood and canvas that opens out into nature – offers three spacious en-suite bedrooms, a ‘sala’ where you can laze away having a siesta, a refreshing plunge pool, various decks and a central lounge, combining a study, living room, dining area and a fully equipped open-plan kitchen.

Boulders Safari Camp

Situated about 45 km south of Wolwedans and hugged by massive granite rocks, Boulders Camp is the southernmost of all the Wolwedans Collection. Sleeping a maximum of eight guests in four spacious tents, Boulders is the most exclusive camp at Wolwedans. The sheltered leisure area has both a dining and a lounge tent, with an open fireplace and an awesome sundowner spot overlooking the vast beauty of the reserve.


| SOSSUSVLEI AND THE NAMIB-NAUKLUFT PARK |

DUNES LODGE

DUNE CAMP

BOULDERS CAMP

PRIVATE CAMP

Activities at NamibRand

Nature drives, rides and walks Accompanied by experienced guides, visitors are introduced to the many facets of the desert habitat with its diverse fauna and flora – on foot, horse or by car. Our interpretive scenic drives in open Land Rovers with resident field guides reveal the fascinating wonders of the desert – as do horse riding through the dunes, picnics in the wild, sundowners on the dunes and dinners by candlelight. We also offer horseback safaris and leisure rides.

Hot-air ballooning A special attraction at NamibRand is hot-air ballooning. Soaring silently over the dunes and never-ending plains provides unforgettable and breathtaking 360-degree vistas. From the best viewpoint imaginable, you will have the opportunity to admire the stark beauty of the Namib for about an hour, before celebrating this extravagant experience with a champagne breakfast at the landing spot.

Scenic flights Scenic flights to the Diamond coast and Sossusvlei are undertaken during the late afternoon and/or in the early morning (if an aircraft is available). For guests staying three to four nights, a day trip by plane to the mighty Fish River Canyon and Lüderitz can also be arranged.

Getting there

There are many ways to get to Wolwedans, be it self-drive (as part of a longer tour), guided transfers, fixed air seat rate or private air charter or a combination. Please contact the Wolwedans Travel desk to advise you on the best option, pending group size, times etc.

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PAUL VAN SCHALKWYK

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COASTAL STRIP • The coast is Namibia’s adventure Mecca • It offers abundant history, culture, art and crafts • The Skeleton Coast Park protects one third of the Namibian coastline • The strip is a haven for unique plants, animals and birds • It is the ultimate summer holiday destination for locals www.travelnewsnamibia.com

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XENIA IVANOFF-ERB

COASTAL STRIP The coastal strip houses the towns of Cape Cross, Henties Bay, Swakopmund and Walvis Bay, and the fishing settlement of Wlotzkasbaken. The Dorob National Park – proclaimed to protect sensitive environmental areas – extends between the Swakop and Ugab rivers, while the Skeleton Coast National Park covers the area north o f the Ugab River up to the Kunene River, protecting the northern third of Namibia’s coastline. Due to the TransKalahari Highway and uranium rush, the area is home to two of Namibia’s fastest-growing urban centres – Swakopmund and Henties Bay – and hosts two of Namibia’s major contributors to the GDP, mining and fishing. In 2013, the Namib Sand Sea – stretching from the Kuiseb River southwards to the northern boundary of the Sperrgebiet National Park – achieved World Heritage Site status, making it Namibia’s second UNESCO World Heritage Site.

DOROB NATIONAL PARK

To protect the most frequented coastal area against damage caused by off-road driving, the stretch of coastline between the Kuiseb Delta and the Ugab River – eastwards from the low-water mark of the Atlantic towards the boundary of the Swakopmund district – was proclaimed a national park in 2008, elevating the status of the West Coast Recreational Area (WCRA) to that of national park, and proclaiming it as the Dorob National Park. It includes the Walvis Bay Lagoon – a RAMSAR site – but excludes the municipal areas of Walvis Bay, Swakopmund, Henties Bay and Wlotzkasbaken. The Namibian coastline is a haven for numerous unique plants, animals and birds. A special feature of international interest is the extensive occurrence of lichen fields. Over a hundred lichen species have been recorded in the Namib Desert. A symbiotic composition of an algae and a fungus, lichens are dependent on coastal fog for survival.

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The continued existence of this intriguing form of desert life is a matter of serious concern to environmentalists, as lichens are extremely slow growing and are destroyed when vehicles driving offroad tread on them. The 200-km stretch of coastline between the Swakop and Ugab rivers is renowned for its excellent angling potential. Over the years popular angling spots along the coast were identified by dedicated anglers and named to indicate their distance from Swakopmund. New rules, regulations and lawenforcement measures were implemented at the end of 2012. To drive in specially demarcated off-road areas, drivers must have a permit, which is issued free of charge and can be obtained from Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) offices in Swakopmund (064 40 4576) and Walvis Bay (064 20 5971). A free information pamphlet is also available from above-mentioned offices, as well as from coastal information offices.

ACTIVITIES AND ADVENTURES Go sand-boarding, quad-biking, fishing, wind-surfing, sailing, sky-diving, paragliding or dolphin cruising in one of the popular coastal towns Take a stroll through the centre of Swakopmund and admire the historical buildings Climb Dune 7 and see the world from a different perspective Go on a cultural township tour through Mondesa or Kuisebmond Admire flamingos and other avifauna at the Walvis Bay Lagoon, a RAMSAR-declared site for coastal birds Take to the dunes and beaches atop a horse or camel on a guided tour just outside Swakopmund


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| COASTAL STRIP |

5 370

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Hotel Zum Kaiser

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Villa Margherita

Swakopmund Hotel & Entertainment Centre

8

Oyster Box Guesthouse

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Walvis Bay

Old Rhenish 8 Mission Church & Hope Locomotive

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Rock Sculpture Trail

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SWAKOPMUND Swakopmund is much-loved by Namibians as a welcome respite from the heat of the interior. It is also popular among visitors because of its oldworld charm and relaxed atmosphere. Founded in 1892 during German colonial rule, it served as the territory’s main harbour for many years. Today this quaint desert town, hedged between desert and sea, is enhanced by lush green lawns, elegant palm trees and carefully tended public gardens. It has a wide choice of hotels, pensions and restaurants, and several coffee shops selling traditional German cakes and pastries. The coast with its desert hinterland offers many options, both for adventure and for relaxation. Just before reaching Swakopmund from the interior, enclosed in a small glass-fronted structure, visitors can view the Martin Luther ‘steam-ox’ imported from Germany in 1896 to transport goods between the town and other settlements. When the steam tractor became irretrievably bogged down in the sand, it was dubbed Martin Luther, because of Luther’s historic statement in 1521, “Here I stand, may God help me, I can go no further.” The venue has a museum, toilet facilities and curios for sale. Quaint architecture from a bygone era adds to the time-out-of-place atmosphere of Swakopmund. When approached from the interior, domes, turrets and towers on the skyline appear as a hazy desert mirage. Much of the distinct German colonial character has been preserved and today many of the town’s old buildings house shops, offices and other utility services. The well-known information service, Namib i, belongs to Almuth Styles, who manages the centre as a generalinformation outlet and marketing service for the Erongo Region. It also provides a comprehensive reservations facility and is the only Automobile Association (AA) stop in town. Another booking office is Swakop Info, which also has a craft shop and café on site. Namib i Tel/Fax (+264 64) 40 4827/3129 Swakop Info Tel (+264 64) 40 5488

What to see and do Woermann House, built in 1905 to accommodate the Damara and

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Namaqua Trading Company and sold in 1909 to Woermann Brock, houses the Swakopmund Arts Association and Public Library. The Woermann Tower, which can be accessed at specified times, affords a panoramic view of desert and sea. It has a platform from which, in earlier times, a flag was flown whenever a ship of the Woermann Line was sighted at sea. The Living Desert Snake Park in Sam Nujoma Drive hosts a variety of interesting creatures for the whole family to enjoy. It is housed in the historical Otavi-Bahn building, which served as the terminal for the mining railway line. The goods shed next to this building, built in 1911 and called OMEG-Haus, is a national monument. The old barracks, known as Die Alte Kaserne, was built by the German colonial government in 1905 to house the German Engineer Regiment responsible for the construction of the jetty and the railway line to the interior. It is now a youth hostel based on the concept of the International Youth Hostel Federation. The privately-owned Hohenzollern-Haus, embellished by a frieze of angels and lions and originally built in 1905 to accommodate visiting aristocracy from Germany, at one time functioned as a house of ill repute. Today this striking building serves as an apartment house, while the Prinzessin Rupprecht-Heim, built in 1902 to operate as a hospital, is now a pension. The Kaiserliches Bezirksgericht (magistrate’s court) was built in 1901. Since independence the building has been serving as a summer residence for the President of Namibia. Next to it are the gardens of the Marine Memorial, commemorating marines who died in the 1904/5 Herero uprising. In recent years the elaborate Railway Station Building, erected in 1901, was transformed into a luxury 75-room hotel and entertainment centre, complete with casino, cinema, bar and restaurant. Resembling a Bavarian villa with its ornamental exterior, the Swakopmund Jail is often mistaken by visitors for a hotel. One of the town’s most prominent landmarks, the Swakopmund Lighthouse, was completed in 1903, as was the harbour breakwater known as The Mole, today the southern boundary of Swakopmund’s main tourist beach. The Evangelical Lutheran Church, consecrated in 1912, is the second-

oldest of its kind in the country. Closely associated with the history of the town, is the Kramersdorf building (1912), with its architectural value lying in the wide, flat wooden bow. It traditionally served as a private residence, school hostel, and summer house. Today it is privately owned. Another historical landmark is the Old Iron Jetty, originally built in 1911 during the German colonial era. The jetty was frequented especially by anglers and tourists, but gradually fell into disrepair. Major reparations were done in 1983 when 17 pairs of the iron pillars were encased in concrete. In 1997 the Save-the-Jetty Fund was established and in 1998 the jetty was closed because it was deemed unsafe. Following a major N$3.7 million refurbishment in 2006, the front section was reopened to the public. In 2010 the back section was reopened and now includes an oyster bar and restaurant, with an observation deck on top. Laid out in stone in 1915, a selection of the regimental badges from the South West Africa Campaign can be viewed 27 km east of Swakopmund. The campaign was launched by the Union of South Africa troops on the Germans stationed in South West Africa at the outbreak of WWI. More regimental badges can be

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Swakopmund is much loved for its old-world charm • German-style confectionery can be found throughout Swakopmund • Hartlaub’s Gull, Chroicocephalus hartlaubii • A walk down the Swakopmund Jetty is a great way to enjoy the coastal town’s relaxed atmosphere • The Woermann Brock Arcade, accessible from Sam Nujoma Avenue, features several shops and outlets selling Namibian products

seen about 46 km east of the town. Similar badges and patterns, also laid out in stone, can be found between Swakopmund and Trekkopje, along the railway line. Other interesting sites in the area are small fortifications, the trenches, and the cemetery at the Trekkopje station.

Stepping into the past A 27-million-year-old fossil, meteorite chunks, fossilised wood, and jawbones of our human ancestors mingle with Spanish coins, restored ox wagons and


RON SWILLING

RON SWILLING

RON SWILLING

RON SWILLING

| COASTAL STRIP |

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RON SWILLING


| COASTAL STRIP | turn-of-the-century drawing rooms in the Swakopmund Museum, a small but comprehensive institution with displays ranging from natural history, mineralogy and botany to historical and ethnological dioramas. A walk through the museum, founded by Dr Alfons Weber in 1951, takes you travelling through time, from ancient earth forming to a more recent colonial past. Situated on the seafront between avenues of palm trees, this treasure house holds a multitude of interesting artefacts. A large airy hall houses a People of Namibia exhibition with information on the diverse and distinct population groups of Namibia. Baskets, headdresses, amulets and ostrich eggs fill the many display shelves. The Emil Jensen Herbarium exhibits Namib flora. The entrance of the museum faces the Atlantic Ocean and the Mole, a popular swimming beach. The Alte Brauereistube café has been added to one side of the building.

Libraries and archives

The Public Library has amenities for visitors, while the well-known reference facility known as the Sam Cohen Library comprises some 6 000 volumes and an impressive collection of historic photographs. This includes the renowned

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Fat bikes afford adventurers and cycling enthusiasts a new opportunity to explore the dune terrains • The Swakopmund Aquarium is a great place to visit with children • The Old Iron Jetty, originally built in 1911 during the German colonial era • Fishing is a popular pastime in Namibia’s coastal towns

2 000-title Africana collection of the late Ferdinand Stich. The archives, housed in the same building, give visitors access to a unique collection of newspapers dating from 1898 to the present day.

Small but modern aquarium On the beachfront next to the National Marine Information & Research Centre in Strand Street is the Swakopmund Aquarium, an extensive and popular facility that underwent extensive upgrades, additions and renovations, completed

at the end of 2012. Its main feature is a large 12x8-metre transparent oval-shaped tank, with a glass walk-through viewing tunnel and a number of additional viewing panels, placed at different angles. The tank contains a variety of fish, including spotted shark, sand shark, kabeljou, steenbras and galjoen, and many other organisms. The theme depicted in the tank is a typical west-coast reef with related flora. There are also 17 smaller viewing tanks, one of them in the form of a tube. Special features are the socalled touch pools containing typical intertidal flora and fauna. A new touch tank was added during the upgrades, hosting stingrays, and the top floor has been renovated into a welcoming educational environment for children. The complex also houses an auditorium, with seating for approximately 120 people. It is used for conferences, lectures, slide shows and other presentations and is fully equipped with audio-visual, interpretation and other amenities. Feeding takes place daily at 15:00. The aquarium is closed on Mondays, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day, but is open all other days from 10:00 to 16:00.

Sport and adventure The Mole and adjacent Palm Beach provide a popular if somewhat cold swimming area, with the lee of the Mole serving as a launching place for yachts and other pleasure crafts. The contestants in the annual triathlon, which takes place in December, end their swim at The Mole. Rossmund is a grass golf course with a unique desert setting located some 10 km inland from Swakopmund. The well laid-out 18-hole golf course has been described as one of the most scenic and unusual in Southern Africa, with herds of free-roaming springbok in the surroundings adding to its charm. The annual horse show, known as the Reitturnier, brings the best horses and riders in Namibia together. Other sports are skydiving, duneboarding, sand-skiing, paragliding, surfing and windsurfing, yachting, and angling from the beach or a boat. There are motocross and 4x4 rally facilities on the outskirts of the town. The latest development in town is the multi-million Swakopmund

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Indoor Sport Centre, also known as The Dome Swakopmund, the only multi-sport complex of its kind in Africa. Spanning over 7 000 m² and comprising five storeys, the centre will accommodate more than 40 different sport codes and their supporting facilities and services. The Dome now also houses a restaurant, bar, shops and a health and wellness centre.

Where to shop Accessible from Sam Nujoma Avenue and Roon and Moltke streets is the Brauhaus Arcade with its many small specialist shops offering handmade leatherwork, art and crafts, furnishing and Namibian textiles, and embroidery. The Brauhaus itself is a popular bistro-type bar with seating outside, popular for serving large beers in boot-shaped glasses. The main outlet for Art Africa is also situated here, selling quirky crafts and fine African tribal art, amongst others. Another branch is situated in Tobias Hainyeko Street, flanked by a corridor of craftsmen and the Art Africa Garden Café. The Woermann Brock Arcade, accessible from Sam Nujoma Avenue and Roon Street, features regular shops and several outlets selling Namibian products. It leads into the Ankerplatz complex, also accessible from Sam Nujoma Avenue. In Tribes Trading in the adjacent Woermann Mall, ‘Made in Swakopmund’ T-shirts are painted as you watch. Featuring animals in bright, primary colours, these make colourful children’s gifts. Next to the arcade on Sam Nujoma Avenue, Small World is an outlet for unique handmade Namibian jewellery and leather goods. Semi-precious stones, ostrich eggshell beads, Owambo ekipa buttons and Himba metal beads are fashioned into stylish and original necklaces, bracelets and belts. Also in Sam Nujoma Avenue, Ikhoba offers a range of well-crafted embroidered goods in vivid colours, produced by 400 women of various ethnic groups as part of the Ikhoba Textiles Farm Project. Meme Ikhoba, situated in Hendrik Witbooi Avenue, is another outlet for these goods. In the same street is Fleissige Biene, an outlet for home crafts. Karakulia Weavers sells woollen carpets and wall hangings made from

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karakul wool, woven into designs depicting Namibian animals and desert scenery. Heading south, Maid in Africa in Libertina Amathila Avenue stocks its own vibrant African fabric made into T-shirts, bags, cushions and placemats. The company also produces a range of artistic Namibian postcards, some with African sayings, others capturing interesting township signs and slogans. The cards have an African rhythm and theme, yet are contemporary and modern. Studio 77, a photographic studio and outlet, is situated next to the shop, selling fine-art prints of work by local Namibian photographers. Another great place to shop is Kitsch Collectables, situated just down the road, selling a range of cleverly recycled products, as well as funky collectable items. The Hoeka Toeka gift shop next to the Total Service Station in Sam Nujoma Avenue offers unique, handmade arts and crafts for sale. Namibian and African crafts are sold at two street markets. The first of these is situated opposite the old prison building on Moses Garoëb Street, and the second adjacent to The Mole, known as The Open Market.

Hand-crafted jewellery A special feature of the coastal town is its outstanding jewellery shops, staffed by master goldsmiths and specialised craftsmen and -women, who design individual pieces with local semiprecious stones in styles ranging from classic and contemporary to Namibian, African and European. One of Swakopmund’s top outlets for handcrafted jewellery is African Art Jewellers next to the Hansa Hotel on Hendrik Witbooi Street, with a second, duty-free shop in Sam Nujoma Avenue, Swakopmund’s main street. At the Imke Engelhard Design Studio, award-winning jewellery designer, Imke Engelhard, transforms locally produced traditional shell necklaces into one-of-a-kind works of art. An interesting museum-like shop to visit in terms of its mineral displays such as gigantic quartz crystal clusters is Kristall Galerie on the corner of Garnison and Bahnhof streets. It also offers jewellery featuring semiprecious stones for sale.

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Art galleries The Swakopmund Arts Association is situated on the first floor of the historical Woermann House. It showcases a wide range of diverse Namibian art, as well as a selection of works by European artists. There are several commercial galleries in Swakopmund where contemporary Namibian art and crafts can be viewed and purchased. These include the Art Gallery in the Brauhaus Arcade; Die Muschel, which also sells books and prints and hosts a coffee shop; and in Sam Nujoma Avenue the Fine Art Gallery, which presents regular exhibitions. The first Alliance Française Cultural Centre was opened in Swakopmund in September 2010. Art exhibitions and tea-and-cake afternoons are held, films are shown, a library is hosted and French classes are offered in the centre.

Where to eat Swakopmund offers a plethora of restaurants, many testifying to the German heritage of the town, such as the Bistro Zum Kaiser, Brauhaus, Kücki’s Pub, and the Wurstbude. Coffee and German-style confectionery are served at Café Anton and Café Treff Punkt. Then there are Café Rosso, Wild Rocket Café, Pandora’s Box & Coffee Shop, Bojo’s Café, the funky Village Café, Slow Town Coffee Roasters, and Tea Time. Raith’s, the ever-popular Namibian bakery, deli, bistro and gelateria, is situated in the centre of town, and right around the corner the Art Africa Garden Café serves light, healthy meals. The Jetty 1905 offers seafood, sushi and oysters in a spectacular setting at the edge of the revamped jetty. At the Mole, an all-time favourite – the Strand Café – now boasts a new look and menu, while the iconic Strand Hotel, which has been recently reopened hosts four new eateries; Brewer & Butcher, The Ocean Cellar, Farmhouse Deli and Café Mole. Great light meals are served at the Tiger Reef beach bar. Then there’s De Kelder, The Secret Garden Bistro, The Wreck, The Tug, 22 Degrees South, Desert Tavern, Western Saloon, Napolitana, Bits ‘N Pizzas, The Fish Deli, Driftwood,

Garnish, Ocean Basket, Spur, and, and, and… A market with fresh produce from the Swakop environs is held every Saturday at Shalom Farm, just outside Swakopmund at the turn-off to Nonidas.

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Colourful salt pans • The lighthouse at Pelican Point was built in 1932 • The Open Market at The Mole is a great place to pick up local arts and crafts • A Horned adder (Bitis caudalis), can be seen on a Living Desert Tour

The Swakopmund environs The environmentally friendly Swakopmund Saltworks north of the town has been registered as a private nature reserve. The shallow expanses of water created to allow evaporation in the salt-producing process are ideal feeding grounds for thousands of wetland birds, such as greater and lesser flamingos. Damara terns breed on the surrounding desert plains and bring their young to the salt works to feed. Other visitors are rare great crested grebes and a large colony of Cape cormorants. The Swakopmund River Mouth is also a good place for birdwatching. Camel and horse rides are offered a short distance from the town. Cars and 4x4 vehicles can be hired to embark on day trips or safaris into the desert. Beach-buggy excursions to the beach, dunes or hinterland also include sundowner tours, hunting and fishing safaris, and dune and tyre surfing. Flights over the town and the shipwrecks along the coast can be expanded to include charter flights further afield, while specialised safaris take visitors to see the dune landscapes and plants of the desert. Reputable air-charter companies take visitors on short flips over the dunes.

