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Agriptopia development ramps up PAGE 20

An edition of the East Valley Tribune

INSIDE

This Week

NEWS......................................

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furious

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GPS players ready to rumble

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rad Smith wants to put a neon rooftop sign reading “Gilbert” atop his threestory red brick building known as Bldg 313 in the Heritage District. “The desire to have a Gilbert sign just goes back to our love of historical small towns,” Smith recently told the town Planning Commission. “My wife serves on a board of historic theaters and we go tour those theaters mostly in small towns and they have beautiful signs outside.” Although that may be so, Planning Commissioners voted 5-2, to recommend Town Council not approve a text amendment to the land development code, allowing for up

to three rooftop signs in the historic downtown along Gilbert Road. Council will have final say on Oct. 17. Both the Redevelopment Commission and staff supported the proposal allowing for signs on top of buildings three stories and taller along Gilbert Road in downtown. A maximum of three rooftop signs no larger than 200-square-feet each, could be permitted in the Heritage District, one each in the north, central and south segments. “We believe this is the most appropriate area for rooftop signs due to the neon that is already existing and the existing Heritage District design guidelines that emphasize signs that are highly graphic in form, expressive and individualized to create a distinctive character and include exposed neon

Gilbert preschool probed over roaming toddlers

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Sweet! Candytopia a sugar high

COMMUNITY...................... 14 BUSINESS............................ 20 OPINION...............................23 SPORTS.................................24 GETOUT................................27 CLASSIFIED.........................32

A

Gilbert preschool is under investigation by a state licensing agency after seven toddlers wandered off its campus last week and some were nearly hit by cars on a busy street. Passersby were able to corral and safely capture the tiny tots who went on a juant Oct. 4, from Little Sunshine’s Playhouse and Preschool on Val Vista Drive near Raleigh Bay Drive. Spokesman Chris Minnick said Arizona Department of Health Services, which licenses child-care facilities, was still investigating Little Sunshine and could not say when a report will be made available. Two of those toddlers who escaped are 2-year-old twin

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PRESCHOOL page 5

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lighting,” Planner Sydney Bethel said. She said the proposed signs are unique and would add to the distinctive sense of place already fostered within the Heritage District. Bethel added the signs would be noncommercial. Recalling the town can’t regulate a sign’s message. According to a staff report, many historic areas around the country are restoring their historic neon signage because they reflect bygone times and serve as unique attractors to their vibrant village centers. But the proposal didn’t sit well with residents who live in the district. “The town is introducing blight in a des-

Scary times ahead

BY CECILIA CHAN GSN Managing Editor

GETOUT..........................

Sunday, OCTOBER 13, 2019

Gilbert to consider downtown rooftop signs BY CECILIA CHAN GSN Managing Editor

Cooley Station homeowners

SPORTS.............................

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William and Maggie Brimie turned out last weekend to help Jay and Tanya Ortiz turn their Val Vista Lakes house into one scary Halloween attraction. For details, turn to page 14. (Pablo Robles/GSN Staff Photographer)

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

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An edition of the East Valley Tribune Gilbert Sun News is published every Sunday and distributed free of charge to homes and in single-copy locations throughout Gilbert. To find out where you can pick up a free copy of Gilbert Sun News, please visit www.EastValleyTribune.com.

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Main number: 480-898-6500 | Advertising: 480-898-5624 Circulation service: 480-898-5641 Publisher:

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The content of any advertisements are the sole responsibility of the advertiser. Gilbert Sun News assumes no responsibility for the claims of any advertisement. © 2019 Strickbine Publishing, Inc.

This proposed 276-unit apartment complex at Cooley Station has upset nearby homeowners. (Town of Gilbert)

No-fence plan for Cooley complex upsets homeowners BY CECILIA CHAN GSN Managing Editor

T

he only thing that’ll be fenced at a new 276-unit Gilbert apartment complex is its dog park and that’s leaving some nearby homeowners upset. The Gilbert Planning Commission on Oct. 2, approved the Springs at Cooley Station’s site plan, landscaping and other design elements – but no fence – on 15-acres near Recker and Williams Field roads. “It seems like kind of a done deal,” said Joshua Jeter, president of the HOA for Fincher Fields at Cooley Station after the vote. “I thought the whole Planning Commission thing was a joke.” Jeter said he was reaching out to the mayor for help via email and if he didn’t get a response, he planned to speak during the public comments session at the Oct. 17, council meeting. Jeter and other homeowners came away from the Sept. 19, Town Council meeting with some assurance their request for a fence could be addressed during the design review process. Council at its meeting approved the project’s minor general plan amendment and rezone. Continental Properties originally designed the project with walls and gates but town staff requested their removal in order to promote connectivity. Cooley Station is within the 4,300-acre Gateway Character Area, which encourages development of traditional neighborhoods with standards such as minimal use of fencing to create a more open feel in neighborhoods. Jeter said that after the council meeting, Greg Davis, representing the property owner, expressed interest in working with the homeowners to address their concerns. Shortly after, Davis sent Jeter an email – which he shared with Gilbert Sun News – stating the developer found it impractical to put the fencing back in.

“We went back to Continental to discuss the viability of adding fences and gates back in,” Davis wrote. “In order to add gates and fences back in, as is their typical design format, we would have to go back and substantially redesign the project. “Being this far down the road and being this vested into the design path we’ve been directed to follow, that is not feasible. Even if it was, we would not have town support and would yet again be firmly directed to eliminate gates and fences.” Jeter questioned how the project could be set in stone so soon after the council vote. “I think where some of the confusion goes is where the Town Council approved it and the design review is running concurrently with the rezoning and general plan,” Planner Sydney Bethel told the Planning Commission. “So, therefore there is only about 2.5 weeks in between the land use and approval and now the design review so it doesn’t leave as much room as the council was kind of discussing up there to make changes to the design.” At the planning meeting, Jeter expressed some of the reasoning for a

fence. “They are talking about starting at $1,000 a month, which being so close to ASU-East (in Mesa), $1,000 a month is not a lot of money compared to the other apartment complexes right there,” he said. “It’s just going to end up being a dorm room with no fence separating our neighborhood from the apartment complex.” Eric Gumm, a development director with Continental Properties, disputed that notion. He said rent ranged from $1,000 for a studio to over $2,000 for a three-bedroom unit. He added there is an income level that has to be met in order to rent. “We don’t have any concerns with interactions with ASU or any concerns about it turning into more of a dorm-like community,” Gumm said. Springs at Cooley Station will have 10 buildings, two- and three-story tall offering a mix of studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom units. Amenities also include a 4,000-square-foot clubhouse, a 24-hour fitness center, kitchen area, coffee bar and pool. Vehicle access would be from both Williams Field Road and Haskell Street


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NEWS

SIGNS from page 1

ignated slum and blighted area,” said Doralis Machado-Liddell. “The text amendment will change the landscape of Gilbert. Once it’s changed, there’s no going back.” The .3-square-mile Heritage District was designated a redevelopment area in 1989, allowing the town access to resources to rejuvenate a deteriorating area. Machado-Liddell said if the signs are approved, a business can put whatever it wants for a message – “’Get Your Beer Here, Bars Rule’ or you fill in the blanks.” She also said public input was limited on the sign proposal and suggested the town withheld action until an update to the district’s design guidelines is completed. She also questioned the need for Smith’s sign when his building is just 440-feet from the town’s 123-foot-tall water tower, stamped with Gilbert’s name. “The Council seems to be fast-tracking rooftop signs in Gilbert,” MachadoLiddell continued. “Gilbert was known as the Hay Capital of the World. I do not want Gilbert to be known as the signclutter capital of the world.” Sandra Reynolds said the text amendment seems to benefit one person and if passed, the sign would be less than a block from her house. If all three signs were to go up, they will compete with the town’s landmark, she said. “It will take away from the iconic water tower,” Reynolds said. “It will be very detrimental. I don’t think this has been thought through as to the fact of what is good for the Heritage District as a whole. “It might be good for this guy to bring business to his building, which is why I think it’s going through right now versus waiting for an overall concept.”

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

She said even though the sign can’t promote a business, service or product, “putting a big light on top of your building is a beacon. It’s advertising in itself.” Three other residents submitted cards in opposition to the signs but did not speak at the hearing. Smith said his building houses his software company, a local restaurant, a co-working space for women and a soon-to-open rooftop restaurant. He said his company works with businesses throughout the country and Canada and he has no need for a business sign. Gilbert is always evolving in new ways as it celebrates its growth, he said. He noted the four-story Hearne Plaza Garage that opened in March blocks the view of the water tower for his daughter, who lives downtown. However, he added, he is thankful for the garage because it eases the parking problem in the area. “Anything that brings recognition to our town I’m in favor of it,” Smith said. “I believe having the name of our town up in lights will continue making Gilbert a great destination.” Commissioner Philip Alibrandi said he saw two sides to the proposal. “With a marketing back- Building owner Brad Smith thinks a sign atop his building would add ground I like the marketing to the town's reputation as a destination municipality. and branding for Gilbert,” he (Special to GSN) said. “I don’t think it’s favoring one person over another.” That said, he added the stylized water ing, less is more. tower is iconic to Gilbert and in marketHe also expressed concern that “making an exception for the Heritage District is problematic” and sometime in the future, someone can ask for a text amendment to allow rooftop signs elsewhere in town. He favored waiting until the district’s design guidelines were updated before taking action. Amanda Elliott, redevelopment program manager, said the design guidelines do not address signage and so waiting for it would serve no purpose. This rooftop sign at a Seattle market has been cited as an example of how such displays can be used as an attractive addition to an urban landscape. (Special to GSN)

This building on Gilbert Road in the heart of the Heritage District would have a big rooftop neon sign that says "Gilbert" if the owner gets his way with Town Council. (Special to GSN)

Vice Chairman Carl Bloomfield said the downtown has its own vibe and wasn’t sure a rooftop sign would be a benefit and that the water town was probably sufficient and enough for the area. Commissioner David Cavenee said the Heritage District is a “very unique place” because of the changes that have occurred there. He supported the proposal, calling it “a good thing.” Alibrandi said he saw no benefits and repeated the risk in the future of rooftop signs spreading elsewhere in Gilbert. Commissioner Jan Simon said he was torn on the proposal because he loved the concept but worried about what the signs’ messages could be today and in the future. Commissioner Noah Mundt said he had a hard time visualizing what the signs would look like so he was struggling with his decision. The vote was 5-2 with Commissioners Scott September, Les Smith, Bloomfield, Mundt and Alibrandi recommending Council deny the proposal while Cavenee and Simon opposed the recommendation.

IF YOU GO

What: Gilbert Town Council meeting on allowing rooftop signs in Heritage District When: 6:30 p.m., Thursday, Oct 17 Where: 50 E. Civic Center Drive


GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

NEWS

PRESCHOOL from page 1

daughters of Gilbert mom Stephanie McCrea. “We pulled them out as soon as it happened,” she said last week. “They will not be going back. We are in touch with two other sets of parents and they are not going back either.” A passing motorist went public on Facebook after nearly hitting two of the toddlers who got out on the street that Friday morning. “We’re talking screeching tires and honking horns,” Samantha Crouch wrote. “There were about six more toddlers on the sidewalk and not an adult in sight. Other drivers and I got out and ushered the kids to safety.” Crouch, who did not return a request for comment, said in her post the school staff didn’t even know the children had gone missing until she screamed and pounded on the lobby door. “I’m still shaking,” Crouch added. “I have kids that age.” Police investigated and said a gate at the school failed, allowing for the escape. Staff were present in the play area but the faulty gate was outside of their view. “The investigation is complete and no charges are being sought,” Sgt. Mark Marino said last week. The Gilbert preschool emailed parents stating it self-reported the incident to the licensing agency and suspended the teachers pending a full investigation. The facility added it will not allow students outside until the entire fence line is inspected. It was unclear how many teachers were suspended over the incident or what steps the preschool is taking to prevent a repeat. The Gilbert facility’s supervisors directed media calls to their corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, where officials did not respond to Gil-

Little Sunshine's Playhouse & Preschool on Val Vista Drive is under investigation by the state licensing agency after seven toddlers escaped and were wandering around the busy street. (Kimberly Carrillo/GSN Staff Photographer)

bert Sun News’ request for comments McCrea said two teachers have been fired over the incident. She also said the school never alerted her immediately after the incident occurred. “I didn’t learn about it until 11:30 a.m. (Friday) when someone saw it on Facebook,” McCrea said. “The school never called me to let me know.” She said she received the school’s email Friday night and a phone call from the school the following Saturday evening. “They said the gate malfunctioned and that they were not actually sure how they got out unsupervised,” she said. “They got surveillance cameras but they don’t record.” McCrea said she was able to piece together the incident after talking to a witness who found her daughters. “They got out the gate and down the sidewalk parallel to the school, all the way to the front of the school,” she said. “They went through the parking lot and down the driveway of the school and into the street, pushing toys. So it was a slow process and a long process before they were found.” McCrea said she enrolled her daughters in August because she was impressed with the school. “They had the cleanest, most aestheti-

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cally pleasing environment in my opinion,” she said. “It was new, clean and fresh. We liked that they had a certified chef, did yoga and had sign language. It was just one of those places you walk in and it doesn’t smell yucky and doesn’t look dirty.” McCrea said it wasn’t the first time the school had a safety breach. She said she witnessed an incident on Sept. 6, after dropping her daughters off at the school. “The kids were already outside in the playground and when I was driving away from the school I saw a couple of kids running out of the same gate and the teacher ran right after them,” she said, adding: “I didn’t stop and had my husband call the office, “why is this gate opened in the first place?’ They told him the cleaning crew left it opened and they would put in protocols to make sure it didn’t happen again.” McCrea said she kept her daughter enrolled because “I thought it was a case of cleaning people leaving the gate unlocked and they made it seem like they fixed it.” The company has preschool locations in 10 states, including three in Arizona. Its first school was accredited in 2005. The Little Sunshine location on Val Vista opened in 2015 and the second Gil-

bert location near Higley and Germann roads is expected to open in November. A third location is in Scottsdale. The state Health Services Department has inspection reports available online for three years for child-care facilities. Records beyond three years are purged, according to a state official. The Val Vista preschool location had seven citations issued since 2018. Six citations were issued Dec. 6, 2018, and one issued last May 16. An investigation of a complaint was done on-site on July 2, 2019, however, there was no evidence to substantiate the allegation, according to state records. The violations, all corrected within days of the citations, included not posting a room capacity inside at any of the indoor play areas, no signed criminal history affidavits in four staffers’ personnel files and four staffers’ files without a record of a tuberculosis test being administered. Records for the Scottsdale location showed 21 citations from 2017-19. In 2017, state inspectors issued seven citations; in 2018, 10 citations and for 2019, four citations. All were corrected. The Scottsdale facility appeared to have been opened since 2012, according to online Yelp reviews. Citations at the Scottsdale site included children lacking written immunization records, diaper cream tubes labeled only with a child’s first name, an electric fan left on a diaper changing sink in the 1-year-olds’ room and a staff person who was left alone with children despite a lack of required education and experience for the job. A 2018 citation also noted a roster in the Scottsdale Pre-K room did not reflect the number of children present in the activity area – there were 23 children in the room and the roster documented 22.

