Texarkana-Region Economic and Labor Market Profile

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T.L.L. Temple Foundation’s

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

JANUARY 2022


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This Texarkana Region Economic and Labor Market Profile is part of a series commissioned by the T.L.L. Temple Foundation, which includes the following reports: 1. Rural East Texas Economic Opportunity Analysis Summary Profile, 2. Beaumont-Port Arthur Region Economic and Labor Market Profile, 3. Lufkin-Nacogdoches Region Economic and Labor Market Profile, and 4. Texarkana Region Economic and Labor Market Profile.

The four profiles have also been collected into a comprehensive edition, titled “Rural East Texas Economic Opportunity Analysis.” The goals of this work are to strengthen the alignment of and linkages between the talent pipeline and key industry clusters in rural East Texas. Economic and labor market research was provided by Alexander Research and Consulting. Graphic design was completed by Safflor Design. All profiles are available for download from the T.L.L. Temple Foundation’s website at www.tlltemple.foundation.

ABOUT THE PROJECT SPONSORS AND CONSULTING TEAM The T.L.L. Temple Foundation works alongside rural communities to build a thriving East Texas and to alleviate poverty, creating access and opportunities for all. Sylvia Leal Senior Program Officer, Education and Economic Development sylvialeal@tlltemple.foundation Jerry Kenney Program Officer, Education and Economic Opportunity jerrykenney@tlltemple.foundation Alexander Research & Consulting provides insights and support to help organizations amplify their impact. I offer a wide range services - research, analytics, program evaluation, strategic planning, and implementation support – with a specialization in community, economic, and workforce development. Caroline Alexander Principal caroline@alexanderrc.com Non-credited images used in this report were licensed from Adobe Stock. Cover image and other Boggy Slough Nature Preserve images used with permission from Jay Brittain. All other images sourced as attributed.

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CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Texarkana Region Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Summary of Findings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Data Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

TEXARKANA REGION LABOR MARKET CHARACTERISTICS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Summary of Findings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Data Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

TEXARKANA REGION WORKFORCE DEMAND. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Summary of Findings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Data Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

TEXARKANA REGION EDUCATION AND TRAINING INFRASTRUCTURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Summary of Findings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Data Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

KEY CONCEPTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Definition of Terms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


TEXARKANA REGION SUMMARY KEY FINDINGS The Situation

In terms of employment growth, the Texarkana region has consistently underperformed Texas and the US, and never fully recovered from the Great Recession before being hard-hit by Pandemic. Although two of its top industry sectors—retail and government—have been losing jobs, healthcare and manufacturing have made substantial gains. These two sectors are expected to continue to expand, bringing better paying, higher skill jobs to the region and setting the stage for a more robust future.

Economic Drivers The Texarkana region has a small cluster related to forestry and forest products, which shows up in the region’s industry and occupational strengths. Other important economic drivers include healthcare and manufacturing.

Workforce Demand Like the rest of the country, the Texarkana region has experienced a decline of middle-skill, middle-wage jobs, and this trend is expected to continue. These jobs require more than a high school diploma and less than a four-year degree. However, demand for higher skill jobs is growing. In-demand jobs that pay $15 per hour or higher include a wide range of middle- and high-skill

jobs in occupational families such as healthcare practitioners, education & training, transportation, and maintenance and repair. Most of the highskill occupations face below average automation risk; middle-skill occupations are more likely to face higher than average automation risk.

Educational Infrastructure and Alignment The region has 20 school districts and two public higher education institutions. Of the 1,400 high school graduates that can be tracked, about 70 percent are employed and 58 percent are enrolled in a postsecondary program. Of the students that are employed, about two-thirds work in retail or accommodations and food services. Of the students that are enrolled, the top destinations are Texarkana College, Northeast Texas Community College, and Texas A&MTexarkana. Texarkana College is the largest source of talent in the region, and Texas A&MTexarkana is a great source for talent with fouryear degrees or higher. These two institutions graduate about 1,300 students, which is fewer than the number of entry-level openings requiring a postsecondary degree. In other words, the talent pipeline from regional institutions falls short of demand. In particular, the regional postsecondary institutions are graduating only about 30 percent of the entry-level workers needed for health science and about 70 percent of the workers needed for education & training programs.

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T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

COUNTIES

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Healthcare Retail Trade Government Education Accommodation & Food Services Manufacturing Construction Other Services (except Public Administration) Administrative & Support Services Transportation & Warehousing Wholesale Trade Finance & Insurance Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services Real Estate & Rental & Leasing Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Arts, Entertainment, & Recreation Management of Companies & Enterprises Utilities Information Mining, Quarrying, & Oil & Gas Extraction

KEY STATISTICS

166,528 Population (2019)

-0.2%

Population Change (2014-2019)

68,083 Jobs (2020)

39,571

Openings (2021-2026)

10,891 8,228 7,558 6,746 6,626 5,581 3,620 3,615 2,974 2,940 2,474 1,808 1,478 896 759 528 427 317 314 301

TOP HIGH-DEMAND, HIGH-WAGE JOBS* OCCUPATION

OPENINGS (2021-2026)

1. Heavy & Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers

864

2. First-Line Supervisors of Food Preparation & Serving Workers

491

3. Registered Nurses

476

4. First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers

450

5. General & Operations Managers

384

6. Correctional Officers & Jailers

335

7. Medical Secretaries & Administrative Assistants

319

8. Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education

310

9. Bookkeeping, Accounting, & Auditing Clerks

304

10. Welders, Cutters, Solderers, & Brazers

301

11. Licensed Practical & Licensed Vocational Nurses

300

12. Maintenance & Repair Workers, General

289

13. Secondary School Teachers, Except Special & Career/Tech. Education

266

14. First-Line Supervisors of Office & Administrative Support Workers

250

15. Project Mgmt. Specialists & Business Operations Specialists, All Other

242

Source: Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed. Page 2 header image by Jay Brittain. * Includes only occupations that pay more than $15.00 an hour and require some kind of postsecondary education.

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TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMY

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SUMMARY OF FINDINGS Texarkana region currently has an • The employment base of 68,083 jobs. Between

2019 and 2020, the regional employment base contracted by 3.2 percent. However, it had never fully recovered from the Great Recession.

retail trade; and government are • Healthcare; the largest sectors in the region. Within the

government sector, the federal government (civilian), which includes the Bureau of Prisons, is the largest segment. Healthcare; accommodation and food services; and manufacturing are expected to be the largest sources of employment growth over the next five years.

2016 and 2019, the region experienced • Between a net loss of 94 jobs. Between 2019 and 2020, the region lost more than 2,000 jobs. Government; other services; and retail trade were the biggest losers. Healthcare; manufacturing; and construction were the biggest winners.

quotients (LQs) measure the share of • Location local industry employment relative to the nation.

A high location quotient can be an indicator of a potential competitive advantage. In the Texarkana region, government; utilities; and accommodations and food services have above average LQs. A more granular look at industry concentrations at a finer level of detail shows a degree of specialization in forestry and forest products. Other high LQs are rubber product manufacturing—as the region is the location of a large Cooper Tire & Rubber Company tire manufacturing facility—as well as fabricated metal product manufacturing, and home healthcare.

sectors that are expected to grow the most • The over the next five years and pay the highest wages are healthcare; manufacturing; and construction.

serves as the primary employment • Texarkana center for the three-county region. employers include hospitals, • Major federal and state correctional facilities, and forest products manufacturers.

