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THE VOICE OF THE EAST VALLEY SINCE 1891 AND WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE FOR LOCAL REPORTING

Martial arts, spectacle on Chandler stage

EAST VALLEY

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PAGE 17 FREE ($1 OUTSIDE THE EAST VALLEY) | EastValleyTribune.com

West Mesa Edition

INSIDE

This This Week Week

NEWS ........................ 3 EVIT superintendent can go back on campus.

COMMUNITY ........ 12 Mesa couple collects tons of can tabs.

BUSINESS ................. 15

Mesa veteran gets underfoot.

OPINION ..................16 They’re our neighbors too.

FOOD ....................... 22 Let the holiday baking begin with this.

COMMUNITY ............... 12 BUSINESS .......................15 OPINION ....................... 16 SPORTS ..........................17 GETOUT......................... 19 CLASSIFIED....................24

Chandler High ready for the big rumble Sunday, November 10, 2019

Mesa preparing $60M water meter replacement BY JIM WALSH Tribune Staff Writer

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nother “emerging technology’’ will soon reach the yards of virtually every Mesa homeowner – improving ef�iciency, reducing theft and helping consumers save money, of�icials predict. It also will cost taxpayers $60 million by the time the project is completed in May 2022. City of�icials outlined plans last week for Mesa’s conversion to “smart water meters’’ that can be read remotely, eliminating meter readers and instantly pinpointing water leaks and other issues. Despite the cost, the project generally was received warmly by Mesa City Council. “I think this is something badly needed in the community,’’ said Councilman Dave Luna. “I like the idea that a customer will be able to go in and monitor their consumption.’’ Councilman Francisco Heredia recommend-

Whew! Schools breath sigh of relief on vote

ed an educational effort to instruct Mesa residents about how to use the system wisely and to save the most money possible. “I am very excited about the technology as a resident,’’ Councilwoman Jen Duff said. “Maybe we have a leak in our irrigation’’ that would be identi�ied by the system. Jake West, Mesa’s water resources manager whose job usually focuses on obtaining and delivering water, said, “I think this will be a big part of our conservation effort.’’ Phase One involves replaceming about 2,000 meters downtown and in Superstition Springs in East Mesa. It also includes building a computer network that will allow the city to turn on and turn off meters electronically from a central location. Residents also will be able to use a portal to monitor their use of electricity and water, to see the impact of replacing an old heat pump or to spot a potentially expensive water leak. Once Phase One is tested and checks out, the

next step is a costly and time-consuming one: replacing more than 200,000 meters citywide. “We are going fast and furious on this project, to get this project through,’’ said Candace Cannistraro, the city’s management and budget director who is heading up the multi-dimensional project. Her presentation said a �irm with experience in rolling out such systems, called Arcadis, has been retained to direct the project, with four different city departments participating. Phase One is anticipated to launch in May 2021 and the entire city is expected to be covered about a year later. She told the City Council at a study session that the cost of phase one would be $5 million and the citywide buildout would cost another $55 million. The entire effort is considered a capital improvement project and could be funded with a

��� WATER ���� 3

Honoring our heroes

TRIBUNE NEWS STAFF

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oters last week approved all East Valley school districts’ bond and budget override requests, prompting jubilation and gratitude among of�icials – especially in Mesa. Mesa Public Schools this time saw victory for its 15 percent budget override – one year after it lost a similar election – although its 54 to 46 percent margin of victory was the smallest among all the districts’ results. Mike Hutchinson, East Valley Partnership vice president and chairman of the political action committee that worked for passage of the measure, hailed the vote. “Last year there were two Mesa Public Schools items on a very lengthy ballot. The $300 million bond request was approved and

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The East Valley Veterans Day Parade will be held tomorrow, Nov. 11, in downtown Mesa to honor, thank and celebrate local veterans and active military. More than 40,000 spectators watched more than 2,000 parade participants from East Valley communities including Mesa, Chandler, Gilbert, Tempe, Scottsdale, Apache Junction, Queen Creek and Higley last year. Commemorating the 100th anniversary of Veterans Day and the 75th anniversary of D-Day, Presentation begins at 10:30 a.m. and the flyover and parade start at 11 a.m. from University Drive and Center Street. For complete details, see the special insert in today’s Tribune. (Special to the Tribune)


2 THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

THE SUNDAY

Tribune EAST VALLEY

The East Valley Tribune is published every Sunday and distributed free of charge to homes and in single-copy locations throughout the East Valley. To find out where you can pick up a free copy of the Tribune, please visit www.EastValleyTribune.com.