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

Gilbert receives poor rating in ‘green living’ GSN NEWS STAFF

G

ilbert overall is near the bottom of the barrel among the nation’s large cities when it comes to promoting an environmentally friendly lifestyle, according to WalletHub. The personal finance website’s 2019 Greenest Cities in America report last week ranked San Francisco first and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, last among the survey of 100 municipalities for green living. Gilbert ranked 92nd. The website noted, “’Green living’ means a choice to engage in cleaner, more sustainable habits in order to preserve the planet as much as possible.” A Wallet Hub expert said it only makes sense to be green. “The biggest benefits from going green are improvements to health,” said Raphael Calel, a Georgetown University public policy assistant professor and WalletHub expert. “Cleaner air and water result in substantial health gains,” Calel said. “This allows people to be more productive and lowers health care spending. These

benefits often far outweigh the financial costs of these policies.” Six other Arizona cities made the list – Scottsdale, 35; Tucson, 45; Phoenix, 38; Chandler, 80; Glendale, 86 and Mesa, 96. To determine which cities promote a “green” lifestyle, WalletHub compared the 100 largest U.S. cities across 28 key indicators of environmental friendliness and sustainability such as miles of bike lanes, accessibility of jobs near public transit and presence of plastic bag ban. The data set ranged from greenhousegas emissions per capita to green-job opportunities per capita to number of smart-energy policies and initiatives.  The study did not look at the cities’ recycling efforts – considered vital to environmental sustainability – because it lacked comparable metrics that either measured the availability of recycling programs or the amount of waste recycled in each city. Despite its low ranking, Gilbert is by no means a slacker in sustainability the environment.

Most recently in July, the town launched Green Gilbert, an initiative with the business community to promote green living. Local businesses join the program and commit to conservation measures such as pollution prevention, waste reduction and water-use efficiency. According to Calel, top indicators of a green community include air quality, amount of green space, walkability, public transport and amount of waste sent to landfills. His tips for those who want to reduce their environmental footprint include fly less, drive less, set the thermostat a degree or higher than normal in the summer, eat more vegetables and less meat and avoid single-use plastics. According to the report, nearly twothirds of Americans believe stricter environmental regulations are worth the cost and a majority of Americans think the government is currently doing too little to improve water and air quality. Joseph F. C. DiMento, a law professor at the University of California in Irvine, said cities need to do more when it

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

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igley Unified students again outperformed their peers at Gilbert Public School in English and math, according to newly released AzMERIT test scores. Overall, both Gilbert school districts tested better than the state average, which increased slightly from the prior year and was among the high performing East Valley districts. All charter and public school students in grades three through high school take the assessment test, which measures student proficiency in the two subjects against state standards for each grade level. The Arizona Department of Education uses a range of quantitative measures, including the AzMERIT results to set each school’s A-F letter grade annually, giving parents an idea of how well a school is preparing students. Among Higley's 14 campuses, 63 percent of the 8,565 students tested in English Language Arts passed – up from 60 percent last year. For math, 65 percent passed – up from 62 percent in 2018. At the Gilbert Public Schools 40 campuses, 53 percent of its 23,740 students passed English while 52 percent passed math. Overall, 42 percent of students in Arizona passed math and 42 percent passed English, each of the scores increased 1 percentage point from the year prior. In other East Valley school districts, Mesa’s passing rate was 41 percent for English and 43 percent for math; Tempe Union came in at 37 and 35 percent, respectively; and Tempe Elementary registered 38 and 43 percent, respectively. District-wide passing rates for English in the other districts in the region were: Kyrene, 60; Chandler Unified, 59; and Queen Creek Unified, 56. District-wide passing rates in math for those districts were: Queen Creek, 62 percent; Chandler, 58; and Kyrene, 57. Arizona Superintendent of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman, in a news release, announced students improved in 13 of the 22 grade-level and test categories for 2019. Unlike AIMS, which students have to pass in order to graduate high school, AZMerit has no such requirement. As a result, students in high school often do

not take the test seriously. In order to motivate better performance, Gilbert Public Schools this year implemented an incentive program. Students in grades 7-12 who do well on their AZMerit tests can see a bump in their semester grade. Besides helping boost a school’s state letter grade, districts that do well in AZMerit receive bonus money, mostly for teachers. Last year, East Valley school districts received over $8.2 million from the state education department for their performance on AZMerit. Gilbert received $1.02 million and Higley received $760,000. For Higley’s two high schools, Williams Field High saw 52 percent passing English and 45 percent passing math while Higley High had 59 percent for students passing math and 56 percent for English. Higley High had the highest passing percentage among all the high schools in town. Among Gilbert district’s high schools, Gilbert Classical Academy registered an 87 percent passing rate in both English and math. Other GPS high school passing rates were: Campo Verde, 53 percent in English and 50 percent in math; Highland High, 50 percent passing English and 52 percent passing math; Gilbert High 35 percent passing English and 39 percent passing math; and Mesquite had 30 percent passing English and 41 percent passing math. How well students tested also is reported as one of four performance levels: Level 1, minimally proficient; Level 2, partially proficient; Level 3, proficient; and Level 4, highly proficient. For English arts, 28 percent of Gilbert district’s students were minimally proficient, 19 percent partially proficient, 35 percent proficient and 18 percent highly proficient. Proficiency in math for Gilbert Public Schools district-wide was: 26 percent, minimally proficient; 22 percent partially proficient; 32 percent, proficient; and 21 percent, highly proficient. Higley’s English proficiency percentages were: 19 percent minimal, 17 partial, 39 percent proficient and 24 percent highly proficient. Math proficiency in Higley was 16 percent minimal, 19 percent partial, 35 percent proficient and 30 percent highly proficient.


GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

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Hearing slated on human service needs in Gilbert BY CECILIA CHAN GSN Managing Editor

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ree parenting workshops, help with utility bills and rent along with free dental cleanings for children are some of the services housed under one roof to meet the community’s needs. The Heritage Resource Center opened in 2018, birthed out of a community needs assessment, commissioned by Gilbert five years ago is now facing town demands to update its list. “The center has been successful in serving the community, assisting 8,460 Gilbert residents from July 1, 2018-June 30, 2019,” said Melanie Dykstra, town community resources supervisor. The center is a partnership between the town and local nonprofit organizations. Gilbert is asking for the public’s help in updating the needs assessment report. Because five years have passed, the town council wants a reality check to see what new needs popped up since then, said David Braaten, president and CEO of The Williams Institute for Ethics and Management. The institute undertook the first as-

sessment in 2014, and looked at several things, including what human services were available in Gilbert and what gaps or areas of improvement exist in human services. Braaten helped kick off the update at the town’s 10th annual Faith Leaders’ Summit in September. There, representatives from nonprofits and churches participated in a survey led by Braaten. Attendees also included the Council, town officials, Gilbert Public Schools Superintendent Shane McCord and former mayor Cynthia Dunham. Survey questions asked representatives what trends they are seeing in the community that affect the well-being of specific individuals or family groups in Gilbert and asked the faith leaders what the town can do to help them better serve the public. Braaten said their input will be incorporated into the updated report, which would include recommendations. The report is expected to be completed by December. Dykstra said the faith community helps play a vital role in Gilbert. “The faith community can be a great asset to serving the Gilbert community

by engaging in a variety of ways to assist those in need,” she said. “This can be done through volunteerism, financial support and program support to the nonprofits who are directly serving residents. “They can also be a source of information and referral to those requesting assistance.” The 2014 assessment report included 17 recommendations such as bring more jobs and higher wages to Gilbert, partner with local nonprofits to address basic needs and provide health care guidance and accessibility. Of the 17 main recommendations, the town took action on all of them and over 34 areas were considered completed or implemented, according to Dykstra. She could not comment if the updated report would include any new needs in the community. “At this time, I don’t have any predictions,” she said. The affluent community of about 248,000 residents boasts a median income of $95,000, second highest in the state behind Paradise Valley, Town Manager Patrick Banger boasted at the forum.

But the 2014 assessment noted needs in Gilbert such as for food security. It pointed to Matthew‘s Crossing Food Bank in Chandler, which was serving 1,420 Gilbert residents per month. The report also guides the town in allocating its funding. Each year, the town doles out money to nonprofits provide needed services identified in the report. In the fiscal year 2017-18, the town gave out $428,200 to 21 nonprofits with the bulk or $168,000 going to groups that served an identified high priority group, families in crisis.

Gilbert’s population is projected to ultimately reach 281,700 by 2030 and 295,000 by 2050, according to the plan. The plan addresses a number of core elements such as land use, open space, recreation, housing and revitalization. Some of the plan’s goals encourage high-quality housing in suitable areas accommodating a variety of lifestyles, households, ages, market preferences and incomes; ensure the town maintains a land-use framework that supports a highly livable community through the efficient use of land and resources; and support placement of compatible commercial uses and community services - integrating access to daily needs into residential neighborhoods. The plan lists short-term, long-term and continuous-action items to achieve those goals. For instance, to encourage job growth in Gilbert, the action plan included identifying infrastructure investments needed to make sites in underperforming areas more competitive for economic development, working with Ari-

zona State University, the University of Arizona and Park University to provide job training and education for those who need to re-train for new industry jobs. It also suggests identifying ways to attract to Gilbert business incubator, coworking and other similar facilities to foster and increase entrepreneurial activity within the town. The plan also looked at its housing stock and ways to diversify it. In 2017, the town had 87,145 housing units, of which 86.2 percent comprised singlefamily homes and 13.8 percent was multi-family residential. The town’s trending growth and changing demographics lean toward an increase of single-person households and seniors. But the lack of housing choices, lowvacancy rates and a high median home value can impact the overall affordability of Gilbert in the long-term, according to the plan. To help diversify Gilbert’s housing, the action plan’s proposals include encouraging more mixed-income develop-

ments that include modern amenities within defined growth areas to create more economically diverse neighborhoods. It also calls for assisting seniors in stabilizing and upgrading existing housing to facilitate aging in place and developing a community education campaign to address the need to maintain housing affordability as a part of Gilbert’s quality of life.

IF YOU GO:

What: Community forum for input on update to Gilbert Human Services Needs Assessment When: 2-4 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 23 Where: 775 W. Greenfield Road, Gilbert RSVP: gilbert-needs-assessmentcommunity-forum.eventbrite.com For other ways to participate, go to gilbertaz. gov/departments/community-resources

Gilbert opens General Plan to residents’ input GSN NEWS STAFF

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esidents can have a say in how their town develops in the future by giving input on Gilbert’s draft General Plan. Residents have from now until Dec. 6, to provide comments during the 60-day review period. Further refinements may be made after the state-mandated review process, according to officials.  They can also attend an interactive workshop on Oct. 24, to weigh in. A General Plan is a municipality’s blueprint for growth and is mandated by the state to be updated and passed by voters every decade. Once the Town Council adopts the plan, it is scheduled to go before voters in Aug. 2020. Gilbert’s current General Plan was last ratified by voters in May 2011. Gilbert hasn’t reached build-out yet. Nearly 246,000 people currently call the town home – a 118 percent growth rate since 2000 and an 18 percent growth rate since 2010.

WORKSHOP DETAILS

What: Interactive workshop on Gilbert’s draft General Plan When: 5:50-7:30 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 24 Where:  Town of Gilbert, South Area Service Center,  4760 S. Greenfield Road  To view a copy of the draft General Plan, go togilbertaz.gov/departments/developmentservices/2020-gilbert-general-plan For questions: 480-503-6743 or email GeneralPlan@gilbertaz.gov.  To provide comments: gilbertaz.gov/


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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

Judge asked to put state in charge for inmate health BY HOWARD FISCHER Capitol Media Services

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special expert is recommending to a federal judge that she override a state law requires the Department of Corrections to farm out health care for inmates to private companies. And former Chandler state legislator Bob Robson, who now lives in Ahwatukee, agrees. In a 138-page report submitted last week, Dr. Marc Stern detailed what he said are systemic problems in the state meeting its legal obligation to provide health services to inmates. He told U.S. District Court Judge Roslyn Silver, the results are directly from “severe underfunding’’ of health care, with a lack of proper staffing. His report put current agency spending at about $195 million. Stern figures it would take an additional $73 million to bring spending up to what the state pays for similar services through its Medicaid program. Those dollars, he said, should be used for the current private provider, Centurion, to increase staff and salaries.

Stern said there’s a more important structural change that needs to be made: It should be state employees responsible for and providing the care, not some outside contractor. Stern’s report is the latest in a multi-year lawsuit against the state by the American Civil Liberties Union. There was a settlement in 2014 with the state agreeing to meet certain standards for health care for inmates at prisons statewide. Since then, however, there have been charges that the agency has failed to comply. Officials at the Department of Corrections did not take a position, noting the issues raised go to decisions made not by the agency but by the governor and lawmakers. Robson suggested that the findings and the recommendation to scrap the private contract should come as no surprise. “I wasn’t a fan of it,’’ said Robson who was in the Legislature in 2011 when his colleagues and then-Gov. Jan Brewer approved the mandate to contract out health services. And Robson said the ramifications of that decision go beyond the level of care being provided.

“The whole thing is they put it all on the director,’’ he said, referring to Charles Ryan who just retired, saying that Ryan was stuck implementing the decisions made by lawmakers. “It lies square in the Legislature’s ballpark,’’ Robson said, “and it lies in the Legislature’s ballpark to fix it.’’ Stern said Arizona could save money by assuming health care of inmates. “Switching back from privatization to self-operation would, in effect, immediately reduce that spending gap by shifting funds ADC is currently spending on the non-value-added parts of contract expenses,’’ Stern wrote. That includes things like duplication of

PRESCHOOL from page 5

The day the Gilbert incident became public, more than 200 people posted comments on a social media site, many slamming the preschool, calling for it to be shut down and the teachers fired. “I was a toddler teacher and you are constantly counting kids throughout the day,” Michelle Martin wrote. “Safety is

key. That’s unacceptable, dangerous and I’d be so upset, too.” Lynn Marble, who taught in a preschool program for Gilbert Public Schools for 12 years, questioned why it took adults so long to notice that it allowed for seven children to get out and go as far as the street. “This is so frightening,” Annie McCarville Crawford wrote. “They should be fined or closed due to this.”