Image courtesy TLL Temple oF undation

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DATA ANALYSIS 70,328

70,585

70,479

68,951

68,311

69,676

70,407

69,632

69,386

70,313

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

68,083

70,593 2009

2020

72,308 2008

Figure 1. TOTAL EMPLOYMENT, TEXARKANA REGION, 2008-2020

Figure 2. COMPARATIVE EMPLOYMENT GROWTH, 2008=100 Texarkana Texas US

120

119 116

109

110

104

100

97 94

90

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

r

2009

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2008

80 Source (Both): Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed.

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Figure 3. EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY, TEXARKANA REGION Healthcare Retail Trade Government Education Accommodation & Food Services Manufacturing Construction Other Services (except Public Administration) Administrative & Support Services Transportation & Warehousing Wholesale Trade Finance & Insurance Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services Real Estate & Rental & Leasing Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Arts, Entertainment, & Recreation Management of Companies & Enterprises Utilities Information Mining, Quarrying, & Oil & Gas Extraction

2020 Change 2021-2026 -500

1,500

3,500

5,500

7,500

9,500

11,500

13,500

Figure 4. EMPLOYMENT CHANGE BY INDUSTRY, TEXARKANA REGION Healthcare Manufacturing Construction Accommodation & Food Services Real Estate & Rental & Leasing Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services Education Mining, Quarrying, & Oil & Gas Extraction Arts, Entertainment, & Recreation Management of Companies & Enterprises Utilities Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Transportation & Warehousing Wholesale Trade Finance & Insurance Information Administrative & Support Services Retail Trade Other Services (except Public Administration) Government

2016-2019 2019-2020 -1,000

-500

0

500

1,000

Source (Both): Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed. Note: Healthcare includes public hospitals and education includes public schools and higher education institutions.

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Figure 5. INDUSTRY LOCATION QUOTIENTS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2020 Government Utilities Accommodation & Food Services Retail Trade Mining, Quarrying, & Oil & Gas Extraction Healthcare Education Transportation & Warehousing Manufacturing Other Services (except Public Administration) Wholesale Trade Construction Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Real Estate & Rental & Leasing Administrative & Support Services Finance & Insurance Arts, Entertainment, & Recreation Management of Companies & Enterprises Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services Information

1.39 1.35 1.29 1.24 1.19 1.17

1.09 1.08 1.05 1.02 1.00 0.92 0.91 0.77 0.72 0.63

▼ Below Average

0.51 0.43 0.32 0.25

Figure 6. INDUSTRY STRENGTHS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2020 TOP 15 INDUSTRY LOCATION QUOTIENTS

NAICS DESCRIPTION

2020 LOCATION QUOTIENT

▲ Above Average

Location quotients (LQs) are ratios of an area’s share of employment by industry relative to the US’s. If an LQ is equal to 1, then the industry has the same share of its area employment as it does in the nation. An LQ greater than 1 indicates an industry with a greater share of the local area employment than is the case nationwide.

2020 JOBS

2020 PAYROLLED BUSINESS LOCATIONS

AVG. EARNINGS PER JOB

3262

Rubber Product Manufacturing

23.79

1,295

1

$85,796

4882

Support Activities for Rail Transportation

21.04

320

5

$73,082

3221

Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills

11.78

473

2

$106,814

1133

Logging

11.77

361

33

$60,592

3313

Alumina and Aluminum Production and Processing

8.28

203

3

$71,216

3211

Sawmills and Wood Preservation

8.24

327

10

$70,699

6223

Specialty (except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse) Hospitals

6.15

622

2

$57,123

3329

Other Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing

5.87

670

11

$63,314

4231

Motor Vehicle & Parts/Supplies Merchant Wholesalers

5.20

784

21

$60,609

2123

Nonmetallic Mineral Mining and Quarrying

5.00

207

3

$61,342

3212

Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Wood Product Manufacturing

3.82

130

2

$57,057

5322

Consumer Goods Rental

3.56

198

18

$43,718

4881

Support Activities for Air Transportation

3.16

295

9

$112,911

6216

Home Health Care Services

3.13

2,086

34

$34,269

5612

Facilities Support Services

3.00

204

4

$16,208

Source (Both): Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed. Note: Healthcare includes public hospitals and education includes public schools and higher education institutions.

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Figure 7. INDUSTRY GROWTH AND WAGES, TEXARKANA REGION TOP 10 INDUSTRIES $90,000 $80,000 Manufacturing

$70,000

Government

Transportation & Warehousing

Average Earnings per Job

$60,000 Construction

$50,000

Healthcare Retail Trade

Education $40,000 $30,000

Other Services (except Public Administration)

$20,000

Administrative & Support Services

Accommodation & Food Services

$10,000 $0 -1,000

-750

-500

-250 0 Projected Change: 2021-2026

250

500

750

1,000

Figure 8. EMPLOYMENT CENTERS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2018 JOB DENSITY BY CENSUS BLOCK

BOWIE MILLER

CASS

Source: (Figure 7) Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed. (Figure 8) US Census Bureau, LEHD Origin-Destination Employment Statistics.

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Figure 9. TOP EMPLOYERS, TEXARKANA REGION TEXAS ONLY NAME

CITY

SIZE

CHRISTUS St Michael Health

Texarkana

1,000-4,999

International Paper Co

Queen City

1,000-4,999

State of Texas Telford Unit

New Boston

500-999

Atlanta

500-999

Wadley Regional Medical Ctr

Texarkana

500-999

Bi-State Justice Building

Texarkana

250-499

Federal Correctional Institute

Texarkana

250-499

Ledwell & Son Truck Body

Texarkana

250-499

Life Net

Texarkana

250-499

Lone Star Div

Texarkana

250-499

Atlanta

250-499

Mayo Manufacturing Corp

Texarkana

250-499

Texarkana College

Texarkana

250-499

Atlanta

250-499

United Steelworkers

Queen City

250-499

USPS

Texarkana

250-499

Walmart Supercenter

Texarkana

250-499

Walmart Supercenter

Atlanta

250-499

Texarkana

100-249

Wake Village

100-249

Texarkana

100-249

New Boston

100-249

Best Buy

Texarkana

100-249

Bi-State Jail

Texarkana

100-249

Bowie County Correctional Ctr

Texarkana

100-249

United Steelworkers

Lone Star Timber

Transportation Department

Adult Services Albertsons Attorney General Texas BAE Systems Platform Solutions

Source: Texas Labor Market Information, Texas Workforce Commission.

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TEXARKANA REGION LABOR MARKET CHARACTERISTICS

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SUMMARY OF FINDINGS Texarkana region has a labor force of about • The 71,000 individuals who are either employed or actively looking for work. Though the number of participants plunged during the economic shutdown in the first months of the Pandemic, it had almost recovered by May 2021. Within the region, Bowie and Cass Counties’ labor forces had not yet recovered in May while Miller County’s labor force had expanded.

the number of participants in the • Although labor force had stabilized, unemployment still

remained extremely high in May 2021 with Bowie and Cass County unemployment rates still more than 40 percent above its pre-Pandemic level. Miller County, on the other hand, had only a slightly elevated unemployment rate by May.

back to 2008, the Texarkana region’s • Looking was at or below the US rate until 2016 when the regional unemployment rate stayed flat while the US and Texas rates continued to fall.

terms of characteristics of the working age • Inpopulation (age 25 to 64), the Texarkana area

has a relatively large Black or African American

population both in comparison to the state and the US but has a much smaller Hispanic/ Latino population in comparison to Texas. The age distribution of the regional working age population is similar to that of the nation, which skews older than that of the state. The region has a much larger share of workers with only a high school diploma and with some college or an associate’s degree. Only 22 percent of the population 25 to 64 in the labor force has a bachelor’s degree or higher, which is significantly lower than that of the state and the nation.

of the educational requirements • Aof comparison jobs and the educational attainment of the

population 25 to 64 in the labor force shows that about two-thirds of the jobs in the region require a high school diploma or less. Yet, 58 percent of the workers have more than a high school diploma. This means than some workers with postsecondary education are working in jobs for which they are overqualified. The number of workers with a bachelor’s degree or higher is fairly well-aligned with the number of jobs that require such a credential.