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WATER from page 1

bond issue, utility excise tax bonds or other short mid-term financing, Cannistraro told the Tribune. funded with bonds, the usual practice in Mesa. “The cost for phase one is estimated at $5 million and is funded with current bond authorization in water, natural gas and electric,’’ she told the Tribune in an email. “The funding for citywide deployment is also anticipated to use bond financ-

NEWS

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ing,” she said, adding: “We will explore all options over the next year as we further understand and quantify the anticipated costs and benefits.” A consultant concluded that the city is primed for such a project because of several factors, including its extensive fiber availability, which will make the network needed for the extensive system possible. The consultant’s report said that Mesa had about 229,000 meters last year, including 148,000 water, 63,000 gas and

16,700 electricity. The vast majority of these meters will need to be replaced. Cannistraro said the city is anticipated to recoup its installation costs in an estimated 12-13 years. The savings from the system are estimated to include $1.7 million a year from minimal meter reading; an 80 percent reduction in customer service trips saving 7,900 work hours; $2.7 million per year from timely replacement of inaccurate meters.

need for all of us to be more aware of how much water each of us uses on a daily basis,” Mesa Water Conservation Coordinator Donna DiFrancesco said. “We hope this urges our customers to be more mindful of how they use water in their household and to learn about the easy ways to reduce their use in order to protect this valuable resource.” Typical residential water usage in Mesa ranges from 90 to 190 gallons of water per person per day, including indoor and

outdoor use. The city broke down water use this way: consumption, seven gallons; showers and baths, 13 gallons; toilets, 14; household cleaning, 21 gallons and outdoors, 65 gallons. During the summer, water bills reach their highest due to outdoor use such as landscaping and swimming pools. By November, if homeowners do not overseed their lawns with winter grass, their water use should be much lower, the city said.

to return to their usual jobs eventually after Wilson regains his card, Koelbel said. O r i g i n a l ly, it was hoped Wilson would regain the card DR. CHAD WILSON much faster, after an expedited administrative review on Oct. 18, before the Arizona Board of Fingerprinting. But the state board declined to restore Wilson’s card without a full hearing, which could take three or four months. Koelbel said it is possible that Wilson’s criminal case in Pinal County Superior Court could be cleared up before the fingerprinting board rules on his case. Kuhn was filling in for Wilson, anyway, while he was off-campus. In return for her added responsibilities, Kuhn is receiving a stipend as compensation. “We have regular leadership team meetings where educators get together to toss around ideas,’’ Koelbel said. “The board wants to let Wilson’s due process play out.’’ Because of that reason, Wilson’s pay also was not reduced, he said. In addition, the board has recognized that Wilson’s alleged misdeeds had no connection to EVIT and that the charges

stem from his actions while serving as superintendent of Apache Junction schools. The obstacle with the fingerprint card is another complication from the board’s decision to retain Wilson, despite his indictment. That indictment stems from a state Auditor General’s Office investigation of Apache School Unified School District records. The state Attorney General’s Office used the audit to obtain charges of misuse of public monies, alleging that Wilson arranged for $133,223 in payments not authorized by the Apache Junction Governing Board to administrators during a five-year period, from 2012 to 2016. The $126,000 in “performance payments’’ went to 11 to 15 administrators, while another $3,880 was spent on “professional development instruction,’’ and $2,550 was spent on paying three administrators to attend athletic events on Friday nights. Wilson himself received $480 in unauthorized payments, according to the Auditor General’s report. Despite the indictment and the case pending in Pinal County Superior Court, the EVIT board voted to retain Wilson, with additional financial safeguards in place. An administrator from a Tucson vocational school was loaned to EVIT to handle financial duties.

Library display depicts Mesa water use TRIBUNE NEWS STAFF

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he Mesa Main Library is also thinking about water – and ways to save it. All month it will host a 16-foot-tall, 120-gallon water jug pyramid display to show how much water one person consumes a day in their home. The display will include water leak detection guides and other free booklets on how to save water. “This impressive display illustrates the

EVIT finds way to get superintendent on campus

BY JIM WALSH Tribune Staff Writer

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he East Valley Institute of Technology found a way to get Superintendent Dr. Chad Wilson back to work despite the automatic suspension of his fingerprint clearance card for his indictment on theft and misuse of public money. Wilson, 49, who was promoted from interim superintendent to superintendent in July, has been reassigned to a new position that doesn’t require the card, director of external affairs. The state requires most teachers and superintendents to carry the card if a criminal background check using their fingerprints shows they have no been convicted of most crimes. Dana Kuhn, who previously was an assistant principal at EVIT, was promoted to interim superintendent, a position she is expected to fill until Wilson regains his fingerprint identification card. The suspension of Wilson’s card left his job in a precarious situation. His contract requires him to possess the card as a condition of employment, said Kevin Koelbel, EVIT’s director of legal services. Koelbel acknowledged the job switch is a work-around, intended to get Wilson back to work after he took 16 days of personal leave when the card was suspended. EVIT’s intention is for Wilson and Kuhn