WALVIS BAY While Walvis Bay is Namibia’s major harbour town, it is fast developing into a sought-after seaside holiday haven. Attractions are the lagoon with its prolific bird life and variety of recreational possibilities; a desert golf course; modern and comfortable hotels and a choice of restaurants;


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| COASTAL STRIP | and activities such as sightseeing in a donkey cart and kayaking on the lagoon at sunrise. The town has a well-developed and efficient port, while its fishing harbour is the hub of Namibia’s lucrative fishing industry. Entry permits to visit the harbour can be obtained from the Police Office at the Harbour Entrance on 13th Road. The Civic Centre complex of the harbour town contains the Walvis Bay information office and consists of the Town Hall, Mayor’s Office, a Museum and a Library, the latter with temporary membership facilities. The oldest building in Walvis Bay, and a national monument, is the Rhenish Mission Church, a timber structure built in Hamburg in 1880, then dismantled and shipped to Walvis Bay. Places of interest in Walvis Bay include the historic cemetery along Ben Amathila Avenue, the Walvis Bay Birds Paradise behind the sewerage disposal works, historic monuments such as the railway locomotive in front of the station and historical rail tracks on the airport road, and the horse-riding stables along Rikumbi Kandanga Avenue. A relic from the first attempts to introduce railroad transport to Namibia – the Old Railway Engine No 652 – which arrived from London in 1899, can be seen in front of the Walvis Bay station in a glass booth to shield it from the coastal weather. Interestingly, due to complications with the railway line caused by the prevailing south-west winds, the locomotive was put to little use during its short-lived lifetime. Outside the town, in the Kuiseb Valley, stands a wooden Boundary Post, erected in 1885 to demarcate the border between the newly founded

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Thousands of flamingos flock to the Walvis Bay lagoon to breed every year • Ocean boat cruises depart twice daily from the Walvis Bay Waterfront • Kayaking amongst the seals at Pelican Point • The Walvis Bay Port is welldeveloped and efficient • Great White Pelican (Pelecanus onocrotalus)

colony of German South West Africa and the British enclave of Walvis Bay. The Walvis Bay Airport terminal building was recently upgraded. Air Namibia offers flights to Walvis Bay seven days a week.

Walvis Bay Tourism Centre At the end of Union Street in Walvis Bay, bordering the desert and tourist area, the Walvis Bay Tourism Centre is a welcoming ‘one-stop shop’. The Centre is a novel concept, with much to offer, such as accommodation in four bungalows, a restaurant, Internet facilities, pro-golf shop and driving range, Information Desk, Levo Tours offices, and Photo Ventures – which offers photographic and other tours. Tel (+264 64) 20 0606

Cultural Township Tours Accompanied by a local guide, visitors can go on self-drive township tours. Various options for sightseeing can be included in the package. Lasting from three to four hours, the tour includes stops at the Kuisebmond Market Hall; the kindergarten in Daniel Maxuilili Street where children present a special show; the Multi-purpose Community Centre; and Tutaleni Village. The tour ends at the Mola Mola shebeen, where traditional foods such as mopane worms, makaka, oshifima porridge and beans can be sampled. The Tutaleni Village and Relocation Project in the township is an example of how the problem of overcrowding is solved by means of an innovative housing concept. More than 800 families have been relocated successfully and now enjoy amenities that previously seemed unattainable. The Tutaleni Village remains municipal property and will be treated as an ongoing project sustained through the joint efforts of the resettled communities, the local authority and the private sector.

Where to eat Options in Walvis Bay include The Raft restaurant on the Walvis Bay Lagoon and Crazy Mama’s Restaurant for pizza lovers. Langstrand Restaurant offers an African grill, seafood and stunning sea views. The Fairway Restaurant & Bistro in the Walvis Bay Tourism Centre serves breakfast, lunch and homemade cakes, sundowners and pizza. Other places to eat are Anchors @ the Jetty, Buffalo’s Restaurant, Bonaroma Restaurant, Probst Willi Bakery, Restaurant

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& Boulevard Café, Steve’s Take Away and O’Heilie’s Steakhouse. The Lemon Tree Deli offers health sandwiches, sushi, fresh fish, and a selection of other seafood delicatessen. See the Walvis Bay Waterfront for an eclectic selection of eateries.

Walvis Bay Waterfront The Walvis Bay Waterfront is abuzz with activity. Apart from the unique ocean atmosphere – with pelicans and other seabirds treating visitors to their playful antics – and operators offering ocean cruises, there is a wide selection of restaurants: Anchors @ the Jetty and Ocean Restaurant provide great local flavours. Sara se Gat is a popular cocktail bar, and the Jetty Shoppe sells a wide variety of gift items. Cuppa Musselcracker has a rustic atmosphere and a great selection of light meals and drinks. Local crafters also sell their goods at the Waterfront.

Walvis Bay Lagoon The Walvis Bay Lagoon takes pride of place as a scenic attraction in the Walvis Bay area. The tranquil stretch of water, its natural beauty accentuated by thousands of flamingos gathering at the rich feeding grounds, is over 3 000 years old. The lagoon has been silting up for hundreds of years, a process being hastened by man’s activities. Because of its value nationally and internationally as a wetland area, it was designated as a RAMSAR site in 1995, RAMSAR being a convention on wetlands held in 1971 in Ramsar, Iran. The lagoon is regarded as the most important wetland for coastal birds in Southern Africa. Wading birds including lesser and greater flamingos and white pelicans are seen here. A pleasant walk of just over 3 km leads to Lover’s Hill, which overlooks the lagoon.

The Walvis Bay environs Midway between Walvis Bay and Swakopmund is the Langstrand Holiday Resort. Established by the Walvis Bay Municipality, the resort features tidal pools and open beaches. The neighbouring Dolphin Park Recreation Resort has its own chalets, swimming pool, hydroslide and barbecue facilities.

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Dune 7, on the outskirts of town, is the highest dune in the area. Palmtree-shaded facilities for day camping and barbecues are ideal for family entertainment. Signboards point the way to the Bird Sanctuary in 13th Road, where a watchtower has been erected for bird-watchers. The angling potential along the coast is particularly good. An angling area favoured by locals is Paaltjies, which consists of four angling spots south of the town. The ‘paaltjies’ are navigational beacons used by commercial fishermen. The first ‘paaltjie’ can be reached by ordinary vehicle, but a 4x4 is required to reach the other three further south. The Walvis Bay Lagoon is ideal for windsurfing, boating and regattas organised by the Yacht Club, in which Hoby Cats, Fireballs and catamarans compete. A tour operator offers skiboat trips for shark, bottom and game fishing. Beach-fishing trips in 4x4 vehicles along the coast specialise in shark fishing. Boating day trips are enjoyable pleasure excursions. If you’d like to lay your hands on some fresh fish, a good option is to catch it yourself by booking an ocean safari, or going on a fishing expedition along the beach. Set on the unspoilt beachfront 10 km north of Walvis Bay, the luxury neighbourhood, Afrodite Beach, has started its process of development. Once completed, it will comprise multiple seafront homes, villas, a luxury hotel, conference facilities, health spa, apartment blocks and commercial facilities.

HENTIES BAY In 1929, Major Hentie van der Merwe, a motorcar dealer who operated from Kalkveld, discovered a fresh-water spring in an old delta of the Omaruru River while on a rhino-hunting expedition in the desert. He fell in love with the surroundings and for years it was his private haven to which he escaped every December. Henties Bay has since become a popular proposition for holiday and retirement property investments, due to the relatively affordable property prices and the town’s popularity as a holiday resort. Its peaceful atmosphere and remote setting along the Skeleton Coast is one of its greatest assets. Henties Bay Tourism www.hentiesbaytourism.com

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What to do in Henties Bay A peculiar and probably one of the most photographed landmarks in Henties Bay is the Gallows, an old tree stump (which formerly contained a rope and a noose), put up in 1978 as a ‘friendly but firm’ warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else! Another surprising phenomenon is a freshwater fountain situated almost on the beach in the so-called Valley, an old tributary of the Omaruru River. Apparently this fountain served as a lifesaver to many early explorers, one being Henties Bay’s own Major Hentie van der Merwe. One of the biggest events in Henties Bay is the annual Fish Festival presented in August each year, attracting visitors from all over Namibia, South Africa and even overseas. The annual Christmas Market, Angling Bonanza, and Touchies in December are events that have a high priority on the yearly calendar. Although shore fishing is still Henties Bay’s number-one attraction, there is much to do for those who don’t fish. The Jakkalsputz walking trail offers the beautiful Solitude Bay with its rocky shores and hummock dunes stabilised by coastal desert plants adapted to grow in harsh conditions. The Omaruru River Walking Trail, a long hike along the riverbed and across the Namib Desert plains, gives hikers an experience of the harsh but beautiful desert environment. Remember to take drinking water along. The Henties Bay Golf Course is laid out in the Valley. It is a nine-hole course, extending over 2.7 km, and has well-tended grass greens and tees, while the fairways are currently being planted with grass, which will turn it into a lush green spot in the riverbed. Golf competitions are organised regularly, especially during the December holiday season. While quad-bikes provide fun on the beach, they should be used responsibly and with due consideration to residents and other holidaymakers. Areas specifically designated for their use are 10 km upstream in the Omaruru River environs and the beach either side of the residential areas. When riding on the beach, please take other people into consideration and be on the lookout for children and pets, especially during the holiday season.

Quad-bikes are not allowed north of the Omaruru River and east of the C34 or in front of residential areas and campsites.

Where to eat

Henties Bay offers the Fishy Corner Seafood Restaurant & Take-away, Legends Pub & Grill, Desert Sands lapa bar & braai, De Duine Hotel, Pirate’s Cove sports bar and pizzeria, the Skubbe Bar and the new Solitude, a beach bar and restaurant on the southern edge of town. Good options for coffee and cake are the Coffee House, Misty Bay Café & Coffee Shop, and NamPie coffee shop.

Henties Bay environs

Situated in the Dorob National Park (the former National West Coast Recreation Area), Henties Bay offers the nature lover an attractive albeit sensitive natural environment with diversified fauna and flora and many sites of interest. Some of the biggest and best specimens of the renowned Welwitschia mirabilis grow among the hills of the Messum Crater. This curious plant – some specimens are estimated to be at least 1 500 years old – is endemic to the Namib Desert, from Swakopmund northwards to Mossamedes in Angola. Desert-adapted game species seen on the desert plains and in the dry watercourses include steenbok, springbok, gemsbok and Hartmann’s mountain zebra. Ostrich are commonly seen in southern Damaraland. This wonderland can be explored along 4x4 routes to destinations such as the Messum Crater, Brandberg West, the Ugab Menhir, Spitzkoppe, Omaruru River and various mineral mines. All roads are signposted and graded. An A2 satellite map with all the routes can be bought from the Henties Bay Tourist Office. Lichen fields can be viewed at Mile 30 south of Henties Bay, just north of the turnoff to the Cape Cross Nature Reserve and on the way to the Messum Crater. Visitors are asked not to leave the existing roads, but to park their vehicles next to the road and inspect these interesting organisms on foot. If a little water is sprinkled on them, they magically come to life. The Damara tern, a Namibian endemic bird that makes its nest in shallow scrapes among the saltbushes (ganna) on the gravel


| COASTAL STRIP | plains, is especially threatened by off-road driving. The nesting grounds of these diminutive birds occur between the coastal road and the sea, and there is an important breeding colony just north of the Omaruru River. If you leave the road to reach the beach, stay on the existing tracks. The Omaruru River offers the opportunity for walking, quad-biking and 4x4 driving, and has excellent picnic sites. The Old Fig Tree is a well-known and popular picnic site not far from Henties Bay. You can also drive up the sandy riverbed past the Omdel Dam to Skoenklip and exit the river at Lêwater to follow the route to the Spitzkoppe. The Omdel Dam – mostly dry – offers picnic sites, a variety of bird species, especially when there is water in the dam, and interesting desert-adapted plants. To reach Omdel Dam, take the C35 to Uis for ±27 km, then turn right and follow the narrow track for 14 km to

BELOW On any given day venturing down the coast you will see small, blurred figures of men with long rods in hand. Angling is a popular activity along Namibia’s shoreline

the Omdel Dam wall. Alternatively, the course of the Omaruru River can be followed in a 4x4 to reach the dam.

Cape Cross Seal Reserve

The Cape Cross Seal Reserve, with a surrounding area of 60 km2 consisting of flat gravel plains and the rocky outcrop where the seals gather, was proclaimed in 1968 to protect the biggest and best known of the 23 colonies of South African (Cape) fur seals that breed along the Namibian and western South African coast. The reserve is situated approximately 130 km north of Swakopmund. From January until the end of June the reserve is open on weekdays from 08:00–17:00; from the beginning of July until the end of November from 10:00–17:00; and in December again from 08:00–17:00. On weekends the reserve is open from 08:00–17:00. For further information contact the Ministry of Environment and Tourism at Cape Cross, Tel: 064 69 4037. It was here that the Portuguese navigator, Diogo Cão, on his second expedition to Africa south of the

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The following rules apply to vehicles, including quad– and other motorised bikes: • Permits are needed when entering the Off-Road Vehicle (ORV) area in the dune belt between Langstrand and Walvis Bay. • No permits are required in areas west of the coastal road between Swakopmund and Henties Bay, or when driving on park routes. • No driving is allowed on the beaches at Henties Bay, Wlotzkasbaken, Swakopmund, Cape Cross and the camping sites at Mile 14, Jakkalsputz, Mile 72 and Mile 108. • East of the C34 routes, self-drives are allowed only on designated 4x4 tracks. (Detailed maps are obtainable from the Henties Bay Tourism Office). • Bikes are prohibited on beaches between Walvis Bay and Swakopmund, and all areas north of Henties Bay. • Beach driving is allowed elsewhere on clearly marked tracks. • No bikes are allowed north of the Omaruru River up to the Ugab River. • Bikes are allowed 10 km upstream from Henties Bay within the Omaruru River course. • Vehicles are not allowed in the park between 21:00 and 05:00, except on proclaimed roads. • Closed and exclusionary areas include the Damara Tern breeding area, the Swakop River, and lichen fields.

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equator, erected a stone cross in 1486. Two replicas of this cross can be viewed at the site where the original one was erected. The original padrão is currently in Portugal. A small lichen reserve containing a relatively large variety of species can be viewed from close by. Bird islands off the coast are also protected. The South African (Cape) fur seal, Arctocephalus pusillus, is the largest of the world’s nine fur-seal species. As many as 210 000 of these animals gather at Cape Cross at any one time during the November/December breeding season.

SKELETON COAST PARK

The Skeleton Coast Park, proclaimed in its present form in 1971, extends from the Ugab River in the south for 500 km up to the Kunene River in the north, covering an area of 16 845 km2. It protects about one third of Namibia’s coastline.

BELOW

The landscape in the park ranges from sweeping vistas of windswept dunes, to rugged canyons with walls of richly coloured volcanic rock and extensive mountain ranges. Over a hundred species of lichen grow on the plains and west-facing mountain slopes, changing colour and becoming soft and leathery to the touch when the coastal fog generated by the cold Benguela Current pushes inland. Animals occurring on the plains are gemsbok, springbok, jackal, ostrich and brown hyaena, while desertadapted elephant and even black rhino, lion and giraffe roam up and down the dry river courses. Of special interest are the clay castles of the Hoarusib, the saltpans near the Agate Mountain and the seal colony at Cape Frio. The northern section of the Skeleton Coast Park is a tourism concession area that is restricted to fly-in safaris only. The southern section – between the Ugab and Hoanib rivers – is accessible to the general public staying at Terrace Bay and Torra Bay. Because of the ecological sensitivity

of the coastal desert, the entire park is managed by the MET as a wilderness area. A day permit to drive directly through the southern section of the park is obtainable from the MET Tourist Office in Swakopmund, as well as at the Ugab and Springbokwasser gates. Visitors driving through need to enter before 15:00 and leave by 17:00 and may not visit Terrace Bay or Torra Bay along the way. Overnight visitors must be in possession of a valid reservation advice for Terrace Bay or Torra Bay and arrive at the checkpoints at the Ugab Mouth and Springbokwasser gates not later than 15:00 and leave from these points not later than 17:00.

Adventure at the coast The coastal strip offers a wide variety of activities for adventure lovers, from quad-biking, ocean cruises, paragliding, sea kayaking, skydiving and sand-boarding, to exploring the Namib on the back of a camel or horse. The possibilities are endless. See the Adventure section on page 58 for further information.

COENIE SNYMAN

With guided tours and self-drive safaris with companies that hold concessions to certain areas of the desert, the option of a desert exploration is an exciting prospect.

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Strand Hotel Swakopmund Tel Reservations (+264 64) 411 4308 Email: strand.res@ol.na Web: www.ol-leisure.com

With its extensive and entertaining Restaurants, Bars, Lounges, Deli, sea facing Terraces and Conference & Banqueting Centre the Strand Hotel is destined to become the social epicenter of Swakopmund, N amibia. Uniquely located on the iconic and historic Swakopmund Mole and surrounded on three sides by the Southern Atlantic Ocean its 125 Rooms and Suites will offer the finest uninterrupted sea views available anywhere in this quaint historic town. The Strand Hotel Swakopmund is not simply being built but is rather being “sculptured” to be more than just a Hotel. It promises to be an integral part of the town’s historical centre and a beachfront entertainment destination in itself hosting both visitors and locals. 125

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Terrace Bay Camp P/Bag 13378, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

There are a number of places on earth that capture your creative imagination and leave a lasting impression on your mind. Namibia happens to have a number of them along its coast which serve as much sought after retreats. Terrace Bay is one such NWR facility - an angler’s paradise offering an absolutely unsurpassed coastal experience packed into one destination. Whereas the camp is ideal for anglers, it is also set in an undisturbed and peaceful surrounding enveloped in the sand dunes of the northern Namib Desert. Whether it is families looking for a getaway holiday or ardent adventurers looking to explore the Uniab River delta. 20

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Torra Bay P/Bag 13378, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

Torra Bay is a seasonal fishing retreat, situated inside the Skeleton Coast Park on the Atlantic coast. Open only in December and January, Torra Bay is famous in the angling circle due to the variety and quantity of fish that come down the Atlantic current. Other activities include bird watching, walking along the beach, and more fishing. The resort offers minimal facilities for a lesser impact on its natural surroundings: 60 campsites (that need to be booked in advance, and visitors are advised to bring all of their equipment with them), a shop, petrol station, and communal shower facilities. 60

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Villa Margherita 34 Daniel Tjongarero Street, corner Otavi Street PO Box 4392, Swakopmund Tel (+264 64) 40 2991, Cell (+264 81) 332 4293, Fax (+264 64) 40 0131 Email: info@villamargherita.com.na

Villa Margherita – The Charming House – is an antique colonial villa under Swiss management located in the heart of Swakopmund. A fusion of contemporary charm and a historic colonial building, Villa Margherita offers seclusion and personalised service. Our eight double rooms, most with a private lounge area, are for connoisseurs looking for a truly remarkable retreat. All our rooms have a flat-screen TV, safe, hairdryer and high-speed wireless Internet connection. Subject to availability, personal laptops are available on request. Our beautifully tended garden is ideal for relaxation; an organic bistro is open throughout the day; we offer professional massages, a laundry service and sumptuous breakfasts served from 7:00; as well as mouth-watering a la carte dinners with a selection of the best South African and international brands of wines and liquors/ spirits. The rooms are serviced at no extra charge till 9:00. 8

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Hotel Schweizerhaus PO Box 445, Swakopmund Tel (+264 64) 40 0331/2/3, Fax (+264 64) 40 5850 Email: reservations@schweizerhaus.net

Hotel Schweizerhaus, situated in Swakopmund on the Namib Desert coast, is a mere two to three minutes’ walking distance from the beach and the centre of town. Most of Schweizerhaus’s rooms have their own balcony, affording a view of the sea. Swakopmund’s famous coffee shop, Cafè Anton, serves traditional German confectionery, including Black Forest cream cake, Florentiners and the ever-popular Bee Sting, all of which are baked on the premises. The establishment has been in the hands of the Anton family since 1965, and is owned and managed by Heidi Snyman. A variety of functions, desert excursions, angling trips and sporting opportunities can be arranged for visitors on request. 24

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Hotel Zum Kaiser Taleni Africa Reservations: Tel (+27 21) 930 4564, Fax (+27 21) 914 9930 Tel (+264 64) 41 7100 (for last minute reservations only) Email: reservations@hotelzumkaiser.com, Web: www.hotelzumkaiser.com Location 4 Sam Nujoma Avenue, Swakopmund

Perfectly positioned on Sam Nujoma Avenue in the picturesque Swakopmund, the luxurious Hotel Zum Kaiser offers direct access to the beach and the town’s vibrant street life, quaint architecture, shopping and fine dining. This exclusive hotel houses 21 fully air-conditioned bedrooms, each featuring a full en-suite bathroom, television, coffee-and tea making facilities, bar fridge, electronic safe and wireless internet. Uniquely combining modern furnishings with a touch of classic elegance dating from imperial times, the Hotel Zum Kaiser creates a truly authentic and intimate ambiance. Enjoy delectable cuisine at the on-site Bistro Zum Kaiser and sip sun-downers whilst experiencing the spectacular sunsets over the Atlantic from the hotel’s idyllic Roof Terrace. The Hotel Zum Kaiser is fully equipped and offers the ideal setting for conferences, banqueting and celebrations. Exciting activities in the area can be booked directly at reception. 21

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Swakopmund Hotel & Entertainment Centre PO Box 616, Swakopmund Tel (+264 64) 410 5200, Executive Office Fax (+264 64) 410 5360, Reservations Fax (+264 64) 4105361 Email: swakopmund@legacyhotels.co.za, Web: www.legacyhotels.co.za

The Swakopmund Hotel and Entertainment Centre is situated in the beautiful town of Swakopmund. This hotel was once the Swakopmund Station Building, which was completed in 1901 and declared a National Monument in 1972. The building was renovated and came to life again in 1994 as a hotel with a sense of history. This luxury hotel has 88 spacious rooms and two stylish Presidential Suites. Most of the hotel’s rooms and the suites overlook the garden courtyard and swimming pool. Guests can dine at the elegant Platform One Restaurant which offers a wonderful selection of à-la-carte dishes, a speciality buffet and an extensive wine list. The hotel also houses the Mermaid Casino with stateof-the-art slot machines and poker, blackjack and roulette tables, a gym, florist, spa and hair salon, car rental and two cinemas. The Spitzkoppe Conference Centre can accommodate any function – from a conference to a banquet for up to 350 people. It’s the ideal venue for conferences, incentives, weddings and specialty functions. Swakopmund Hotel and Entertainment Centre – where the Skeleton Coast comes to life! 90

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Oyster Box Guesthouse Corner of The Esplanade, JJ Cleverly Street Tel (+264 64) 20 2247, Fax (+264 64) 24 9597 Email: oysterboxguesthouse@oysterboxguesthouse.com Web: www.oysterboxguesthouse.com

The Walvis Bay Lagoon, regarded as the most important coastal wetland in Southern Africa, is a RAMSAR site that is an important way station for African and Palaearctic migrants. It is also home to large numbers of resident birds and thousands of lesser and greater flamingos. If you’re not an avid bird watcher, the harbour town offers a range of other activities, such as angling from the beach; sand-boarding down the dunes; sailing, kayaking and wind- and kite-surfing on the lagoon; watching dolphins and seals; quad-biking; venturing on 4x4 trips into the Namib Desert; or simply taking a leisurely stroll on a paved walkway around our famous lagoon. Start your day with a hearty Oyster Box breakfast, and end it by unwinding on our open deck, watching the vibrant African sun set over the Atlantic or enjoying a cosy sundowner in our sheltered lounge and bar! 12

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FISH RIVER, COASTAL & THE DEEP SOUTH

• The region is home to one of the most majestic canyons in the world • It hosts Namibia’s first transfrontier conservation area • A diamond-mining industry of note was established here • Lüderitz is renowned for its distinctive German colonial architecture • Namibia’s most famous ghost town is found in the region

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RON SWILLING

FISH RIVER, COASTAL AND THE DEEP SOUTH The country’s most spectacular geological phenomenon and the highlight of Namibia’s ‘Deep South’ is the Fish River Canyon. The famous ravine lies in the lower reaches of Namibia’s longest river, the Fish River. It took millions of years to evolve to its present shape – a massive 161 km long, up to 27 km wide and up to 550 metres deep. Further north, in the small settlement of Helmeringhausen, an open-air museum dating back to the 1960s has been revamped to entice those interested in former farming methods.