Image by Renelibrary via

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

iW kimedia Commons

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DATA ANALYSIS Figure 10. LABOR MARKET SUMMARY, TEXARKANA REGION, FEBRUARY 2020 TO MAY 2021 FEB 2020

APRIL 2020

MAY 2021

CHANGE (Feb. 2020 to May 2021)

Labor Force

71,394

68,138

71,092

-0.4%

Employment

68,302

59,176

66,849

-2.1%

Unemployment

3,092

8,962

4,243

+37.2%

4.3

13.2

6.0

+37.8%

Labor Force

39,530

36,751

39,172

-0.9%

Employment

37,866

31,719

36,838

-2.7%

Unemployment

1,664

5,032

2,334

+40.3%

4.2

13.7

6.0

+42.9%

Labor Force

12,261

11,741

12,218

-0.4%

Employment

11,721

10,420

11,355

-3.1%

Unemployment

540

1,321

863

+59.8%

Unemployment Rate

4.4

11.3

7.1

+61.4%

Labor Force

19,603

19,646

19,702

+0.5%

Employment

18,715

17,037

18,656

-0.3%

Unemployment

888

2,609

1,046

+17.8%

Unemployment Rate

4.5

13.3

5.3

+17.8%

GEOGRAPHY TEXARKANA REGION

Unemployment Rate BOWIE COUNTY

Unemployment Rate CASS COUNTY

MILLER COUNTY, AR

Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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Figure 11. COMPARATIVE UNEMPLOYMENT RATES, 2008-2020 Texarkana Region

12.0

Texas

US

10.0

8.0

6.0

4.0

2.0

0.0 2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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Figure 12. WORKING AGE POPULATION BY RACE POPULATION 16+ White

Texarkana Region

Black

Asian

Other

71%

23%

4%

Texas

75%

12%

5%

8%

US

74%

12%

6%

8%

Figure 13. WORKING AGE POPULATION BY ETHNICITY POPULATION 16+ White alone, not Hispanic or Latino

Texarkana Region

Some other race, not Hispanic or Latino

Hispanic or Latino origin (of any race)

Texas

36%

19%

45%

US

Figure 14. WORKING AGE POPULATION BY AGE POPULATION 16+ 16-24

14%

Texas

25-34

17%

17%

US

35-54

55+

32%

37%

19%

15%

34%

17%

30%

32%

36%

Figure 15. WORKERS BY EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT POPULATION 25 TO 64 IN THE LABOR FORCE Less than high school graduate

Texarkana Region TX US

High school diploma

7%

Some college or associate's degree

34% 13%

8%

16%

21%

63%

Texarkana Region

5%

27%

68%

Bachelor's degree or higher

36%

23%

22%

30%

24%

34%

30%

37%

Figure 16. COMPARISON OF EDUCATION LEVEL OF WORKERS AND JOBS TEXARKANA REGION High School or Less

Workers Jobs

Some College or Associate's Degree

42%

Bachelor's Degree or higher

36% 66%

22% 13%

21%

Note: (Figure 16) Workers are defined as the working age population (age 25 to 64). Sources: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey 5-year Estimates, 2019 and Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed.

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TEXARKANA REGION WORKFORCE DEMAND

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SUMMARY OF FINDINGS largest occupational families in the • The Texarkana region are office and administrative

support; sales and related; and transportation and material moving. The largest sources of growth are expected to be food preparation; healthcare support; and management. Office and administrative support occupations are expected to lose jobs over the next 5 years.

Prior to the Pandemic, the occupational families that gained the most jobs were educational instruction and library; management; and business and financial operations. The occupational families that lost the most jobs were office and administrative support; installation, maintenance, and repair; and sales and related. During the Pandemic, the hardest hit occupations were food preparation and serving; office and administrative support; and sales and related.

LQs show the share of • Occupational occupational employment relative to the

nation. LQs above 1 indicate a higher share of occupational employment in comparison to the nation. In the Texarkana region, the occupational LQs that are above average are installation, maintenance, and repair and food preparation. The detailed occupations with the highest LQs reflect the region’s forest and forest products cluster, various production occupations related to the manufacturing that takes place in the region, and maintenance occupations to maintain the related machinery.

skill level of occupations is determined by • The the education required for entry, the experience

required, and the level of on-the-job training. Low-skill jobs are those that require a high school diploma or less, no experience, and minimal on-the-job training. Middle-skill jobs require more than a high school diploma but less than a four-year degree. High-skill jobs require a bachelor’s degree or higher. In the Texarkana region, the share of middle-skill jobs is slightly larger than that of the state and nation while the share of high-skill jobs is somewhat smaller.

2008, the number of low and middle• Since skill jobs had declined but is expected to grow over the next 5 years. The number of highskill jobs has grown significantly in recent years and is expected to continue to grow.

high-skill occupations that are highest • The in-demand include nurses and various

management; business and operations; and education and training occupations. With the exception of substitute teachers, all of these occupations pay more than $20 an hour and three meet the threshold for high wage with median hourly earnings above $45. More than half of the occupations face a high degree of retirement exposure but few face above average risk of automation.

middle-skill occupations that are highest • The in-demand include various first-line supervisors; maintenance and repair occupations; and skilled trades and production-related occupations. With just a few exceptions, these occupations earn more than $15 an hour. The workers in these occupations tend to be younger with fewer workers nearing retirement and more face above average risk of automation.

wage level of occupations is determined • The by the average hourly earnings. Low-wage jobs

are those that have average hourly earnings less than $15.00. Middle-wage jobs have average hourly earnings between $15.00 and $45.00. High-wage jobs have average hourly earnings more than $45.00. The Texarkana region has a relatively high share of low-wage jobs in comparison to the US and a relatively low share of high-wage jobs. About 60 percent of jobs pay, on average, between $15 and $45 per hour.

2008, the number of middle-wage jobs • Since declined while the number of high and low-

wage jobs has increased. Over the next five years, the number of middle-wage jobs is expected to continue to stay relatively flat while lowwage and high-wage jobs continue to grow.

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

20


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

region has very few high-wage, high• The demand jobs. Only six occupations meet the

threshold for high wage—these are airline pilots, nurse practitioners; financial manager; lawyers; pharmacists; and physical therapists. All of these jobs face lower than average automation risk. Due to the small number of workers in these occupations, retirement exposure cannot be determined except for lawyers (high risk) and pharmacists (not too bad).

middle-wage jobs that are highest in • The demand include truck drivers and other

transportation/warehouse workers, various office and administrative workers, and nurses. More than half of these occupations face a high degree of retirement exposure and

21

higher than average automation risk.

posting activity, a real-time indicator of • Job workforce demand, has recovered to its pre-

Pandemic levels. Since September 2020, the number of unique job postings has been above 5,000 and progressively increasing until a seasonal drop-off in June. In May 2021, there were more job postings than unemployed people. The companies with the most unique job postings were Christus Health, Wal-Mart, and General Dynamics. The top occupations were truck drivers, registered nurses, and customer service representatives. The top industries were retail trade, transportation and warehousing, and health care and social assistance.