4

NEWS

BOND from page 1

the budget increase was defeated,” he said. “With only one item on this year’s ballot, the Yes for Mesa campaign was able to really focus on telling the story about the need for additional budget capacity for the schools. “A key factor was the work of hundreds of volunteers who participated in a wide variety of grassroots voter education activities across the School District,” he said. “Their months of hard work led to excellent voter turnout and the great result for the students and the dedicated employees of the Mesa Public Schools.” Turnout was relatively light in all the East Valley districts’ all-mail election, with only about a quarter of all ballots that were sent to voters being returned. Districts that saw approval of their money requests also included Chandler Unified, Gilbert Public Schools, Higley Unified and Tempe Elementary. Chandler Unified voters okayed by a 62 to 38 percent margin a $290-million bond – the largest in the district’s history. It will help pay for construction of a new elementary school in Gilbert, where the district covers the western edge of town and a new high school in eastern Chandler. Chandler, Arizona’s second-largest school district, said it needed the bond money to accommodate the 3,000 extra students projected within the next decade. Gilbert Public Schools also won approval by a margin of 62 to 38 percent for a big bond request – $100 million. But voters there approved a 15 percent budget override by only 55 to 45 percent. Higley Unified voters gave their blessing to two district money questions. By a 65 to 35 percent margin, they approved a repurposing of money from a 2015 capital bond, and voted 63 to 37 percent in favor of continuation of a budget override. Tempe Elementary voted by a similar 2-1 margin in favor of continuing and increasing a budget override. Mesa’s money request posed dire consequences for the state‘s largest school district had voters rejected it with officials projecting the need to cut $37 million over the next three years if the override isn’t approved. The bond issues and budget overrides were signs of the continuing financial struggles of Arizona public schools in the

t o Gews? N

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

minimum wage increase is making it hard for us to maintain a minimum wage for our classified employees, such as bus drivers and cafeteria workers,” Thompson said prior to the vote. The district also plans to funnel more money toward increased school security staffing, attracting and retaining quality teachers with better pay and keeping class sizes low. Additional counselors The political action committee that supported a “Yes” vote on Mesa Public Schools’ and programs override request on last week’s ballot worked hard to get it passed. for staff and (Special to the Tribune) student social face of underfunding by the state. and emotional support are also at the Although MPS has been operating un- forefront. der a 10 percent override since 1995, District officials hailed the vote. district officials argued that a 15 percent Stating the district is “thankful” to votoverride is needed in order to stay afloat. ers, MPS spokeswoman Heidi Hurst said The additional 5 percent will pro- the additional funding also “provides vide $54 million per year for five years. the learning resources needed as we Homeowners with a property valued at carry out our strategic and master facili$100,000 can expect to pay $15.50 per ties plans, and continue to deliver on our month in taxes. promise that all students graduate ready “At the end of the day it’s a continuation for college, career and community.” and extinction of local control we’ve had Governing Board member Marcie in place since ‘95,” said Assistant Superin- Hutchinson, whose husband chaired the tendent Scott Thompson. “The reason for PAC pushing for the override, said the adthe increase is that the costs of things are ditional money “would ensure that every going up.” MPS student has a shot at a great public Like many of the other districts that education. sought overrides, Mesa is struggling to “Mesans understand that securing the meet the requirements of the 2016 voter- funds to attract and retain the best emapproved minimum wage referendum. ployees: teachers, bus drivers, counselors, The current override covers only 8.7 custodians, nurses, administration and percent of the district’s employees, which office staff to serve every MPS student by serve more than 63,000 students. strength and need matters,” she said. “The primary thing for us is that the “We’ve been passing overrides in Mesa

since 1994! Mesans want our graduates to be ready to seize opportunities in higher education and in their careers. They look forward to our graduates contributing to our community. They understand that this election was about our kids, our schools, and our future.” In the voter informational pamphlet for Mesa Public Schools, 10 people – including Mayor John Giles – submitted arguments in support for the override increase while the former Mesa Governing Board president wrote the sole argument against it. “Successful neighborhood schools are the backbone of a strong community, and Mesa’s school system is one of our city’s crown jewels,” Giles wrote. Former board president Ben Smith cited the refusal of MPS to look for ways to improve efficiency and the over-reliance of the district on a series of five budget overrides dating back for 24 years. “It was their unwillingness to innovate. They want to keep things the same,’’ he wrote. “They are so dependent on the overrides.’’ Thompson disputed Smith’s arguments against the override, stressing the district’s financial transparency. “To argue we’re not efficiently run is a disservice to the work that Mesa has done to run its budget as conservatively and appropriately as possible in terms of what we have available,” he continued. Thompson also praised the last week’s victory, stating, “The increase will go into effect in the year 2021 on July 1 – that’s important for people to understand. It’s not tomorrow – I don’t get a big check tomorrow.” “The increase from 10 to 15 percent will impact next year’s budget, so now we start planning the details of really getting into what next year’s going to look like,” he added. “Of course we already have a roadmap, but there are a lot of things for planning that is still being worked out.” He too thought this year was a better year for the campaign, year to this year: “Last year, there was a lot on the ballot and a lot of political races and initiatives and it’s difficult for districts to have this conversation with our community because we are limited in how we can approach it,” Thompson said. “We just want to continue to be very intentional about being transparent and open with our community.”