© Kenneth Donn Photography 2019

October Nature Sale!

services and the profit margin for the vendor, a figure he estimated at $10 million a year. Robson said one way for the state to save money would be greater use of telemedicine – a system where prison staff and lower-level medical workers can be available on-site for routine matters while essentially having doctors and specialists on call. Stern said the current system of contracting out has made that impossible. He said that Corizon, which had the inmate care contract before Centurion, tried to form relationships with individuals and organizations to provide more telemedicine services.

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

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Gilbert woman wins in special ‘Let’s Make a Deal’ show BY MIKENNA YARMUS-GANNON GSN Staff Writer

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fter being diagnosed with two types of cancer, Rachel Welin decided to start living her life to the fullest. For the Gilbert woman, this meant booking a last-minute trip to California with a few of her closest friends and crossing one item off of her bucket list – attending the popular game show “Let’s Make a Deal.” Welin had always dreamed of being on the “Deal” and was a fan of the original show growing up. After a spur-of-the-moment decision, she decided to make her dream a reality. Welin had no intention of being on the stage but had every intention of having a good time and making the most of their once-in-a-lifetime experience. Welin not only ended up on stage but walked away with a new car as well. Seven years ago, Welin’s mother was diagnosed with cancer and passed away within four months. Shortly after, Welin decided to get checked at age 46, and

Rachel Welin of Gilbert, far right, dressed the same way she did when she was on "Let's Make a Deal" during a viewing party of the show's segment. With her were, from left, Jennifer Pearson, Leigh Cummings and Charity Brown. (Pablo Robles/GSN Staff Photographer)

doctors found both breast and ovarian cancer. Welin said that if her mother hadn’t died from cancer, she wouldn’t have caught her own in time. The experience transformed her. “I would never have followed my dreams if it wasn’t for the fact of having cancer,” she said. Welin, 49, also became determined to give back to the community each year. She and her friends decided that they

would each come up with a statement for the year and Welin’s was: “Just when the caterpillar thought her life was over, she became a butterfly.” She appeared on the Let’s Make a Deal episode dedicated to breast cancer victims and in the spirit of her statement, she attended dressed as a butterfly. Aftershow host Wayne Brady made eye contact with her, her heart stopped. “I wasn’t even breathing, I was so ex-

cited,” Welin said. Welin was chosen to play a game called “?” where each card had a different number behind it, and she had to come up with $1,500. She was successful in playing the game and won a 2019 Nissan Versa Note SV. She originally planned on giving the car to a friend, who since then acquired her own. Now, Welin plans to sell the car to buy her dream car—a Mustang convertible. In honor of her time on the show, Welin held a viewing party Oct. 7 with friends and family where she held “Let’s Make a Deal” themed games and prizes. At the party, Welin split the cash prize with the friends who attended the show with her, giving them each $500. “Sometimes God makes you go through some hard times so you can share your story with somebody else—so they don’t have to struggle so hard or so they’re not alone during their struggle,” Welin said. Welin, now cancer-free, decided that one game show wasn’t enough and plans on attending the show “The Price is Right” with her friends.

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

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ithin Arizona alone, there are roughly 14,000 children within the foster care system but only about 8,700 foster beds at any given time. Voices for CASA Children, a foster child advocacy group, is looking for people to help play a special role in advocating on behalf of abused and neglected children within the foster care system. Court Appointed Special Advocate volunteers are assigned by a court to advocate for a child’s best interests with the goal of finding those children a forever home. Voices for CASA Children is hosting an informational session 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, at McQueen Park Activity Center, 510 N. Horne St., to help people

learn how to become a CASA volunteer. Caseworkers, teachers and foster homes come and go, but CASAs stay with those children throughout all the changing school placements, court hearings, etc. to create a sense of normalcy. Children with a CASA volunteer by their side are more likely to receive services they need, spend less time in the child welfare system and are less likely to return to foster care. However, only every one in nine children in foster care is assigned a CASA volunteer, which leads to a drastic number of children being left to navigate the system without anyone to advocate on their behalf. CASA volunteers often put 15 to 20 hours every month into their role, but there are always other ways to help foster kids for people who don’t have the time. Information: voicesforcasachildren.org.

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

BY JIM WALSH GSN Staff Writer

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he former manager of a Gilbert homeowners association is charged in a complaint with using a credit card to steal more than $2,100, spending it to pay a hotel and her telephone bills. But a company executive told Gilbert police that Aimee Risher Lentz, 46, admitted to him during a meeting in his Scottsdale office that she stole nearly

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Community

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COMMUNITY

GilbertSunNews.com |

@GilbertSunNews

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

For more community news visit gilbertsunnews.com

/GilbertSunNews

Gilbert couple fighting cystic fibrosis with fun event BY HAYLEY LORENZEN GSN Staff Writer

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hen he was just a week old, Knox Bowyer of Gilbert was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis; three days later, he began treatment at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Now almost 3 years old, Knox is continuing to fight cystic fibrosis, while his mom is fighting for more awareness of the disease. Last year, Kylie Bowyer, Knox’s mom and a longtime Gilbert resident, founded The Bowyer Battle and now the nonprofit organized a Party for the Cause to spread awareness and raise money for – cystic fibrosis research. The Party for the Cause will be 2-6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, in the Big Surf parking lot 1500 N. McClintock Drive, Tempe. Admission is free and there plenty of fun for young and old alike. But the cause is a serious one. Bowyer was born and raised in Gilbert and attended Highland High School,

Kylie and Jake Bowyer have two children, Remington, 5, and Knox, 3. Knox is struggling to live with cystic fibrosis and Kylie has founded a support foundation, The Bowyer Battle. Information: thebowyerbattle.org. (Kimberly Carrillo/GSN Staff Photographer)

where she met her high school sweetheart, now husband Jake. The couple also has a 5-year-old daughter.

“As a parent, you dream of this life you want to have with your family and all the things you want your child to be able to

accomplish,” Bowyer said. “I don’t think you expect for that to be shattered at such a quick rate,” she explained. “But for us, with Knox only being 7 days old, it felt as though all of those dreams just came tumbling down. And we didn’t really know what the next day, or the day after that, was going to look like.” The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation defines the disease as, “a progressive, genetic disease that causes persistent lung infections and limits the ability to breathe over time.” It also affects the pancreas through a “buildup of mucus that prevents the release of digestive enzymes to help the body absorb food and key nutrients. As a result, malnutrition and poor growth” can develop. Knox has to take almost 40 pills just to be able to eat and has at least two hours of treatments every day. Yet, his mother said, “You’d never know

see CYSTIC page 16

Val Vista Lakes man prepares to scare Gilbert BY CECILIA CHAN GSN Managing Editor

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oo! Jay Ortiz can’t wait to give people a good fright this Halloween in Gilbert. Ortiz, this year, took over the mantle of the original purveyor of the must-see “Halloween House of Gilbert.” Robert Cox had been scaring the pants off people for five years before he moved out of state. Starting Friday and running nightly from 6-9 p.m., through Halloween, the outside of the Ortiz home will provide more than a few scares. “I’ve been doing my own home haunt for years but not to the scale of Halloween House was,” Ortiz said. “Robert was moving last year so we came in and bought his entire set-up. We bought a lot of stuff.” The “stuff” includes custom-built pillars, faux-iron fencing, animatronics monsters and ghosts, ground lights and foggers for about $2,000, but retails for five times that amount if bought new, according to Ortiz.

Above, Tanya and Jay Ortiz are looking forward to scaring folks this month in Val Vista Lakes with their elaborate haunted house, which young William and Maggie Brimie, right, volunteered to help put together. (Pablo Robles/GSN Staff Photographer)

Ortiz is adding a few new touches to Cox’s display of a traditional spooky graveyard scene. Joining Haunted Cemetery will be a 20foot walkthrough Zombie Zone and an Egyptian Hall of Horrors corridor, said Ortiz, who with a team of volunteers set up the exhibits over three days. Because the zombie display is a bit scarier, it’s totally enclosed to keep with the kid-

see HOUSE page 17


GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

CYSTIC

Williams Field High School students last year raised 12,000 pounds of food and over $4,000 in cash for United Food Bank during their Stuff the Bus drive, which begins later this month. (Higley Unified)

Williams Field students ready to ‘Stuff the Bus’ GSN NEWS STAFF

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or Williams Field High School students, the time to “Stuff the Bus” is drawing near. Students will kick off their ninth annual food drive campaign Oct. 21. They’ve already scheduled several special collection days to gather canned and other nonperishable food items over the course of a month for United Food Bank in Mesa. The first event will be a “Trunk or Treat” on Oct. 30. Followed by a public collection 6 a.m.-6 p.m. Nov. 2, at Bashas’ on Higley and Elliot roads. Last year, the Black Hawks collected about 12,000 pounds of food and $4,000 in cash for fresh produce and meat products. Williams Field Spanish teacher Alison Wood runs the Stuff the Bus program and said students are hoping to exceed their

2018 collection by at least 500 pounds. They also hope to raise more cash than they did last year. Collections will end around Nov. 20. Students will help deliver the food to United Food Bank on Nov. 26, right before Thanksgiving. “We do it during this time of year because of the holidays,” Wood said. “They kind of run low at the food bank, so we try to supply them for the holiday season.” “The students really get a kick out of being able to help feed people and see just how much food they can gather,” she added, noting: “When the teachers really get into it and are encouraging the students, they like to bring in whatever amounts they can. My favorite thing is to just see how stuffed it really is because it looks so big and empty at the beginning. It’s amazing to see what can be done and what we can collect in four weeks.”

from page 14

he was sick. He’s like the happiest, most active child.” The family spends an average of $1,000 every month on Knox’s medical care, which Bowyer said will continue to rise as he requires more medications and changes to his daily routine. “Cystic fibrosis is known to be one of the most expensive diseases to care for because there’s never a reprieve, there’s never a cure,” she said. After her son’s diagnosis, Bowyer and her family got involved with the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and helped raise money to support research. Eventually, Bowyer explained, as they began to meet and connect with more families in the cystic fibrosis community in Arizona, they realized there is a gap in much needed resources. “We just felt like as a family the best way to fight this disease and stay positive was to found The Bowyer Battle foundation. Our main mission is to offer education scholarships to children living with CF to go to college,” she said. The Bowyer Battle was officially founded in 2018. Since its founding, Bowyer has organized several events to raise money and awareness for the disease. Another goal of The Bowyer Battle is to “adopt” a family in the Arizona cystic fibrosis community who is in need during the holiday season Last year, Bowyer said they were able

to take care of around $6,000 worth of medical expenses for a family and helped them celebrate the holidays. “We took Santa to see their daughter, it was amazing,” Bowyer said. “So that is something that we plan to be a part of in the community, is every Christmas adopt a family that is in need due to medical hardship; whether that be children being admitted into the hospital, parents being out of work because their taking care of their children, whatever that may be,” she added. Last year’s big fundraising event was a little bit smaller than this year’s event, described as “just a cornhole tournament.” That cornhole tournament ended up raising $17,000 for cystic fibrosis research in just one day. This year’s Party for the Cause will again have a cornhole tournament, but Bowyer said there will be lots of other kinds of fun for the family. Admission is free, as well as several of the children’s activities. Most of the funds raised come from the silent auction. The cornhole tournament costs $85 a person and the top three teams will win cash. Guests can also enjoy two food trucks, a soda truck and a tap beer truck. “As of right now, with us being so new, that’s really the only way for us to get our name out, and try and get people to know who we are, and come out and support us, and fall in love with our cause,” Bowyer said.

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Gilbert native and Mesquite High graduate Sherrill R. Draheim has been promoted promoted to the rank of Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class. Draheim is an electrician’s mate assigned to Mid-Atlantic Regional Maintenance Center (MARMC) in Norfolk, Virginia, and advanced through the Navy’s Meritorious Advancement Program. MAP is one of Navy’s continuing efforts to foster more merit-driven career outcomes and recognize the best sailors by advancing them when they are ready for the next level of responsibility. (U.S. Navy)


COMMUNITY

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

Catherine Brimie also showed up last weekend to help the Ortizes set up their haunted huouse. (Pablo Robles/GSN Staff Photographer)

The haunted house features a broad array of scary props that have been bought or scavanged over years.

HOUSE

from page 14

friendly entertainment, Ortiz said. “We’ve always been Halloween fanatics so we’ve always decorated,” said Ortiz, whose wife, Tanya, joins in the ghoulish fun. “It’s just one of our favorite holidays. We like spooky, dark macabre stuff.” Ortiz, who works in the microchip technology industry, said he once contemplated a livelihood of scaring people. Ortiz and his wife moved more than a decade ago from the Midwest. “While living there we talked about opening a haunted house attraction there but we got pretty good careers going to throw it away for a haunted house but we still enjoy it for the community,” he said. Decorating comes early at the Ortiz home, except for the front of house, which under HOA rules couldn’t commence until the first weekend in October. “Ten years ago, we stepped it up,” Ortiz said. “The past five years we started going all out.” The couple hosts a Halloween party for friends and family, complete with spooky decorations on the inside and backside -

but the theme changes every year. “Last year it was ‘Gods and Goddesses’ and the year before, ‘Insane Asylum,’” Ortiz said. “This year’s theme is ‘Game of Thrones’ with White Walkers and dragons.” Ortiz estimated his own collection before he purchased Cox’s used props cost him about $5,000. His collection is composed of mostly second-hand or clearance items scooped up the day after Halloween. “The Spirit (Halloween) stores got elaborate displays and huge walkthroughs and they change every year,” he said. “At the end of the year they sell those displays and we come in and buy it like the turnkey zombie display.” Today, a 10-foot by 20-foot storage unit and one of three garages at Ortiz home are crammed with all things Halloween. Although this is his first year hosting Halloween House, Ortiz expects a big turnout based on the event’s Facebook page, also handed off to him by his predecessor, Cox. “We now have a webpage with 4,000 followers so we’ll get a lot of foot traffic,” he said. Also, the Spinnaker Bay neighborhood in

ANSWERS TO PUZZLES AND SUDOKU (Puzzles on Page 31)

(Pablo Robles/GSN Staff Photographer)

Val Vista Lakes goes all out for Halloween, it’s a huge attraction, so he expects cross traffic. Ortiz said knowing that Cox gave out over 1,500 pieces of candy to trick-ortreaters, he went to Dulceria La Bonita Wholesale in Mesa, the “Costco of candy stores” and bought 2,500 pieces of candy. “I plan to hand out a lot of candy,” he said.