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

DATA ANALYSIS Figure 17. EMPLOYMENT BY OCCUPATION, TEXARKANA REGION Office & Administrative Support Sales & Related Transportation & Material Moving Food Preparation & Serving Related Healthcare Practitioners & Technical Production Educational Instruction & Library Healthcare Support Installation, Maintenance, & Repair Construction & Extraction Management Building & Grounds Cleaning & Maintenance Business & Financial Operations Protective Service Personal Care & Service Community & Social Service Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, & Media Architecture & Engineering Computer & Mathematical Farming, Fishing, & Forestry Legal Life, Physical, & Social Science

2020 Jobs Change 2021-2026

Military-only -500

500

1,500

2,500

3,500

4,500

5,500

6,500

7,500

8,500

Source: Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed.

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

22


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 18. EMPLOYMENT CHANGE BY OCCUPATION, TEXARKANA REGION Educational Instruction & Library Management Business & Financial Operations Transportation & Material Moving Community & Social Service Building & Grounds Cleaning & Maintenance Healthcare Support Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, & Media Food Preparation & Serving Related Production Life, Physical, & Social Science Construction & Extraction Architecture & Engineering Healthcare Practitioners & Technical Farming, Fishing, & Forestry Legal Computer & Mathematical Military-only Protective Service Personal Care & Service Sales & Related Installation, Maintenance, & Repair

2016-2019

Office & Administrative Support

2019-2020 -2,000

-1,500

-1,000

-500

0

500

1,000

Source: Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed.

Imeag by ReneLariby via

23

Wikimeda Comons

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 19. OCCUPATIONAL LOCATION QUOTIENTS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2020 Installation, Maintenance, & Repair

1.34

Food Preparation & Serving Related

1.28

Production

1.23

Protective Service

1.23

Healthcare Practitioners & Technical

1.22

Healthcare Support

1.20

Transportation & Material Moving

1.17

Building & Grounds Cleaning & Maintenance

1.15

Educational Instruction & Library

1.15

Community & Social Service

1.09

Sales & Related

1.08

Farming, Fishing, & Forestry

1.03

Construction & Extraction

0.97

Office & Administrative Support

0.91

Personal Care & Service

0.72

Legal

0.63

Business & Financial Operations Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, & Media

▼ Below Average

0.74

Management

Life, Physical, & Social Science

▲ Above Average

0.60 0.55 0.51

Figure 20. OCCUPATIONAL STRENGTHS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2020 TOP 15 OCCUPATIONAL LOCATION QUOTIENTS 2020 LOCATION QUOTIENT

2020 JOBS

OPENINGS (2021-2026)

MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

SOC

DESCRIPTION

45-4022

Logging Equipment Operators

11.17

190

149

$20.31

51-2031

Engine & Other Machine Assemblers

8.49

177

77

$21.03

49-3042

Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines

6.80

479

213

$28.61

51-9196

Paper Goods Machine Setters, Operators, & Tenders

6.68

285

114

$22.15

47-5071

Roustabouts, Oil & Gas

6.18

119

68

$34.62

51-7041

Sawing Machine Setters, Operators, & Tenders, Wood

5.95

128

87

$14.80

33-3012

Correctional Officers & Jailers

4.86

839

335

$19.52

51-9041

Extruding, Forming, Pressing, & Compacting Machine Setters, Oper., & Tenders

4.74

133

62

$22.31

49-9098

Helpers--Installation, Maintenance, & Repair Workers

3.71

148

96

$11.44

51-4121

Welders, Cutters, Solderers, & Brazers

3.28

599

301

$19.28

53-3031

Driver/Sales Workers

3.10

595

311

$11.17

43-9051

Mail Clerks & Mail Machine Operators, Except Postal Service

2.89

105

49

$15.37

29-2061

Licensed Practical & Licensed Vocational Nurses

2.76

834

300

$18.62

49-9041

Industrial Machinery Mechanics

2.61

446

215

$27.58

43-4071

File Clerks

2.46

102

52

$15.23

Source: (Both) Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed.

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

24


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 21. COMPARATIVE JOBS BY SKILL LEVEL, 2021 Low Texarkana Region

Middle

High

40%

Texas

38%

US

37%

39%

21%

36%

26%

35%

28%

Figure 22. JOBS BY SKILL LEVEL, TEXARKANA REGION, 2008-2026 Low

115

Middle

High PROJECTION ▶

110

105

100

95

90

85

80 2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Source: (Both) Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed. Note: (Figure 21) Low-skill jobs require a high school diploma or less, no experience, and minimal on-the-job training. Middle-skill jobs require more than a high school diploma but less than a four-year degree. High-skill jobs require a bachelor’s degree or higher.

25

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 23. HIGH-SKILL HIGH-DEMAND OCCUPATIONS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2021-2026 BY OPENINGS REGIONAL MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

REGIONAL MEDIAN/ US MEDIAN EARNINGS

PERCENT WORKERS OVER 55

2020 JOBS

OPENINGS (2021-2026)

1,889

476

$31.66

87.5

25%

85.3

11-1021 General & Operations Managers

860

384

$36.16

72.9

24%

82.2

25-2021 Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education

852

310

$22.16

75.8

21%

82.3

25-1099 Postsecondary Teachers

541

225

$31.16

84.6

31%

86.6

13-1198 Project Management Specialists & Business Operations Specialists, All Other

564

242

$32.27

86.8

27%

86.8

771

266

$24.11

79.9

22%

84.9

13-2011 Accountants & Auditors

413

187

$29.10

82.3

30%

93.1

25-3031 Substitute Teachers, Short-Term

414

218

$10.43

73.8

27%

83.3

25-2022 Middle School Teachers, Except Special & Career/ Technical Education

391

141

$22.51

77.1

21%

84.5

11-9111 Medical & Health Services Managers

218

108

$39.14

78.8

29%

75.2

21-2011 Clergy

186

110

$21.89

89.0

46%

75.3

11-9198 Personal Service Mgrs., All Other; Entertainment & Recreation Mgrs., Except Gambling; & Mgrs., All Other

229

94

$27.68

68.8

32%

84.5

11-9021 Construction Managers

215

94

$29.08

76.7

30%

88.6

11-9032 Education Administrators, Kindergarten through Secondary

248

91

$35.56

75.3

29%

79.2

13-1071 Human Resources Specialists

189

87

$24.35

79.8

83.8

13-1111 Management Analysts

142

74

$32.22

76.2

38%

91.1

13-1028 Buyers & Purchasing Agents

158

69

$28.47

89.8

32%

93.4

21-1022 Healthcare Social Workers

136

66

$29.49

106.4

83.5

21-1012 Educational, Guidance, & Career Counselors & Advisors

127

59

$25.87

92.8

80.0

53-2011 Airline Pilots, Copilots, & Flight Engineers

122

59

$75.78

98.5

91.5

29-1171 Nurse Practitioners

113

56

$56.05

104.6

83.2

11-3031 Financial Managers

133

55

$45.92

71.7

85.8

21-1021 Child, Family, & School Social Workers

105

56

$22.92

98.4

83.7

41-3031 Securities, Commodities, & Financial Services Sales Agents

112

47

$24.96

80.5

92.8

13-2072 Loan Officers

136

48

$37.02

120.5

91.7

SOC

DESCRIPTION

29-1141 Registered Nurses

25-2031

Secondary School Teachers, Except Special & Career/ Technical Education

AUTOMATION INDEX

Source: Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed. Note: includes only occupations with greater than 100 jobs in 2020. The automation index captures an occupation’s risk of being affected by automation. An automation index greater than 100 indicates a higher-than-average risk of automation; an automation index less than 100 indicates a lower-thanaverage risk of automation.