Contact Paul Maryniak at 480-898-5647 or pmaryniak@timespublications.com


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

5

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NEWS 6 THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

cozy up with hops Fiesta Bowl Charities had a colorful celebration last year when it announced its grants through the Wishes for Teachers program and this year the charity doled out another $1 million across the state to teachers in the form of $5,000 grants. (Tribune file photo)

EV teachers score with Fiesta Bowl grants BY JORDAN HOUSTON Tribune Staff Writer

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iesta Bowl Charities have $5,000 grants to 62 East Valley public and private school teachers – half from Mesa – that they can put toward classroom improvements of their choice. The Fiesta Bowl Charities Wishes for Teachers grants – totaling $1 million – were awarded through a lottery-style drawing to teachers across the state who had submitted requests. Of awardees in the East Valley, 33 teach in Mesa schools, followed by Gilbert at 14, Chandler with 8, and Queen Creek with 7. “We are grateful to Fiesta Bowl Charities and DriveTime for awarding 24 Mesa Public Schools educators $5,000 classroom grants,” said district spokeswoman Heidi Hurst. “These funds will provide innovative learning opportunities for students throughout the district.” Some teachers’ grant requests covered basic classroom items. For example, Susan Might, a ninthgrade English teacher at Westwood High in Mesa, wanted money for new desks. Brittany Whiteman, a first-grade teacher at the Liberty Arts Academy, a Mesa charter, wanted “shade for their playground,” according to the charity. On the other hand, Christy Hegebush, a special education teacher at Chandler Preparatory Academy, “wants to use money to open a school store that her

students with special needs can work at to learn valuable life and communication skills,” the charity said. And seventh-grade social studies teacher Patricia Smith, who works at South Valley Junior High School in Gilbert, plans to use her grant “to create a Civil War trunk of items to give kids a hands-on learning experience about the war.” GPS spokesperson Dawn Antestenis echoed Hurst’s sentiments toward the additional funds. “We are delighted that 11 Gilbert Public Schools teachers were successful in their applications for 2019 Fiesta Bowl Wishes for Teachers,” she told the Tribune. “Every year our students directly benefit from the projects funded by these grants and we are grateful to Fiesta Bowl for this opportunity,” Antestenis added. Each fall, Arizona public and charter K-12 teachers are invited to fill out an online application to the charity program detailing their school or classroom need. The Fiesta Bowl organization then selects 200 teachers whose wishes meet certain criteria. “They’re great examples of the good that Arizona teachers can do for their communities and their students,” a Fiesta Bowl spokesman said. “With many teachers spending their own money to improve classrooms, the Fiesta Bowl decided to lend a hand.”

see TEACHERS page 7


NEWS

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

TEACHERS ���� ���� 6

The program awarded $1 million for the second year in a row. Over the four years of the program, Fiesta Bowl Wishes for Teachers has granted $3.2 million to Arizona teachers, according to its website, impacting over 150,000 children across the state. The $1 million grant is believed to be the largest donation to Arizona teachers. A majority of teacher wishes surround enhancements in technology, reading, music and �itness among other things. One �ifth-grade Mesa Public Schools teacher said she hopes to use her grant toward purchasing mini robots for her �ifth-grade classroom. Dwight Patterson Elementary School’s Janet Bleeker, who has been teaching for 21 years, told the Tribune that she believes her students will bene�it from having access to Lenovo – a Chinese multinational computer technology company – Cue robots. The robots are customizable robots designed for kids interested in coding. “This past summer, I spent some time focusing on gaining more knowledge in technology and the new programs that are available,” she said. “We know that in our world of tech — and how things are changing,” she continued. “Coding and computer programming

are going to be really important skills for our kids.” The Cue robot is described by its maker as a tool to help students transition from block-based code to state-machine and text-based programming. Its mots and sensors work together to provide accurate and “versatile” behavior while reacting in real-time to its surroundings, which coerces kids to build problem-solving skills through coding, engineering and design. “The kids do all of the programmings,” said Bleeker. “They tell the robot what to do, create the programs and are then able to see their creation come to life through the robot,” she added. “It includes making the robots move and adding emoji faces to them and colors.” While the robots cost around $200 a piece, the software needed to operate them is free. “I’m so grateful and thankful to the Fiesta Bowl organization for this opportunity,” Bleeker said. “We [teachers] have grand ideas and sometimes aren’t able to put them into play in a classroom because of �inancial restraints.” In addition to their �inancial grants, the teachers can march in the Desert Financial Fiesta Bowl Parade on Dec. 28 and be recognized on-�ield at the Cheez-It Bowl at Chase Field the day before.

2 Chandler lawmakers grapple with health coverage issue BY HOWARD FISCHER Capitol Media Services

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wo Chandler Republican legislators and Attorney General Mark Brnovich are taking the �irst steps to craft legislation to ensure that Arizonans with preexisting conditions can still buy health insurance if federal courts strike down the Affordable Care Act. The move comes even as Republican attorneys general – including Brnovich – are working to have the law declared unconstitutional, including the provisions about access to coverage. They contend Congress lacks the power to mandate that people buy health insurance. Last December a federal judge in Texas agreed. That sent the case to the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, which could rule any day. But the �inal word is likely to belong to the U.S. Supreme Court. Depending on how quickly they schedule arguments, a ruling could come as early as this spring. The law, approved by what was at the

time a Democrat-controlled Congress has never been popular among many Republicans. But Sen. J.D. Mesnard said that if the Affordable Care Act disappears, so does the provision requiring insurers to provide coverage for those with preexisting conditions. And he acknowledged that particular part of the statute, in particular, remains popular. Mesnard is working with state Rep. Jeff Weninger and Brnovich “I think there’s growing appreciation that we want to make sure that those with preexisting conditions aren’t now somehow unable to get coverage,’’ he said. How that would work and who would pay for it, however, remains to be decided. “There are obviously going to have to be conversations with a wide assortment of folks, including insurance companies that will obviously be impacted by this,’’ Mesnard said. And those costs, he said, are likely to be