TOP ATTRACTIONS IN THE SOUTH Top tourist attractions in the region include the quaint coastal town of Lüderitz; the legendary desert horses found west of Aus, especially at the water point at Garub; Namibia’s most famous ghost town, Kolmanskop, a former diamond settlement that was deserted in the 1950s; the Northern Sperrgebiet, which can be explored with concession-holding tour operators. Further east are the Quiver Tree Forest, Giant’s Playground and Brukkaros Mountain, the latter not an extinct volcano as is popularly thought but the remnants of a gaseous explosion that took place many millions of years ago. Lying at the centre of this region is the unofficial capital of the south,

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Keetmanshoop – the gateway to many of these attractions. Further south lies the Fish River Canyon, the second largest canyon in the world.

FISH RIVER CANYON AND /AI-/AIS RICHTERSVELD TRANSFRONTIER PARK The /Ai-/Ais Hot Springs and Fish River Canyon were first proclaimed in 1968, and in 1989 the Huns Mountains complex west of the canyon was added to these features to form a single conservation entity. The Namibian Government acquired several farms in the surroundings, which were also incorporated into the unit, and in 2003

ACTIVITIES AND ADVENTURES Take a step back in time in the deserted mining village of Kolmanskop – be sure to take your camera along! Hike the Fish River, or tackle it on the back of a mule Sample some fresh home-grown oysters in Lüderitz Surf the waves of the Atlantic Ocean in the Lüderitz waters Visit the Quiver Tree Forest and Giant’s Playground Go on a guided canoe or kayak adventure down the Orange River


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Namtib Desert Lodge

6

Bird’s Accommodation

9

Kalahari Game Lodge

7

N7

Onseepkans

Bahnhof Hotel Aus Goodhouse

Dabenoris

8

Lekkersing

This is just an approximate indication of where these establishments are situated

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Kokerbo

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Edward Cook Warmbad Memorial Warmbad & Hot Springs Historical D2 Gateways 06

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Hamab

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Narubis

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D3906

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M24

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D3918

Schmelen House

D43

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Diaz Cross Haalenberg 5 Große Bucht Rotkop 3Kolmanskop Grasplatz Ghost Mining Town Elizabeth Bay Ghost Mining Elizabeth Bay Town

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Wild Horses of the Namib Prisoner of War Camp Memorial

Lüderitz

D3

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Koichab Pan

1

90

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D425

Neisip

NO PUBLIC ACCESS

Icaboe Island Marshall Rocks

M98

D417

D707

Salt Flats

D390

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BRUKKAROS 1586m

Mooifontein Mooifontein Military Cemetery

Great Tiras 1867m

Hottentot’s Bay

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D61

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Spencer Bay Mercury Island

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C15

Har dap Ebeneerde

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Maltahöhe

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M3

D1041

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Zarishoogte Pass

Namib Rand Nature Reserve

C20

Mariental

C19

D1

C19

Namib-Naukluft Park

3

33 D10

Haribes

1895m

Zaris

42

D10

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Fish 50

5

D1

C41

Salzbrunn

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D8

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Cemetery Nomtsas at Nomtsas

D1010

Aranos

C20

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Sossusvlei

C21

C22

Lidfontein Eirup

Twilight

D100

C20

Vogelweide

04

Sesriem Canyon Hot-air Balloon Flights

C27

St Francis Bay

Haruchas

D83

sbird land

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Fish Kub Memorial Hardap Recreation Resort

75 D17

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Kalkrand

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C19

C14

Amin

C42

18 D13

1973m

C21

54

D1268

Salt Flats

39

D12

C79

C22

D1765

C41

D12

Rietoog

0

77 D1

Uhlenhorst

Duineveld

Remhoogte Pass

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Tsondab Vlei

D1

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Nauzerus

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5 D121

C14

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Tsumis Park

D1230

D1218

D10 52

D1262

MR 47

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Nauchas

Spreetshoogte Pass

Kuiseb

Leonardville | | FISH RIVER, COASTAL AND THE DEEP SOUTH

B1

5

Homeb

C24

Dassie Trails

D1248

C23

Zebra Pan

D1 2

D1265

Gaub Pass

C15

C25

Gebied

283

D1 25 9

MIT

D1

23

D12

M40

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Kuiseb Canyon

MIT

C24

D1 7 7

Gobabeb Desert Research Centre

PER

Girib

Rehoboth

Lake Oanob Resort

D1219

Gamsberg Pass

Namib-Naukluft Park

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the long-term conservation objective to manage the Huns Mountains and /Ai-/Ais Game Park jointly with the Richtersveld National Park as one integrated Transfrontier Conservation Area (TFCA) became a reality when the /Ai-/Ais-Richtersveld Transfrontier Park became Namibia’s first transfrontier conservation area. The attraction of this rugged wilderness is its isolated and otherworldly landscape, and wealth of interesting xerophytic plants, such as the halfmens or elephant’s trunk, Pachypodium namaquanum. Geologically and botanically the area is similar to South Africa’s Richtersveld south of the Orange River. Eroded over many millennia, the Fish River Canyon is the second-largest natural canyon in the world. Set in a harsh, stony plain, dotted with drought-resistant succulents such as the distinctive quiver tree or kokerboom, Aloe dichotoma, and Euphorbia gregaria, the canyon is a spectacular natural phenomenon that took hundreds of millions of years to evolve. While its full length is 160 km – the width is up to 27 km and depth up to 550 metres – its most spectacular section is the 56km stretch between the northernmost and southernmost viewpoints. Because the river flows inter­mittently, there is always water in some of the pools, except in very dry years. Containing small- and largemouth yellowfish, sharptooth catfish, tilapia and common carp, the pools are also frequented by the water monitor or leguan. Baboon, rock hyrax, ground squirrel and klipspringer are often seen in the canyon, while the presence of leopard and mountain zebra is indicated by tracks left at waterholes. Kudu inhabit the densely vegetated lower reaches north of /Ai-/Ais. An interesting variety of birds, such as the olive thrush, Cape robin-chat and African black duck, are found in the canyon.

Fish River viewpoint A new, N$1.6-million enviro-friendly viewpoint overlooking the spectacular Fish River Canyon was completed in 2010. Designed by Windhoekbased architect Nina Maritz – who is internationally recognised for her expertise in energy efficiency and sustainable building within developing countries – the new facility greatly enhances this popular southern destination. Displayed at the viewpoint

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are a series of interpretive information posters for tourists, providing information on the flora, fauna and geology of the canyon, the history of the area, the human footprint, the transfrontier process and the Fish River Canyon hiking trail.

LÜDERITZ One of Namibia’s truly unique destinations is the coastal town of Lüderitz in the so-called Deep South. Originally named Angra Pequena (small bay) by the famous Portuguese explorer Bartholomeu Dias in 1487, the settlement was renamed Lüderitz in honour of its founder Adolf Lüderitz in 1884. Located directly on the shores of Lüderitz Bay facing the Atlantic Ocean, Lüderitz forms a barrier between the towering coastal dunes of the NamibNaukluft Park directly to the north, and the unforgiving rocky coastline to the south. The town has a colourful fishing harbour surrounded by early 20th Century German colonial buildings. Ten kilometres to the east the worldrenowned ghost town, Kolmanskop, affords you the opportunity to gain a spellbinding insight into what life was once like in this former diamond settlement. Other activities include bird-watching such as visiting Halifax Island to view Namibia’s largest colony of African penguins, exploring the Lüderitz Peninsula and its many bays and beaches, whale watching, windsurfing and speed-sailing Lüderitz is especially famous for its delicious fresh seafood: west-coast rock lobster (called crayfish locally), oysters and the much-sought-after delicacy abalone (perlemoen variety). The town celebrates its rich seafood culture by presenting the annual Lüderitz Crayfish Festival. Current developments in the town include the construction of the Diaz Wind Power project at Diaz Point 12 km south of the town. Namibia’s first wind farm is expected to generate wind energy at a capacity of 44 megawatts. A major project for the future is the establishment of the largest maritime museum complex in Africa. This multi-million-Namibia-dollar tourist attraction will display Namibia’s rich maritime history, geology and marine fauna and flora. Cafés, restaurants, an outdoor arena, a yacht jetty and large promenades will provide additional relaxation opportunities for the visitor. The scheduled date for

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT The Fish River Canyon is the second largest canyon in the world • Remains of old car wrecks are often found along gravel roads in rural areas • Lüderitz has an old-world appeal that is characterised by its German colonial architecture • Mountain biking in the south ranges from short self-guided trips to longer safaris and extreme endurance events • The lighthouse on Shark Island

completion of this major maritime centre is 2017. Lüderitz is easily accessible by good roads from Windhoek, Keetmanshoop and the Fish River Canyon, as well with direct Air Namibia flights from Windhoek International Airport several times a week. To fully appreciate Lüderitz, a minimum of two nights’ stay in the town is recommended.

Distinctive architecture Among the most striking architectural attractions are the Goerkehaus and Felsenkirche. Both adorn the slopes of Diamond Mountain. The church with its beautiful stained-glass windows is truly unique, as all building materials – even the sand - were shipped from Germany. In the ‘old town’ are the houses of former mining magnates and prominent businessmen, including Kreplin House and Troost House. The Krabbenhöft & Lampe Building was erected for a trading business during the period of economic prosperity that followed the discovery of diamonds. The Deutsche Afrika Bank is part of the historic street view of Bismarck Street, one of the oldest roads in town. In Berg Street, in the historic core of the town, is a complex of residences built during the diamond boom. Other noteworthy structures are the old post office, the former German school, the Lesehalle and the Turnhalle. The small Lüderitz Museum on Diaz Street is another fascinating stop to learn about the town’s history and heritage.

Beaches, bays and birds The Lüderitz Peninsula is characterised by numerous bays, lagoons and unspoilt stretches of beach. At Diaz Point a replica of Bartolomeu Dias’ padrão can be seen, while a memorial on Shark Island commemorates Captain Cornelius Fredericks. Another one, which was unveiled in 1903 to mark 20 years of


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| FISH RIVER, COASTAL AND THE DEEP SOUTH | German colonisation, originally stood in the old Nautilus cemetery on the site of the first surveyor’s beacon but was moved in 1976, as were the graves of German soldiers. The popular local beaches are Grosse Bucht, Sturmvogelbucht and Agate Beach, the latter with its excellent barbecue facilities, long sandy beach and good bathing opportunities. The remains of an old Norwegian whaling station can be viewed further out. The Lüderitz area is home to a wide variety of aquatic birds. Large numbers

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Namibia’s famous ghost town, Kolmanskop, is situated in the Sperrgebiet National Park • The remains of Kolmanskop is situated 10 km inland from Lüderitz • Diaz Cross • African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) • Apart from a wide variety of sea life, the Luderitz area is home to aquatic birds and specially adapted desert dwellers that roam the beaches

of flamingos, cormorants and seagulls inhabit the shallow lagoons. When sailing in the bay, seals and dolphins can be seen playing in the water. For anglers, favoured species are galjoen, steenbras, dassie and rock lobster. It is not unusual to see an occasional jackal or brown hyaena trotting along the beach, or a group of springbok close to the sea. An attractive plant in the surroundings is Bushman’s candle, its pink flowers contrasting vividly against the black rock. Unusual species of dwarf succulents grow in the area, such as small but intriguing lithops, colloquially referred to as Hottentot’s buttocks.

Activities in and around Lüderitz Excursions into the environment vary from 4x4 camping tours to experience the natural surroundings – dunes, vast open plains, black mountains, and magnificent desert night skies – to boat trips around Lüderitz Bay and the outlying islands. Attractions en route include a colony of Cape fur seals, an abandoned whaling station, WWI entrenchments, an old foghorn and lighthouse, African penguins, Heaviside’s dolphins and, in season, Humpback and Southern Right whales. Sunset cruises, deep-sea fishing, and private charters are further possibilities, as well as bird watching, whale watching and exploring the

many bays and beaches. The large Lüderitz second lagoon, with strong winds coming from the surrounding Namib Desert, offers windsurfers and kite surfers exciting sailing opportunities throughout the year – this is a real sailing paradise with no crowds and plenty of opportunity to test your skills

Festivals The annual Crayfish Festival is celebrated in April/May, a Snoek Derby normally takes place during the long weekend in May, and in September the bi-annual Lüderitz Karneval is held according to German traditions. Windsurfing and speed sailing are two activities that draw crowds to the small town during October/November for the annual Lüderitz Speed Challenge. Excellent wind conditions and a specially made 1km long canal attract the world’s best kite surfers and windsurfers to compete for the top world ranking in speed sailing. A total of 75 national and 12 world records have been achieved since the first event in 2007 and Lüderitz has become synonymous with speed sailing records. Lüderitz offers the perfect conditions for speed sailing records: warm winds gain momentum on their way through the coastal hills of the Namib Desert and are accelerated to incredibly high speeds by thermal atmospheric pressure when they reach the cold waters of the Atlantic Ocean. Statistically the wind blows at 35 knots and more at least 3 times a week during the event, often reaching 40-45 knots and sometimes even 50 to 65 knots (119 km/h). If you are in Lüderitz during the annual speed challenge it is definitely worth your while to see these worldclass speed sailors in action. www.luderitz-speed.com

Abalone and oysters Oyster and abalone production in Lüderitz is on the rise, with marine aquaculture enterprises currently producing abalone, oysters, mussels and seaweed in the Lüderitz sea lagoons and the salt-ponds of Walvis Bay and Swakopmund. There is a wide choice of eateries serving seafood. The Lüderitz Nest Hotel has two restaurants: the Penguin Restaurant and Crayfish Bar & Lounge. Another place to enjoy the local catch is Ritzi’s Restaurant at the

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Waterfront Harbour. Culinary alternatives range from homebaked cakes and fresh bread to prime steak and wood-fired pizza. www.luderitzhotel.com

Lüderitz Waterfront A number of exciting modern developments have taken place in the centre of Lüderitz. One of them is the Lüderitz Waterfront Development which currently includes the harbour square that hosts the annual Crayfish Festival. The harbour square consists of shops, restaurants and coffee shops, offices and apartments. The Yacht Club is also at the Waterfront. The second phase of the development, currently underway, is the upgrading and renovation of the historic power station located directly on Lüderitz Bay. Future developments that will put the bay on the map include the country’s first shopping centre with sea views, luxury apartments, a fourstar hotel, indoor and outdoor sports facilities, a modern satellite campus for the Polytechnic of Namibia, and Africa’s largest Maritime Museum.

Kolmanskop Namibia’s most famous ghost town, Kolmanskop, is situated in the Sperrgebiet National Park about 10 km inland from Lüderitz. It was named after transport driver Johnny Coleman, who lived in the tiny settlement of Aus at the turn of the century. During a fierce sandstorm he was forced to abandon his ox wagon on the small incline from where Kolmanskop can be seen. It stood there for a while, giving rise to the name Colemanshuegel, which eventually became Kolmanskop. In 1908, the railway worker Zacharias Lewala found a sparkling stone in the sand he was shovelling at Kratzplatz railway station nearby Kolmanskop. His supervisor, August Stauch, was convinced he had found a diamond. When this was confirmed, the news spread like wildfire, sparking a frantic diamond rush and causing fortune hunters to converge on Kolmanskop in droves. It soon became a bustling little centre, featuring a butchery, bakery, furniture factory, soda-water and lemonade plant. By 1915, Kolmanskuppe was one of the richest towns in the world with its own millionaire’s row, large outdoor salt-water swimming pool, bowling alley, hospital, entertainment hall and

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ice-making factory. The first X-ray machine in the southern hemisphere was introduced here, as well as the first tram in Africa. Today, Namibia’s diamond-mining operations take place offshore in the Oranjemund area (on the border with South Africa). The development of the town reached its pinnacle in the 1920s, with approximately 300 German adults, 40 of their children and 800 Owambo contract workers living there. In spite of, or probably because of, the isolation and bleakness of the surrounding desert, Kolmanskop developed into a lively little haven of German culture, providing entertainment and recreation to suit the requirements of the affluent, for whom large, elegant houses were built. However, when richer diamond deposits were discovered further south, operations were moved to Oranjemund. Today, the crumbling ruins of the ghost town bear little resemblance to its former glory. The stately homes, their grandeur now scoured and demolished by desert winds, are gradually becoming enveloped by sand. In 1980 the mining company CDM (now Namdeb) restored a number of the buildings and established a museum for tourist viewing. Permits are needed to enter Kolmanskop. These can be obtained at the entrance gate, which is open daily from 08:00 to 13:00 (longer for visitors who have a photo permit. Interesting guided tours are conducted free of charge, in English and German, from Mondays to Saturdays at 09:30 and 11:00, and on Sundays and public holidays at 10:00.

AUS An almost-forgotten hamlet on the north-south and east-west crossroads between the Maltahöhe–Rosh Pinah and Keetmanshoop–Lüderitz routes has reinvented itself. Most people usually pass Aus or just drive in briefly to fill up with fuel. However, apart from refuelling, having refreshments and perhaps staying at one of the accommodation establishments, there are more reasons to stop at Aus, as it offers much of interest. The settlement has several historical buildings and traces of crucial historical events, including the remains of the prisonerof-war camp where over 1 500 German prisoners were kept after the surrender

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of the German forces in 1915. Aus is also a starting point for viewing the well-known wild horses of Garub and a trading centre for the karakul farmers of the surroundings. Aus is not only at the crossroads of major transport routes, but also at the meeting point of three main ecological biomes – the Succulent Karoo, Nama Karoo and Dune Namib. In terms of natural assets this makes Aus one of the most diverse places in Namibia. Over 500 plant species have been recorded in the environs, representing nearly one fifth of Namibia’s entire flora. Some species are restricted to the granite koppies around Aus, and grow nowhere else but here. The sporadic occurrence of winter and summer rains, and diverse landforms including granite koppies, sand-andgravel plains, and rivers, contribute to this extraordinary natural diversity. As an outpost of the Succulent Karoo biome, the area yields flower displays that rival those of Namaqualand a few weeks after significant rains. These could occur almost any time of the year due to the transitional nature of the Aus environs between the two major climatic regimes in Southern Africa. Good times to visit these environs to view the plant life are from May to June and from August to September. Aus is also a rewarding spot for birding. Namib endemics such as the Namib dune lark can be seen here, as well as a variety of other larks, raptors and shrikes, in addition to the regular inhabitants of the marginal desert areas, such as Ludwig’s bustard, Rüppel’s korhaan and Namaqua sandgrouse.