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

26


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 24. MIDDLE-SKILL HIGH-DEMAND OCCUPATIONS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2021-2026 BY OPENINGS

SOC

2020 JOBS

DESCRIPTION

OPENINGS (2021-2026)

REGIONAL MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

REGIONAL MEDIAN/ US MEDIAN EARNINGS

PERCENT WORKERS OVER 55

AUTOMATION INDEX

53-3032 Heavy & Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers

864

1,681

$23.29

103.3

34%

110.1

35-2014 Cooks, Restaurant

693

756

$11.84

85.7

12%

125.0

31-1131 Nursing Assistants

501

965

$13.02

88.0

20%

97.0

35-1012 First-Line Supervisors of Food Prep. & Serving Workers

491

631

$15.73

94.9

13%

107.7

41-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers

450

874

$18.08

93.4

19%

87.8

43-6013 Medical Secretaries & Administrative Assistants

319

606

$15.65

87.2

29%

93.1

25-9045 Teaching Assistants, Except Postsecondary

363

722

$10.17

73.2

25%

89.7

33-3012 Correctional Officers & Jailers

335

839

$19.52

85.6

15%

90.5

43-3031 Bookkeeping, Accounting, & Auditing Clerks

304

572

$15.04

73.8

38%

103.6

49-9071 Maintenance & Repair Workers, General

289

549

$15.81

80.6

30%

109.6

51-4121 Welders, Cutters, Solderers, & Brazers

301

599

$19.28

91.2

18%

121.4

29-2061 Licensed Practical & Licensed Vocational Nurses

300

834

$18.62

79.5

25%

84.8

43-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Office & Admin. Support Workers

250

515

$23.62

84.2

26%

91.8

49-3042 Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines

213

479

$28.61

108.7

24%

109.6

49-9041 Industrial Machinery Mechanics

215

446

$27.58

103.7

27%

109.8

47-2031 Carpenters

218

420

$16.14

73.6

22%

125.9

31-9092 Medical Assistants

194

335

$13.78

80.0

97.3

41-4012 Sales Representatives, Wholesale & Manufacturing, Except Technical & Scientific Products

188

365

$26.15

88.4

29%

91.5

49-3023 Automotive Service Technicians & Mechanics

180

378

$18.35

91.4

105.9

39-5012 Hairdressers, Hairstylists, & Cosmetologists

180

323

$11.87

89.8

16%

98.0

51-9061 Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, & Weighers

159

305

$20.35

104.5

24%

106.1

47-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades & Extraction Workers

178

338

$26.08

82.1

31%

106.2

47-2111 Electricians

176

311

$22.21

82.6

21%

110.3

51-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Production & Operating Workers

157

302

$29.93

99.4

24%

88.6

25-2011 Preschool Teachers, Except Special Education

148

303

$11.94

78.3

15%

81.5

Source: Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed. Note: includes only occupations with greater than 100 jobs in 2020. The automation index captures an occupation’s risk of being affected by automation. An automation index greater than 100 indicates a higher-than-average risk of automation; an automation index less than 100 indicates a lower-thanaverage risk of automation.

27

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 25. LOW-SKILL HIGH-DEMAND OCCUPATIONS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2021-2026 BY OPENINGS

SOC

DESCRIPTION

2020 JOBS

OPENINGS (2021-2026)

REGIONAL MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

REGIONAL MEDIAN/ US MEDIAN EARNINGS

PERCENT WORKERS OVER 55

AUTOMATION INDEX

35-3023 Fast Food & Counter Workers

2,721

2,747

$9.57

83.5

11%

130.8

41-2031 Retail Salespersons

1,740

2,459

$10.45

80.2

21%

93.4

41-2011 Cashiers

1,522

1,812

$9.84

81.8

14%

105.5

31-1128 Home Health & Personal Care Aides

1,679

1,959

$9.47

72.9

33%

93.6

35-3031 Waiters & Waitresses

999

917

$9.07

79.4

7%

129.8

37-2011 Janitors & Cleaners, Except Maids & Housekeeping Cleaners

896

1,249

$11.88

85.0

32%

122.5

53-7062 Laborers & Freight, Stock, & Material Movers, Hand

666

955

$14.98

100.3

15%

117.2

43-9061 Office Clerks, General

685

1,242

$14.56

85.8

31%

102.0

53-7065 Stockers & Order Fillers

601

954

$12.15

86.6

18%

112.3

37-2012 Maids & Housekeeping Cleaners

519

738

$10.26

82.5

25%

124.5

37-3011 Landscaping & Groundskeeping Workers

423

617

$12.49

84.0

24%

129.1

43-4051 Customer Service Representatives

367

599

$13.92

80.9

20%

96.4

43-6014 Secretaries & Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, & Executive

345

687

$14.32

76.8

35%

91.4

53-3031 Driver/Sales Workers

311

595

$11.17

83.2

24%

109.1

39-9011 Childcare Workers

333

516

$9.84

83.8

21%

88.0

53-3033 Light Truck Drivers

308

538

$13.34

75.0

30%

112.9

47-2061 Construction Laborers

296

525

$13.64

78.4

18%

131.9

43-4171 Receptionists & Information Clerks

249

396

$11.15

74.6

25%

94.2

35-9011 Dining Room & Cafeteria Attendants & Bartender Helpers

231

236

$10.04

83.5

15%

130.6

53-3058 Passenger Vehicle Drivers, Except Bus Drivers, Transit & Intercity

210

354

$12.08

80.8

44%

99.9

53-7051 Industrial Truck & Tractor Operators

204

371

$18.75

103.9

17%

119.5

35-2011 Cooks, Fast Food

172

259

$10.26

87.7

134.1

43-4081 Hotel, Motel, & Resort Desk Clerks

208

207

$10.30

84.0

104.0

43-3071 Tellers

177

381

$13.55

86.4

21%

102.3

35-2021 Food Preparation Workers

189

208

$10.50

83.8

16%

129.1

Source: Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed. Note: includes only occupations with greater than 100 jobs in 2020. The automation index captures an occupation’s risk of being affected by automation. An automation index greater than 100 indicates a higher-than-average risk of automation; an automation index less than 100 indicates a lower-thanaverage risk of automation.