IF YOU GO

What: Jay and Tanya Ortiz hosts The Halloween House of Gilbert. Cost: Free When: 6-9 p.m., daily starting Oct. 18, through Halloween. Where: Val Vista Lakes community, 2265 E. Mallard Court, Gilbert

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

Centennial parents, students work on STEM BY MICHELLE REESE GSN Guest Writer

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parked by an idea to provide students with a new way to process problems, Centennial Elementary School launched a campus-wide literature-based STEM program using parent volunteers, simple materials and a lot of creativity. The Future Engineer idea was developed in a partnership between the Centennial PTO and fourth-grade teacher Jennifer Ignacio. Ignacio created five unique engineering challenges based on stories for each grade level to conduct throughout the year. Supplies and directions for each challenge are stored in kits and rotated between classrooms. A parent volunteer replenishes the supplies in the kits after each use and then redistributes kits to classroom teachers. The Future Engineer program impressed Higley administration so much, it won Centennial the district’s first Innovation Challenge. There are between 30-35 parent volunteers in the program and most classrooms at Centennial have at least one volunteer. Shortly after school began, Ignacio held a parent training, guiding volunteers

The catch? They are limited to using just five items in 20 minutes to complete the challenge - and they must agree as a team how it will come together. Collaborating as a team allows student groups to consider each other’s design ideas and agree on how they will complete the challenge, Ignacio said. “It’s neat to have a program that imCentennial Elementary students work with parents and teachers on science, technology, engineering and math projects. (Higley Unified) pacts all students across every grade level. I love that all through the engineering design process This serves to make students better criti- of the teachers, and so many parents, and letting them try the challenges. cal thinkers and teaches them how to be are also enjoying the challenges,” Ignacio said. “I’m excited to see what design Parents were given strategies on how to problem solvers. facilitate each STEM challenge, as well as One project students are working on principles they start to apply from year how to encourage children, while at the this year involves designing a gondola to year and how the students’ critical same time teaching kids to embrace fail- car to deliver a ping pong ball down a zip thinking skills develop from challenge ure and perseverance. line made from rope. Each student team to challenge.” A short video about the program can Ignacio said students learn to identify receives straws, paper cups, foil, metal with the engineering design process and washers, tape, rubber bands and fishing be found online: youtube.com/watch?v =APNxFtyZw9g&feature=youtu.be later apply it to their own life challenges. line.

Town fire engineer honored for accomplishments

GSN NEWS STAFF

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ilbert Fire Engineer Carl Grant recently received a Fire Safety Commendation Award from the Palo Verde Chapter, Arizona Society, Sons of the American Revolution. Palo Verde Chapter President Bob Hodsden and Assistant Chief Bob Badgett presented the award. Badgett had recommended Grant for the honor, stating he “has always performed his public safety functions at the highest level and is respected by all who work with him.” “Carl has played a direct role in helping make Gilbert a community of excellence,” Badgett added. Grant helped get construction of Fire Station 9 accomplished on time and also is an accreditation manager. “Through his efforts, Gilbert Fire and Rescue became accredited and several of his ideas have been recommended for inclusion in the national model,” Badgett said.

The Sons of the American Revolution was founded in 1889, on the 100th anniversary of George Washington taking the oath to become the nation’s first president. The charter was established by an act of Congress and signed on June 9, 1906, by former President Theodore Roosevelt. It is the largest male lineage society in the U.S. and consists of 50 societies with more than 500 local chapters, several international societies with over 33,000 members. Prominent members have included 16 former U.S Presidents, Winston Churchill and King Juan Carlos I of Spain. All members have proven descent from either someone who provided military service during the Cause for Independence or provided material or financial support to the cause. Patriot ancestors are both male and female. The society’s mission is patriotic, historical and educational. Information: azssar.org.

Gilbert Fire Engineer Carl Grant, center, is congratulated by Bob Hodsden, left, and Assistant Chief Bob Badgett on winning a commendation from the Palo Verde Chapter f the Arizona Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. Hodsden is president of the chapter. (Special to GSN)


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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

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Agriptopia retail-apartment complex ramping up GSN NEWS STAFF

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picenter, the high-end retail-residential building planned for Agritopia in Gilbert, is already signing up new tenants. Last week, Developer Johnston & Co. announced the four-story complex will host Matt’s Big Breakfast, Gadzooks, Bunky Boutique and Hooligans Barbershop. The company said it’s looking for “best-in-class” businesses that are experts in their craft” as it plans a complex “that will be focused on healthy living and treasured finds for all generations to live, gather and thrive.” It will be the commercial hub for the 166-acre master-planned Agritopia community near Higley and Ray roads with 49,038 square feet of ground-floor retail with 320 luxury loft-style residential on top three floors. Located on 21.8 acres, Epicenter is the first of its kind, said company CEO William Johnston. “Epicenter will be the town center

As it signs up tenants and prepares for a groundbreaking in a few weeks, Johnston & Co. is moving full speed ahead with Epicenter, a retail-residential focal point for the sprawling Agriptopia planned community in Gilbert. (Johnston & Co.)

within Agritopia, creating a gathering space for the community to come and enjoy luxury living and renown local restaurants, shops and entertainment for decades to come,” he said, promising the complex “will become one of the top shopping destinations in Gilbert.” Johnston said the project will complete

Agritopia, calling it a “vertical village” Epicenter will also offer one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments along with a host of amenities. Those features will include a maker’s space for woodworking and crafting with tools available to residents and a demonstration kitchen for residents.

None of the buildings in the complex will have repeat patterns. A groundbreaking date has yet to be determined. The founder of Johnston & Co. is wellknown Valley entrepreneur Joe Johnston, owner of Joe’s Barbecue and Liberty Market and the father of Agriptopia. William Johnston is his son. The project drew raves from the Gilbert Planning Commission when it was approved earlier this year. “I like the project,” said Commissioner David Cavenee. “It’s a nice addition to the corner. I’m excited to see it come about.” Cavenee said Gilbert doesn’t get a lot of mixed-use development and now has the opportunity for one. The Epicenter’s design review was first approved by the town in 2014 and the main changes of what was approved this year involved architectural design. The modifications included additional ground-level pedestrian space and

see

EPICENTER page 23

Gilbert car dealer gets big Ford honor

GSN NEWS STAFF

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n Gilbert car dealer has been elected vice-chairman of the Ford Dealer Council. Tim Hovik, owner-operator of San Tan Ford in Gilbert who has been involved in community activities throughout Ahwatukee and the East Valley, also will be chairman of the Desert Ford Dealers Association for Arizona and Southern Nevada. The Ford Dealer Council is an elected group of 27 dealers who represent all Ford dealers throughout the country. The council’s primary goal is to work with Ford Motor Company and Ford Motor Credit “to set company policy to better serve our customers, both in sales and service,” a spokeswoman said. Hovik will eventually chair the group

Gilbert dealership owner Tim Hovik picked up a new honor from the Ford Motor Co. with his election to a national coucil of dealers. He owns San Tan Ford. (GSN file photo)

and the spokeswoman called his new vice-chair position as “the second-highest individual honor and recognition that a Ford Dealer can receive.” Ford noted that San Tan Ford “has an impressive record since its inception in 2009” and in the top 40 of all Ford dealerships in the nation. “We hope to achieve even greater things by bridging gaps between Detroit and the West Coast dealers,” Hovik said. “Basically, my goal is to put the brand people into the shoes of our customers and dealers.” Hovik has been a strong supporter of philanthropic and community activities for years. He has been a strong supporter as well of Arizona State University and his support of Sun Devil Athletics has been

see

HOVIC page 23


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BUSINESS

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

Entrepreneurs have services, will travel

Chandler couple brings Chandler business brings field trips to local schools eyecare to workplace GSN STAFF

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time to fit Arizona history into elementary curriculum, so their bus can fill an important gap. The students get to touch cotton seeds, squish copper pennies, learn about solar panels, and even pet a bearded dragon. “Which has nothing to do with Arizona, but he’s super cool and the kids love him,” Cohen added about the reptile. The bus offers about two hours of programming for elementary students and can visit any school in Maricopa County.

ield trips typically involve students getting out of school and going to a museum, planetarium, or historical site. But Christine Cohen of Chandler has found a way to reverse this concept by bringing the field trip to schools. She and her husband, Steve, bought a school bus a couple years ago and revamped it to serve as a mobile learning center. Inside their bus are several work stations that provide hands-on activities related to Arizona history. There’s a station involving lemons to represent the state’s citrus industry. Another one has cow figurines to symbolize Arizona’s abundance of cattle ranchers. In the early years of This bus is loaded with exhibits that give kids a hands-on field trip experistatehood, Arizona’s ence without having to be piled into a bus of their own and driven to a economy was domi- museum or other place of interest. (Special to GSN) nated by cotton, copper, The field trips start at $9 per student cattle, citrus, and the climate – otherwise and the Cohens are trying to obtain corknown as the five C’s. Cohen said she wanted to find a way to porate sponsorships for schools unable bring an activity to students that not only to afford the cost. Teachers get to customize their field taught them a civics lesson but would entrip by picking from a selection of learngage them through games and objects. ing modules that emphasize one particu“I just felt like the elementary school lar subject of Arizona history. students needed more hands-on learnThe most popular module teaches stuing,” Cohen said, “because it was just becoming impossible for teachers to coordi- dents about Arizona’s state flag, Cohen nate and provide these types of hands-on said, because they get to create their own flag out of pre-cut materials and take it learning activities.” Cohen worked as a substitute teacher home. Cohen continues to tweak curricuin Valley schools and noticed some struglum and hopes the business can expand gled to provide field trips for students. The cost to transport students to a lo- enough to be able to serve schools outcation can be thousands of dollars, she side the Valley. “You never know where an idea’s gonna said, which can be a major hindrance for strike you,” Cohen said, “and so I’m consome school districts. The Cohens launched Arizona Mobile stantly on the lookout and thinking about Education last year and have already vis- how I can change or add activities into ited more than a dozen schools across the the program.” East Valley. Information: arizonamobileeducation. Cohen said some schools don’t have com.

GSN STAFF

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mainly Monday-Friday, he expects Sight on Site will also be rolling over to community events eventually. “The employer has to allow us to come visit, but we recommend employees that would like us to visit let their HR know or contact us and we can reach out to their employer,” he said. A comprehensive Eye Exam is $69 and contact lens evaluations are an additional $59. In addition to more than 350 frame styles to choose from, Sight on Site also is the only optical business in the state of-

un intended, but Michael Garcia knows a business need when he sees one. The Chandler optician has launched a business that helps busy people get glasses without going out of their way or interrupting their busy schedule at work. He brings everything to them – including the optometrists, the equipment and a vast array of frames. A licensed optician since 2001, Garcia teamed up with optometrists Dr. Kerri Luce and Dr. John Riley and optician Joy Perluisi to form Sight on Site Mobile Eye Care. Garcia said he has been an optician for too long to ignore the need for mobility. “I have realized the convenience Mobile Eye Care offers is much Chandler optician Michael Garcia has van to help him provide eye examinaneeded because people tions and new glasses and contact lenses. (Pablo Robles/Staff Photographer) delay getting eye exams. Even when they know they need to get an fering 3DNA Eyewear, which allows cusupdated prescription, they put it off un- tomers to design your own style. While the business accepts some intil it is too late and they either can’t see anymore or they broke their only pair of surance, Garcia said he encourages businesses to work out special group rates glasses,” he explained. While the business has been in its for- with him. Garcia said the biggest challenge he has mative stages for two years, it was only faced with his new business is people to in the last month that the partners began try it. “Employees love this benefit, but making appointments to bring their serbeing such a new concept, the employees vice to businesses. do not know they love it until they experiDepending on the size of the business and their own availability, he and his staff ence it for the first time,” he said. He estimates that an average visit to a can typically set up appointments in less bricks-and-mortar optician takes about than six weeks. “We can see up to 20 people in a day four hours, including the time to get there and need to see at least 12 in one day in and back. “When we are on-site, the employee order to visit a business,” Garcia said. gets their eye care done in 25 percent of “We do serve small businesses and let them know that if they cannot get 12 peo- the time. Imagine if we saw 40 employple to sign up, they can also invite friends, ees: that’s 120 saved hours right there family and neighboring businesses. An- alone,” he said, adding: “Once a business understands what we other option is having an office buildare doing, they are excited to have us.” ing host us to serve all businesses in the Information: 480-331-6360, info@sosbuilding.” eyecare.com or soseyecare.com While they make their appointments


OPINION

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

Opinion GilbertSunNews.com

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For more opinions visit gilbertsunnews.com /Gilber tSunNews

Votes for schools are votes for our future BY ERIN ECCLESTON AND MIKE HUTCHINSON GSN Guest Writers

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f you earned a master’s degree and had decades of experience in your chosen field, what would you expect to earn? Certainly, you’d expect more than the $50,000 salary of the teacher we spoke with recently. It should come as no surprise to learn that educators in our state are woefully underpaid, earning about $45,000 per year, which is far below the national median. But teachers aren’t all that is lacking in our school systems. That’s why five school districts in our community have bonds or overrides on the ballot this fall. Chandler, Gilbert, Higley, Mesa and Queen Creek Unified are all depending on the outcome of November’s vote. There are great things happening in our schools already. The East Valley Institute of Technology is using hands-on learning to prepare students for in-demand careers. A partnership between the Gilbert Chamber of Commerce and local manufacturers

EPICENTER

from page 20

walkways, allowing for retail arcades and sidewalk dining. Joe Johnston is partnering with Streetlights Residential of Phoenix on the project. Founded in 2011, Streetlights has completed or is working on 13,000 mul-

HOVIC

from page 20

“worth north of seven figures” in dollars. Devil Athletics that, according to ASU, were “worth north of seven figures” in dollars. In acknowledgment of his support, Hovik was presented with the Alumni Appreciation Award at ASU’s 2017 Homecoming. As an upperclassman at ASU, Hovik had planned to take a gap year while earning money as a car salesman working with Tex Earnhardt.