The Desert Horses A captivating feature of the Sperrgebiet are the legendary desert horses seen from the road when travelling between Lüderitz and Aus. About 100 km east of Lüderitz, a signpost indicates the turnoff to Garub, a maintained water point where the wild horses can be observed and photographed as they come to drink. There are several theories regarding their origin. One is that they are descendants of the horse stud belonging to Baron von Wolf, who built Duwisib Castle 160 km northeast of Garub. Another is that they are descendants of horses left behind when the German Schutztruppe abandoned Aus during the South West African Campaign in 1915, and yet another that they are descended from some

6 000 horses belonging to South African soldiers who camped at the borehole at Garub in 1915. There was also the so-called Kubub stud bred at the Kubub Station under management of Emil Kreplin (mayor of Lüderitz from 1909–1914), who supplied workhorses for mining purposes and as racehorses. It is thought that the Kubub horses also added to the evolvement of the famous desert horses of Aus.

ROSH PINAH Rosh Pinah, a mining village south of Aus, is yet to gain town status. Mining operations in Rosh Pinah started in 1969 when the Rosh Pinah Lead-Zinc Mine commenced operations. In 2001, the village received another economic boost when the Anglo Skorpion Zinc Mine started operations. Rosh Pinah doesn’t offer much in terms of activities and leisure, but serves as a convenient stopover between Aus and Oranjemund. The Geo Centre is worth a mention though, displaying rocks and minerals from the Rosh Pinah and Skorpion mines, as well as from other areas in Namibia. Open Mondays to Fridays from 8:00 to 17:00, the Geo Centre also offers geological and historical trips to interesting locations in the vicinity, ranging from day trips, to five-day, allinclusive tours.

ORANJEMUND Known as the ‘town built on diamonds’ where jackal, ostrich and gemsbok wander the streets amongst the local inhabitants, Oranjemund was officially granted local-authority status in August 2011. The long-standing plan to proclaim Oranjemund as an open town came to fruition following the proclamation of a 90-km access road linking Rosh Pinah to Oranjemund as a national road. The town was previously owned privately by Namdeb. Oranjemund can lay claim to being the only town surrounded completely by the Sperrgebiet National Park. In its heyday, when Oranjemund boasted 15 000 inhabitants, the mining giant DeBeers provided several luxuries for its employees, such as one of the best 18-hole golf courses in Namibia. Fishing and birding are further popular pastimes in Oranjemund, as the town is located at the Orange River mouth, a RAMSAR proclaimed wetland. Air Namibia offers flights to Oranjemund four times a week.


| FISH RIVER, COASTAL AND THE DEEP SOUTH |

Access to the town itself and the surrounding area is restricted as per the Namibian Diamond Act and a Restricted Area Permit is required by anyone wishing to visit. These permits may be obtained from Namdeb Security Department’s Permits Office at Oranjemund. Visitors should apply for permits themselves and if they are planning on staying over in town or passing through town they must attach the address and details of the accommodation they will be using. All visitors over the age of 18 will be subjected to a security clearance check if they plan on entering the town. You do not need to apply for a permit if you plan on passing around town in transit to another destination.

Oranjemund Border Control Oranjemund Border control is situated between Namibia and South Africa. On the Namibia side you have the town of Oranjemund, and on South Africa’s side, Alexander Bay. Namibia’s daylight saving time (GMT+1) is from the first Sunday of April to first Sunday in September. (i.e. the times specified will then be an hour earlier, see page 19). A single paved carriageway leads towards the border post crossing at the bridge at Alexander Bay to Oranjemund. Please note that it will be impossible to cross the bridge at this border post without a valid permit. You have to apply beforehand for a permit to be able to get through the border. It takes about 2-3 weeks for the permit to arrive and you can contact The Permit Office at +264(0)63 236 100 for more information. You will need to complete an Application form and include a copy

of your ID. They accept faxes or emails. Also make sure you have a ZA sticker on your car if travelling from South Africa through Namibia, which can be purchased at an AA agent or at outdoor retailers, a valid passport for showing at the border, which should be valid for another 6 months from the date you leave South Africa or your relevant country, a valid driver’s license (i.e. South Africa licenses are valid in Namibia), cash to pay a road user’s fee (approximately N$ 220 for a car, N$ 140 per trailer/camper). You can pay by credit card, in South Africa Rand or Namibian Dollar. It is safer to take enough cash with you. The police at the border post will check your engine number, chassis, trailer number and license details. If you own the vehicle, make sure that your insurance is covered while you travel in Namibia. A road tax certificate is necessary if you plan on traveling through Namibia. When passing into Namibia from South Africa at the Oranjemund border you need to obtain your road tax certificate at Rosh Pinah, which is a two-hour drive from Oranjemund. In Rosh Pinah head to the local Police Station, here they will guide you through the steps to obtaining your road tax certificate. Permits Office: permits.permitsoffice@namdeb.com. Fax: +264 63 23 6104 Tel: +264 63 23 6100 Oranjemund Immigration Office: +264 63 2327 56

SPERRGEBIET NATIONAL PARK The Sperrgebiet National Park was proclaimed in 2008. While it is still largely undeveloped and much of

it remains inaccessible to visitors, a small section of this wild landscape can be explored with a tour group, accompanied by an official of the MET. The Sperrgebiet (forbidden territory) covers 26 000 km2 of globally important semi-desert. It forms part of the Succulent Karoo biome that extends into South Africa. With its profusion of succulent species, unrivalled anywhere else on the planet in terms of endemism and quantity, conservation scientists have classified this area as one of the world’s top 25 Biodiversity Hotspots. To qualify for hot-spot status, an area must contain at least 1 500 endemic vascular plants (0.5% of the planet’s total) and must have lost at least 70% of its original habitat. Prior to the establishment of the Sperrgebiet National Park, a mere 11% of the surviving Succulent Karoo, which is home to 2 439 endemic plants, was in protected areas. Now, following the proclamation of the park, 90% of this zone is protected. Concessionaires with the Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) take visitors from Lüderitz into the northern extremity of the park where they can admire the colossal 55-metre-high Bogenfels rock arch; the modern diamond mine and the mysterious ghost town at Elizabeth Bay; the ghost town of Pomona (noteworthy for enduring the highest average wind speeds in Southern Africa); and Märchental – the famous ‘Fairy Tale Valley’ – where diamonds were once so common they could

LEFT TO RIGHT Quiver trees (Aloe dichotoma) • The wild horses of the Namibia can be found near Aus

RON SWILLING

Access Permits

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be picked up in handfuls from the surface as they lay gleaming in the light of the moon. Activities further south include kayaking down the Orange River to observe the birds and animals that frequent this internationally renowned Ramsar Wetland Site and viewing the wealth of succulents, some growing as tall as trees and many putting on a spectacular floral display after winter rains. Because the Sperrgebiet, due to its diamond wealth, has been off limits to the public for close to a century, the habitat is largely untouched and pristine, making a visit to the park a truly unique wilderness experience. A permit issued by the Namibian Police is required to enter this area. These permits are arranged by tour operators who take visitors into the Sperrgebiet.

Northern Sperrgebiet concession The Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) has given tour operators such as Uri Adventures/ Topnaar 4x4 (a joint venture) and Coastway Tours concessions to conduct a limited number of trips annually along the stretch of coastline between Sylvia Hill northwards to Sandwich Harbour in the wilderness section of the Namib-Naukluft Park. Participants drive in their own vehicles and are accompanied throughout the trip by a tour guide in the leading vehicle and an assistant driving at the rear of the convoy with the kitchen equipment and food for the tour on board. A MET representative assists the tour when deemed necessary. Points of interest include Saddle Hill, Koichab Pan, Sylvia Hill, Conception Bay, Langewand, the wreck of the Eduard Bohlen, Fischersbrunn and Sandwich Harbour.

Ancient shipwreck discovered In April 2008, a shipwreck was discovered along the southern Sperrgebiet coast with priceless treasure in the form of glittering gold coins and hundreds of almost mint-condition silver pieces. Other artefacts retrieved were fifty ivory tusks, thousands of Portuguese and Spanish gold and silver coins minted in late 1400 and early 1500, and pewterware. Astrolabes were

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the only navigational tools found on the wreck. Astrolabes were used to determine how far north or south you have sailed, although what doomed this ship still remains a mystery. In all likelihood it ran aground due to bad weather, as this stretch of coast is notorious for fierce, disorienting storms. Unofficial estimates are that the gold coins alone are worth N$16 million. The origin of this find remains a mystery, although informed sources speculate the ship could have been one of a fleet of four, small, fast Portuguese ships – led by Bartholomeu Dias in the 15th and 17th centuries – that came to grief during a storm off the Cape of Good Hope in May 1500. Dias’s caravel was part of a fleet of a dozen ships that set sail from Portugal in the first half of 1500 under the stewardship of the legendary sailor Pedro Alvarez Cabral, who stumbled on Brazil after becoming lost at sea. The discovery was made inside Namdeb’s Mining Area 1, which is accessible only with permits issued jointly by the Ministry of Mines and Energy and the Government’s Protective Resources Unit. Namibian heritage laws on such discoveries automatically give ownership of the treasure to Government. A maritime and mining museum for Oranjemund is in the pipeline to display, among others, the artefacts found on the wreck.

BETHANIE The historical town of Bethanie, one of the oldest settlements in the country, lies west of Keetmanshoop. It can be visited from the road leading to Lüderitz. A significant historical event took place in Bethanie in 1883 when the first recorded deed of sale was signed at the house of the 19th-century Nama Chief, Joseph Fredericks, for the land that was to become known as Lüderitz. The house, built in the same year, is a national monument. Buildings of historical interest in Bethanie are the Evangelical Lutheran Church Complex, comprising Schmelenhaus, built in 1814 and believed to be the oldest excising building in the country, the original mission church, and the adjacent graveyard. Situated next to the road between

Bethanie and Goageb is a Site of Veneration, a stone heap known as a prayer mound or Heitsi Ghub in the local Khoekhoe language. This feature is protected as a cultural historical relic. The Musical Stone, a large block of dolomite that produces different pitches when struck by a sharp stone, and found on the farm Rooipunt, is another relic of early Namibian history. Because the feature is situated on private land, permission needs to be obtained to visit the site.

KEETMANSHOOP The main centre and focal point of the scenic and historic attractions in the south is its ‘capital’ Keetmanshoop. Founded in 1860 by the Rhenish Mission Society, the town still retains vestiges of its original German buildings, and some dating back to the arrival of the first Europeans, who trekked across the Orange River to trade, hunt and explore the land. The first of these expeditions was in 1791. It was led by Hendrik Hop, who trekked as far as Hainabis on the Löwen River, about 12 km from Keetmanshoop. In 1866 preacher John Schröder of the German Missionary Society built a shelter at Keetmanshoop from which to operate. It is said the two acacias he used to support the shelter are still alive and well. Schröder approached the rich industrialist, Johan Keetman, chairman of the society, for funds to build a church and dwelling for himself and his family. Keetman donated 2,000 German marks for the church, and was rewarded for his generosity by having the settlement named after him, although he never saw the town himself. The first version of the Rhenish Mission Church built by Johan Schröder was swept away in 1890 by floodwaters of the Swartmodder River. It was then rebuilt on higher ground, completed

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Over 1 000 shipwrecks dot the 1 500 km long Namibian coastline • Cape Fur Seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) • The colossal 55 metre high Bogenfels rock arch in Sperrgebiet National Park • There are numerous opportunities to explore off-the-beaten track 4x4 destinations in Namibia


| FISH RIVER, COASTAL AND THE DEEP SOUTH | in 1895, and used as a church until 1930. It is now a museum with displays depicting the colourful past of the region. Eagle’s Monument, built between 1897–1907 in remembrance of the casualties in the battles fought with the Bondelswarts and the Namas and declared a National Monument in 1966, can be viewed in the Garden of Remembrance. A former officer’s barracks built in German colonial times, the Turnverein Gut Heil, has been converted into tourist accommodation. Much of the German architectural style was retained, as well as unexpected Jewish motifs in the shape of the Star of David, lending an interesting detail to the tall windows of Schützenhaus.

The previous owner transferred the windows to the house when the old Jewish Synagogue in Keetmanshoop was demolished. The Southern Tourism Forum (STF) operates from an information office in the centre of Keetmanshoop. The building in which it is housed was inaugurated in 1910 as the Kaiserliches Postamt (Imperial Post Office) and is a national monument. The STF is actively engaged in the annual Dorsland Trek/Fish River Canyon awareness project, which entails collecting refuse left by hikers on the hiking trail. Also in the Keetmanshoop vicinity is the site of the historical monolith Mukurob, a relic of erosion also referred to as the Finger of God, which collapsed in December 1988.

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Today, only the foot piece and part of the neck are still in evidence. Also in the Keetmanshoop district, albeit in a remote area on the edge of the Kalahari about 28 km east of Aroab on the road to Botswana, is an impressive stone rondavel, erected in 1900. STF/Keetmanshoop info Tel (+264 63) 22 1266

Quivertree Dolerite Park Forty-two kilometres north-east of Keetmanshoop on the road to Koës is the Mesosaurus Fossil Site & Quivertree Dolerite Park. Father and son, Giel and Hendrik Steenkamp, happened on a rock with an imprint of a reptile’s skeleton on their farm, which geologists

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informed them was a fossil of the early saurian Mesosaurus tenuidens, a predecessor of the dinosaurs. They unearthed further fossils in the layers of mudstone, and, having gained permission from the National Heritage Board, started taking tourists to the site in 2000. Tourist facilities are provided on site. Close by is a quiver tree ‘forest’ and a ‘singing rock’. A guided tour takes 90–120 minutes. For those who prefer to explore on their own, there are two marked trails.

SEEHEIM Founded in 1896 as a base for the German Schutztruppe, and serving as an overnight stop for visitors travelling by rail to present day !Nami≠nûs, the settlement doesn’t offer much, although the historical hotel was recently renovated. Seeheim was a booming settlement during the 40s and 50s, of even greater prominence than Keetmanshoop. In the late 50s it started falling into decline and in 1974, the last remaining business – the Seeheim Hotel – was forced to close down. After standing empty for 30 years, the hotel is once again open for business. Near Seeheim, on the farm Naiams, is an old German Fortress, built in 1898. Two historical graves are found in the vicinity.

NAUTE DAM Some 50 km south-west of Keetmanshoop en route to Seeheim, is Namibia’s third-largest water reservoir, the Naute Dam, fed by the Löwen River, a tributary of the Fish. Surrounded by flat-topped ridges and large rust-coloured boulders, the area is scenically attractive, and harbours a surprising variety of birds, including some aquatic species. The Naute Recreation Resort was proclaimed in 1989, offering picnic sites, toilets and a small shop. The Naute Project is an irrigation scheme fed by the dam for the production of domestic white maize, dates, grapes, prickly pears and pomegranates. Only about 20–25 tonnes of the dates produced at Naute are distributed locally, as Namibians are not great consumers of this highly nutritious fruit. The other 70–75 per cent is exported primarily to England, Canada, Spain and France.

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BRUKKAROS MOUNTAIN About 130 km north-west of Keetmanshoop en route to the small settlement of Berseba where a mission station was established in 1850 is the conspicuous Brukkaros Mountain. In a landscape devoid of vegetation, this mass of dark-coloured lava rises abruptly from a vast, sun-scorched plain. The turnoff to the base of the mountain, accessible only in 4x4 vehicles, is south of Tses. A wellmaintained footpath leads from the end of the road via the eroded southern rim to the mountain. The trail was carved in 1930 when the Smithsonian Institute installed an observatory on the western rim of the crater to examine the sun’s surface. Although still standing, the observation station has not functioned for many years. At the turn of the century the German authorities maintained a heliograph station on the eastern rim of Brukkaros. Relatively recently, a VHF radio mast was placed on the northern rim. Brukkaros is not an extinct volcano, as its shape would suggest, but the eroded remnants of a pile of fragmented rock produced by a gigantic gaseous explosion some 84 million years ago. At its highest point it is about 1 580 metres, the mountainous ridge surrounding a deep crater of almost 2 000 metres in diameter, with a flat, rock-littered floor. The mountain’s vernacular name, the Nama word Geitsigubeb, refers to its resemblance to the large leather ‘trouser apron’ worn traditionally by Khoekhoe women.

HELMERINGHAUSEN Although the small settlement of Helmeringhausen doesn’t offer much in terms of tourism, it does have a museum that is worth a visit. The displays are mainly of farming implements from earlier times, Founded during the German colonial era as a farm by a member of the Schutztruppe, the Helmeringhausen area later became famous for the breeding of karakul sheep. On the farm Mooifontein is a cemetery containing graves of German soldiers who fell during the Nama uprisings against German Colonial rule (1903– 1907), as well as some civilian graves. The farm was formerly a German military post known as Chamis.

QUIVER TREE FOREST AND GIANT’S PLAYGROUND A much-favoured topic for photographers, the Quiver Tree Forest can be viewed on Farm Gariganus, some 14 km north-east of Keetmanshoop. About 300 specimens of this prehistoric tree, Aloe dichotoma, also referred to by its Afrikaans name, kokerboom, reach skywards with graphically forked branches. On average about 3–5 metres tall, the trees are rewarding subjects to photograph, especially at sunset or sunrise. They produce bright yellow flowers during the winter months, and their trunks are smooth and shiny with light silverygrey bark, which peels and forms intricate rectangular and diamondshaped patterns as the tree matures. Across the road from the Quiver Tree Forest is Giant’s Playground, an impressive jumble of massive dolerite boulders between 160 million and 180 million years old. Wandering through the maze of boulders is an interesting excursion, but care must be taken not to become lost in the extensive rocky labyrinth.

WARMBAD For most Namibians the small settlement of Warmbad in southern Namibia is a mere dot on the map. However, in historical times Warmbad occupied a prominent place in the country. Two hundred years ago the Albrecht brothers, Abraham and Christian, as representatives of the London Missionary Association, settled in Warmbad to introduce Christianity to local inhabitants. By then, in addition to its Nama residents, including Bondelswarts people who were farming in the surroundings, the settlement was an important stopover for big-game hunters, traders and adventurers en route to and from South Africa. Thus, although these activities started as early as 1760, the Albrecht brothers are regarded as the founders of Warmbad. Today the town is inhabited primarily by Nama people, a friendly race with a rich history of folklore and tales of heroism in battle. Of great historical interest in Warmbad is the site where the Bondelswarts leader, Jan Christiaan Abraham, was shot and killed by German district officer Lieutenant Jobst when resisting arrest in 1903. The Bondelswarts retaliated by shooting Lieutenant


| FISH RIVER, COASTAL AND THE DEEP SOUTH | Jobst and a non-commissioned officer, an incident that gave rise to the Bondelswarts taking up arms against the Germans. This historic event is re-enacted every year on the weekend preceding or following 25 October. Also of interest in Warmbad is the stone entrance built between 1907 and 1913 as a gateway to the German fort. Completed around 1895, the fort with its single tower was enclosed by a stone wall. Although the fort no longer exists, the remains of the Schutztruppe stables with their beautiful stone cribs can still be seen. Nearby is the old prison building with its two cells, still in a relatively good

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condition. To appreciate the historic attractions offered by Warmbad, it is best to engage the services of a guide. The hot-water springs at Warmbad were discovered by the Bondelswarts people more than 200 years ago when searching for water and grazing for their livestock. With funds provided by the Namibian Government, bungalows, a restaurant, camping facilities, a swimming pool and a kiosk were developed to accommodate tourists. The hotsprings complex has since become community property. Another site of interest is that of a

commemorative stone erected in 1929 for Reverend Edward Cook, the second Wesleyan missionary to arrive in the area. The community-based Warmbad Museum is the result of an alliance between the Warmbad Community Based Tourism Enterprise (WCBTE) and the History Department of the University of Namibia. It houses pictures and items that are unique to Namibia. Other sites of historical interest are old German and South African graves, the 1805 Lutheran Church and Roman Catholic mission building.

Fish River Canyon & Hobas Camp P/Bag 13378, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

The Fish River Canyon is one of the largest canyons in the world, and one of the most impressive natural features in the southern part of Namibia. The massive ravine, gouged out of the surface of the land many millions of years ago, is 550 m deep in places and about 160 km long. The Fish River Hiking Trail extends over 85 km from the main lookout point to Ai-Ais. It is self-guided and usually takes four to five days to complete. Due to extreme temperatures and the risk of flash flooding in summer, the trail is open only from 1 May to 15 September. Situated some 70 km north of Ai-Ais and 10 km from the main viewpoint along the access road to the canyon, is the Hobas Camping Site with communal ablution facilities, a kiosk with basic supplies and a swimming pool. Hobas is the official viewpoint to the Fish River Canyon.