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

28


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 26. COMPARATIVE JOBS BY WAGE LEVEL, 2021 Low Texarkana Region

Middle

High

36%

Texas

61%

25%

US

3%

64%

18%

10%

70%

12%

Figure 27. JOBS BY WAGE LEVEL, TEXARKANA REGION, 2008-2026 Low

150

Middle

High

PROJECTION ▶

140 130 120 110 100 90 80 2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Figure 28. HIGH-WAGE HIGH-DEMAND OCCUPATIONS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2021-2026 BY OPENINGS

SOC

DESCRIPTION

2020 JOBS

OPENINGS (2021-2026)

REGIONAL MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

REGIONAL MEDIAN/ US MEDIAN EARNINGS

PERCENT WORKERS OVER 55

AUTOMATION INDEX

53-2011 Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers

59

122

$75.78

98.5

91.5

29-1171 Nurse Practitioners

56

113

$56.05

104.6

83.2

11-3031 Financial Managers

55

133

$45.92

71.7

85.8

23-1011 Lawyers

35

158

$40.05

67.9

41%

81.1

29-1051 Pharmacists

37

194

$66.52

107.6

20%

89.1

29-1123 Physical Therapists

39

145

$50.96

117.0

85.5

Source (All): Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed. Notes: Low-wage jobs are those that have average hourly earnings less than $15.00. Middle wage jobs have average hourly earnings between $15.00 and $45.00. High-wage jobs have average hourly earnings more than $45.00. Figure 28 includes only occupations with greater than 100 jobs in 2020. The automation index captures an occupation’s risk of being affected by automation. An automation index greater than 100 indicates a higher-than-average risk of automation; an automation index less than 100 indicates a lower-than-average risk of automation.

29

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 29. MIDDLE-WAGE HIGH-DEMAND OCCUPATIONS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2021-2026 BY OPENINGS

SOC

DESCRIPTION

2020 JOBS

OPENINGS (2021-2026)

REGIONAL MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

REGIONAL MEDIAN/ US MEDIAN EARNINGS

PERCENT WORKERS OVER 55

AUTOMATION INDEX

53-3032 Heavy & Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers

864

1,681

$23.29

103.3

34%

110.1

53-7062 Laborers & Freight, Stock, & Material Movers, Hand

666

955

$14.98

100.3

15%

117.2

43-9061 Office Clerks, General

685

1,242

$14.56

85.8

31%

102.0

35-1012 First-Line Supervisors of Food Prep. & Serving Workers

491

631

$15.73

94.9

13%

107.7

29-1141 Registered Nurses

476

1,889

$31.66

87.5

25%

85.3

41-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers

450

874

$18.08

93.4

19%

87.8

11-1021 General & Operations Managers

384

860

$36.16

72.9

24%

82.2

43-4051 Customer Service Representatives

367

599

$13.92

80.9

20%

96.4

43-6014 Secretaries & Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, & Executive

345

687

$14.32

76.8

35%

91.4

43-6013 Medical Secretaries & Administrative Assistants

319

606

$15.65

87.2

29%

93.1

33-3012 Correctional Officers & Jailers

335

839

$19.52

85.6

15%

90.5

53-3033 Light Truck Drivers

308

538

$13.34

75.0

30%

112.9

43-3031 Bookkeeping, Accounting, & Auditing Clerks

304

572

$15.04

73.8

38%

103.6

49-9071 Maintenance & Repair Workers, General

289

549

$15.81

80.6

30%

109.6

25-2021 Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education

310

852

$22.16

75.8

21%

82.3

47-2061 Construction Laborers

296

525

$13.64

78.4

18%

131.9

51-4121 Welders, Cutters, Solderers, & Brazers

301

599

$19.28

91.2

18%

121.4

29-2061 Licensed Practical & Licensed Vocational Nurses

300

834

$18.62

79.5

25%

84.8

43-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Office & Admin. Support Workers

250

515

$23.62

84.2

26%

91.8

25-1099 Postsecondary Teachers

225

541

$31.16

84.6

31%

86.6

13-1198 Project Management Specialists & Business Operations Specialists, All Other

242

564

$32.27

86.8

27%

86.8

25-2031 Secondary School Teachers, Except Special & Career/ Technical Education

266

771

$24.11

79.9

22%

84.9

49-3042 Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines

213

479

$28.61

108.7

24%

109.6

49-9041 Industrial Machinery Mechanics

215

446

$27.58

103.7

27%

109.8

47-2031 Carpenters

218

420

$16.14

73.6

22%

125.9

Source: Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed. Note: Includes only occupations with greater than 100 jobs in 2020. The automation index captures an occupation’s risk of being affected by automation. An automation index greater than 100 indicates a higher-than-average risk of automation; an automation index less than 100 indicates a lower-thanaverage risk of automation.

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

30


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 30. LOW-WAGE HIGH-DEMAND OCCUPATIONS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2021-2026 BY OPENINGS

SOC

2020 JOBS

DESCRIPTION

OPENINGS (2021-2026)

REGIONAL MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

REGIONAL MEDIAN/ US MEDIAN EARNINGS

PERCENT WORKERS > 55

AUTOMATION INDEX

35-3023 Fast Food & Counter Workers

2,721

2,747

$9.57

83.5

11%

130.8

41-2031 Retail Salespersons

1,740

2,459

$10.45

80.2

21%

93.4

41-2011 Cashiers

1,522

1,812

$9.84

81.8

14%

105.5

31-1128 Home Health & Personal Care Aides

1,679

1,959

$9.47

72.9

33%

93.6

35-3031 Waiters & Waitresses

999

917

$9.07

79.4

7%

129.8

37-2011 Janitors & Cleaners, Except Maids & Housekeeping Cleaners

896

1,249

$11.88

85.0

32%

122.5

35-2014 Cooks, Restaurant

693

756

$11.84

85.7

12%

125.0

53-7065 Stockers & Order Fillers

601

954

$12.15

86.6

18%

112.3

37-2012 Maids & Housekeeping Cleaners

519

738

$10.26

82.5

25%

124.5

31-1131 Nursing Assistants

501

965

$13.02

88.0

20%

97.0

37-3011 Landscaping & Groundskeeping Workers

423

617

$12.49

84.0

24%

129.1

25-9045 Teaching Assistants, Except Postsecondary

363

722

$10.17

73.2

25%

89.7

53-3031 Driver/Sales Workers

311

595

$11.17

83.2

24%

109.1

39-9011 Childcare Workers

333

516

$9.84

83.8

21%

88.0

43-4171 Receptionists & Information Clerks

249

396

$11.15

74.6

25%

94.2

35-9011 Dining Room & Cafeteria Attendants & Bartender Helpers

231

236

$10.04

83.5

15%

130.6

31-9092 Medical Assistants

194

335

$13.78

80.0

97.3

53-3058 Passenger Vehicle Drivers, Except Bus Drivers, Transit & Intercity

210

354

$12.08

80.8

44%

99.9

35-2011 Cooks, Fast Food

172

259

$10.26

87.7

134.1

43-4081 Hotel, Motel, & Resort Desk Clerks

208

207

$10.30

84.0

104.0

43-3071 Tellers

177

381

$13.55

86.4

21%

102.3

35-2021 Food Preparation Workers

189

208

$10.50

83.8

16%

129.1

25-3031 Substitute Teachers, Short-Term

218

414

$10.43

73.8

27%

83.3

35-9021 Dishwashers

160

174

$10.00

82.4

18%

136.4

35-3011 Bartenders

146

146

$10.01

83.4

121.3

Source: Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed. Note: Includes only occupations with greater than 100 jobs in 2020. The automation index captures an occupation’s risk of being affected by automation. An automation index greater than 100 indicates a higher-than-average risk of automation; an automation index less than 100 indicates a lower-thanaverage risk of automation.