Mike Hutchinson

Erin Eccleston

is giving area students an inside look at career possibilities in the industry. Specialty early learning programs are helping young students in Higley build a strong pathway from preschool to high school. Unfortunately, many of these programs will not continue or expand to reach more youth without the dollars that come from bonds and overrides. For instance, Higley Unified has slated override funds to maintain small class

sizes and continue offering art programs, along with continuing competitive teacher and staff pay, among other things. Because its override was originally approved in 2015, a yes vote will mean a continuation of the override and no new taxes for homeowners and businesses. In Chandler Unified, proposed bond dollars would help offset $127 million in lost state funding. If passed, the bond

would fund the building of two new schools, as well as security improvements at existing locations and other classroom and technology improvements. The Gilbert Public Schools override will be used in part to improve social and emotional student support, in addition to attracting and retaining highquality educators. A yes vote is a vote for our community. After all, it’s to everyone’s benefit to establish a strong educational continuum. Intel, Boeing and other firms will need a stream of qualified employees. If we want to continue attracting goodpaying jobs, we will need the people to staff them. Voters today were students once upon a time and the voters of the past funded our education. Now it’s our turn to ensure funding for the youth in our community.

Mike Hutchinson is executive vice president of the PHX East Valley Partnership and co-chair of Yes for Mesa Schools. Erin Eccleston is vice president of community engagement with Expect More Arizona, a nonprofit, nonpartisan education advocacy organization. Information: ExpectMoreArizona.org/vote.

BUSINESS

tifamily units across five states. “This capstone project will allow people to have a bit more urban vibe,” Johnston said of the four-building complex. Retail and residential parking will be separated with retail parking along Higley and Ray roads frontages and at the northwest corner of the site.

He stayed with Earnhardt for 13 years, rising to general manager. In 2007, he was offered a partnership at a Las Vegas Ford franchise. “I’d kept my home in Ahwatukee, and San Tan Ford had just opened, and after a couple months, they asked me to come over and I finally agreed.” In the ensuing years, Hovik and the firm’s parent company, The Richardson Group, continue to grow. The parent firm owns five Ford franchises in California, New Mexico and Texas. His San Tan Ford store at 1429 E. Mo-

Residential parking will be to the northwest of the buildings, according to a town staff report. Land-use attorney Adam Baugh, who represents the developers, noted the project has been in the works for a decade or more. “Personally, I’m excited about it,” Plan-

torplex Loop in Gilbert has grown from 70 employees eight years ago when he arrived, to more than 230. Sales at San Tan Ford have skyrocketed from approximately $49 million in 2009 to more than $200 million. Ford posted nearly $160 billion in revenue last year and recently came out in support of curbing CO2 emissions “consistent with the Paris Accord.” He is on the boards of both the Ahwatukee Foothills and Gilbert chambers of commerce. A resident of Ahwatukee for more than

ning Commission Vice Chairman Carl Bloomfield said. “It fits in well with Agritopia. All in all, I’m pleased with it.” Agritopia, built in the 2000s includes 452 homes, a functional farm, a community garden, a Christian school and onsite restaurants such as Joe’s Farm Grill.

20 years, Hovik has also chaired the Arizona Ford Dealers Association has been a member of the Ford National Dealer Council for several years. “I think by nature, I’m pretty competitive and competitive with myself,” he told AFN in an earlier interview. “You strive to succeed, but you always want to balance that drive. At San Tan, we take care of each other. If there’s a Little League game an employee’s kid is playing in, we try and arrange schedules so they can go. We want to be supportive, and help the next generation.”


Sports & Recreation

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SPORTS

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

GilbertSunNews.com @GilbertSunNews /GilbertSunNews

McClelland brothers taking 1A by storm BY ZACH ALVIRA GSN Sports Editor

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atthew and Noah McClelland have the type of relationship one would expect from brothers separated by just two years in age. They often tease one another and argue but are also protective of each other. Most of that carries over to the football field, where the two play for Arete Prep in Gilbert. But there’s also a certain level of chemistry they share when playing, one that has led to both breaking numerous school records and Matthew being one of the nation’s top passers. “All summer long he was in the weight room training with a trainer,” Arete Prep coach Cord Smith said. “He’s stronger, taller and faster but more than that, he basically went from middle school football to varsity football last year. So now he has a lot more experience.” Matthew, a sophomore quarterback for the Chargers, took the 1A by storm last season as a freshman. He passed for 2,559 yards and 31 touchdowns, only throwing nine interceptions. Noah, a senior, was one of Matthew’s top targets last season, as he caught 32 passes for 562 yards and seven touchdowns. That has carried over in bunches this year, as he has already eclipsed the 1,000-yard mark with 15 touchdowns. The senior has had a few dropped passes this year, but he insists none of them is his fault. In fact, according to Noah, all the blame goes on Matthew. Another aspect of their brotherly love. “If I miss a pass it’s his fault,” Noah said. “I know that it’s really my fault, but it’s fun to blame him.” Smith describes Noah as a silent leader, who lets his play on the field do

to spread out the opposing defense to give room for Matthew to operate both in and out of the pocket. “Last year I knew he was a passer,” Smith said. “But the first couple of games Matthew started scrambling and running. He surprised all of us. Now we want him to get out of bounds and not cut back into traffic because Arete Prep football coach Cord Smith has confidence in his he’s our quarterback and we team’s ability to grow into a 1A power. (Zach Alvira/GSN Staff) don’t want him to get hurt. “But that’s the thing this year, if he best teams the 1A Conference doesn’t see it, run.” has to offer. Smith has seen his Smith expects Matthew’s production team grow each week, especially to continue to increase as the season Matthew. Arete Prep senior wide receiver Noah McClelland (left) and As a freshman, Matthew was goes along. sophomore quarterback Matthew McClelland (right) have taken The Chargers are currently the ninththe 1A by storm this season, as the two have connected for well the typical pocket-passer. He over 1,000 yards passing and 15 touchdowns. rarely relied on his legs to make ranked team in the 1A Conference. 12 (Photo courtesy Cord Smith) plays and would often throw the teams make the postseason. Last year, Arete won its first playoff ball away if he felt pressure. This the talking for him. He believes Noah’s season, however, Matthew has used his game in school history, a feat that Smith reception against Mogollon in the sea- speed to break free in the open field, said the young school had been buildson-opener reflects that. adding another element to Arete’s ing toward. They aspire to be like those Noah was quiet during pregame, let- already high-powered offense. they compete within the East Region of ting other seniors on the team do most “I think I’m more confident now that the 1A, which features teams that have of the talking before Arete took on I’ve grown a little,” Matthew said. “I’ve either won several state titles or have Mogollon, who is one of the top teams been able to use my speed and my pass- made deep playoff runs in recent years. in 1A. But on one of the Chargers’ first ing has also gotten better. I trained a lot The team recognizes that they are few plays, Noah scored on a long pass during the summer.” building toward something great, espefrom Matthew. The touchdown sparked Along with 1,764 passing yards and cially Matthew, who still has two more the Arete Prep sideline. 18 touchdowns this season, Matthew seasons to bring Arete Prep its first Though Arete went on to lose to has also rushed for a team-high 1,057 state championship. Mogollon, Smith believes it was a sign yards and 15 touchdowns. He is ranked “We all have to come together, I think of what was to come for the Chargers among the top-10 passers in the state, we can beat any team, really,” Matthew this season. regardless of division, and No. 3 in the said. “I look at my own success and base “Noah will be missed after this sea- country for 8-man teams. it off the team’s success. If my team is son,” Smith said. “Both he and Matthew Part of Matthew’s success both doing well, I will do well and vice versa. lead by their play. We did seven or eight through the air and on the ground is “We all have a goal to win a state passing leagues this summer and it due to Arete’s spread offense. championship and make a deep playoff was always Matthew to Noah, Matthew Fields for 8-man teams are slightly run and I think that’s helped.” to Noah, it was almost like he knew narrower than those for traditional But for now, they remain focused on exactly where he was going to be.” 11-man teams. But with only eight the present. Arete will play its final regArete has gone 4-2 since the loss to players to account for on defense, Mogollon, playing against some of the three of which linemen, Arete is able see MCCLELLAND page 25


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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

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Cardinals owner eulogized for his ideals BY CHRISTOPHER LINDSAY Cronkite News

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undreds of loved ones donning “WVB” pins filed into St. Xavier Francis Catholic Church on last week to celebrate the life of Cardinals owner William Vogel “Bill” Bidwill, who had been a part of the organization for eight decades. He died Oct. 2 at age 88. Before the ceremony, several buses loaded with former and current players and family members emptied into the parking lot, with many of the mourners wearing bowties, a Bidwill trademark. Among those who attended were Gov. Doug Ducey, New York Giants President John Mara, Cardinals coach Kliff Kingsbury and quarterback Kyler Murray. Silence overtook the waiting area as a six-person Navy funeral detail saluted Bidwill, who served in the Navy shortly after college. He began working for the Cardinals in 1960. Bid was eulogized by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, Cardinals receiver Larry Fitzgerald and Bidwill’s son, Cardinals President Michael Bidwill. Goodell

said he was happy to see the massive turnout but wasn’t surprised because of Bidwill’s positive influence on the community and the NFL. “Bill left us with more than we could ever give him,” Goodell said, “We will all miss you greatly.” Bidwill will be remembered for the initiative he took to improve diversity in the NFL. Bidwill took pride in the fact that the Cardinals became the first organization in NFL history to employ an African-American head coach and general manager at the same time, when Dennis Green was the coach under GM Rod Graves, Goodell said. Hiring that duo is just one example of the steps Bidwill took to help facilitate equality and diversity. “Mr. B. didn’t just talk about diversity as a distant ideal. He made it so,” Goodell said. The NFL is celebrating its 100th anniversary, and Goodwell said Bidwill, who was the longest-tenured owner in the NFL at the time of his death, set the standard for the league.

Fitzgerald was drafted by the Cardinals in 2004 and struck up a close relationship with Bidwill. “What Mr. B. meant to the National Football League, the Cardinals, his community, and a young 20-year-old from Minneapolis, Minnesota will endure forever,” Fitzgerald said. After sharing some stories that got the crowd laughing, Fitzgerald said he was glad everyone could share a laugh because that is what Bidwill would want. “He was telling dad jokes long before we knew what dad jokes were,” Fitzger-

McCLELLAND

from page 24

ular-season game of the season against Lincoln Prep on Thursday, Oct. 17 at Lincoln Prep in Chandler. It’s the last chance the Chargers have at improving their record in hopes of hosting a first-round playoff game for the second consecutive year. They realize they are on the verge of something great for the school, it’s just a matter of time for them to put it all

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ald said. “But one thing he was serious about was his family.” His son Michael remembered his father attending all of Michael’s high school football games, and how he included the family in business decisions, including the momentous one to move the Cardinals from St. Louis to Arizona. His father’s sense of humor was a major theme in all three of the eulogies. Michael Bidwill noted that even when his father could no longer speak to share a joke, he still managed to put a smile on everyone’s face with his presence.

together. But as long as the McClelland brothers are able to keep up their production on the field, Smith is confident they can play with anybody they line up against going forward. “It stings when you’re that close, but it shows us that we can compete,” Smith said. “We want to learn to finish games. “I think a good team learns to peak at the right time and that’s what we are trying to do.”


26

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

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Club sports are not regulated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), and do not have varsity status at the intercollegiate athletic level. However, club sports are organized and administered by their respective national sport governing body. For more information about the median debt of students who completed the program and other important information, please visit our website at gcu.edu/disclosures. Please note, not all GCU programs are available in all states and in all learning modalities. Program availability is contingent on student enrollment. Grand Canyon University is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (hlcommission.org). GCU, while reserving its lawful rights in light of its Christian mission, is committed to maintaining an academic environment that is free from unlawful discrimination.  Further detail on GCU’s Non-Discrimination policies can be found at  gcu.edu/titleIX. The information printed in this material is accurate as of JULY 2019. For the most up-to-date information about admission requirements, tuition, scholarships and more, visit gcu.edu. ©2019 Grand Canyon University 19GTR0576


GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

GilbertSunNews.com |

@GilbertSunNews

GET OUT

27

/GilbertSunNews

Candytopia a sweet treat for the eyes BY KRISTINE CANNON GetOut Staff Writer

A

life-size deep-sea diver made of gummy bears, jelly beans, gumdrops, and licorice; candy-coated unicorn pigs; a pool of 300,000 marshmallows; a towering sphinx made of 7,800 pieces of candy; and augmented reality interactive photo stations. This whimsical scene sounds like a kid’s dream come true; and this month, they’ll all exist under one roof in Scottsdale. Candytopia, which has attracted more than a million guests across the country, will made its debut at Scottsdale Quarter on Oct. 11 and will remain open through Dec. 29. Clearly inspired by the playful, sugarysweet world of Willy Wonka, Candytopia features more than one dozen carefully

Candytopia, which opens in Scottsdale on Oct. 11, features a pool of 300,000 marshmallows. (Marcus Ingram/Getty

Images for Candytopia/Special to GSN)

curated and crafted rooms and environments, brimming with sweets and boasting larger-than-life interactive art in-

stallations, like a candy aquarium with sharks, fish, and a life-size diver. In addition to featuring the most pop-

ular attractions from past locations, Candytopia will feature new elements inspired by Scottsdale’s culture and landmarks. And as part of the experience, Candytopia attendees will be treated to candy samples throughout, including chocolate treats, sours, gummies, and nostalgic candies, among other sweet surprises. Hundreds of thousands of pieces of candy are used to create the 3-D mod-

see CANDY page 28

Beer N Bones a tasty intro to science BY LAURA LATZKO GetOut Contributor

A

date night or outing with friends doesn’t have to consist of a conventional dinner at a restaurant or drinks at a neighborhood bar. At the Arizona Museum of Natural History in Downtown Mesa, adults can learn about and interact with different science disciplines while also having a night out with their significant others or friends. As part of Beer N Bones on Friday, Oct. 18, the museum will have Speed Date a Scientist, Q&A sessions, a beerology panel, animal encounters, science stations, artists selling dinosaur-themed work, chances to try different craft beers and cuisine from local food trucks. Alison Stoltman, the museum’s curator of education, said guests come to the museum when they are children or have young kids of their own. This event helps to attract new audiences of adults to the museum. “This is an opportunity for us to get a

ticket and alcohol sales and a raffle will help the museum to fund a new gallery focused on Arizona 75 million years ago and the renovation of one centered around inquirybased learning opportunities. As part of the raffle, the museum will give away a gift basket, a dinosaur quilt and a one-of-a-kind stamp set. People can have fun and examine the dinosaurs and other exhibits during the In the past, the Beer N Bones event Friday at the Arizona Museum of Natural History in Mesa. event has helped to (Special to GetOut) raise money for Dinew demographic into the museum of nosaur Mountain and educational proyoung adults that don’t often come to the grams. Stoltman said Beer N Bones helps museum but are interested in science,” the museum expand. Stoltman said. Stoltman said the event was designed Beer N Bones is the museum’s prima- for young professionals who are looking ry fundraiser. This year proceeds from for more creative, interactive experienc-

es. Besides the museum’s lecture series, Beer N Bones is the only event geared toward adults only. During the Speed Date a Scientist activity, scientists from different disciplines are introduced in a game show-style manner and attendees have a chance to ask them about what they do. When a gong is rung, the participants move to a different table with another scientist. Each year, the museum brings in scientists from different specialties, such as paleontology, archeology, zoology, chemistry, planetary geology and biomedical engineering. Stoltman said this activity is fun for the guests and the scientists. “They are looking for these opportunities to get their information out into the public. This is a really great medium to do that,” Stoltman said. As part of the beerology panel, scientists will discuss beer from different angles, including the evolution of the hop

see bones page 28


28

GET OUT

CANDY

from page 27

els found throughout the confectionary wonderland. The rainbow-hued mini theme park not only pays homage to “Game of Thrones” and various celebrities, like Marilyn Monroe and Cardi B, but it has also amassed a large following of celebrity fans, including Drew Barrymore, Bruce Willis, and Kevin Durant, to Christina Aguilera, James Corden, Wiz Khalifa and Usher. Candytopia is the brainchild of candy artist and star of TLC’s “Candy Queen” Jackie Sorkin, who began creating candy art out of her garage while she was pregnant. Sorkin teamed up with production design expert Zac Hartog of ZH Productions and retail veteran John Goodman to launch Candytopia last year in Santa Monica.