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NEWS

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Beleaguered Mesa Police chief calls it quits BY JIM WALSH Tribune Staff Writer

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ormer Mesa Police Chief Ramon Batista abruptly resigned after enduring a vote of no confidence earlier this year by the Mesa Police Association and criticism for his reaction to two controversial use of force incidents. Assistant Police Chief Ken Cost was quickly promoted to interim chief by city officials – who praised Batista for his community outreach and for improving training to reduce use of force incidents. Mayor John Giles noted that Mesa has its lowest crime rate since the 1960s, and said it’s important for residents not to lose perspective by focusing on the controversial incidents. “We need to step back and reassure ourselves that the Mesa Police Department is a very good police department, that crime is down and that officer use of force is down,’’ Giles said. “I hold Chief Batista in high regard. This was the chief’s decision. He leaves having accomplished a lot,’’ Giles said. Giles acknowledged that complaints had been filed against Batista, but he said he did not think some of them were legitimate. “He was in a situation where he was attacked internally,’’ Giles said. “He was never going to have a particularly long term anyway. He was really coming in at the tail end of his career.’’ Mesa Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Sally Harrison said, “‘I’m sad to see him step down. The Chamber Board appreciates the efforts Chief Batista made and wish him well.” Batista was hired in July 2017, by Mesa after a 35-year career with the Tucson Police Department. City Manager Chris Brady said the city was looking at the time for someone with experience who would bring new ideas and communicate well with everyone in the city, including minorities. Brady echoed Giles in saying that Batista’s short, stormy term was far from a failure. He said Batista’s clashes with the police association wore on him. At one point,

t o G ws? Ne

Though he won plaudits from the mayor and City Council as well as the Chamber of Commerce, Mesa Police Chief Ramon Batista tendered his resignation last week, telling his civilian bosses he planned to “do some different things,” City Manager Chris Brady said. (Special to the Tribune)

the association posted a billboard in central Mesa calling for Batista’s ouster. “As much as we assured him that we had his back, I think it just wears on you,’’ Brady said. “He’s been through some tough times. He decided it was time for him and his whole family to do some different things,’’ Brady said. “He’s done a lot of good things for the city.’’ But while Batista may have pleased the city’s management, it was clear that he poisoned his relationship with rankand-file officers when he released two controversial videos of some patrolmen’s violent encounters with suspects. One depicted an officer pummeling a man during a response to a domestic violence incident, punching him three or four times and delivering knee strikes. Union officials at the time said they thought Batista rushed to judgment on the actions of officers after viewing the controversial videos, without the benefit of an internal affairs investigation. “I don’t feel our officers were at their

best,’’ Batista said at the time he released the video. “I don’t feel this incident went the way it should have went.’’ Batista later hired a national police organization to review Mesa police use of force tactics and enlisted the help of former Maricopa County Attorney Rick Romley in investigating use of force incidents. “They are disturbing and they will not be tolerated,’’ he said about the videos during the press conference. “The actions shown on that video and all these recent videos do not reflect on the vast majority of men and women with the Mesa Police Department,’’ Batista said. “I am angry and deeply disturbed by what I saw in those videos.’’ In tersely worded responses to Batista’s resignation, both the Mesa Police Association and the Mesa Fraternal Order of Police chapter avoided commenting directly on Batista’s departure and instead focused on the future. “Batista’s departure marks the third leadership transition in less than a de-

cade for our department. We look forward to working with the City Council and city management to finding a longterm chief who will serve our city well,’’ the MPA said in a prepared statement. Glenn Pearson, the association’s new president, said officers look forward to working with Cost, a longtime Mesa officer who previously commanded the Fiesta District in west Mesa and all patrol operations. Will Biascoechea, president of the FOP’s Mesa Lodge, said in a prepared statement, “The Mesa Fraternal Order of Police wishes to express its gratitude to the City of Mesa’s city management team for bringing closure to a strained twoyear period by former Chief of Police Ramon Batista.’’ John Goodie, a retired Mesa park ranger and longtime civil rights activist, said he was saddened to hear about Batista’s resignation. “I liked Chief Batista. I thought he was a man of character. I know he believed in good policing,’’ he said.