31

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


3,772

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE 5,919 5,912 Jul-21

7,567 May-21 Jun-21

7,529

7,098

6,730

7,372

Apr-21

Mar-21

6,188

5,883 Jan-21 Feb-21

5,793

5,302

5,470

5,079

4,841

5,410

5,326

5,545

Dec-20

Nov-20

Oct-20

Sep-20

Aug-20

4,506

4,308

Jun-20 Jul-20

4,357

3,966

4,379

4,128

4,460

4,385

4,724

4,710

May-20

Apr-20

Mar-20

Feb-20

Jan-20

Dec-19

Nov-19

Oct-19

Sep-19

Aug-19

Jul-19

Jun-19

May-19

Apr-19

5,093

4,864

Feb-19 Mar-19

4,761

Jan-19

T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 31. JOB POSTING ACTIVITY, TEXARKANA REGION, JANUARY 2019-JULY 2021 MONTHLY UNIQUE JOB POSTINGS

Source: Emsi 2021.2 Job Posting Analytics.

32


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 32. JOB POSTING CHARACTERISTICS, TEXARKANA REGION, JUNE 2020-JUNE 2021 UNIQUE JOB POSTINGS BY COMPANY COMPANY Christus Health Wal-Mart, Inc. General Dynamics Corporation Dollar General Corporation Encompass Health U.S. Xpress, Inc. CRST International, Inc. Red Carpet Employment Agency, Inc. Steward Health Care System LLC GPM Investments, LLC Care.com, Inc. Sonic Drive-In COMPASS GROUP PLC Doordash United Parcel Service, Inc. Lowe's Companies, Inc. Iasis Healthcare Corporation Uber Eats Express Employment Professionals Assurance IQ, LLC

UNIQUE JOB POSTINGS BY INDUSTRY

POSTINGS 779 628 389 335 309 307 238 205 202 195 190 188 182 181 180 167 164 148 143 140

INDUSTRY Retail Trade Transportation & Warehousing Health Care & Social Assistance Admin. & Support & Waste Mgmt. & Remediation Services Accommodation & Food Services Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services Manufacturing Finance & Insurance Public Administration Educational Services Information Construction Other Services (except Public Administration) Wholesale Trade Real Estate & Rental & Leasing Utilities Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Arts, Entertainment, & Recreation Mining, Quarrying, & Oil & Gas Extraction Management of Companies & Enterprises

POSTINGS 4,663 4,209 3,539 3,203 2,509 1,844 1,039 831 681 556 536 509 463 373 240 115 81 72 18 17

UNIQUE JOB POSTINGS BY OCCUPATION OCCUPATION Heavy & Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Registered Nurses Customer Service Representatives First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers Retail Salespersons Stockers & Order Fillers Fast Food & Counter Workers Light Truck Drivers Cashiers First-Line Supervisors of Food Preparation & Serving Workers Insurance Sales Agents Maintenance & Repair Workers, General Cooks, Restaurant Home Health & Personal Care Aides Licensed Practical & Licensed Vocational Nurses First-Line Supervisors of Office & Admin. Support Workers Computer User Support Specialists Driver/Sales Workers General & Operations Managers Laborers & Freight, Stock, & Material Movers, Hand

33

POSTINGS 4,845 1,937 1,527 1,111 1,031 751 698 553 549 460 417 408 353 339 323 322 319 299 287 277

Imeag esycourt TLL Temple Foundatio

r

Source: (All) Emsi 2021.2 Job Posting Analytics.

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

34


TEXARKANA REGION EDUCATION AND TRAINING INFRASTRUCTURE

35

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS the Texas side of the Texarkana region, there • On are 20 school districts that graduate more than

1,400 students each year. Of the students that can be tracked (e.g. they are enrolled in a Texas public college or university and/or working in Texas), about 70 percent are employed and 58 percent are enrolled in a postsecondary program. Of the students that are employed, about two-thirds work in retail or accommodations and food services. Of the students that are enrolled, the top destinations are Texarkana College, Northeast Texas Community College, and Texas A&M-Texarkana.

region has two public higher education • The institutions and two private institutions. Over

the last three years, these institutions have awarded, on average, 1,379 degrees. More than half of these are awarded by Texarkana College. Most of the awards from Texarkana College are associate’s degrees or certificates of at least one

but less than two years. The vast majority of the degrees at Texas A&M-Texarkana are bachelor’s.

the number of annual openings • Comparing of entry-level occupations that require

postsecondary education to the number of degrees or completions in related fields can be an indicator of the alignment of the regional talent pipeline with regional jobs. Overall, there are more annual openings than there are students graduating with credentials. In addition, the number of completions and openings show potential shortages of students choosing careers in health science, education & training, human services, and information technology. Note that the annual openings of transportation, distribution, & logistics includes truck drivers, which requires a commercial drivers license. These can be acquired through a postsecondary degree program or nondegree program.

Image by Tdga22aft via

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

iW kimedia Commons

36


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

DATA ANALYSIS Figure 33. ENROLLMENT AND EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES BY SCHOOL DISTRICT, 2017-2018 NUMBER OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES TOTAL

ENROLLED IN COLLEGE ONLY

EMPLOYED ONLY

ALL EMPLOYED

NOT LOCATED*

Texarkana

423

74

112

66

140

178

171

Liberty-Eylau

170

23

52

29

52

81

66

Pleasant Grove

145

28

30

27

55

57

60

Atlanta

112

20

29

17

37

46

46

New Boston

96

11

29

20

31

49

36

Hughes Springs

88

21

25

11

32

36

31

Redwater

85

21

17

12

33

29

35

Hooks

79

9

22

11

20

33

37

Dekalb

59

11

16

13

24

29

19

Pewitt

56

13

12

11

24

23

20

Linden-Kildare

55

9

18

13

22

31

15

McLeod

30

6

0

6

12

10

18

Simms

29

0

9

10

12

19

10

Maud

23

6

0

0

10

6

17

SCHOOL DISTRICT

EMPLOYED ALL ENROLLED & ENROLLED IN COLLEGE

Figure 34. TOP TEXAS PUBLIC COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES, 2017-2018 BY FALL COLLEGE ENROLLMENT OF DISTRICT HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES SCHOOL DISTRICT

NORTHEAST TEXAS TEXARKANA COLLEGE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

TEXAS A&MTEXARKANA

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

STEPHEN F AUSTIN UNIVERSITY

Atlanta

20

Dekalb

15

Hooks

14

Liberty-Eylau

28

6

5

Hughes Springs

19

Maud

New Boston

17

Pleasant Grove

24

11

Linden-Kildare

6

7

McLeod

8

Pewitt

12

Redwater

16

Simms

Texarkana

81

17

12

*Not Located - High school graduates not found either as college enrolled (in a Texas public college or university in the fall semester following graduation) or employed (not found in the 4th quarter of Texas employment data as reported by the Texas Workforce Commission). Source: TPEIR, a joint effort of the Texas Education Agency and Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Data are not displayed for districts with fewer than 25 high school graduates in order to protect student confidentiality.

37

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 35. TOP INDUSTRIES WHERE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES ARE EMPLOYED, 2017-2018 AVERAGE OF PERCENT OF TOTAL EMPLOYED Retail Trade

36%

Accommodations & Food Services

32%

Construction

16%

Health Care & Social Assistance

13%

Manufacturing

8%

Administrative & Support Services Educational Services

4% 3%

Figure 36. HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS, TEXARKANA REGION, 2018-2020 COMPLETIONS COMPLETIONS INSTITUTION

CITY

2018

2019

2020

Texarkana College

Texarkana

908

836

761

Texas A&M University-Texarkana

Texarkana

479

524

529

Cosmetology Academy of Texarkana

Texarkana

23

29

31

Tonsorial Arts Barber College

Texarkana

12

4

1,410

1,401

1,325

TOTAL

Figure 37. COMPLETIONS BY AWARD LEVEL, TEXARKANA REGION, 2020 INSTITUTION Certificates of at least 12 wks., but less than 1 yr.