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/Ai-/Ais Hot Springs Spa P/Bag 13378, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

/Ai-/Ais Hot Springs Spa offers comfortable accommodation in 36 exquisitely appointed double rooms facing either the Fish River or the mountains, all with direct access to the indoor spa pools, and seven self-catering chalets. Visitors can enjoy the therapeutic powers of the thermal springs in the central indoor spa or choose to wallow in the large outdoor thermal pool, and experience an invigorating and relaxing foot massage with a magnificent view of the surrounding mountains. For a true Namibian touch, true relaxation and true tranquillity that heal body, mind and soul, a wide range of massage options are now on offer! Hikers and visitors alike can experience exotic massages on the banks of the Fish River. 36

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Shark Island P/Bag 13378, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 285 7200, Fax (+264 61) 22 4900 Email: reservations@nwr.com.na, Web: www.nwr.com.na

Shark Island is located on Shark Peninsula in Lüderitz Bay in Southwest Namibia. The resort overlooks the bay, town and harbor. Onlookers can spot the seals and pelicans that frequent the rocky areas around the site. The resort is an excellent central point for exploring the town of Lüderitz, the famous Kolmanskop Ghost Town, and Diaz Point, the historic landing spot of 17th century explorer Barthelomeuz Dias. The resort also runs its own signature trip, Sand Roses, into the Diamond Area at Agate beach. Visitors get to see the sand roses formed from crystallized gypsum, which are a stunning natural marvel, unlike anything you’ve ever seen. Visitors can also swim at the Agate Beach. 1

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Fish River Lodge –

‘On the Edge of Eternity’

PO Box 91045, Klein Windhoek Reservations: Tel (+264 61) 22 8104, Fax (+264 88) 62 5855, Lodge: Tel (+264 63) 68 3005 Booking Email: fishriver@journeysnamibia.com, Web: www.fishriverlodge-namibia.com

The Lodge: This is the only lodge situated directly on the rim of Namibia’s Fish River Canyon, the world’s second largest canyon and with access down into the heart of the canyon. Set amongst ancient “kokerbome” (quiver trees) the uniquely designed lodge with dry-packed stone walls and large windows has breathtaking views of the canyon from sunrise to sunset. The Hiking Trails: The 45 000 hectare Canyon Nature Park includes 75 km river frontage and offers incredi­ble hiking from the Lodge. There are strolls along the rim, a guided hike or 4 x 4 drive down into the heart of the canyon. The Canyon Hiking Trail (3-5 nights) along the river in the heart of the canyon is a unique experience reserved exclusively for guests at Fish River Lodge. This is a journey of amazing discoveries, solitude and a true feeling of wilderness as you camp under the stars in this pristine and dramatic landscape. 20

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Lüderitz Nest Hotel 820 Diaz Street, Lüderitz Tel (+264 63) 20 4000, Fax (+264 63) 20 4001 Email: info@nesthotel.com, Web: www.nesthotel.com

Lüderitz boasts one of Namibia’s leading four-star resort hotels, the Lüderitz Nest Hotel. This well-known establishment offers the best “on the rocks and sea” location in Namibia with its own private tidal beach and walk-on jetty, unique in Namibia. The hotel’s air-conditioned standard and new deluxe rooms, and large executive suites, all offer fabulous and direct sea views. The hotel’s two eateries, Penguin Restaurant and Crayfish Bar & Lounge, serve the best and freshest Lüderitz oyster, lobster and abalone, uniquely served at the hotel. Superior facilities include: Free Wi-Fi, complimentary full buffet breakfasts (in-house guests), sparkling outdoor pools, verdant gardens, sauna, free on-site secure parking, elevator, wheelchair ramps and cosy fireplace. Lüderitz Airport and Kolmanskop transfer service on request. Management and staff look forward to welcoming you with their warm friendly service! 2016 HAN Excellence Award winner. 73

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Bird's Accommodation PO Box 460, Keetmanshoop Bird's Mansion Hotel: Tel (+264 63) 22 1711, Fax (+264 63) 22 1730 Bird's Nest Guesthouse: Tel (+264 63) 22 2906, Fax (+264 63) 22 2261 Email: birdnest@iafrica.com.na / birdsmansions@iway.na Web: www.birdsaccommodation.com

Situated in the centre of Keetmanshoop are the gracious Bird’s Mansions Hotel with 24 rooms and 2 self-catering flats and the clean and fresh Bird's Nest Guest House with 10 rooms. All the rooms are air-conditioned and have bathrooms en suite, direct-dial telephones, free Wi-Fi and television (DStv – five channels). Both establishments have barbecue facilities and secure parking, and provide a laundry service and transport to and from the airport or station. They prepare takeaways and lunch packs on request. The hotel has a fully licensed restaurant, shaded beer and tea garden and two conference venues. 33

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Bahnhof Hotel Aus PO Box 2, Aus, Karas Region Tel (+264 63) 25 8091 Direct email: bahnhof-hotel-aus@iway.na Reservations email: marketing@travel-weaver.com Web: www.bahnhof-hotel-aus.com, www.bahnhof-hotel-aus.de

The historic Bahnhof Hotel presents itself in a modern, elegant format, combining rich history and traditional comfort with excellent service and à la carte cuisine. Light lunches, daily fresh bread and cakes from the kitchen are best enjoyed on the sundeck. 26 stylish refurbished double rooms with en-suite facilities, including a 4 bed family unit and a wheelchair room, as well as one self-catering unit, are inviting the weary traveler to stop over for a good night’s rest. 27

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Namtib Desert Lodge PO Box 19, Aus Tel (+264 63) 68 3055, Fax (+264 88) 63 3459 Email: stay@namtib.net, Web: www.namtib.net

Discover a different meaning of luxury: tranquility, wide open spaces, clear skies and unspoilt environment. At the jewel of the Tiras Mountains, situated along one of Namibia’s most scenic desert routes, visitors will be: • enfolded by a unique array of contrasting landscapes, • accommodated in five en-suite rustic farm-style bungalows, • pampered by personalised hospitality, • introduced to sustainable farming practices in a challenging environment, and • exploring the 16400ha Biosphere Reserve bordering the southern Namib-Naukluft Park. 8

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Kalahari Game Lodge Tel (+27 21) 880 9870 Email: info@kalaharigamelodge.com.na Web: www.kalaharigamelodge.com.na

The Kalahari Game Lodge arises over the last dunes towards the eastern border of Namibia, adjacent to the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park. It lights up the early evening sky with the Boma fire already inviting the guests to its warmth. Arriving at the The Kalahari Game Lodge you can choose between camping or staying in one of eight beautiful chalets. Chalets are equipped with a small kitchenette, as well as an en-suite bathroom. Each chalet also has a lovely patio with views of the tranquil surroundings, where you can enjoy your morning coffee as the sun rises over the Kalahari dunes. The six exclusive campsites are situated next to the Auob riverbed, approximately 100m apart. Each is equipped with a braai area and private ablution facilities, heated and lighted by solar energy. Kalahari Game Lodge has open vehicle game drives all year round. There are three trips to choose from - the Scenic Game Drive, Night Drive as well as a Lion Tracking Experience guaranteeing an excellent encounter with the king of the Kalahari. 8

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GENERAL INFORMATION

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| GENERAL INFORMATION |

The bedrock of Namibia’s tourism is a versatile range of natural assets – from the hauntingly beautiful landscapes of the Skeleton Coast, Sperrgebiet and Namib-Naukluft Park – featuring the celebrated Sossusvlei with its monumental dunes of red-orange sand – to the famous Etosha National Park where rare and endangered species such as black rhino, cheetah and black-faced impala can be viewed against the unique backdrop of the Etosha Pan. In the far north-east there are the river paradises of Zambezi and Kavango, and in the deep south, expansive grassy plains sandwiched between the colourful sand seas of the Kalahari and Namib deserts. Additional draw cards are the friendliness and cultural diversity of the Namibian people, a well-developed infrastructure and an extensive choice of parks, resorts and accommodation establishments ranging from luxury hotels and upmarket guest lodges to simple and rustic facilities in the quiet seclusion of the bush. Namibia has it all, whether you opt for travelling in luxury or economically, with a guide or by yourself, and whether your interest is in wildlife, landscape, people, adventure, geology, photography, culture or cuisine. Namibia’s bountiful sunshine, abundance of wildlife, scenic beauty, and rich diversity of geological phenomena make it a tourist destination to which visitors return again and again.

FAST FACTS • Namibia has 13 cultural groups. • Between 2001 and 2011 the annual population growth was 1.4%, down from 2.6% in the previous ten–year period. www.npc.gov.na • English is the official language. • Other languages spoken are the Bantu languages by the Owambo, Herero, Kavango, Zambezian and Tswana people; the Indo-Germanic – Afrikaans, German and English languages; and the Khoesan languages spoken by the San/ Bushmen, Nama and Damara. • Namibia has a surface area of 824 269 km2. • Situated on the south-western Atlantic seaboard of the African subcontinent, Namibia is bordered by Angola and Zambia in the north, South Africa in the south and Botswana in the east.

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HISTORICAL AND POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT Namibia’s varied geographical features have played a significant role in the history of the Namibian people. In pre-colonial times a relatively stable water supply and the well-wooded terrain in the north-eastern regions of the country encouraged cattle farming and agricultural practices by the Owambo people along the Okavango River. Among the earliest inhabitants of the central and southern areas were the San/Bushmen, who were huntergatherers; the Damara, about whom little is known other than that they were hunters and to a lesser extent pastoralists; and the Nama, who were nomadic cattle farmers.

GOVERNMENT AND THE RULE OF LAW Namibia has a democratic constitution that is highly regarded by the international community. • The country is ruled by a Multiparty Parliament. • Nine political parties are represented in the National Assembly, the lower chamber of parliament. They are SWAPO, Rally for Democracy and Progress, Congress of Democrats, Democratic Turnhalle Alliance, United Democratic Front, National Unity Democratic Organisation, Republican Party, All People’s Party, and the South West Africa National Union. • Following independence the territory was divided into 14 regions: Omusati, Oshana, Ohangwena

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and Oshikoto in the north; Kunene in the north-west; Kavango East, Kavango West and Zambezi in the north-east; Erongo in the west; Otjozondjupa, Omaheke, Khomas and Hardap in the central region; and Karas in the south. • Namibia hosts the following diplomatic missions: Algeria, Angola, Botswana, Brazil, China, Congo, DRC, Cuba, Egypt, the European Union, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Libya, Malaysia, Nigeria, Portugal, the Russian Federation, South Africa, Spain, United Kingdom, the United States of America, Venezuela, Zambia and Zimbabwe. • The country is hosted by diplomatic missions in Angola, Austria, Belgium, Botswana, Brazil, China, DRC, Cuba, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Germany, India, Japan, Malaysia, Nigeria, the Russian Federation, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, United Kingdom, United Nations, the USA, Zambia and Zimbabwe. • The Namibian Police Force, based on the British model of policing, has its headquarters in Windhoek. It has 22 A-class, 26 B-class and 70 C-class police stations, 36 sub-police stations, 18 immigration border posts, 14 satellite police stations and three checkpoints across the country. • The judiciary, headed by the Chief Justice, is independent and subject only to the Constitution and the Law. The judicial power is shared by the Supreme Court, a High Court and lower courts, consisting of regional and magistrate’s courts.

THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION OF NAMIBIA

The Electoral Commission of Namibia was established by an Act of Parliament, the Electoral Act, Act 24 of 1992. The Electoral Commission of Namibia is mandated to specifically: a. Supervise and control the registration of voters for the purposes of any election under this Act; b. Supervise the preparation, publication and maintenance of a national voters’ register and local authority voters’ register; c. Supervise and control the registration of political parties under this Act;

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d. Supervise, direct and control the conduct of elections under this Act; e. Supervise, direct, control and promote voter education in respect of elections;

Otjiwarongo • Brukkaros Mountain – crater-like, halfway between Mariental and Keetmanshoop • Dicke Willem – conspicuous inselberg, towards the west near Aus

Vision: To be an excellent and independent election management institution committed to credible elections.

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Mission To promote and deliver free, fair and credible elections, managed in a transparent, innovative and participatory manner to the Namibians. Did you know? In the 2014 general elections, Namibia was the first SADC nation to implement the use of Electronic Voting Machines (EVM’s). The EVM’s replaced the cumbersome process of manual voting and thereby minimised challenges associated with the normal voting process. Electoral Commission of Namibia Private Bag 13352, Windhoek Namibia Tel +264-61-376-202 Email: vhango@ecn.na Visit us at: www.ecn.na

THE NAMIBIAN ENVIRONMENT Namibia’s main topographical regions are the: • Central plateau • Namib Desert in the west • Kalahari Desert in the east • Kavango and Zambezi high-rainfall areas in the north-east.

Distinctive mountains • Brandberg – highest, western Erongo • Moltkeblick – second highest, Auas range, south of Windhoek • Bismarckfelsen – third highest, south of Windhoek • Gamsberg – fourth highest, tabletopped, Khomas Hochland, southwest of Windhoek • Mount Etjo – south of Otjiwarongo • Spitzkoppe – most imposing peaks, Erongo Region • Omatakos – twin-peaked, between Okahandja and Otjiwarongo • Erongo Mountains – between Usakos and Omaruru • Naukluft Mountains – massif, Namib-Naukluft Park • Waterberg Plateau – east of

Namibia is the most arid country in Southern Africa, with water being a key resource. Perennial waterways: • Orange River, forming the southern border • Kunene, in the north-west, • Okavango, Zambezi & Kwando/ Linyanti/Chobe, in the north-east Ephemeral/episodic waterways: • Fish and Nossob, tributaries of the Orange • Kuiseb, Swakop, Omaruru, Hoarusib, Hoanib, Ugab and Khumib, all west-flowing and draining into the Atlantic • Tsauchab, landlocked, with floodwaters occasionally feeding Sossusvlei • Marienfluss and Omatako, north-flowing • Cuvelai, a drainage system of rivers originating in southern Angola, with floodwaters flowing into the Etosha Pan.

Climate • Typical of a semi-desert country, with droughts a regular occurrence. • Namibia is the most arid country in Southern Africa, with a humidity of less than 10% during the winter months and varying from 50% to 80% during the summer. • Except for the south-western areas where winter rainfall occurs, rain usually falls during the southernhemisphere summer. Rainy season • Short – October/November to March/April • Main – January to March. Average annual rainfall • 50 mm & less, along coast in west • 350 mm, central highlands • 700 mm, far north-eastern areas Temperatures • Days – mostly warm to very hot, summer from 20–34°C, winter, average day temperatures vary from 18–22°C. • Nights – generally cool, dropping to ±18°C, average from 0–10°C, as low


| GENERAL INFORMATION | as 8°C. • Interior – lower than in pre-Namib due to altitude. • Coast and hinterland – moderate due to influence of cold Benguela Current, causing the fog typical of the coast, reduces rainfall in the rest of the country.

Fauna Namibia’s abundant wildlife is arguably its greatest tourist asset. Fast facts on fauna • The country hosts eight endemic mammal species. • Over 20 antelope species, • A wealth of small mammals, including mongoose and jackal; the less common, solitary and nocturnal aardvark; and the honey badger. • The Namib Desert is worldrenowned for its large number of endemic dune-dwellers, especially lizards, including 30 endemic species. • Large game species are elephant, rhino, giraffe, buffalo, lion, leopard and cheetah. • Endangered mammals are wild dog, cheetah, black rhino, lion, puku, oribi and waterbuck.

Flora

Namibia’s plant-life is represented in 14 vegetation zones: • Desert • Semi-desert • Mopane • Mountain • Thorn bush • Highland • Dwarf shrub • Camel-thorn • Mixed tree and shrub savannahs • Forest savannahs and woodlands • Golden expanses of African grasslands, dotted by solitary acacias, typified by stretches of silvery grass after rains Fast facts on flora • Over 120 species of trees grow in Namibia. • There are approximately 200 endemic plant species. • A large variety of dwarf succulents grow in the Lüderitz environs. • The Namib hosts over 100 species of lichen, several endemic. • Namibia’s most noteworthy plant, the Welwitschia mirabilis, is endemic to the Namib Desert and one of the oldest plants known to man.

Birds Of 887 bird species recorded for Southern Africa, 676 occur in Namibia. About 500 breed locally, the rest migrate; 11 species are endemic, with over 75% of world populations found in Namibia. Special endemics • Herero chat • Rockrunner • Monteiro’s hornbill • Damara tern For detailed information, refer to Atlas of Namibia – A Portrait of the Land and its People by John Mendelsohn, Alice Jarvis, Carole Roberts & Tony Robertson.

CONSERVATION AND ECOTOURISM Namibia was the first country in the world to include the protection of the environment in its constitution. Today approximately 17% of its surface area is protected, either as a national park, game reserve, conservancy, or other form of state protected area, exceeding the 10% prescribed by the IUCN. The broader conservation network, including private and communal conservation areas, covers over 46% of the country. • The protection of rare and endangered species was boosted in 1972, when the Waterberg Plateau Park was proclaimed a sanctuary and breeding ground for animals such as white rhino, eland, buffalo, roan and sable antelope and tsessebe. • Protection of the black rhino in the western arid regions gained momentum in the early eighties. Today Namibia is one of the few countries in Africa with growing populations of the highly endangered black rhino, within as well as outside national parks. • The first Marine Protected Area – stretching 400 km along the coast and 30 km offshore, incorporating 10 islands – was established in 2009. This will be expanded to encompass the entire coastline (excluding towns), as the Namib-Skeleton Coast National Park, set to be the eighth largest park in the world and the largest in Africa. • In the private sector several NGOs assist Government in conservation and development. These include the Namibia Nature Foundation,

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

Save the Rhino Trust, Cheetah Conservation Fund, AfriCat Foundation, and the Namibian Association of Community Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) Support Organisations, an association comprising 15 nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) and the University of Namibia (UNAM). • Certain game ranches and lodges focus especially on the conservation of certain species of wildlife on their farms. The largest private conservation area in Namibia is the NamibRand Game Reserve, an area of 180 000 ha situated south of Sesriem. Others are the Gondwana Cañon Park in the south, Erindi Private Game Reserve in the central plateau area, the Huab Private Nature Reserve in the north-west, and AfriCat North in the north. A total of 161 private game reserves are registered with the MET. Venture Media, the publisher of Namibia Holiday & Travel, also publishes Conservation and the Environment in Namibia annually, detailing the latest information on conservation efforts by the MET and NGOs in Namibia. www.travelnewsnamibia.com

THE ECONOMY Namibia’s economy is based on agriculture, fishing, mining, food processing and tourism. • Mining is the biggest contributor to the GDP. • The country’s economy provides many employment opportunities. • Green Economy promotes sustainable development. • Agricultural production is small but sustains ±70% of population.

Agriculture – Facts & Figures • Only 2% of Namibia’s surface area is arable. • ±46% is suitable for natural grazing and livestock rearing. • 22% is forested. • The rest is semi-arid to arid. • Irrigation schemes possible only along two perennial rivers on northern and southern borders. • Irrigation schemes produce mainly white maize and mahangu. • Beef, mutton and exports singlelargest contributor to GDP. • Dairy industry mainly in Gobabis, Mariental and Windhoek areas. • Poultry farming became productive early in 2012. • Local fruit production consists

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mainly of table grapes, olives, dates. • Namibia Organic Association promotes organic agriculture. Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry: www.mawf.gov.na Agricultural Union: www.agrinamibia.com.na Namibia Organic Association: www.noa.org.na

Mining – Facts & Figures • The chamber of Mines of Namibia, with 105 members, represents interests of industry. • In 2012 the sector grew by 11.2% • Exports rough diamonds, uranium oxide, high-grade zinc and acidgrade fluorspar. • Produces gold bullion, blister copper, lead concentrate, salt and dimension stone. • Mines and exploration companies collectively employ some 15 000 people. www.chamberofmines.org.na

Uranium exploration and mining in Namibia The presence of the radioactive metal uranium, used to fuel commercial nuclear power plants, permeates Namibia’s mining future. • While uranium was discovered in the Namib Desert as far back as 1928, intensive exploration was carried out only in the late 1950s. • In 1966, Rio Tinto took the rights over the low-grade Rössing deposit, 65 km inland from Swakopmund. • Namibia’s two major uranium mines are at Trekkopje, a calcrete deposit 80 km north-east of Swakopmund, and Langer Heinrich, a calcrete deposit, 80 km inland from Walvis Bay within the Namib-Naukluft Park. • Further drilling for uranium has been in the Namibplaas area, 7 km north-east, and at the Etango project 30 km south-west of Rössing and 35 km east of Swakopmund. • Namibia is party to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, and has had a comprehensive safeguards agreement in force since 1998, and in 2000 signed the Additional Protocol. • Due to the boom in uranium exploration worldwide, Bureau Veritas, a global provider of conformity assessment, certification services and mineral analysis, opened its first geochemical

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laboratory in Swakopmund in 2010. • Extract Resources completed its definitive feasibility study for the Husab Uranium Project in March 2011. Husab is likely to be the world’s second-largest uranium mine and the largest open-pit mine on the African continent. The mine was expected to commence production in December 2015. • In April 2011, the Namibian Government announced that its state-owned mineral exploration company, Epangelo Mining Ltd, would have exclusive control over new strategic minerals developments, including uranium. • Canada’s Xemplar Energy Corp is exploring its Cape Cross Uranium Project in the Namibian ‘uranium corridor’, near the coast. • The Namibian Government has articulated a policy position of supplying its own electricity from nuclear power by about 2018. • While Namibia’s identified uranium resources are about 5% of the world’s known total, the country is capable of providing 10% of world mining output.

Namibia’s gemstones Namibia is also internationally known as a producer of a large selection of other fine gemstones. These include tourmaline, beryl, garnet, pietersite, jeremejevite, iolite, dioptase, topaz, sodalite, agate, jasper, amethyst, rose quartz, carnelian and a host of others.