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

It has since traveled coast to coast, including stops in San Francisco, New York City, Atlanta, and Minneapolis-St. Paul, Houston and Philadelphia. “It’s really just this magical place that runs on sugar and candy, and you lose your mind here,” Sorkin told CNN. “It’s just a place to have fun!”

IF YOU GO Candytopia

When: Starts Oct. 11 Where: 15059 N. Scottsdale Rd. Tickets: $20 kids (4-12), $28 adults; free for kids under 3 Website: candytopia.com

BONES from page 27

plant, microbial action during the fermentation process, the effects of alcohol on brain receptors, modern-day brewing techniques and alcohol use throughout history. Throughout the evening, guests can also interact with birds, tarantulas, snakes and lizards. Partnering organizations will offer hands-on activities such as an escape room, a forensic table or a maker space. But it comes down to the beer. Attendees can try a variety of craft beers from local breweries, as well as specialty items such as alcoholic kombucha and craft cider. The alcoholic beverages are donated by local companies. General admission tickets come with two food and drink tickets. VIP tickets have added perks such as

early access from 6 to 7 p.m., four food and drink tickets, a commemorative glass and a behind-the-scenes paleo lab tour. “People tend to think of museums as being heavily funded or supported,” Stoltman said. “It takes public support to fund a museum. Events like that this are really important to supporting our goals.”

IF YOU GO

What: Beer N Bones Where: Arizona Museum of Natural History, 53 N. Macdonald, Mesa When: 6 to 7 p.m. early VIP entry, 7 to 11 p.m. general public entry, Friday, Oct. 18, Info: 480-644-2230, arizonamuseumofnaturalhistory.org Cost: Tickets start at $20 for general admission, $45 VIP. Food and beverage tickets are $4 each or three for $10.

Judas Priest’s Rob Halford at AZ Mills

BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI GET OUT Editor

J

udas Priest’s Rob Halford sat with his family during Christmas dinner a few years ago and had an epiphany: They should record a Christmas album. Due Oct. 18, “Celestial” is credited to Rob Halford with Family and Friends – his brother, Nigel, on drums; his nephew, Alex (son of Judas Priest bassist Ian Hill), on bass; his sister, Sue, on bells; and twin guitar tandem of Robert Jones and Jon Blakey. “This is a dream come true for me,” the Paradise Valley resident said. “Over the years, I’ve watched my brother play drums really well and Alex on the bass guitar. We thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be great to manage a song or two? That’s how it started.’ “These things we do in music start with a simple idea and grow into something special. It turned out just celestial. It’s a genuine family and friends experience at the heart of the music.” The “metal god” takes on traditional tracks like “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen,” “Joy to the World,” and “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing,” and originals such as the opening title track, “Donner and Blitzen” and “Protected by the Light.” Halford will sign copies of his new album during an in-store appearance at FYE Arizona Mills in Tempe at 2 p.m. Sat-

Phoenix Suns or Coyotes T-shirt. The more tangible it is, the more connected we feel.” The 12-track “Celestial” is a complete story, one that cannot be grasped until every track is heard. “The 12 in sequence tell a beautiful season story,” he said. “The way it opens with the reindeer and Santa, you can feel the Christmas excitement. The album goes into lots of different places, in terms of tempo, emotion and adventure. “As you get older, everything changes, but the magic of Christmas Rob Halford of Judas Priest will belt out some Chrstmas tunes at a free is in all of us, I think. concert next Saturday at Arizona Mills in Tempe. (Special to GetOut) That’s the beauty of it. It crosses time. Kids get excited on Christmas Eve and they can’t urday, October 19. “I don’t think I’ve ever done an in-store sleep. ‘What was that noise outside?’ It’s in Arizona,” Halford said. “Oh wait, I just the most exciting time ever for kids. A told a lie. I did do one many, many years lot of those beautiful feelings went into ago at Zia Records. Outside of what we making this record.” Halford is also going to share this mudo as musicians, the physical side of visic at this year’s Alice Cooper’s Christmas nyl and CDs are still really valuable. We Pudding at 7 p.m. Dec. 14, at the Celebrity all love the clouds, don’t we? But there’s nothing better than having vinyl, or a Theatre with the likes of Paul Rodgers,

Joe Bonamassa and Gary Cherone and Nuno Bettencourt of Extreme. Whether he’s at his in-store or at Christmas Pudding, Halford wants his fans to understand one thing. “Music is about making sure the conviction of the emotion of the message is getting across,” he said. “Whether it’s ‘O Little Town of Bethlehem’ or ‘Away in the Manger,’ the words are incredibly powerful and important. You really have to get in the zone to work on those tracks.” “ We were doing a Christmas song in the Valley in July. I remember being in the studio and it was full on. We barely had time to take a breath. I love that type of experience. It keeps you on your toes. You can’t afford to be lazy. You really have to go for it.” Next year, Halford will hit a milestone with Judas Priest – 50 years. The band will begin the year on the road with Ozzy Osbourne in the United Kingdom and England. Then he readies a “gigantic 50th anniversary presentation” that will take the band through Christmas 2020. “I’m busier now than I’ve ever been,” he said with a laugh. “I thought I’d be slowing down, but I just whizzed past 68 years of age. I’m having the time of my life.” Information: 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, FYE Arizona Mills, 5000 Arizona Mills Circle, Suite 612, Tempe, 480-491-1146. Free.


29

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

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With JAN D’ATRI GetOut Contributor

With JAN D’ATRI

How to make your own GetOut Contributor wheat thins and hummus

Be ‘fair’ at home with H easy onion rings these ere’s to homemade all the way. If you love hummus, here is a recipe that you can whip up in just fewdays! mint’s Arizona Statea Fair utes. to enjoy TimeAforgreat yourway deep-friedthe hummusfix, is it with my everything homemade wheat This year you’ll findthins. the Make once, and usual fanthese favorites like corn you may never buybutter, store dogs, deep-fried bought again! cotton candy and cheese

I

fries. But they’ve added more of the zing factor the year with things like a Easy jumbo hummus hollowed out 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil plus more for pickle stuffed with melted ingredients: One 15-ounce of chickpeas, drained, reserving drizzling cheddar cheese,can Flamin’ ½ teaspoon of the liquid and the Flamin’ Hot ¼ Thetosmoke point salt is essentially the temperature that Hot1 tablespoon Cheetos and jalapenos 1/8 teaspoon or smoked 1 garliccrusted clove, chopped an oil can getsweet to before it startspaprika to smoke and break Cheetos turkey leg. garnish, optional 2Also tablespoons down.parsley Any oilforused for deep frying needs to have a new thisfresh year,lemon baconjuice and Cheetos cotton Fresh 1/4 cup Tahini (I used candy thatSesame will feel a bit like Joyva pop Brand) rocks in your smoke point of at least 350°F. Some good oils for mouth! To get you into the state fair spirit, I’m deep frying are avocado oil, canola oil, peanut oil Directions: andgarlic, cornlemon oil. juice and sesame tahini. Puree to a sharing my recipe for deep fried onion rings. In a food processor, combine chickpeas withThey the liquid, Do you smell until the smooth onion at store?Spoon Onions are thick superpaste. easyScrape to make and really fun for a side, down sides. Add olive oil, salt and paprika and puree andthe creamy. should have absolutely no smell whatsoever. If they snacks or game day munching. They’re as delicious into serving dish. Drizzle with olive oil and garnish with parsley. Serve with crackers, pita chips or crudités. as you’ll find on the midway. do, they are probably bruised somewhere under The hummus can be refrigerated for up to 5 days. Makes about 1½ cups. Tip about frying oil: It’s all about the smoke point. the skin and are on their way out.

Homemade wheat thins

ingredients: Ingredients: whole-wheat flourpeeled 21 1/4 largecups sweet yellow onions, 5 teaspoons sugar 3 cups flour, divided teaspoon salt 11/2 cup cornmeal 1/4 teaspoon paprika, (Sweet or Hungarian paprika ¼ cup cornstarch if possible) ¼ cup baking powder

4(Iftablespoons (1/2 stick) butter, chilled and cut too thick, add into pieces moresmall buttermilk. Consistency 1/4 cup water should be vanilla 1/2 teaspoon like pancake Salt and various seasonings for topping

batter.) Pour into second dredging container. 2Directions: tablespoons seasoning salt, such as Lawry’s Pour enough oil into a heavy skillet or pot 1 bottle vegetable In a large mixingoilbowl, combine flour, sugar, salt and small pieces of cold butter.Heat Withto to paprika. come toAdd a depth of about 2 inches. 2electric cups buttermilk beaters, blend butter and flour mixture together. about 350 degrees on a candy thermometer. (Or, (If mixing by hand, combine dry ingredients then cut in buttermake withsure a pastry forks.) alternately, whenblender you testorantwo onion that Directions: it bubbles upaand immediately.) Add water and vanilla. Mix well. Dough should begin forming into ball.fries If necessary, add a little more Cut toonions Drain onions and pat dry. Working in batches, water bind. crosswise into 1-inch-thick slices and separate into rings. Place rings in a large bowl about 3–5 rings at a time, dredge onions in dry the mixture in half form into balls. of Divide buttermilk and soak for and at least 30 minutes. mixture and then dip in buttermilk mixture. On a buttermilk. lightly floured surface or piece of parchmentImmediately paper, roll out dough as thinly as possible, Reserve fry the onions in hot oil until crisp and about 1/16thdry of batter, an inch.mix Sprinkle with1sea desired Cut tongs into 1 or inch squaresspoon and To make together ½ salt cupsorofothergolden onseasonings. each side. Use a slotted flour, powder, paper. and to remove onion rings from oil; drain well on place cornmeal, on a bakingcornstarch, sheet lined baking with parchment seasoning a largefor bowl. Pour dredging towels sprinkle with thins, salt or Bake at salt 400indegrees about 7-8into minutes or until paper browned and and crisp.immediately (For extra crispy wheat container. seasonings. turn oven off and let wheat thins stay in oven for 2 hours or until oven cools down. For the wet batter, mix remaining 1 1/2 cups Serve immediately with ranch dressing or any When storebuttermilk in an airtight at room temperature. flour in a completely bowl with 1cooled, cup of the that container favorite condiment. Recipe makes about 5 dozen pieces. the onions were soaking in. Stir well to combine. Watch my how-to video: jandatri.com/recipe

Watch my how-to video: jandatri.com/recipe/fried-onion-rings/

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019 GET OUT 25 4143

GET GETOUT OUT

King Crossword King KingCrossword Crossword

ACROSS ACROSS 1 1 Donkey Bar order 4 5 Portion of an act Stick out 9 8 Mischievous String tie tyke 1212 Hawaiian Incite garland 1313 Overuse mirror Blonde the shade 1414 Ultra-modern prefix Disney’s “-- and the 15 Clarified Detectives” 1715 Auto O orfuel W 1817 Upper Even,limb as a score 1918 Lack “-- Abner” 2119 Uses Gaptweezers 2421 Long storyhorse Charley 2524 AMilitary billion years status 2625 Male offspring Tatters 2826 Jockey’ handful Quites attractive 3130 “No -luck!” Past 3331 Phone bk. data Paycheck extra 3532 Winter forecast Altar affirmative 3633 Different Artist Rene 3835 Charlotte’ Toppleds creation 4036 Greek H Commotions 4137 War god Jaunty chapeau 4338 Muffle Tray 4541 Landi Helpof 1930s movies 4742 Plant bristle Neighborhood 4843 Lair Mississippi flower 4948 Didn’t “The vote, View”perhaps alumna Lisa 5449 Rd.Gorilla 5550 Shunned St. Louisone team 5651 Wall climber Shakespeare’s shrew 5752 Central Bow the head 5853 Obliterate Pumps up the volume 59 Grant opponent DOWN DOWN 1 Lazy person 1 2 Heady brew Historic period 2 3 Gender Ovum 3 4 Taste a drink Kingdoms 4 5 Activates Hoosegow 5 6 Shade of red Tars’ org. 6 7 Still, in verse city Netherlands 7 8 Requirements Cause to go 8 9 Ingratiate Leave out 9 10 Deep-seated Stead 1011 Vegan’ s no-noRansom Eli -Automaker 11 16 Luxurious Speed 1620 Fond du --, Wis. Hostels 2021 AStudy long time at the last minute 2122 Mexican Sitarist’smoney offering 2223 Lummox Enthusiastic 2324 “Django Carries--” on(film title) 2726 Promptly Subway employee 2927 Brief letter Layer 3028 Pavlova portrayal Between jobs 3229 Towel embroidery Filly’s brother word

3431 Tranquilizes Wait 3734 Auction, so to speak Devastate 3935 Caveat word Indy Jones’ hat 4237 Cavalry Crib sword 4438 Blackbird Polio vaccine pioneer 4539 Cheese choice Met melody

4640 Jeans-maker Strauss Fasting period 5041 Hot tub On in years 51 44 Zero Mil. address 5245 First ladys flight Felon’ 5346 Coloring agent Little devil 47 Fool

PUZZLE ANSWERS ononpage page 2026 PUZZLE PUZZLEANSWERS ANSWERSon page15 PUZZLE ANSWERS on page 17


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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