Contact Paul Maryniak at 480-898-5647 or pmaryniak@timespublications.com


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

INSURE from page 7

passed on to all people with health insurance, no matter where and how it is purchased. “I suspect there’ll be a domino effect for all of us to be impacted by this potentially in our premiums,’’ Mesnard said. “But at the end of the day, I think that most people acknowledge that the preexisting conditions issue has always been a challenge and one that we have to overcome.’’ The wide-ranging 2010 law, required employers to provide health insurance for their workers and individuals to obtain their own coverage. It also created insurance exchanges to provide discounted coverage for those who meet income guidelines, expanded Medicaid coverage and eliminated lifetime monetary caps on insurance coverage. And then there was the prohibition against insurance companies from excluding people for preexisting conditions. The Supreme Court upheld the law in 2012, with the majority hanging its hat on the mandate for individuals to purchase insurance, saying that fits within the power of Congress to impose a tax. But all that fell apart in 2017, when Congress eliminated the financial penalty for failing to have insurance, a move that the current round of challengers eliminated

any legal basis for the law. It is that, Mesnard said, that creates the need for a contingency plan if the Supreme Court finds the current version of the law unconstitutional. “We don’t want to be caught unprepared,’’ he said. Mesnard said he believes Arizonans should not have to go back to the days before the Affordable Care Act when they could find themselves unable to purchase insurance.

tion to challenge the law. “There is a question here as to whether or not the act, as it stands today is unconstitutional,’’ he said. Anderson said it is separate from the policy questions of whether there should be mandated coverage for preexisting conditions and whether more needs to be done to ensure that Americans have better access to health care. “Those are all very relevant discussions and they’re appropriate discussions,’’ An-

a policy standpoint, I think it’s the “rightFrompolicy to make sure that those with preexisting conditions can get coverage ” - Sen. J.D. Mesnard

“From a policy standpoint, I think it’s the right policy to make sure that those with preexisting conditions can get coverage,’’ he said. Mesnard said while there can be debate over other provisions of the law, this issue is “one that most people on both sides of the aisle have rallied behind as an issue we have to tackle.’’ None of this would be necessary if there were no lawsuits, one in which Brnovich has joined. But aide Ryan Anderson defended his boss’ decision to join the litiga-

derson said. “The fact of the matter is, if you believe something is unconstitutional, the ends shouldn’t justify the means,’’ he said. “He personally believes that preexisting conditions should be covered by insurance companies,’’ Anderson said of Brnovich. “But that doesn’t mean the American people should be forced to accept a broader unconstitutional mandate in order to keep the act’s most popular provision.’’ A court ruling voiding the Affordable Care Act would have effects beyond the

9

issue of preexisting conditions that this proposal hopes to resolve. Arizona was one of the states that took of the provision which provided federal dollars to expand health coverage to anyone earning up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level, about $29,400 for a family of three. Prior to that, Arizona law, as approved by voters, included coverage only up to the poverty level. That added about 400,000 people to the rolls of the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System, the state’s Medicaid program, bringing the current total to close to 1.9 million. If the Affordable Care Act goes away, so does the federal cash which pays almost the entire cost of the expansion. Mesnard said it is possible that the Supreme Court could leave the Medicaid expansion piece in place even if the rest of the law is voided. And if not? “I’m prepared to consider all options,’’ he said. Mesnard said his views won’t be colored by the fact that he voted in 2013 against the proposal by then-Gov. Jan Brewer to expand Medicaid. “Opposing a new thing is one thing,’’ he said. “And sort of rolling back something that’s already in place is another.’’

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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Mesa ex-vice mayor Kyle Jones gets nod for JP BY JIM WALSH Tribune Staff Writer

F

ormer Mesa Vice Mayor Kyle Jones won appointment for the second time as the North Mesa – Justice of the Peace – seven years after his �irst selection by the county Board of Supervisors. This time, Jones, who had been serving in the court as a justice pro tem, will replace retiring Justice of the Peace Cecil Ash. In May 2012, he replaced Lester Pearce, who resigned to run for a seat on the Board of Supervisors. Ash and Pearce were both ex-state legislators. Jones served as North Mesa JP for seven months and has served as a judge pro tem, who �ills in for judges who are on vacation or ill, for more than six years. Jones was one of eight candidates to submit applications to the supervisors after Ash announced his retirement. Because Ash was a Republican, only members of the same party quali�ied. The candidates included another former Mesa Vice Mayor, Chris Glover, who represented central Mesa until he stepped aside because of term limits. He was replaced on the council by Jen Duff. “He’s not only got a good heart, he’s not only an honorable man, but he has a passion to do right by others,’’ said Steve Chucri, who represents District Two, which includes Mesa. Chucri added that Jones has “the right temperament’’ to serve as a JP and that he has a proven record of “very ably’’ running courts as a pro-tem. “I have great hopes for the future, working with the wonderful staff there,’’ Jones said. “I am grateful’’ for the appointment. The appointment not only pays Jones

KYLE JONES

annual salary of $101,500, but also puts him in a position to run as an incumbent for the position in 2020. Jones stressed his experience in the lower courts in his application, saying he has already received the legal training JPs are required to obtain, even though they are not required to a have a law degree. “When sitting on the bench, a judge must be fair and impartial with a demeanor that allows for good interaction with the public,’’ Jones wrote. While acting as a council member and the JP, “I have always strived to be a moderator seeking common ground and reaching the fairest resolution possible,’’ he wrote. The 25 county justice courts handle a similar caseload to that of municipal court, which includes civil and criminal traf�ic offenses, some driving under the in�luence cases, small claims and landlord-tenant disputes. JP’s also can of�iciate at civil marriage ceremonies.