Iron ore The latest mining development in Namibia involves the proposed mining of approximately 1.8 million tonnes of magnetite and haematite, two of the most prominent iron ores used in steel and sponge-iron industries. The Lodestone Magnetite Mine Prospect of Dordabis is expected to produce an estimated 600 000 tonnes of produce per year once it starts mining in 2016.

THE FISHING INDUSTRY Marine fisheries The marine fishing industry is currently Namibia’s second-largest earner of foreign currency. • Due to the inshore upwelling of the nutrient-rich Benguela Current, Namibia’s fishing grounds of 200 nautical miles are highly productive. • With over 90 per cent of the output already being exported, the Namibian

coastline is potentially one of the world’s richest fishing grounds. • Namibia currently lands nearly 600 000 metric tonnes of fish and shellfish per annum for processing onshore. • Over 20 commercially important species are currently harvested, including hake, monkfish, horse mackerel, pilchard, deep-sea red crab and rock lobster. • Mariculture production comprises predominantly abalone and seaweed, farmed in Lüderitz, Walvis Bay and Swakopmund. • Walvis Bay is one of the largest seafood processing centres in the southern hemisphere.

Freshwater fisheries Inland fisheries are crucial in the north-eastern Zambezi and Kavango regions. • The Okavango and Upper Zambezi rivers provide food for more than 100 000 people. • Fish is a source of subsistence and livelihood for over 90% of these households. • Selling fish provides income for approximately 45% of households.

Aquaculture The development of aquaculture is aimed at: • enhancing food security • reducing poverty • generating employment • improving rural livelihoods

Freshwater aquaculture • Tilapia, catfish, and carp are currently being cultured by centres in the north-west and north-east • The viability of culturing a second species of tilapia is underway. • The Onavivi Inland Aquaculture Centre (IAC) at Onavivi is focussed on training, fingerling production, and breeding. • Fingerlings not distributed are taken to the Epalela Fish Farm in Omusati to mature, from where market-size tilapia and catfish is availed to the community all year round. • The Kamutjonga Inland Fisheries Institute (KIFI) in the Kavango Region does research and training, and produces fingerlings and mature fish. • The Uis Fish Farm Ecotourism Enterprise is focussed on farming tilapia in cages • The potential culturing of rock lobster, freshwater prawns,


| GENERAL INFORMATION | marine shrimps, dusky kob, rainbow trout, scallops and clams is being researched by commercial companies. Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources: www.mfmr.gov.na

INVESTING IN NAMIBIA Namibia enjoys one of the most peaceful and politically stable environments in Sub-Saharan Africa and has an infrastructure to rival those of many developed countries. • Most of the country’s primary resources are exported. • Almost all consumer goods are imported. • There is scope for investment in manufacturing for both local and international markets. • Namibia is complemented by an advantageous legislative and fiscal environment and a government keen to foster the engines of economic growth and prosperity. www.gov.na See also the 2017 Namibia Trade Directory with a special annual focus on Investment in Namibia. www.namibiatradedirectory.com

Investment incentives Namibia has a highly competitive incentive and fiscal regime, which adds to its attractions for foreign investors. Cornerstones of this regime are: • The Foreign Investment Act and its provision for a Certificate of Status Investment • The Special Incentives for Manufacturers and Exporters, and • The Export Processing Zone Incentives. • The Foreign Investment Act

provides for: • Liberal Foreign Investment conditions; • Equal treatment of foreign and local investors; • Openness of all sectors of the economy to foreign investment; • Full protection of investments; and • The granting of a Certificate of Status of Investment (CSI).

Tourism structures Rigid standards of protection, conservation and control are practised to ensure sustainable utilisation of Namibia’s natural assets by the tourism industry. • Tourism developments are closely monitored, with the emphasis on high-quality tourism, carrying capacity and minimum impact on the environment • Environmental impact assessment studies are required. • New resorts or expansion of existing resorts require registration and endorsement by the MET and the Namibia Tourism Board (NTB). NTB ensures that services rendered and facilities provided to tourists comply with prescribed regulations. www.namibiatourism.com.na • Before any development takes place, The Federation of Namibian Tourism Associations (FENATA) acts as an umbrella organisation for tourism associations in the private sector. • The Namibian Professional Hunting Association (NAPHA), Tour and Safari Association (TASA), and the Hospitality Association of Namibia (HAN) are amongst the three oldest and largest tourism associations in Namibia. • The Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa (RETOSA) is a specialised agency of the Southern African Development Community

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(SADC), mandated to facilitate the development of regional tourism and market the region as a single destination. www.retosa.co.za

Top-notch diamonds

Namibia is one of the world’s foremost producers of gem-quality diamonds and the world’s sixth-largest diamond supplier by value. The first ‘pretty stone’ to be identified as a diamond was picked up by railway worker Zacharias Lewala in 1908. Today the leading diamond-mining company, Namdeb Diamond Corporation (Pty) Ltd, produces 90% of all Namibia’s diamonds and employs over 1 600 people, primarily Namibians. De Beers and the Government of Namibia are now equal shareholders in Debmarine Namibia. Namdeb does land-based prospecting, mining and rehabilitation operation and services for Namdeb Holdings, primarily along the Namibian southwestern coast and inland areas around and between the coastal towns of Oranjemund and Lüderitz. The Namibia Diamond Trading Company (NDTC) is a diamondsorting facility established in 1988 under the name Central Selling Organisation (CSO) Valuations. NDTC, headquartered in Windhoek, sells diamonds in Namibia for local manufacturing, and handles all diamonds produced by Namdeb and Debmarine Namibia. www.debeersgroup.com

PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE Namibia has well-developed and efficient infrastructures to supply its citizens consistently with electricity

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and water. A total of 126 bulk national schemes supply water for domestic, stock-watering, mining, irrigation and industrial purposes.

Electricity Namibia depends to a large extent on imports of electricity to meet national demand. Opportunities for hydrocarbon exploration are offered on- and offshore. The local power utility company, NamPower, has three power stations: the Ruacana Hydro Power Station on the Kunene River (249 MW), the coal-fired Van Eck Power Station in Windhoek’s north(120 MW), and the diesel-powered Paratus Power Station in Walvis Bay (24 MW). The latter is used mainly to match shortterm demand peaks. The latest development in terms of energy is the construction of the Diaz Wind Power Project at Diaz Point, 12 km south of Lüderitz. www.nampower.com.na

Oil and gas Namibia is attracting significant international interest as an emerging offshore producer of oil and gas. In 1973, gas was discovered off the Orange River in the southern offshore area, about 170 km off Namibia’s coast from Oranjemund northwards. The proven gas reserves of 1.3 trillion cubic feet will be sufficient to supply an 800 MW station for over 20 years. Development of the Kudu Gas Field is currently under development.

Fuel Namibia has no refining capacity, and imports the petroleum products consumed in the country mainly from South Africa.

TRANSPORT SERVICES Roads Namibia has a well-established road network of over 45 645 km, of which 6 664 km is bitumen surfaced and the responsibility of the Roads Authority of Namibia. • Arterial roads link Namibia with Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana and South Africa. • The Trans-Caprivi and TransKalahari highways provide a road link between Walvis Bay and

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landlocked neighbouring countries in the Southern SADC Region, reducing the time required to transport imports and exports by at least five days. • There are also 37 170 km of wellmaintained gravel roads, and 287 km of salt roads, providing access to most towns, parks, nature reserves and tourist attractions in the country.

tarred roads and rail networks, accommodating transport from Walvis Bay through the TransKalahari, Walvis Bay-NdolaLubumbashi Development Corridor (Trans-Caprivi Corridor), the Trans-Cunene Corridor, and the Trans-Oranje Corridor, providing landlocked SADC countries access to the global market.

www.ra.org.na

www.wbcg.com.na

Ports and harbours

COMMUNICATION SERVICES

Namibia’s two harbours, Walvis Bay and Lüderitz, are administered by the Namibian Ports Authority (NamPort) a state-owned organisation. NamPort: • Manages a Syncrolift (dry-dock facility) that can lift vessels of up to 2 000 tonnes for repairs. • Operates two floating docks with a lifting capacity of 8 000 tonnes each through its subsidiary – the ship repair company, Elgin Brown & Hamer. The Port of Walvis Bay: • Is Namibia’s largest commercial port. • Is a sheltered deepwater harbour benefiting from a temperate climate. • Has direct access to principal shipping routes. • Is strategically located halfway down the Namibian coast. • Provides a fast transit route between Southern Africa, Europe and the Americas. The Port of Lüderitz: • Provides access to markets in South Africa’s Northern Cape. • Caters for southern Namibia. • Serves the needs of the Namibian fishing industry. • Also caters for the needs of the offshore diamond industry. www.namport.com

Railways Namibia’s railway network comprises 2 615 km. • The Cape gauge (1 067 km) railway network is managed by TransNamib Holdings Ltd. www.transnamib.com.na

Walvis Bay Corridors This network of transport corridors consists of well-maintained

Telephone services Namibia’s leading communications company, Telecom Namibia: • Has a transmission network that is 100% digital. • Provides a comprehensive portfolio of communication services and solutions in broadband, data and voice-over fixed, fixed-wireless- and mobile platforms. • Enables Namibians to enjoy full Internet connectivity through various independent Internet Service Providers. • Offers a mobile service called TN Mobile (formerly trading as Leo) that covers much of the country. • Has a highly developed international network that provides direct connections from Namibia to more than 240 destinations worldwide. • Is an investor in some of the world’s most sophisticated submarine cable systems, such as SAT3, Seacom and WACS (West Africa Cable System), to which it was linked with a new fibre-optic cable of approximately 14 400 km along the southern Atlantic coast in 2012, improving Internet and other telecommunications capabilities to and from the African continent. • Is involved in business operations in Angola and South Africa through joint ventures with Startel and Neotel. www.telecom.na

Postal service Namibia has one of the most modern postal infrastructures in Africa. NamPost (Namibia Post Ltd) was established in 1991 following the commercialisation of post and telecommunications. It is affiliated to the Universal Postal Union, provides postal, logistics and financial services to customers from more than 128 post offices countrywide. NamPost Philately, which is well-


| GENERAL INFORMATION | known for its outstanding stamp designs and first-day covers, has won two international awards for its beautiful stamps. Financial services such as SmartCard savings accounts with fingerprint identification, Save-As-YouEarn, and tax-free investments for individuals are also available. The Tourist SmartCard provides tourists with a safe option to transact at all post offices and selected merchants nationwide. www.nampost.com.na

SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE Health and welfare Namibia currently has: • About 700 registered medical practitioners • Approximately 250 medical specialists in various specialities • An average of one doctor per 4 000 people Qualifications of medical practit­ioners measure up to international standards. All specialist fields are available in Windhoek, where 90% of emergency cases can be treated. All medication is obtainable in the capital. There is strict adherence to the American Food and Drug Organisation standards, and the local Drug Control Board controls all imported medication. www.hpcna.com.na

clinics and health-care centres with professionally trained medical staff. Windhoek has four private hospitals: • Medi-Clinic in the Eros suburb. • The Paramount Health Care Centre, also in Eros. • The Roman Catholic Hospital in the centre of town. • The Rhino Park Private Hospital, accessible from the northern highway. • The Lady Pohamba Private Hospital, in Kleine Kuppe. Major private hospitals outside Windhoek include Cottage MediClinic in Swakopmund, the Medi-Clinic Private Hospital in Otjiwarongo, the Tsumeb Private Hospital in Tsumeb, the Welwitschia Hospital in Walvis Bay, and Ongwediva Medipark in Ongwediva.

HIV/Aids in Namibia • Namibia is one of the countries in Africa most affected by the pandemic. • The overall HIV prevalence in Nami­ bia stands at under 20%, peaking in the age group of 30–34 years. • The Namibian Government has called on stakeholders in the public and the private sectors to establish comprehensive HIV/Aids programmes. • Non-governmental organisations, churches, and youth and women’s groups are assisting by raising awareness and provide care and support. www.mhss.gov.na

Emergency medical services

Religion

Emergency evacuation services extend to the furthest corners of Namibia. • E-MED Rescue 24 is a Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) company. • Crisis Response Rescue Union offers an emergency medical service that includes a medical service, transfer and standby. • Air evacuation is a highly reliable service, since weather conditions are suitable for safe flying most times.

Freedom of religion is validated by Namibia’s Bill of Fundamental Rights. • About 90% of the population is Christian. • There are three Lutheran denominations. • Major denominations represented are Roman Catholic, Dutch Reformed, Rhenish, Anglican, Methodist and Protestant. • There are several reformed groupings and independent African churches. • Many traditional African celebrations have permeated the Christian denominations, such as Ancestors’ Memorial Day observed by the Herero people in Okahandja, and similar festivals in Gobabis and Omaruru. • In 1995 Namibia’s first mosque opened in Windhoek. • The Council of Churches in Namibia (CCN) is the governing body for most Christian churches.

Hospitals All major centres have state-run hospitals. In Windhoek there are four world-standard, privately run hospitals and two state hospitals, all with fully equipped and maintained intensivecare units. There are state hospitals in virtually all Namibia’s major towns. In smaller towns, villages and rural settlements, the Ministry of Health and Social Services operates well-equipped

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

Media Despite its small population, Namibia has a varied and lively press, with 13 newspapers. • Five are dailies – The Namibian, New Era (issued by Government), The Namibian Sun, Allgemeine Zeitung and Die Republikein. • The Namib Times appears twice a week • The Economist, Informanté, Confidénte and The Villager once a week • A weekend tabloid, the Windhoek Observer, appears on Fridays, as does Namibia Today, mouthpiece of the SWAPO party. Caprivi Vision and The Northern Bulletin are published twice monthly. Likewise, there is an eclectic variety of broadcasting media: • The Namibian Broadcasting Corporation (NBC) has nine radio services and one television channel. It broadcasts in English and eight indigenous languages. • There is one privately owned television channel, One Africa TV. • Privately owned radio stations operating from Windhoek are Radiowave, Radio Kudu, Radio Omulunga, Fresh FM, Radio Energy, Kosmos, 99FM and Channel 7. • Base FM is owned by the Katutura Community Trust, while UNAM Radio, also community-owned, operates from the UNAM campus. • In July 2012, Hitradio Namibia, a new commercial radio station targeting the German market, was launched. • Private commercial enterprises, such as Multichoice Namibia, account for several additional television channels. • The Media Institute of Southern Africa (MISA) is an NGO with members in 11 SADC countries. The MISA Namibia Chapter was launched in November 1998, aimed at maintaining a genuinely free and pluralistic media in Southern Africa. www.misa.org

Literacy and education

The current literacy rate in Namibia is about 83%, one of the highest in Africa. • An estimated 94% of children between the ages of seven and 18 now attend school. • There are over 1 600 schools in the country, with an average learner/ teacher ratio of 29:1. • The University of Namibia (UNAM), Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST), Polytechnic School of Health and

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Applied Sciences, two agricultural colleges, four colleges of education (that fall under UNAM) and seven vocational training centres provide tertiary education. • The privately owned International University of Management (IUM) – which has its roots in the Institute of Higher Education (IHE) – was founded in 1993. • The Microsoft IT Academy was launched as a partnership between the Polytechnic of Namibia Centre of Entrepreneurial Development and Microsoft Tate Group. www.nust.na www.unam.edu.na www.ium.edu.na

ART AND CULTURE Architecture The German-colonial architecture found in many of Namibia’s towns contrasts with the open expanses of African bush and savannah. Residences with wide, shady verandas reflect European architectural styles of the time, adapted to the local climate. In Windhoek, Swakopmund and Lüderitz many of these earlier buildings have been renovated as government offices, libraries and research facilities. New developments follow the post-modern movement, echoing the German-colonial style, with the emphasis on shape and colour. www.nia.org.na

Art and crafts

Traditional crafts include woodcraft from Kavango and Zambezi; Owambo, Kavango, Zambezian and Himba baskets; and Bushman eggshell jewellery. Embroidery and appliqué work, wall hangings and carpets woven from karakul wool feature native designs of trees, animals and birds. www.nagn.org.na www.namibiacraftcentre.com

Cultural activities Cultural development is promoted by institutions such as the National & Mobile Museum, Museum Association of Namibia, National Art Gallery of Namibia, National Theatre of Namibia, College of the Arts, the Art Department at UNAM and the Bank Windhoek Namibia Theatre School. Reflecting the traditions of the many different groups that coexist in the country are: Namibian cultural groups performing customary African dances to rhythmic drumbeats. The COTA Youth Choir

ANNABELLE VENTER

The first artists of Namibia were the San (Bushmen), whose rock art can be viewed in shelters on mountains and hills throughout the country. Today, relative to its small population, Namibia has a surprisingly large and active community of artists and craftspeople. • The National Art Gallery of

Namibia (NAGN) and Arts Association Heritage Trust (AAHT) have comprehensive Permanent Collections of Namibian art that can be viewed by the public. • The Katutura Community Art Centre (KCAC) offers a wide range of training programmes for young artists and houses the John Muafangejo Art Centre, an NGO that also offers training programmes and exhibition space for young artists. • Work by contemporary artists and craftspeople can be viewed and purchased in galleries, craft centres, at urban and rural street markets, and along roadsides. The biggest of these is the Namibia Craft Centre (NCC) in Tal Street, Windhoek.

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and Voices of Namibia choir, with singers drawn from different cultural groups singing songs that originate all over of the country. Multicultural events that include exhibitions, dance and music concerts featuring Namibian and foreign artists. The cultural activities of diplomatic missions have expanded the cultural dimensions of Namibians considerably, and helped promote rural art abroad. The Franco-Namibian Cultural Centre (FNCC) has been particularly active by organising different cultural activities and supporting all art disciplines. It regularly presents film screenings and courses in French, English, art, photography and cooking. Annual events on the arts calendar are: The Bank Windhoek Arts Festival (BWAF) stages an array of local and guest artists, and supports several galleries in Windhoek to present exhibitions of contemporary art and design. The Bank Windhoek Triennale, the biggest art competition for local artists in Namibia, is a joint art competition hosted by Bank Windhoek and the National Art Gallery of Namibia. The /Ae//Gams Arts and Cultural Festival usually takes place during the first week of September at various venues throughout the city. The event showcases Namibia’s artistic and cultural diversity through music, cuisine, traditional attire, dance and song, contemporary visual arts, crafts, theatre and poetry. www.cityofwindhoek.org.na

Performing arts The National Theatre of Namibia (NTN) is situated in the heart of the city, providing art lovers with activities ranging from theatre, contemporary dance and music to ballet and opera. Higher up in Robert Mugabe Avenue is the Bank Windhoek Theatre School. The College of the Arts and UNAM


| GENERAL INFORMATION | Performing Arts Department presents music recitals, art, drama, ballet and experimental theatre. The Warehouse Theatre in the Old Breweries Building provides a platform for theatrical and social needs. African music groups perform at the Windhoek Showgrounds and the Independence Arena in Katutura. www.ntn.org.na

The museum circuit A wealth of historical collections are presented as concise and viewerfriendly overviews of local history, natural history and cultural life to educate and interest children, members of the public and visitors to the country. • The National Museum of Namibia houses collections of more than two million cultural and natural history items. It has a reference library for public use and facilitates research on the different collections. There are two National Museum display facilities in Windhoek – the Alte Feste Museum and the Owela Museum – both in Robert Mugabe Avenue. • The new Independence Memorial Museum is next to the Alte Feste Museum. • The TransNamib Railway Museum in the historical Windhoek Railway Station at the bottom of Bahnhof Street depicts the history of railways and transport in Namibia. • The Geological Survey Museum, on the ground floor of the Ministry of Mines and Energy at 1 Aviation Street near Eros Airport, houses displays of minerals, fossils and meteorites in their geological context. Namibia’s mining activities and geology are depicted with collections of maps, ore samples and photographs. • The Museum Association of Namibia (MAN) – accessible from Love Street – works on new museum projects in regions and communities where museums and heritage sites were previously underdeveloped. MAN joined up with the National Museum of Namibia in 2008 to launch the annual Museum Week. In 2010 the National Heritage Council was also included and it became known as Namibian Heritage Week, held each year under a different theme.

Museums in the north • Nakambale Museum and Rest Camp is part of the Olukonda

National Monument in the Oshikoto Region in northern Namibia. • Guided excursions are offered in the Omusati Region, among others to the Uukwaluudhi Royal Homestead near the town of Tsandi, the former traditional house of King Taapopi of Uukwaluudhi. • Also of historical interest is the Ombalantu Baobab Tree Heritage Centre in the centre of Outapi, a town 80 km west of Oshakati. • Tsumeb Museum in the town’s main street depicts the history of copper mining in the Tsumeb region. It includes a large display of items raised from the Otjikoto Lake (World War 1 cannons and ammunition). • The Okakarara Community, Cultural and Tourism Centre (OCCTC), a short drive from the Waterberg Plateau, contains displays focussed on the culture of the Ovaherero community and their war against German colonial forces in the early twentieth century. • Omaruru Museum is housed in the Rhenish Mission House, a national monument in the main street in Omaruru (arrange with the municipality to view). • Grootfontein Museum in Das Alte Fort is a private museum with displays of domestic life, mining and minerals, wagon construction, blacksmithing and traditional crafts. • Franke Haus Museum in Outjo makes for another interesting visit. • In Katima Mulilo the small Sangwali Museum tells the interesting story of the journey of early missionaries in the region and the pre-colonial Kololo invasion. • Sambyu Museum, 30 km from Rundu, is an art and crafts facility containing mainly woodcarvings and traditional crafts from Kavango Region and southern Angola.