Gilbert Sun News

1620 W. Fountainhead Parkway #219 • Tempe, AZ 85282 480.898.6465 class@timespublications.com

Deadlines

Classifieds: Thursday 11am for Sunday Life Events: Thursday 10am for Sunday

The Place “To Find” Everything You Need | GilbertSunNews.com

Employ ment Employment General Region Technologies has openings for the following positions in Phoenix, AZ and/or client sites throughout the US. Must be willing to travel/relocate. IT Engineer reqs US Masters/equiv or bachelors + 5 yrs exp to design/dev/test systems/apps using Java/J2EE/CSS/Net/ Database/ Data Analysis/Mainframe/Testing technologies on Linux/Unix/Windows/H TML. Operations Research Analyst (ORA) reqs US Masters/equiv or bachelors + 5 yrs exp to analyze/formulate/design systems using J2EE/.Net/ETL/Hadoop/Bigdata/SQL/ Tableau on Linux/Unix/Windows. IT Analyst reqs US Bachelors/equiv (3 or 4 yr degree) to test/maintain/monitor systems/programs using Hadoop/Bigdata/Tablea u/SQL/Selenium/QA on Linux/Unix/Windows. Send resume to careers@regiontechnologies.com with ref # 2019-19 for IT Eng; 2019-20 for ORA; 2019-21 for IT Analyst & ref EVT ad

Employment General Database Administrator Perform job duties w/skills,knowledge of SQL Server, Postgres, Mongo databases BI tools: SSIS, SSAS, SSRS,& Tableau. MS in Computer req. mail Job Loc: Cascade Financial Services, 2701 E Ryan Rd, Ste. 150, Chandler, AZ 85286 HUMAC, Inc has openings for the following positions in Phoenix, AZ and/or client sites throughout the US. Must be willing to travel/relocate. IT Engineer reqs US Masters/equiv or bachelors + 5 yrs exp to design/dev/test systems/apps using Java/J2EE/HTML/CSS/ Unix/Windows. Operations Research Analyst (ORA) reqs US Masters/equiv or bachelors + 5 yrs exp to analyze/formulate/desig n systems using ETL/Informatica/Cognos/Oracle/Java/Unix. IT Analyst reqs US Bachelors/equiv (3 or 4 yr degree) to test/maintain/monitor systems/programs using SQL/Oracle/Java/Hadoop/Unix. Send resume to jobs@humacinc.com with ref # 2019-19 for IT Eng; 2019-20 for ORA; 2019-21 for IT Analyst & ref this ad

MISSED THE DEADLINE? Place your ad online! Call 480-898-6465

Employment General

3RP has opening for a Database Administrator position in Scottsdale, AZ area. Reqs Masters degree/foreign equiv or Bach degree + 5 yrs experience w/ skills in Oracle Database, Linux, RMAN, Cloud Technologies, SQL, PL-SQL, & Unix Shell Scripting to support/manage/resolve/troubleshoot applics/systems. Email your resume to Recruiting@3rpco.co m with ref # 2019-20 & ref EVT ad KollaSoft, Inc has openings for the following positions in Scottsdale, AZ and/or client sites throughout the US. Must be willing to travel/relocate. IT Engineer reqs US Masters/equiv or bachelors + 5 yrs exp to design/dev/test systems/apps using Java/J2EE/HTML/CSS/. Net/C#/Unix. Operations Research Analyst (ORA) reqs US Masters/equiv or bachelors + 5 yrs exp to analyze/formulate/desig n systems using ETL/Informatica/Cognos/Oracle/JAVA/UNIX/.Net/ C#. IT Analyst reqs Bachelors/equiv or 2 yrs IT exp to test/maintain/monitor systems/programs using SQL/Oracle/JAVA/Hadoop/UNIX/.Net/C#. Send resume to jobs@kollasoft.com with ref # 2019-19 for IT Eng; 2019-20 for ORA; 2019-21 for IT Analyst & ref EVT ad

HEADSTONES Make your choice Everlasting

Employment General H.E.R.O.S., Inc. in Chandler, AZ is seeking an Accessory Shop Technician to asst in the rep & overhaul of all acc to the Rolls Royce model 250 series engs. No trvl req’d, no telecomm. Email resumes: raffi@herosinc.com. IntraEdge has multiple openings for Software Engineer (SE) and Operations Research Analyst (ORA) positions at different levels in Chandler, AZ. SE and ORA candidates req US Masters degree/foreign equiv or bachelors degree + 5 yrs exp, w/ skills in C,SQL,Oracle,J2EE,SA P,JAVA,JSP,UNIX to analyze/dsgn/dev/implement/test systems & applics. Email resume to jobs@intraedge.com w/ ref no 2019-19 for SE; 2019-20 for ORA directly on resume/cover & ref ad in EVT IntraEdge has multiple openings for Sr. Programmer Analyst II in Chandler, AZ. Reqs US Bachelor degree/foreign equiv in Commerce/BusAdm/ST EM field. Will accept combination of IT training/education/experience for equiv to ed req. Analyze/resolve/test/report on IT related projects using skills in EMC/MS/SQL /Excel/Java/C. Email resume to jobs@intraedge.com w/ ref no 2018-25 directly on resume/cover & ref ad in EVT

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AGRICULTURAL NURSERY HELP Whitfill Nursery needs 12 temporary workers in Arizona for Nursery Worker positions. Workers tasks will include planting, transplanting, watering, loading & unloading various trees and plants. Additional tasks will include pruning, fertilizing, chemical spraying, and use of farm implements including tractor, loader & forklifts. Workers should have 3 month’s experience and will be required to lift up to 50lbs on a regular basis. Work is outdoors in a variety of weather conditions. All work tools, supplies, and equipment will be provided at no cost to worker. 6 positions are in Phoenix and 6 positions are in Gilbert from 11/7/2019 thru 6/30/2020. Wage is $12.00 per hour (51 hours per week). Work is guaranteed for at least ¾ of the work hours in the work days during this period. Free housing provided for those who can’t reasonably return home at end of the work day. Transportation and subsistence expenses to the worksite will be provided upon completion of 50% of the work. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency Office or www.azjobconnection.gov use job listing number 3615740 or call 602 268-9466 or email susie@whitfillnursery.com

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Auto - All Makes 2001 Gold Ford Taurus 107k Miles, 1 owner, excellent inside and out. $3250/OBRO. 480-652-3223. Leave message or text for call back.

Merch andise Garage Sales/ Bazaars

Gilbert: Seville Golf & Country Club Huge Community Wide Garage Sale btwn Riggs/ N & S. of Chandler Heights. W. of Power & E. & W. of Higley. Sat Oct 19 & Sunday Oct. 20th 8am-?

Lost & Found LOST framed ironworking pictures from 25 years ago, last seen in storage shed facility that was auctioned in Mesa. 15X24 appx. 50100 pic collage. REWARD! (417)379-5815

Miscellaneous For Sale 2019 ASU FOOTBALL Sec 3 Row 40, Seats 23-25 on aisle. 3 Home Games left Buy all 3 OR will sell in order of games. Voice, NO Text! 623-236-0277

BELL ROAD PAWN

Liquidating Firearms Come see at 2510 E. Bell Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85032. 602.765.2274

OUR JOB BOARD HAS THE TALENT YOU’RE LOOKING FOR. FIND THE BEST TALENT. EASILY POST JOBS. COMPETITIVE PRICING AND EXPOSURE More info: 480-898-6465 or email jobposting@evtrib.com

Most jobs also appear on Indeed.com

J BS.EASTVALLEYTRIBUNE.COM


33

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

Miscellaneous For Sale 1990's Hot Wheels Cars for sale. Hundreds to choose from. Mint on card. 50 cents per car. Collectors paradise, purchase one or all. 574-303-7675

Commerical/ Industrial/Retail Outdoor commercial/personal Storage Yards for lease. Secure, gated 24 hour access, and much more. Call 480-926-5957 for details

Wanted to Buy

Diabetic Test Strips by the box, unused. Any type or brand. Will pay top dollar. Call Pat 480-323-8846

Real Estate

For Rent Apartments Alma Sch /Main St Duplex apt, 1br/1ba $700 incl Utilities. Bad Credit ok. No deposit. (602) 339-1555

Apartments ALMA SCH & MAIN Partially Furnished 1bd/1 ba. Bad Credit OK. No Deposit. Starting at $600 Includes utilities (602) 339-1555 APACHE TRAIL & IRONWOOD Secluded Cute Studio, A/C $625/Month Bad Credit ok No Deposit. Water/Trash Inc. (602) 339-1555

Appliance Repairs

Appliance Repair Now

• Same Day Service • On-Site Repairs • Servicing All Major Brands • Quality Guaranteed

Manufactured Homes BRAND NEW NEVER LIVED IN 2 BED / 2 BATH HOMES $58,900 Financing Available. Also Available Affordable Homes Between $5K - $15K 55+ Mobile Home Park in Great Chandler Location. Call Kim 480-233-2035

Homes For Sale For Sale Developer Real Estate Note Steady Inccome stream 4.78% interest $969 monthly P & I Call for Details 480-284-4700 For sale 1/2 interest in 614 S. Revolta Circle, Mesa, AZ 85208 $117,500.00. Call 574-315-2976 if interested.

We Also Buy, Sell & Trade Used Appliances Working or Not

480-659-1400 Licensed & Insured Cleaning Services

RESIDENTIAL & SMALL BUSINESS CLEANING SPECIALISTS SINCE 2007 Weekly, biweekly, tri-weekly, or monthly; same talented crew each visit Flexible, customized services to meet individual needs of each client GREEN eco-friendly products used to clean and sanitize Move-in/move-out and seasonal deep cleans Small, family-owned company with GUARANTEED high quality services Always dependable, excellent references, bonded, and insured

FreeFree estimates estimatesat at 480-802-1992 480-802-1992 or or dennis@simplygrandcleaningaz.com reed@simplygrandcleaningaz.com

602-402-2213

Not a licensed contractor

Concrete & Masonry

SHARE WITH THE WORLD! Place a Birth, Anniversary, Wedding Announcement, In Memoriam, Obituary or any life event in this paper today! Call us for details.

Fencing/Gates

Block Fence * Gates

602-789-6929 Roc #057163 Lowest Prices * 30 Yrs Exp Serving Entire Valley

YOU’LL LIKE US - THE BEST!

DESERT ROCK C O N C R E T E & M A S O N RY

BLOCKWALL

RETAINING WALL BLOCK FENCE PLANTER BBQ

Handyman

CONCRETE

FOUNDATION DRIVEWAY SIDEWALK PATIO

PAVER • CONCRETE REMOVAL • HARDSCAPE BONDED & INSURED • ROC#321648 SATISFACTION GUARANTEED! FREE ESTIMATES • 16 YEARS EXPERIENCE RESIDENTIAL CALL JOHN: 480.797.2985 COMMERCIAL

LLC

• Drywall Repair • Bathroom Remodeling • Home Renovations

SERVING THE ENTIRE VALLEY

SIR JOHNS CONTRACTING HOME IMPROVEMENTS REMODEL& REPAIR

All Estimates are Free • Call:

Licensed, Bonded & Insured • ROC#317949 Ask me about FREE water testing!

Rez/Biz

Over 30 Years Quality Experience

HQ

Est Free ima tes

UAL Lice ITY ns ROC ed & B 251 ond 661 ed

602-315-5470

4960 S. Gilbert Rd. Suite #1 Unit #260 John McMillan-Owner Chandler, AZ 85249 sirjohn53@gmail.com

Drywall

JOSE DOMINGUEZ DRYWALL & PAINTING

Not a licensed contractor.

520.508.1420

www.husbands2go.com

Painting of All Types Interior & Exterior Cabinets Stains & Paints

HIG

• Electrical Repair • Plumbing Repair • Dry rot and termite damage repair

GENERAL CONTRACTOR / HANDYMAN SERVICES

josedominguez0224@gmail.com

FROM THE UPPER 100’S

www.linksestates.net

Nights/Weekends Bonded/Insured 480-251-8610

480.266.4589

Why Rent The Lot When

40667 N Wedge Dr • San Tan Valley, AZ 85140

Broken Springs Replaced

QUICK RESPONSE TO YOUR CALL! 15 Years Experience • Free Estimates

THE LINKS ESTATES

Gawthorp & Associates Realty

HANDYMAN 37 years experience. Drywall, framing, plumbing, painting, electrical, roofing and more. Stan, 602-434-6057

House Painting, Drywall, Reliable, Dependable, Honest!

Manufactured Homes

ASK US HOW YOUR $105,000 CASH INVESTMENT AND OUR SENIOR LOAN PROGRAM ENABLES QUALIFIED 62+ SENIORS MAKING THE LINKS THEIR PRIMARY RESIDENCE HAVE NO MORTGAGE PAYMENT & NO LOT RENT AS LONG AS YOU LIVE IN HOME.

GARAGE DOOR SERVICE

Contractors

Classifieds 480-898-6465

YOU CAN OWN THE LAND And Own Your New Home

Handyman

East Valley/ Ahwatukee

If It’s Broken, We Can Fix It!

Cash 4 Diabetic Strips! Best Prices in Town. Sealed and Unexpired. 480-652-1317

Garage/Doors

FREE ESTIMATES • Flooring • Painting • Tile • Cabinets • Light Electric & Plumbing • Grout Caulking • Bathroom Renovations

480-799-1445

WWW.THEHANDYMANNYC.COM

NOT A LICENSED CONTRACTOR

REASONABLE HANDYMAN • Painting • Plumbing • Carpentry • Drywall • Roofing • Block

- Free Estimates -

480-276-6600

Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman Needs!