TEXARKANA COLLEGE

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITYCOSMETOLOGY TEXARKANA ACADEMY OF TEXARKANA

TONSORIAL ARTS BARBER COLLEGE

1

10

Certificates of at least 1 but less than 2 yrs.

355

21

4

Associate's degree

405

Bachelor's degree

425

Master's degree

97

Doctor's degree–research/scholarship

7

761

529

31

4

TOTAL

Sources: (Figure 35) TPEIR, a joint effort of the Texas Education Agency and Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Data are not displayed for districts with fewer than 25 high school graduates in order to protect student confidentiality. (Figure 36, Figure 37) National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System. Includes only for-credit degree or other recognized postsecondary credentials that are eligible for Federal financial aid.

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

38


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 38. ALIGNMENT OF FIELDS OF STUDY AND JOBS, 2020 BY CAREER CLUSTER ANNUAL OPENINGS

TOTAL COMPLETIONS

TEXARKANA COLLEGE ONLY

Health Science

438

139

120

Education & Training

368

270

187

Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

226

57

57

Business, Marketing, & Finance

181

231

83

Human Services

159

67

31

Information Technology

38

18

11

Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

37

212

19

Law and Public Service

35

61

23

Arts, Audio/Video Technology & Communications

28

15

10

Manufacturing

19

91

91

Architecture & Construction

14

89

89

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

12

0

1

0

40

40

CAREER CLUSTER

Hospitality & Tourism

Source: Emsi 2021.2 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed and National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System. Note: Annual openings include only entry-level occupations that require a degree program. Completions include only for-credit degree or other recognized postsecondary credentials that are eligible for Federal financial aid.

39

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 39. COMPLETIONS BY FIELD OF STUDY, TEXARKANA COLLEGE, 2020 CERTIFICATES CERTIFICATES OF AT LEAST 12 OF AT LEAST 1 WKS. BUT LESS BUT LESS THAN THAN 1 YR. 2 YRS.

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREE

TOTAL

140

140

75

4

79

Registered Nursing/Registered Nurse

66

66

47.0201

Heating, Air Cond., Ventilation & Refrig. Maint. Technology/Technician

51

0

51

51.3901

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training

45

45

52.0101

Business/Commerce, General

45

45

12.0503

Culinary Arts/Chef Training

30

10

40

24.0103

Humanities/Humanistic Studies

33

33

15.1001

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician

27

2

29

47.0604

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician

25

4

29

12.0401

Cosmetology/Cosmetologist, General

23

4

27

52.0408

General Office Occupations & Clerical Services

1

26

27

43.0103

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration

23

23

47.0603

Autobody/Collision & Repair Technology/Technician

16

1

17

47.0605

Diesel Mechanics Technology/Technician

9

2

11

52.0401

Administrative Assistant & Secretarial Science, General

11

11

26.0101

Biology/Biological Sciences, General

10

10

13.1202

Elementary Education & Teaching

9

9

46.0302

Electrician

7

2

9

11.0101

Computer & Information Sciences, General

0

7

7

15.0303

Electrical, Electronic, & Communications Engineering Tech./ Technician

3

3

6

47.0303

Industrial Mechanics & Maintenance Technology/Technician

5

1

6

19.0706

Child Development

1

4

5

51.0805

Pharmacy Technicia—ssistant

5

5

11.1002

System, Networking, & LAN/WAN Management/Manager

3

1

4

45.0101

Social Sciences, General

4

4

50.0501

Drama & Dramatics/Theatre Arts, General

4

4

50.0701

Art/Art Studies, General

4

4

51.0904

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic)

3

1

4

51.1501

Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling

1

3

4

14.0101

Engineering, General

3

3

50.0901

Music, General

2

2

27.0101

Mathematics, General

1

1

40.0501

Chemistry, General

1

1

CIP CODE

DESCRIPTION

24.0102

General Studies

48.0508

Welding Technology/Welder

51.3801

Source: National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System. Note: Includes only for-credit degree or other recognized postsecondary credentials that are eligible for federal financial aid.

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

40


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Figure 40. COMPLETIONS BY FIELD OF STUDY, TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-TEXARKANA, 2020 BACHELOR’S DEGREE

DOCTOR’S DEGREERESEARCH/ SCHOLARSHIP

MASTER’S DEGREE

GRAND TOTAL

89

37

126

118

2

120

43.0104 Criminal Justice/Safety Studies

33

33

42.0101 Psychology, General

28

0

28

13.0301 Curriculum and Instruction

23

23

52.0301 Accounting

16

6

22

24.0102 General Studies

20

20

26.0101 Biology/Biological Sciences, General

20

20

54.0101 History, General

16

4

20

51.3801 Registered Nursing/Registered Nurse

17

17

14.1001 Electrical and Electronics Engineering

14

14

31.0505 Exercise Science and Kinesiology

13

13

45.1101 Sociology, General

12

12

13.0401 Educational Leadership and Administration, General

3

7

10

7

7

7

7

23.0101 English Language and Literature, General

5

2

7

27.0101 Mathematics, General

6

6

42.2803 Counseling Psychology

6

6

09.0102 Mass Communication/Media Studies

5

5

45.1001 Political Science and Government, General

5

5

13.1201 Adult and Continuing Education and Teaching

3

3

42.2805 School Psychology

2

2

51.3802 Nursing Administration

2

2

40.0501 Chemistry, General

1

1

27.0101 Mathematics, General

1

1

40.0501 Chemistry, General

1

1

0

0

13.1202 Elementary Education and Teaching

0

0

14.1901 Mechanical Engineering

0

0

26.1201 Biotechnology

0

0

44.0701 Social Work

0

0

51.3203 Nursing Education

0

0

CIP CODE

DESCRIPTION

52.0201 Business Administration and Management, General 30.9999 Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

11.0101 Computer and Information Sciences, General 13.0501 Educational/Instructional Technology

09.0100 Communication, General

Source: National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System. Note: Includes only for-credit degree or other recognized postsecondary credentials that are eligible for federal financial aid.

41

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

42


KEY CONCEPTS

43

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE


T.L.L. TEMPLE FOUNDATION

DEFINITION OF TERMS Career Clusters

Occupations

Groups of related types of work and occupations.

Groups of jobs that require similar knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform a variety of activities and tasks. Occupations are classified using the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) taxonomy.

Completions Measurements of the number of students who completed an academic or occupational instructional program. Completions include programs offered for credit at postsecondary institutions—degrees, certificates, and other such formal awards.

Fields of Study Standardized categories of instructional programs. Fields of Study are classified using the Classification of Instruction Programs (CIP) taxonomy to facilitate the collecting, reporting, and analyzing of program data.

Industry Sectors Groups of companies or economic units that share production processes. Industries are classified using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

Occupational Demands

Openings Numbers of new and replacement jobs. New jobs are positions that did not exists in the prior time period; replacement jobs are positions that were vacated by a worker who changed occupations.

Traded Sectors Sectors in which companies sell products or services across regions and/or countries outside of their local area.

Primary Jobs Jobs that infuse new dollars into the economy within industries that are traded or exportoriented. Examples include agriculture, mining, oil, & gas, and manufacturing.

Measurements of the number of openings in a specified time period.

Image by Jay Brittain

TEXARKANA REGION ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET PROFILE

44


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