Museums at the coast • Swakopmund Museum in the Old Customs House displays archaeological and historical artefacts, the natural history of the Namib Desert and the Atlantic Ocean, and the cultural anthropology of Namibia’s ethnic groups. • Walvis Bay Museum in the Civic Centre of the harbour town focusses on domestic and commercial developments in the town and its links with the sea. • Lüderitz Museum in Diaz Street in the harbour town is a private local history museum, offering special displays on the Dias expeditions

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of discovery, diamond mining and the history of Lüderitz. • The Kolmanskop Ghost Town, 10 km east of Lüderitz, is an openair museum displaying the history of this legendary diamond mining community. Some of the houses are kept clear of sand. • Another private enterprise is the Sperrgebiet Museum in Oranjemund, featuring local history, minerals and mining, fossils and regional history.

Museums in central and southern Namibia • Colonial household items and farming implements are displayed at the Gobabis Museum. • A unique display of Baster history can be viewed in the Rehoboth Museum housed in the old Postmaster’s House. • Helmeringhausen Museum is an open-air display of farm implements, machinery and wagons, and karakul farming. • Situated at the edge of the Namib Desert is Duwisib Castle, built in 1908/9 by the legendary Baron von Wolf. • Housed in one of the oldest mission houses in Namibia is the small Schmelenhaus Museum in Bethanie, containing natural history and Rhenish missionary displays. • Keetmanshoop Museum depicts the history of Keetmanshoop and the traditional culture of the Nama people.

CUISINE Traditional cuisine in Namibia is unusually interesting and varied. • Mahangu (pearl millet) is the staple food of countless families in the north. • Ekaka is a wild spicy spinach that grows in the mahangu fields. • Oxuxwa is a dish made from fresh chicken fried in nutty-tasting marula oil, also produced in Namibia. • A seasonal delicacy is omaungu, or mopane caterpillars, named after the mopane leaves on which they feed. • Another Namibian delicacy is goat’s head cooked on an open fire until it is tender and tasty and the flesh around the teeth becomes soft. • For centuries San people have been harvesting nuts from manketti trees and edible tubers from nearby bushes as their main staple. • A highly sought-after form of edible fungi found in Namibia is omajowa,

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the Herero name for the large fleshy mushrooms that appear at the foot of termite hills shortly after the February rains. • The elusive Kalahari truffle is found in the sandy eastern regions of the country. The fungi are also known by their Nama name nabba, and appear only when the rains have been late. • Popular across all cultures in Namibia is the traditional braai, an institution that bridges social and economic divides. It typically includes lamb and pork chops, chicken portions, beef or game steaks, and boerewors, a savoury spicy Namibian and South African speciality. • A top favourite on festive occasions is sosaties (kebabs), cubes of succulent lamb on skewers marinated beforehand in a spicy sauce containing soaked, dried apricots. • A popular variant on the braai is potjiekos (pot food), prepared over an open fire in a three-legged castiron cauldron, the potjie. • Other local specialities worth sampling are Swakopmund green asparagus (September to April), Lüderitz oysters (all year round), homemade cheese (including goat’s), Namibian olives, and, of course, the famous and much enjoyed brötchen (a German bread roll). • Because Namibia’s cattle live entirely off savannah grass and shrubs, Namibian beef is free from harmful residues, hormones and antibiotics, as is Namibian mutton. • Venison is becoming increasingly popular; especially ostrich, springbok and gemsbok, while game birds, crocodile and seafood are also highly regarded. • Namibia is well known for its local beer, brewed by Nambrew according to the traditional purity law, the Reinheitsgebot, issued in 1516 in Bavaria, as well as by the country’s first microbrewery, Camelthorn Brewing Company. • Wine is produced in Namibia at the Kristall Kellerei in Omaruru, and by Neuras, part of the N/an ku sê Foundation, on the edge of the Namib Desert in southern Namibia.

NAMIBIA AS CONFERENCE DESTINATION Figures have shown that about 10–13% of foreign visitors to Namibia visit the country for business purposes. The

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infrastructure in Namibia that caters for the MICE (Meetings Incentives Conference Exhibitions) market is extensive, with Windhoek featuring the widest selection of conference facilities. Conferences cater for small to large groups in many parts of the country, be it in the desert in mobile settings, on a game lodge or in the capital.

Conference facilities The largest conference venue in Windhoek is the Safari Court Conference Centre, while the Windhoek Country Club Resort & Casino, NamPower Convention Centre, Hilton Hotel, Hotel Fürstenhof, Heja Game Lodge, Roof of Africa, Hotel Thüringerhof, Midgard Country Estate, Sun Karros at Daan Viljoen and Okahandja Country Hotel, also have facilities for conferences. Specialised conferences on geology are hosted in the auditorium at the Geological Survey in Windhoek, which can seat up to 150 delegates. The Swakopmund Hotel & Entertainment Centre, Hansa Hotel, Rössmund Lodge, and Hotel Pelican Bay offer conference facilities in and around the coastal towns of Swakopmund and Walvis Bay. The National Marine and Research Centre in Swakopmund also has space for conference delegates. Many guest farms and most guest lodges in Namibia have small facilities for conferences.

Conservancies The objective of a conservancy is to reinstate the original biodiversity of the area and to share resources amongst all conservancy members. • The first conservancies in Namibia were commercial conservancies, now called freehold conservancies, as they are on privately-owned land. Today there are 25 freehold conservancies in Namibia, all voluntary associations that came into being through the concern and dedication of communities in the commercial farming areas. • To streamline the conservancy movement in Namibia, an umbrella organisation, CANAM, was established in 1996 to co-ordinate and liaise conservancy efforts and to act as a lobby group in the interest of conservancies and conservation with the relevant ministries. • Communal conservancies are managed by local inhabitants. They

provide employment, and give locals the opportunity to benefit directly from their wildlife and other natural resources. There are currently a total of 82 registered communal conservancies in Namibia, adding another 19% to Namibia’s protected area network. Areas under conservation management cover 44% of Namibia’s total land area. www.canam.iway.na www.nacso.org.na

Environmental management After independence in 1990, a Directorate of Environmental Affairs (DEA) was established in the Ministry of Environment and Tourism, to actively promote and maintain the welfare of the people. • Namibia, as a signatory to several international environmental treaties, has introduced a number of groundbreaking programmes and policies aimed at tackling environmental challenges while implementing national development goals. • Desertification is Namibia’s most pressing environmental concern. • Other issues are deforestation, overgrazing, soil erosion, bush encroachment, climate change, loss of groundwater resources and decreasing crops. • Threats related to mining and habitat and biodiversity loss have also been highlighted as areas of concern.

Environmental Investment Fund The Environmental Investment Fund (EIF) of Namibia provides economic opportunities and a stake in the use of natural resources to the impoverished sectors of Namibian society. www.eifnamibia.com

Eco Awards The Eco Awards Namibia programme was launched in 2004 to promote sustainable tourism practices. Any accommodation establishment in Namibia can apply for the Desert Flower emblem, which is awarded to establishments that work successfully according to sustainability principles. The programme is the only certification scheme that rates the sustainability of tourism establishments. www.ecoawards-namibia.org


| GENERAL INFORMATION |

Recycle Namibia Forum As a private-public sector partnership, the Recycle Namibia Forum (RNF) is aimed at promoting the 3Rs (Recycle, Reuse and Reduce) of products through projects and networking. www.rnf.com.na

Namibian Chamber of Environment The Namibian Chamber of Environment (NCE) is an umbrella Association that provides a forum and mouthpiece for the broader environment sector, that can lobby with government and other parties, that can raise funds for its members and that can represent the sector The Chamber aims to become a financial (and other) resource center, sponsored by industry, but at the same time keeping industry at arm’s length and ensuring complete independence. Many environmental specialists work in remote areas, often alone or in small groups with little in the way of support structures. The Chamber aims to provide support to such individuals and organizations. www.n-c-e.org

Non-governmental organisations The Namibia Nature Foundation (NNF) is Namibia’s leading nongovernmental environmental organisation. Other NGOs that aim to support the environment are the Desert Research Foundation of Namibia (DRFN), which incorporates the Desert Ecological Research Unit (DERU); the Namibia Institute for Sustainable Development (NISD); the Namib Desert Environmental Education Trust (NaDEET); Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation (IRDNC); and the Namibia Association of CBNRM Support Organisations (NACSO). One of Namibia’s longest-standing NGOs is Save the Rhino Trust (SRT), founded in 1982. Others worth mentioning are the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF); the AfriCat Foundation; N/a’an ku sê; Harnas; the Namibia Animal Rehabilitation, Research and Education Centre (NARREC); the Namibia Environmental and Wildlife Society (NEWS); the Large Carnivore Management Association of Namibia (LCMAN); the Elephant Human Relations Aid (EHRA); the World Wildlife Fund (WWF); Rare and Endangered Species Trust (REST); the

Namibia Development Trust (NDT); and the Southern African Institute for Environmental Assessment (SAIEA). www.nnf.org.na www.savetherhinotrust.org

Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) In Namibia SEAs offer a welldeveloped methodology for improving strategic decision-making and integrating of environmental issues into policies, plans and programmes. The country’s Environmental Management Act (EMA) of 2007 stipulates mandatory environmental assessments for a number of policies, plans and programmes. An Environmental Commissioner’s office was established within the MET.

Private game reserves

Private landholders in Namibia have played a significant role in the conservation of wildlife by establishing conservation initiatives on their land. • The NamibRand Nature Reserve, a vast area of about 202 000 hectares situated south of Sesriem – is a scenically beautiful conservation area created by Windhoek businessman, Albi Brückner. • The Erongo Mountain Nature Sanctuary encompasses an area of more than 200 000 hectares, protecting a unique wilderness reserve with the Erongo Mountains at its centre. • In southern Namibia the Gondwana Collection consists of four private nature reserves (about 197 000 ha combined). • Also in the south is the Sandfontein Nature Game Reserve, which extends over 76 000 hectares. • The Erindi Private Game Reserve (79 000 ha) in central Namibia is home to over 20 000 animals. • Situated in the upper reaches of the Huab River, the Huab Private Nature Reserve (8 060 ha) provides a sanctuary for the desert-dwelling elephants of the area. • Fischer’s Pan Private Game Reserve (7 000 ha) lies next to the Etosha National Park in the east. • The 36 000 ha Onguma Private Game Reserve adjoining Fischer’s Pan, harbours many of the mammals and birds found in Etosha. At present there are about 200 private game reserves registered in Namibia.

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Hunting and hunting safaris Guided by strict ethical standards set and encouraged by the Namibia Professional Hunting Association (NAPHA), hunting is intrinsically part of the Namibian culture. The country’s hunting activities have evolved into a highly specialised wildlife industry, with trophy hunting playing a crucial role in managing wildlife populations and contributing significantly to the GDP. www.napha.com.na

Transfrontier Conservation Areas The concept of TFCAs (Transfrontier Conservation Areas) has rapidly gained momentum in SADC countries such as Namibia, Angola, Mozambique, Botswana, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Zambia. TFCAs are transfrontier wildlife sanctuaries that embrace crossborder conservation areas and game parks. The first TFCA established in the region was the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, which incorporates parks in Botswana and South Africa. www.peaceparks.org The Namibian Government is firmly committed to the transfrontier process and has achieved several agreements with cross-border countries. Namibia established its first TFCA, the /Ai-/Ais Richtersveld Transfrontier Park, in 2003, with South Africa as co-signee. About 70% of the 6 046 km2 is situated in Namibia, comprising the /Ai-/ Ais Hot Springs Game Park, the Hunsberg conservation area, the Huns Mountains, Fish River Canyon and /Ai/Ais Hot Springs. A Memorandum of Understanding between Namibia and Angola was signed in 2003 to establish the Iona Skeleton Coast Transfrontier Conservation Area, encompassing 31 540 km2 of the northern Namib coastal desert. Officially launched in 2012 and spanning over 444 000 km2 (similar in size to Sweden), the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KaZa) is the world’s biggest conservation area, comprising national parks, game reserves, forest reserves, conservancies, game/wildlife management areas and communal lands in Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. www.kavangozambezi.org

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GENERAL INDEX //Hai-Sores Campsite 51 /Ae//Gams Arts and Cultural Festival 99 /Ai-/Ais Hot Springs 198 /Ai-/Ais Hot Springs Spa 209 ≠Nudi Campsite 51

A Aawambo 71 Aba-Huab Campsite 51, 81 Acacia Forest 95 Accommodation, classification of establishments 14 Activities at NamibRand 177 Adonai Tours 83 Adventure 58 Adventure at the Coast 180 Adventure Calendar 59 Adventures in and around Windhoek 86 African Art Jewellers, Swakopmund 186 African Profile Safaris 38 African Tracks 4x4 27 AfriCat Foundation 147, 149 AfricAvenir 99 Afrodite Beach 190 Agate Beach 203 Agriculture 215 Ai Aiba Lodge 161 Air Namibia 32 Air travel 29 Albrecht brothers 208 Alliance Française Cultural Centre, Swakopmund 186 Alte Feste 88 Alte Feste Museum 99 Ama Buruxa 83 Ameib farm 158 Ameib Guest Farm 163 Ancient shipwreck discovery 206 Andersson Gate 152 Andersson’s Camp 131 Andoni plains 152 Andoni waterhole 152 Angling 60 Ankerplatz 185 Annual cultural events 220 Aquaculture 203 Aranos 95 Architecture 220 Art Africa 185 Art Africa Garden Café 185 Art and crafts 220 Art and culture 220 Art and Culture Hotspots 99 Art-i-San 78 ASCO Car Hire 26 Auas Safari Lodge 101 August Stauch 92, 203 Aus 204 Autovermietung Savanna 26 AVANI Windhoek Hotel & Casino 106

B Bäckerei Outjo 125 Bahnhof Hotel Aus 211 Bank Windhoek inside back cover Bank Windhoek Arts Festival 99 Baobab Bistro 114 Baraka Beads 79 Basket traditions, Kavango and Zambezi 117 Baster community 95 Belvedere Boutique Hotel 102 Best-culture practice 16

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Bethanie 206 Bezi Bar 114 Biathle 59 Bird’s Accommodation 210 Birds 215 Bloedkoppie 46 Bocian Safaris 39 Boerewors 222 Bogenfels rock arch 205 Boiteko Campsite 49 Bondelswarts people 82 Books on Namibia 21 Border posts 7, 214 Botanical Garden 91 Boulders Safari Camp 176 Braai 16, 222 Brandberg 154 Brötchen 16, 222 Brukkaros Campsite 83 Brukkaros Mountain 198 Bull’s Party boulders 158 Burnt Mountain 152 Bushman’s Paradise 157 Bwabwata National Park 116

C Camel Inn Restaurant and Bar 147 Camp Kipwe 163 Camping on the Kunene 138 Camping tips 51 Camping with Culture 49 CANAM 222 Cape Cross Nature Reserve 191 Caprivi Art Centre 114 Caprivi Collection 119 Caprivians/Zambezians 68 Cardboard Box Travel Shop 47 Car Rental Association of Namibia (CARAN) 20 Car rentals and self-drives, tips 24 Casa Blanca 105 Caving 144 CBNRM 223 Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) 148 Chief Samuel Maharero 92 Chobe Community Campsite 50 Chobe Water Villas 118 Christuskirche 88, 98 Classic Namibia Route 35 Classic Namibia Route map 36 Climate 214 Coastal Route 45 Coastal Route map 46 Coastal Route, alternative 45 Coastal Strip 178 Coastal Strip, map 181 College of the Arts 99, 220 Commiphora wildii Resin Project 74 Communal conservancies 222 Communication services 218 Community Based Natural Resource Management 215 Community campsites, Zambezi Region 112 Community Forests, Zambezi 69 Condor 33 Conference facilities 222 Conservancies 222 Conservancy Safaris – Namibia (CS-N) 75 Conservation and ecotourism 215 Contents 8 COTA Youth Choir 220 Crafts in Zambezi (Caprivi) 69 Crayfish Festival 200, 203

Credit cards 15 Cross of Sacrifice 98 Cross-border charges 18 Cuisine 221 Cultural activities 220 Cultural Camping Route 50 Cultural Township Tours, Walvis Bay 189 Culture in Katutura 99 Currency 15 Customs 15 Customs duties 15 Cuvelai River 126 Cycletech Skyride 59 Cycletech Spring Festival 59 CYMOT 10

D Daan Viljoen Game Park 91 Damara Living Museum 80 Damara people 80 Damara tern 186 Damaraland Camp 159 Dâureb Crafts 81 Dâureb Mountain Guides 81, 154 Day trips from Windhoek 91 Dead Pan 166 Desert Camp 175 Desert Flower emblem 222 Desert Homestead Lodge 173 Desert Homestead Outpost 173 Desert horses 204 Desert Rhino Camp 159 Desert-adapted elephants 136 Desert-adapted elephants, viewing 138 Desert Quiver Camp 175 Diamonds 217 Diaz Point 200 Die Alte Kaserne 182 Die Muschel, Swakopmund 186 Dinosaur footprints 144 Djokhoe Campsite 49, 79 Dolomite Resort 129 Dolphin Park Recreation Resort 189 Dordabis 92 Dörgeloh Chocolates 157 Dorka carpets 95 Dorkambo Teppiche Co-operative 128 Doro !Nawas Granietkop Campsite 51 Doro Nawas 159 Dorob National Park 180 Doros Crater 152 Dr Sam Nujoma Half Marathon 59 Dragon’s Breath, cave 144 Driving in sand 25 Duathlons, triathlons and biathle 59 Dune 7 190 Dune Camp 176 Dunes Lodge 158 Düsternbrook Safari Guestfarm 104 Duty-free allowances 15 Duwisib Castle 171, 172

E Eagle’s Monument 207 Eco Awards 222 Economy 11, 215 Ecotourism 55 Eenhana Heroes’ Memorial Shrine 128 Efundja 16 Ekaka 221 Ekipas 71 Ekori 74 Ekwatho Quilt Craft 72


| GENERAL INDEX | Electoral Commission of Namibia 214 Electricity 216 Elephant Song Campsite 223 Elephant’s trunk 200 Elisabeth House 98 Elizabeth Bay ghost town 205 Emergency medical services 219 Emma Hoogenhout Building 88 Endangered mammals 112 Eningu Clayhouse Lodge 103 Environmental Investment Fund 222 Epupa Falls 136 Epupa Falls Campsite 51 Equestrian Statue 98 Equitrails Namibia 64 Erari theatre group 77 Erindi Private Game Reserve 147 Erkrath-Gathemann-Kronprinz façades 98 Erongo Mountain Nature Conservancy 152 Erongo Mountains 157 Erongo Region 80 Erongo Wilderness Lodge 160 Etambura Camp 75 Etemba rock-art site 157 Etendeka Mountain Camp 160 Etoscha i Büro 125 Etosha & Owambo 12 Etosha & Owambo, map 124 Etosha National Park 122 Etosha National Park, regulations 125 Etosha Pan 122 Etosha Village 132 Evangelical Lutheran Church 182

F Farm Ghaub 42 Farm Ibenstein 92 Fast facts on Namibia 213 Fauna 215 Federation of Namibian Tourism Associations (FENATA) 20, 217 Ferdinand Stich Collection 185 Figtree Campsite 51 Films on Namibia 21 Fine Art Gallery, Swakopmund 186 Firearms 15 First National Bank (FNB) 5 Fish River Canyon 198 Fish River Canyon and /Ai-/Ais Richtersveld TFP 198 Fish River Canyon viewpoint 200 Fish River, Coastal & the Deep South 196 Fish River, Coastal & the Deep South, map 199 Fish River Canyon & Hobas Campsite 209 Fish River Lodge 210 Fishing industry 216 Flash floods, hazards of 209 Flora 215 Fly-in adventures 29 Fly-in safaris 29 FNB 5 FNCC 88 Fog-basking beetle 168 Fonteine Community Restcamp 51 Former State House 73 Four Rivers Route 73 Fourways Stopover 147 Franco-Namibian Cultural Centre 88, 220 Franke Tower 221 Freshwater angling 60 Friedenau Offroad Triathlon 59 Fuel 218

G G!hunku Crafts 78 Gallows 190 Galton Gate 125 Game Reserve No 2 130 Game viewing 61, 125 Gamsberg 214 Ganab 87 Ganigobes Campsite 51 Garub 198 Gas 218 Gateways to Etosha 125 Gemstones 86 General information 212 General safety precautions 192 Geological Survey Museum 198 Ghaub 143 Ghaub Caves 123 Giant’s Playground 198 Gibeon Folk Art 51 Gibeon Meteorites 82 Goamus Campsite 83 Goat’s head 221 Gobabeb Research and Training Centre 166 Gobabis 92 Gobabis Museum 92 Gochas 95 Gocheganas Nature Reserve & Wellness Village 104 Goethe Centre 99 Golden Snake rock-art site 116 Government and the Rule of Law 182 Grashoek 79 Grave of John Ludwig 114 Gravel-road driving 25, 157 Groot Tinkas 54 Grootberg Lodge 161 Grootfontein 143 Grootfontein Museum 144 Gross-Barmen 57 Gross-Barmen Resort 101 Grosse Bucht 203 Grow Namibia 157 Guinas Lake 128