Veterans Expo Wednesday at Chandler-Gilbert college TRIBUNE NEWS STAFF

C

handler-Gilbert Community College will host the 11th-annual Veterans Resource Expo to showcase college and community resources for veterans and a speaker billed as “transformational.” The expo, 1-4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13, is in Room SC 140, at the college, 2626 E. Pecos Road, Chandler. The resource expo will feature exhibitors from college and community orga-

nizations who work diligently to serve student veteran population and their dependents. Guest speaker is Marine veteran Artesian Kirksey, a mental skills coach and author who will discuss practical and easy-to-implement techniques for developing mental toughness, improving focus, establishing good habits, increasing ef�iciency and capitalizing on momentum. The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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Mesa couple devotes tons of love to charity BY HALEY LORENZEN Tribune Staff Writer

D

ick Paulin says, “Every little bit adds up.” The Mesa resident can attest to

that. He and his wife Karen collected over six million soda can tabs, over the last 12 years. Since 2007, the Paulins have collected tabs for Ronald McDonald Houses in the Valley, raising over $15,000 for the charity – enough to house a family there for a thousand nights. Founded in 1974, Ronald McDonald House Charities provide families a more comfortable, affordable alternative to a hotel to stay in while their child is in the hospital. Some families stay for a day, while others stay up to a year, depending on their child’s treatment. “It doesn’t take much to take a tab off a can, Dick said. “And we take any tab, it

Since 2007, Karen and Dick Paulin of the Sunland Springs Village in Mesa have collected more than six million aluminum can tabs - over 2 tons - to help Ronald McDonald Houses. (Haley Lorenzen/Tribune Staff Writer)

doesn’t have to be soda or beer, you have soup cans that have tabs on them now, cat

Mesa United Way launches Thanksgiving food drive TRIBUNE NEWS STAFF

M

esa United Way’s hopes to give 500 homeless families across the county a happy Thanksgiving. Through its Harvest of Hope campaign, it has launched an effort to collect enough nonperishable food for a complete meal for families of four through local shelters and transitional housing programs such as Paz de Cristo, Save the Family and Homeless Youth Connection. Mesa United Way is asking residents, social clubs, church groups, neighborhood organizations and employers to help make its vision a reality. Interested groups should visit mesaunitedway.org/harvest to learn more about the project, sign up to host a donation drive, download a full list of needs or purchase a meal for a family in need. As an of�icial charity partner of the Mesa Music Festival, Mesa United Way will be featured

food, so we take them all.” The Milwaukee natives moved to Mesa

at the festival with a special stage where they will collect all of the donated meals. Donors can deliver their Harvest Dinner Boxes to the Band Bodega/Mesa United Way Stage Nov. 14-16, at 120 W. Main St. Mesa. Event attendees will also have an opportunity to get involved or learn more about the campaign while they enjoy more than 200 of the best emerging artists in the country. “The holiday season often means that young children go without receiving breakfast or lunch at school and parents must stay home from work to care for them, straining budgets that are already tight. When we come together, we really can make a signi�icant difference in the lives of families that we call neighbors, friends, and colleagues,” said Harmony Nelson, director of community impact for Mesa United Way. Information: John Zielonka at john@mesaunitedway.org.

GOT NEWS?

Contact Paul Maryniak at 480-898-5647 or pmaryniak@timespublications.com

in 2001, and they’ve been ever since, residents of the Sunland Springs Village retirement community. “We were going to be snowbirds and it took us about �ive weeks to realize it’s just too nice,” Dick said. Right after moving to Arizona, their grandson, who was later diagnosed with autism, began frequently spending time in hospitals in Wisconsin while doctors tried to �igure out his diagnosis. When they went to visit, they were invited to stay in a Ronald McDonald House. “It was so wonderful, we kind of got hooked on it. Their availability and the things they do for the people that come in is phenomenal. So, I was really impressed,” Karen explained. The two Ronald McDonald Houses in Phoenix and one in Mesa serve families that live more than 35 miles away from the hospital where their child is being

The Fiesta Patrol Division of Mesa Police Department also is helping homeless people. Det. Angel Rea from the Crisis Response Team reached out to the Coleman’s Company and asked if they could provide some sleeping bags. The renown outdoor company donated 50 sleeping bags for the Paz de Cristo, where Rea helps out when he’s not on duty. Starting today, a box will be in the lobby at the Fiesta Station, 1010 W. Grove and at Paz de Christio, 424 W. Broadway Road for sleeping bag and blanket donations. (Special to the Tribune).