Electrical Services Marks the Spot for ALL•Your Handyman Needs! Painting Flooring • Electrical

*Not a Licensed Contractor

Painting • Flooring • Electrical Plumbing • Drywall • Carpentry HONESTY • INTEGRITY • QUALITY Marks the Spot for ALL Plumbing • Decks Drywall • Carpentry • Tile • More! Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman Needs! Your Handyman Needs! Decks • Tile • Changes More! Painting • Flooring • Electrical • Panel Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman Needs! • Drywall • Carpentry Plumbing Painting • Flooring • Electrical • Plumbing andPainting Repairs • Flooring Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman • Electrical • Tile More! Needs! DrywallDecks • Carpentry • •Decks • Tile • More! • Installation of • Drywall Plumbing • Carpentry Painting • Flooring • Electrical • More! Ceiling FansDecks • Tile “No Job Too Plumbing • Drywall • Carpentry Too Man!” • Switches/Outlets “No JobSmall Decks • Tile • More! “No Job Too Small Man!” Small Man!” - Ahw Resident Since 1987 - • Home Remodel rk Since 1999 Affordable, Quality Wo 1999 rk Since Affordable, Quality Wo

“No Job Too

Work Sinc Quality le,Small 2010, 2011 Affordab Man!” ALL RESIDENTIAL & 2012, 2013, 2010, 2011 “No Job 2014 Call Bruce at 602.670.7038 Call Bruce at 602.670.7038 2012,92013, e 199 Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a LicensedToo Contractor “No Man!” Job Too COMMERCIAL Work SincAhwatukee Small QualityContractor 2014 Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ELECTRICAL Insured/ Notle, a Licensed Affordab Call Bruce at 602.670.7038 Small Man!” class@timespublications.com Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ Insured/Call Not aBruce Licensed at Contractor 602.670.7038 Call Jim Endres 480.282.7932 Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor Call Bruce at 602.670.7038 9

or call 480-898-6465

e 1999

2010, 2011 2012, 2013, 2014

2010, 2011 2010, 2011 2012, 2013, 2012, 2013, 2014 2014

rk Since 199

Quality Wo Affordable,Ahwatukee Over 28 Years Experience • ROC #246019 Bonded/Insured 2010, 2011 Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor

Call Bruce at 602.670.7038

2012, 2013, 2014


34

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

Irrigation

Painting

RAMIRO MEDINA LANDSCAPING

Jose Dominguez Painting & Drywall SEE OUR AD IN DRYWALL! Quick Response to your Call! 15 Years Exp 480-266-4589

➧ LANDSCAPING ➧ TREE TRIMMING & REMOVAL ➧ IRRIGATION ➧ YARD CLEAN-UP ➧ GRAVEL ➧ COMMERCIAL ➧ RESIDENTIAL

• Sprinkler/Drip Repairs • New Installs Poly/PVC • Same Day Service

NTY

5-YEAR WARRA

480.654.5600

Not a licensed contractor

LICENSED • INSURED • OVER 25 YEARS EXPERIENCE

azirrigation.com

Call or Text Today for a FREE ESTIMATE

Carlos Medina - 602-677-3200

Cutting Edge LLC • ROC 21671

Irrigation Repair Services Inc. WE DO IT ALL! Bath & Kitchen Remodels • Drywall & Stucco Repairs Plumbing • Electrical • Can Lights Windows • Doors • Cabinets • Painting Block Fences • Wrought Iron Gates Remodeling • Additions • Patios • Tenant Improvements

A+

East Valley 480-833-7353

-S

IN

C

9 E1

78

LIC/BONDED/INSURED Res/Comm’l ROC#218802

Licensed • Bonded • Insured Technician

Specializing in Controllers, Valves, Sprinklers, Landscape Lighting, P.V.C. & Poly Drip Systems

Call Lance White

480.721.4146

We will give you totally new landscaping or revamp your current landscaping! Tree/Palm Tree Trimming Storm Cleanups Sprinkler Systems

Desertscape • Concrete Work Gardening • Block Wall Real & Imitation Flagstone

Free Estimates 602-471-3490 or 480-289-1673 ROC#276019 • Licensed Bonded Insured

Water Heaters

 A

As Iowas

Voted #1 Paint Interior & Exterior • Drywall Repair Light Carpentry • Power Washing • Textures Matched Popcorn Removal • Pool Deck Coatings Garage Floor Coatings • Color Consulting

10% OFF

Insured/Bonded Free Estimates

Free Estimates! Home of the 10-Year Warranty!

ROC# 256752

ALL Pro S E R V I C E

480-688-4770

www.eastvalleypainters.com Family Owned & Operated Bonded/Insured • ROC#153131

Now Accepting all major credit cards

L L C

Prepare for Monsoon Season! LANDSCAPING, TREES & MAINTENANCE

$42Month

ROC223709

Nonnalbusinesshours

Nonnalbusinesshours

480-405-7099 www.itsjustplumbsmart.com www.itsjustplumbsmart.com

Affinity Plumbing LLC 480-487-5541 affinityplumber@gmail.com

www.affinityplumbingaz.com

Your Ahwatukee Plumber & East Valley Neighbor Anything Plumbing Same Day Service Water Heaters

24/7

Inside & Out Leaks

Bonded

Toilets

Insured

Faucets

Estimates Availabler

Disposals

Your Ad can go ONLINE ANY Day! Call to place your ad online!! Classifieds 480-898-6465

Tree Trimming • Tree Removal Stump Grinding Storm Damage • Bushes/Shrubs Yard Clean-up Commercial and Residential

.II._

A

SERVICE CALLS MONDAY-FRIDAY

We Beat Competitors Prices & Quality

T R E E

A-Z Tauveli Prof LANDSCAPING LLC

Plumbing Heating & Air

700 5-Star Reviews

www.irsaz.com

aaaActionContractingInc.com

Landscape Maintenance

East Valley PAINTERS

PlumbSmart

$BS SAVINGS

Home Improvement

ACTION CONTRACTING INC.

Plumbing

Landscape Maintenance

$35 off

Any Service

ACCREDITED BUSINESS ®

Not a licensed contractor

Plumbing

PMB 435 • 2733 N. Power Rd. • Suite 102 • Mesa dennis@allprotrees.com

480-354-5802 Painting

HOME IMPROVEMENT & PAINTING Interior/Exterior Painting 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE Dunn Edwards Quality Paint Small Stucco/Drywall Repairs

We Are State Licensed and Reliable!

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts

480-338-4011

ROC 304267 • Licenced & Bonded

ROC#309706

MORE CLASSIFIED ADS ONLINE! www.GilbertSunNews.com

What we do… • Employees Background Checked • Up-Front Pricing • Tankless Water Heaters • Tank Water Heaters • Fixture Replacements

• Plumbing & Drain Repairs • Water Treatment • Best Warranties • Fully Stocked Vans • Fix It Or It’s Free Guarantee

Drain Specialists… • FREE Camera Inspection With Every Drain Cleared • Hydrojetting

$45 off Any service call With service performed

Financing Available

• Pipe Relining • Clean Out Installation • Sewer Repair/Replacement • Pipe Bursting

*$69 drain good Monday thru Friday during normal business hours and not combined with any other offers.

480-281-7564


35

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

Pool Service / Repair

Public Notices

Roofing

Juan Hernandez

Pavers • Concrete • Water Features • Sprinkler Repair

PPebbleOcracking, O L Plaster R Epeeling, P ARebar IR showing, Pool Light out? I CAN HELP!

FALL SPECIAL! $500 OFF COMPLETE REMODEL! 25 Years Experience • Dependable & Reliable

Call Juan at

Tiles, shingles, flat, repairs & new work Free Estimates • Ahwatukee Resident Over 30 yrs. Experience

480-720-3840

480-706-1453

Not a licensed contractor.

AE&Sons

Window Cleaning

Pebble • White Plaster • New Pool Builds Tile • Deck • Pump & Filters

FREE Estimates • BEST Prices

APPEARANCE Professional service since 1995

Window Cleaning $100 - One Story $140 - Two Story

602-252-2125 Ofc. • 602-505-8066 Cell Se Habla Espanõl

Includes in & out up to 30 Panes

Lic’d, Bonded • ROC #235771 • ROC #235770

Sun Screens Cleaned $3 each Attention to detail and tidy in your home.

General Contacting, Inc.

(480) 584-1643

Bonded & Insured

A hearing will be held at 1:00 PM on the 21st day of October 2019. If you do not appear; a judgment may be given to the person suing you. A copy of the Summons and Complaint has been attempted to be served to you at your last known address listed above. Dated this the 9th day of October 2019 CoVantage Credit Union, Plaintiff Brian Millar, Plaintiffs Agent

CIVIL COMPLAINT AND SUMMONS CASE NUMBER CC2019101273RC Maricopa County Justice Courts, Arizona San Tan Justice Court, 201 E. Chicago St. #102, Chandler, AZ 85225. 602-372-3400 BURNETTA L COTTO PO BOX 7206 MESA, AZ 85216 (480)416-1956 Plaintiff(s) Dianna Lindenfelser 9739 E Empress Ave. Mesa, AZ 85208. 480-984-9414 Defendant(s) NOTICE AND SUMMONS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANT(S): You are directed to answer this complaint within TWENTY (20) DAYS by filing a written ANSWER in the court named above. If you do not answer or defend, you run the risk of having a judgment entered against you for the amount of plaintiff's claim, plus court costs. A filing fee must be paid at the time your answer is filed. If you cannot afford to pay the required fee, you may request that the Court either waive or defer the fee. Date: 5/20/19 Clerk: JB (SEAL) PLAINTIFF'S CLAIM This Justice Court has venue because -The debt, or cause of action, or the incident that resulted in this claim, occurred in this precinct at the following location: n/a $3500 is the total amount owed me by defendant because: Defendant(s) Dianna Lindenfelser neglected to return my deposit within the 14 days per landlord/tenant Act Article 2 33-1321 (item D & E or 33-1341.) Nor has she given me a written explanation on why she didn't do so. Security deposit of $1050.00 I gave Dianna a written notice to vacate premises at 7932 E. Milagro on June 3, 2016. The written noice was given to her with the rent the 3rd of May 2016. I requested her to send the deposit refund to my P.O. Box 7206 Mesa, AZ 85216. I even thanks her for giving me the opportunity to reside in their home for the last 1 1/2 years. (see further items on file) Date: May 20, 2019 /s/ Burnetta L Cotto, Plaintiff Published: East Valley Tribune, Oct 6, 13, 20, 27, 2019 / 24440

Published: Gilbert Sun News/East Valley Tribune Oct. 13, 2019 / 24794

Your newspaper. Your community. Your planet. Please recycle me.

SEEING DOUBLE - 8 DIFFERENCES Find things 8 different in the two sets of owls.

LLC

Remodeling

COUNTS

All Complete Pool Renovations

1998 Harley Davidson, VIN: 1HD1CHP13WK116586

Licensed/Bonded/Insured • ROC #236099

Pool Plaster Company

State of Wisconsin, SHAWANO County Circuit Court CASE # 19SC681 To: Maderia Lottie Dee Raymond (last known address: 455 S Recker Rd, Gilbert, AZ 85296) You are hereby notified that you are being sued by CoVantage Credit Union in Small Claims Court, Shawano County Courthouse, 311 North Main Street, Shawano, WI 54166, for a Replevin Judgment of the following collateral:

Public Notices

Licensed • Bonded • Insured • ROC118198

One Call, We Do It All! 602-339-4766

Owner Does All Work • All Honey-Do Lists • All Remodeling • Additions • Kitchen • Bath • Patio Covers • Garage • Sheds • Windows • Doors

• Pointing • Drywall • Roofing Repairs • Painting • All Plumbing • All Electrical • Concrete • Block • Stucco

• Drywall & Roofing Repairs • Stack Stone • All Flooring • Wood • Tile • Carpet • Welding • Gates & Fences • Tractor Services

Free Estimates with Pride & Prompt Service!

Sell Your Stuff! Call Classifieds Today! 480.898.6465

CLASS@TIMESPUBLICATIONS.COM

Roofing The Most Detailed Roofer in the State

®

Tim KLINE Roofing, LLC Roofs Done Right...The FIRST Time! 15-Year Workmanship Warranty on All Complete Roof Systems

www.timklineroofing.com

480-357-2463

FREE Estim at and written e proposal

R.O.C. #156979 K-42 • Licensed, Bonded and Insured

CB

ANSWERS: Left to right. 1. 1st owl beak changed color, 2. 5th leaf changed color, 3. 2nd owl has one blue eye, 4. 3rd owl body changed to blue, 5. Top of head changed to red, 6. 5th owl is now a bunny 7. heart on belly is now a square, 8. Last two owls changed places.

TK

Meetings/Events? Get Free notices in the Classifieds! Submit to ecota@timespublications.com


36

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 13, 2019

tions? Plant Ques tfill Call The Whi ow Sh Nursery Garden Sat 7-9 am KFYI 550AM Sun 7-9 am KTAR 1230FM

ARIZONA’S LARGEST GROWER DIRECT NURSERY FOR

FALL SALE!

You’ll See The Difference As Soon As You Arrive!

HUGE GIANT 36” BOX TREES UP TO 15’ TALL

Mesquite • Oak • Pistachio Mesquite • Thornless Mesquite Palo Verde • Acacia Ash • Elm • Acacia Palobrea • Ironwood Sissoo • Oak • Ash PLANTED & GUARANTEED

YOUR CHOICE

Elms & more

299 599

$

• Best Trees In Town • Friendly, Knowledgeable Nurserymen • No Commissioned High-Pressure Sales People • Best Price In Town On Quality Trees!

R O L O C L L A F IS HERE!

We Deliver & Plant Trees! Licensed, Bonded & Insured

24” BOX TREES

FOUR GENERATIONS!

PLANTED & GUARANTEED

$

This Wee

GERANIUM BLOWOUT!

k ONLY!

The Valley’s Best!

5

Giant Premium $ 99 REG.8.99 Gallon Size

Gilbert & Southern Stores only. Limited to stock on hand!

SHADE TREES $ Monster 48” Box Trees 1000’s to Choose From

• Ash • Elm • Mesquite • Palo Verde • Pistachio • Pines From UP TO 25’ TALL Planted & Guaranteed • Compare at $2500

1500

CITRUS TREES BIG 5-6 Year Old Many With Fruit!

Includes Dwarf Trees:

Lemon • Lime Grapefruit • Oranges

FROM

Compare at 3 for $1699 Compare at $1000

Regular Price

119

$

99

$

95

15 GAL.

CASH & CARRY

• Lemon • Lime • Tangerine • Tangelo • Oranges • Grapefruit & more!

PLANTED & GUARANTEED

ORCHARD SPECIAL Three 5-6 Year Old Trees

HUGE 24” Box

349

$

399 GIANT

$

36” Box

799

$

YOU CAN BUY TIME AT WHITFILLS - SPECIMEN TREES UP TO 30’ TALL. PROFESSIONALLY PLANTED AND GUARANTEED MAIN TREE FARM 2647 E. Southern Ave. (Phx)

602-268-9096

EAST VALLEY

NORTH PHX/ SCOTTSDALE

Cooper (Stapley) & Guadalupe

824 E. Glendale Ave.

480-892-2712

602-944-8479

All offers limited to stock on hand. • No other discounts apply. • Not valid on previous sales. Multi trunk, jumbo size, and field dug trees slightly higher. STORE HOURS: MON-SAT 8-5:30, SUN 10-4 • LICENSED, BONDED & INSURED • RESIDENTIAL - C-21 - 125878 • COMMERCIAL - A-21 - 125879

SALE ENDS 10/22/19

Price is good with ad only. Delivery is $75

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Gilbert Sun News 10-13-2019  

Gilbert Sun News 10-13-2019  

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