H Hai||om 51 Hakos 87 Hakos Guest Farm 106 Halali Resort 129 Hälbic Trading Store 158 Halfmens 200 Halifax Island 200 Hammerstein Lodge 174 HAN 20 Harbours 208 Hardap and Karas regions 214 Hardap Resort 109 Harnas Wildlife Foundation and Guest Farm 223 Hartlief’s Continental Meat Products (Pty) Ltd 97 Haus Woll 126 Health and welfare 219 Heavenly Herbs 157 Heinitzburg Castle 87 Helmeringhausen 198 Helvi Mpingana Kondombola Cultural 125 Henckert Tourist Centre 157 Hendrik Witbooi 185 Hentie van der Merwe 190 Henties Bay 190 Henties Bay environs 191 Henties Bay Fish Festival 191 Henties Bay Golf Course 191 Herero Festival 213

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Herero headdresses 215 Herero people 219 Heritage Route 220 Hermanus van Wyk 95 Heroes’ Acre 98 Hiking the Waterberg 104 Himba 126 Himba adornments 135 Himba crafts 136 Himba head and hair ornamentation 137 Himba social structure 138 Himba traditional jewellery 75 Hippo Pools Campsite 49 Historical and political development 213 HIV/Aids in Namibia 219 Hizetjitwa Festival 74 Hizetjitwa Indigenous Peoples Organisation 74 Hoachanas Campsite 51 Hoada Camp 161 Hoanib Skeleton Coast Camp 139 Hoba Meteorite 141 Hobatere Lodge 132 Hoeka Toeka, Swakopmund 186 Hohenstein Lodge 159 Hohenzollern-Haus 182 Homeb 167 Horseback safaris 168 Horseriding 59 Hospitals 219 Hospitality Association of Namibia (HAN) 20 Hotel Heinitzburg 105 Hotel Schweizerhaus 194 Hotel Zum Grünen Kranze 158 Hotel Zum Kaiser 194 House of Art 99 House on the Hill 51 Hunting and hunting safaris 223

I Ibenstein Teppiche 92 Ikhoba, Swakopmund 185 Imke Engelhard Design Studio, Swakopmund 186 Independence Museum 86, 221 Index 224 Industrial tours 126 Investing in Namibia 217 Investment incentives 217 Irrigation farming 95, 218

J Jakkalsputz walking trail 190 Jan Jonker Afrikaner 86 Johan Keetman 206 John Muafangejo Art Centre and Gallery 63 John Schröder 206 Ju/’Hoansi 78 Jungkwa 147

K Kaiserbrunnen 158 Kaiserliches Bezirksgericht 182 Kalahari Basin 107 Kalahari Desert 79 Kalahari Red Dunes Lodge 103 Kamanjab 154 Kambahoka Restcamp 49 Kanaan N/a’an ku sê Desert Retreat Kalahari Game Lodge 211 Kaokoland, map 137 Kaptein’s Tree 95 Karakul trade 95 Karakul trade, centre of 95

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Karibib 157 Karibib Marble Works 157 Karibu Safaris 39 Kashana Landhaus 157 Katima Craft Centre 114 Katima Mulilo 114 Katima Mulilo Airport 114 Katutura Community Art Centre 99 Kaumbangere Restcamp 49 Kavango and Zambezi regions, map 113 Kavango and Zambezi regions 110 Kavango basket Project 73 Kavango East 112 Kavango Living Museum 68 Kavango people 68 Kavango Region 112 Kavango West 112 Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area 117 KaZa TCA 117 KCAC 220 Keetmanshoop 206 Key phrases in local languages 17 Key tourism-related associations 20 Khaudum Campsite 148 Khaudum National Park 147 Khaudum surroundings 147 Khomas Hochland 45 Khorab memorial 123 Khorab Room 125 Khorixas and environs 152 Khorixas Camp 161 Khowarib Campsite 75 Khwe fruit 69 King Nehale Gate 125 Kitsch Collectables, Swakopmund 186 Kokerboom 97 Kolmanskop 203 Königstein 81, 154 Krafft family 92 Kramersdorf building 182 Kristall Galerie, Swakopmund 186 Kristall Kellerei 157 Kubas Station Building 158 Kulala Desert Lodge 173 Kunene Region 138 Kunene River Lodge 139 Kwaluudhi 49 Kwanyama 71

L Lake Guinas 36 Lake Oanob 108 Lake Otjikoto 36, 125 Langstrand Holiday Resort 189 Leonardville 95 Lichen fields 190 Literacy and education 219 Little Kulala Desert Lodge 173 Little Spitzkoppe 157 Living Museum of the Ju/’Hoansi San 49 Living Museum of the Mafwe 112 Lizauli Traditional Village 114 Local lingo 16 Lüderitz 200 Lüderitz architecture 200 Lüderitz Karneval 203 Lüderitz Nest Hotel 210 Lüderitz oysters 198 Lüderitz Peninsula 200 Lüderitz Speed Challenge 59, 203 Lüderitz Waterfront 203 Lusata Cultural Festival 70

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M Maack’s Shelter 81 Mafwe Campsite 50 Mahangu 68, 221 Mahangu Festival and Mahangu Championship 126 Maid in Africa, Swakopmund 186 Maiteko Cultural Group 83 Maize Triangle 144 Makalani palm 51, 73 Malaria 14 Maltahöhe 42, 168 Mangetti National Park 112 Map of Namibia 6 Marble Campsite 51, 75 Märchental 205 Mariental 95 Marine Memorial 182 Martin Luther ‘stem-ox’ 182 Marula 72, 221 Mashi Crafts, Kongola 114 Mashi Crafts Festival 69 Masubia Cultural Festival 70 Mata Mata Gate 6 Mbamba Campsite 50 Mbangura Woodcarvers Market 92 Mbungura Woodcraft Co-operative, Rundu 112 Mbunza Living Museum 68 Media 219 Meme Ikhoba, Swakopmund 185 Mesosaurus Fossil Site 207 Message from the Namibia Tourism Board 11 Messum Crater 154 Michael Krafft 92 Midgard Country Estate 102 Mokuti Etosha Lodge 128 Mondesa 180 Money matters 15 Mountain biking 62 Mowani Mountain Camp 162 Mudumu National Park 114 Mukuri Campsite 49 Musemes 117 Museum Association of Namibia 92, 220 Museums 221 Museums at the coast 221 Museums in central and southern Namibia 221 Museums in the north 221 Mushara Collection 130 Musical Stone 206

N N//goabaca Campsite 51 N/a’an ku sê’s Carnivore Challenge 101 N/a’an ku sê Foundation 100 N/a’an ku sê Lodge and Wildlife Sanctuary 101 Nabasib 83 NaDEET 171 NAGN 220 Nakambale 221 Nakambale Cemetery 72 Nakambale Church 72 Nakambale Mission House 126 Nakambale Museum 221 Nakambale Museum and Restcamp 49, 72 Nama people 221 Nama tribes 82 Nambwa Campsite 50, 118 Nambwa Tented Lodge 118 Namib Desert Environmental Education Trust 172 Namib Desert Park 174

Namib Naukluft Lodge & Soft Adventure Camp 175 Namib Oasis farm 45 Namib section, Namib-Naukluft Park 166 Namib-Naukluft Park 166 Namibia as conference destination 222 Namibia Breweries Ltd inside front cover Namibia Broadcasting Corporation 219 Namibia Car Rental 27 Namibia Craft Centre 47, 79 Namibia Movie Collection 99 Namibia Nature Foundation 223 Namibia Scientific Society 88 Namibia Tourism Board 11 Namibian Environment 223 Namibian public holidays 17 Namibian Shooting Union 56 NamibRand Desert Research & Awareness Centre 223 NamibRand Nature Reserve 223 NamPort 218 Namtib Desert Lodge 211 Namutoni Resort 129 National Archives and National Library of Namibia 91 National Archives of Namibia 98 National Art Gallery of Namibia 99 National Botanical Garden of Namibia (NBGN) 91 National Library of Namibia 99 National Marine Information & Research Centre 185 National Museum of Namibia 221 Naua Naua Art Shop 157 Naukluft Camp 172 Naukluft section, Namib-Naukluft Park 165 Naulila Monument 125 Naute Dam 208 Navachab Gold Mine 157 Ncumcara Craft Shop 68 Ndilimani Pottery Group 72 Ndonga 73 Nedbank Cycle Challenge 59 Nederburg 4 Neuras Wine and Wildlife Estate 174 Newspapers 219 Ngandjera 71 Nghuoyepongo 73 Ngoma Crafts Centre 107 Nkasa Lupala Tented Lodge 118 Nkasa Rupara National Park 116 NNF 223 North-Central regions 49 Northern Sperrgebiet concession 198 Nyae Nyae Conservancy 78

O Oanob Dam 87 Odyssey Car & 4x4 Hire 27 Off-road 4X4 desert trips 136 Office of the Ombudsman 88 Ohangwena Region 122 Ohumba 75 Oil and gas 218 Okaepe Living Museum School Project Okahandja 91 Okakarara Community Cultural and Tourism Centre 147 Okapuka Horse Safaris 64 Okapuka Ranch 105 Okarohombo Campsite 51, 138 Okatjikona Environmental Education Centre 144 Okaukuejo Resort 129 Okonjima – AfriCat Foundation 149 Okuryangava 72

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| GENERAL INDEX | Olifantsrust Camp 129 Old German School Building 98 Old Iron Jetty 182 Old Location Cemetery 98 Old Prison Building 186 Old Rhenish Mission House 154 Old Windhoek Cemetery 98 The Olive Exclusive All-Suite Hotel 102 Olukonda 126 Omaheke Region 214 Omaheke San Trust 78 Omajowa 221 Omaruru 154 Omaruru Artist’s Trail 152 Omaruru River 65, 154 Omatako Valley Restcamp 49, 79 Omaue Information 147 Omauni Community Campsite 49, 73 Ombalantu Baobab Heritage Centre 128 Ombalantu Baobab Tree Campsite 49, 221 Ombo Rest Camp 107 Ombwiya 74 Omdel Dam 191 OMEG 125 Omuguluwombase 72 Omuntu Garden 154 Omusati Region 126 Onandjokwe Lutheran Hospital 128 Onankali-Omahangu Paper Project 73 Ondangwa 126 Ondangwa SME Start-Up & Tourist Information Centre 126 Ondato 74 Ondjowo 79 One Africa TV 219 Ongava 131 Onguma Game Reserve 133 Ongwediva Trade Fair 73 Onjala 107 Onkoshi Resort 129 Onyoka 72 Opening times at border posts 7 Opuwo 138 Oranjemund 204 Organ Pipes 81 Oshakati 126 Oshakati Omatala 126 Oshakati-Ongwediva-Ondangwa 126 Oshana Region 126 Oshanas 71 Oshikoto Region 126 Otavi 144 Otavi Minen und Eisenbahn Gesellschaft Minenbüro 125 Otavi-Bahn 182 Otjihavera Xperience 62 Otjikaeva 77 Otjikoto Lake 128 Otjimbingwe 158 Otjimbondona 107 Otjiwarongo 147 Otjiwarongo Crocodile Ranch 147 Otjozondjupa Region 79 Oudstryders Memorial 98 Outjo 125 Outjo Museum 125 Owambo culture and crafts 72 Owambo hairstyles 72 Owambo houses 71 Owambo regions 73 Owambo tribes 71 Owambo, social structure and lifestyle 71 Owela Museum 99 Oyster Box Guesthouse 195 Oysters 186 Ozondato 74

P

S

Palm Beach 185 Paul van Schalkwyk Photography 84 Paula Cave 157 Penduka Development Project 99 People of Namibia exhibition 185 Peperkorrel 95 Performing arts 220 Performing Arts Department, University of Namibia 99 Petrified Forest 36 Philipp’s Cave 163 Photographing people, tips 16 Physical infrastructure 217 Pointbreak Open Water Swim 59 Pomona ghost town 205 Pondok Mountains 157 Popa Falls Resort 117 Popa Game Park 117 Port of Lüderitz 218 Port of Walvis Bay 218 Ports and harbours 218 Postal service 218 Potjiekos 222 Potters of the Zambezi 69 Powder magazine 158 Prinzessin Rupprecht-Heim 182 Private Camp, NamibRand Nature Reserve 176 Private game reserves 131 Proviantamt 158 Public Library 88 Public transport 86 Pure & Simple Gallery Shop 99 Puros Campsite 51, 75 Puros Traditional Village 75

Sãa Ta Ko 79 Safety precautions 24 Safety precautions for driving on gravel roads 24 Safety precautions for self-drivers 25 Salambala Community Campsite 50 Sam Cohen Library 91 Sambyu Museum 112 San (Bushmen) 77 San Ekoka 73 Sandwich Harbour 166 Scenic Air 31 Schwerinsburg Castle 98 Seeheim 208 Self-drivers, precautions 25 Self-drives, tips 24 Sense of Africa 38 Serra Cafema 139 Sesriem Campsite 172 Sesriem Canyon 168 Shark Island 210 Shovel-snouted lizard 168 Sikereti Campsite 148 Single Quarters, Katutura 99 Site of Veneration 199 Skeleton Coast Park 180 Skeleton Coast Safaris 33 Small Bushman’s Paradise 157 Snake Park, Swakopmund 182 Snoek Derby 203 Snyfontein Camp 51 Social infrastructure 219 Sosaties 22 Sossus Dune Lodge 172 Sossus Oasis Camp 175 Sossusvlei 168 Sossusvlei & the Namib-Naukluft Park 166 Sossusvlei & the Namib-Naukluft Park, map 167 Sossusvlei Lodge 175 Special endemics 215 Speed limits 25 Sperrgebiet National Park 205 Spitzkoppe 157 Spitzkoppe massif 157 Spitzkoppe Rest Camp 49, 157 Sport and adventure in Swakopmund 185 Sprokieswoud, Phantom or Fairy Forest 125 St George’s Cathedral 98 Stampriet 95 Stargazing 95 StayToday 47 Steps for Children 77 Ster Kinekor 99 STF 207 Strand Hotel Swakopmund 192 Strategic Environmental Assessment 223 Studio 77, Swakopmund 186 Sturmvogelbucht 203 Sugarloaf Mountains 157 Suggested reading on Namibia 21 Sun Karros Daan Viljoen 222 Supreme Court 71 SWA Safaris Namibia 39 Swakop River 76, 180 Swakopmund 182 Swakopmund Aquarium 185 Swakopmund Arts Association 182 Swakopmund environs 186 Swakopmund green asparagus 222 Swakopmund Hotel & Entertainment Centre 195 Swakopmund Indoor Sport Centre 185 Swakopmund Museum 91 Swakopmund Public Library 182

Q Qgu (!kung) 78 Quiver tree 83 Quiver Tree Forest 198 Quivertree Dolerite Park

207

R Railway Station Building, Swakopmund 182 Railways 218 Rare and Endangered Species Trust (REST) 147 Recycle Namibia Forum 223 Regimental badges 182 Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa 23 Rehoboth 95 Rehoboth Basters 95 Rehoboth Museum 95 Reitturnier 185 Religion 219 Responsible tourism 16 REST 147 RETOSA 23 Rhenish Mission Church 36 River Crossing Lodge 106 Rivers 214 Roads 218 Rock climbing 63 Roman Catholic Cathedral 98 Röseman Building 157 Rosh Pinah 204 Rossmund Golf Course 185 Routes in Namibia 34 Ruacana Falls 138 Rundu 112 Rundu Airport 112 Rundu Open Market 112

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Swakopmund River Mouth 186 Swakopmund Saltworks 186 Swakopmund Tour Company 47 Swimming 92, 185 Sylvia Hill 206

T TALA 109 Taleni Etosha Village 132 TAN 20 Taranga Safari Lodge 119 TASA 20 Tax and customs 15 Telephone services 218 Temperatures 214 Ten-man House 98 Terrace Bay 193 Teufelskrallen Tented Lodge 103 TFCAs in Namibia 223 The Farmhouse 125 The Grand, African Villa 149 The Himba people 74 The Mole 182 The Mushara Collection 130 The Namibian Pick ‘n Pay Cycle Classic 59 The Owambo people 71 The Tug 1 Tigerfishing 58 Tintenpalast 98 Tips for photographing people 16 Tips for Travellers 12 Tips on driving in sand 25 Topnaar people 82 Tour and Safari Association of Namibia (TASA) 20 Tour Guides Association of Namibia (TAN) 20 Tourism structures 217 Tourist destinations 24 Tourist information 126 Towns close to Windhoek 92 Traditional cuisine 221 Traditional San crafts 78 Trailer towing, tips 25 Train travel 23 Trans-Kalahari Highway 218 Transfrontier Conservation Areas 223 TransNamib Railway Museum 88, 99 TransNamib’s Starline Passenger Service 23 Transport services 218 Travel documents 23 Travel News Namibia 2 Travel Tips, seasonal 11 Travelling with children, tips 12 Tree Park, Grootfontein 144 Treesleeper Camp 50 Trekkopje Battlefield 158 Triathlons 91 Tsandi 49 Tsisab Gorge 154 Tsiseb Conservancy 157 Tsumeb 125 Tsumeb Arts and Crafts Centre 122 Tsumeb Cultural Village 125 Tsumeb Museum 128 Tsumkwe 147 Tulipamwe Sewing Project 126 Tulongeni Craft Market 73 Turnhalle Building 98 Tutaleni Village and Relocation Project 189 Tutwa Tourism and Travel 114 Twyfelfontein and surroundings 151 Twyfelfontein rock engravings 51 Twyfelfontein, Brandberg & Damaraland 152 Twyfelfontein, Brandberg & Damaraland, map 153

228

U Uakii Wilderness & Gobabis Info and Coffee Shop 92 Ugab Vingerklip (Finger Rock) 154 Ûiba-Ôas Crystal market 157 Uis Information Centre 81 Uranium exploration 216 Usakos 158 Utopia Boutique Hotel 101 Uukwaluudhi Royal Homestead and Museum 221 Uukwaluudhi Traditional Homestead 74

V Van Zyl’s Pass Campsite 51, 75 VAT 12 Vegetable ivory 126 Venison 22 Vicky’s Coffee Shop 81 Villa Margherita 194 Vingerklip Lodge 162 Visiting neighbouring countries 20 Volleyball 59 Von Bach Dam 91 Von Bach Dam and Game Park 91 Von Lindequist Gate 125 Vondelhof Guesthouse 108

W Walvis Bay 186 Walvis Bay Bird Sanctuary 189 Walvis Bay Corridors 210 Walvis Bay environs 189 Walvis Bay Lagoon 189 Walvis Bay Municipality 193 Walvis Bay Tourism Centre 189 Walvis Bay Waterfront 189 War memorial 98 Warehouse Theatre 221 Warmbad 208 Warmbad Hot Water Springs 209 Warmbad Museum 194 Water sports 95 Waterberg & Khaudum and surroundings, map 141 Waterberg Camp 148 Waterberg Guest Farm 148 Waterberg Plateau Park 142, 214 Waterberg surroundings 116 WCRA 180 Welwitschia mirabilis 154 Westair 30 West Coast Recreational Area 180 What to do in Henties Bay 190 Where to eat in Swakopmund 190 White Elephant (rock art) 158 White Lady of the Brandberg 154 Wild Africa Travel 38 Wild horses of Garub 204 Windhoek, day trips 88 Windhoek & surroundings & Central East 86 Windhoek Carnival (WIKA) 99 Windhoek City Museum 99 Windhoek Country Club Resort 108 Windhoek Golf and Country Club 58 Windhoek Public Library 99 Windhoek Railway Station 98 Windhoek Underwater Club 128 Windhoek, Art and Culture 99 Woermann Brock Arcade 185 Woermann House 186 Woermann Tower 182 Wolwedans Collection 176

Wronsky House 154 Wuparo Campsite 50

Z Zacharias Lewala 203 Zambezi people 68 Zambezi Region 114 Zambezi Waterfront Tourism Project Zoo Park 98

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Access to Foreign Exchange Services wherever you are

When visiting our beautiful country, we want to be sure that you have access to Foreign Exchange Services, no matter where you go. Bank Windhoek caters for all your foreign exchange and banking needs offering you American Express agencies, a large distribution network of 54 branches and agencies as well as 347 ATM’s and Cash Express Machines across Namibia.

Bank Windhoek Branches / Agencies and ATMs Bureau de Change / Foreign Exchange Services and American Express / Bank Windhoek Joint Venture

www.bankwindhoek.com.na

www.travelnewsnamibia.com

229


H O L I D A Y

&

NTB Head Office C/O Haddy & Sam Nujoma Drive Private Bag 13244, Windhoek Tel (+264 61) 290 6000 Fax (+264 61) 254 848 info@namibiatourism.com.na www.namibiatourism.com.na

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N$ / R 100.00 Namibia Holiday & Travel 2017

T R A V E L

NTB South Africa Ground Floor, Pinnacle Building Burg Street, PO Box 739, Cape Town, 8000 Tel (+27 21) 422 3298 Fax (+27 21) 422 5132 Namibia@saol.com www.namibiatourism.com.na

NTB Europe Schiller str. 42-44 60313 Frankfurt/Main, Germany Tel (+49 69) 133 7360 Fax (+49 69) 133 73625 info@namibia-tourism.com www.namibia-tourism.com

Namibia Holiday and Travel 2017  

The Namibia Holiday and Travel is a 200 plus page coffee table book that contains everything you need to know to plan your next trip to wond...

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