��� TABS ���� 13


COMMUNITY

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Mesa student named Miss Indian Arizona TRIBUNE NEWS STAFF

T

he Miss Indian Arizona Scholarship Program named Mesa resident Audriana Mitchell the 2019-20 Miss Indian Arizona. Mitchell, a Navajo member of the Colorado River Indian Tribes, competed against �ive other contestants and will represent 22 Arizona Native American tribes across the country. Audriana is a student at Mesa Community College, studying communication and organizational management. “The American Indian Institute at MCC is very proud to recognize Audri in this capacity and wishes her all the best as she moves forward in this capacity,” said Jim Larney, director of the MCC American Indian Institute. Audriana said she has a goal of serving as an ambassador for Native youth everywhere and much of her previous experience leading to her prestigious recognition has prepared her in numerous ways. She said she is excited to continue connecting Native youth with opportunities through engagement in their schools and communities. She also wants to travel to as many tribal communities as possible while in this role to meet, serve and teach youth how to become leaders capable of positively

TABS ���� ���� 12

treated. Families are asked to make a small donation to stay, but if they are unable to pay, they won’t be turned away. Karen Paulin said she asked their community director how she and all her neighbors could support the Ronald McDonald Houses in the Valley together. “So, then we brainstormed, and she said, ‘Okay, why don’t we collect a ton of tabs?’” Karen’s reaction was, “Well, that sounds really cool. But how many is a ton of tabs?” Dick said there are 2,534,000 in a ton and the couple is currently working on collecting their third ton. The Paulins collect a majority of the tabs from other residents of Sunland Springs Village, although they will sometimes get calls from those outside of the community who want to donate the tabs they’ve accumulated. Every Tuesday morning, members of the community get together for coffee and donuts so the couple can collect the tabs they’ve accumulated.

Mesa Community College student and Mesa resident Audriana Mitchell waves to the crowd after she was crowned Miss Indian Arizona. She now will represent 22 Arizona tribes in events across the country. (Special to

the Tribune)

impacting and serving their tribes and nations. “Audriana spent many years serving and advocating for Native youth to learn how to overcome the many issues and challenges they face,” an MCC spokeswoman said. “She has served passionately as a volun-

They also don’t wait for the tabs to come to them. At bingo every week, Dick said, “We go around checking the �loor, anybody who’s �inished their soda, we always take the tab off of that.” Once collected, he sorts through the tabs with a large magnet in order to pull out the pieces of steel or other junk that get mixed in with the aluminum. The tabs are then stored in �ive-gallon paint buckets until the �irst Tuesday in May each year, when they are taken down to the Roanoke House in Phoenix, the largest Ronald McDonald House in the Valley. They are then recycled by an outside vendor. “We have like a tag-along that day, people go with, and we take pictures of them dumping the tabs, it’s kind of a fun thing,” Karen said. Dick laughed and added, “Then we always have a Dutch treat lunch somewhere, I mean seniors can’t go out if we don’t have something to eat.” The couple doesn’t just donate the tabs, however. They also do fundraising and cook din-

teer, mentor, leader, peer guide, organizer and of�icer with local and national organizations including Big Brothers Big Sisters, Mesa Strength Youth Council, Mountain View High School Native American Club and United National Indian Tribal Youth. A member of the 25 Under 25 Native Youth Leaders Class of 2018, she also has

ners once a month for the families staying at one of the houses. For the past �ive years, the Paulins have served dinner, along with other volunteers from their community, at the Ronald McDonald House in Mesa. Every night, other volunteers and organizations come in and cook meals for those staying at the house. “They provide the food so that the parents at the hospital, when they come back, they don’t have to worry about what I’m going to do about supper? Where’s my next meal?” Dick explained. Collecting the tabs has become somewhat of a habit for the couple, they said. “We’ve already been on vacation with some friends, and they had a cocktail party for everybody that was staying at the resort,” Karen said. “After the party was done, the four of us went around to the

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13

been Miss Colorado River Indian Tribes and is current president of the MCC Intertribal Student Organization. Through all of her experiences and recognitions, she has received an outpouring of support from friends and family but she says she honors the most important supporter, her mother Harlietta Mitchell. “I am pleased to represent my community and look forward to connecting and supporting other Native youth,” Audriana said. “I hope to make a positive impact on those I meet through this wonderful opportunity.” Larney said during the time Audriana has been at MCC, she strengthened her leadership skills by assisting with outreach activities the MCC American Indian Institute provides to Native American students. “She serves as a campus tour guide, participates in our student panels, is active in our ISO student club and currently serves as the President,” Larney said, adding: “She is genuine in her interactions with campus visitors and is always willing to share her educational experience in assisting other students to navigate through a higher education institution. “She is a great role model for American Indian students. She will be a wonderful ambassador as a representative of her tribal community and for MCC.”

dumpsters, and we were picking the cans out and popping the tabs off.” “And one of the people that was working there came by and said, ‘What are you guys doing?’ Then we told him about the Ronald McDonald House and so they got right in there and they were helping us pull all the tabs off,” said added. “It’s so crazy.” They don’t add too many cans themselves, though Karen sad, “I pop a few Diet Coke cans.” The Paulins need slightly over a million more tabs to complete their next ton, but said they have no intention of slowing down. “We’ll collect the tabs until there are no children in the hospital,” Dick said. “That’s not going to happen, unfortunately, but it just means were going to continue to do this as long as we can.”


14

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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Mesa veteran switches career to new floor store BY JORDAN HOUSTON Tribune Staff Writer

F

rom working as a United States Air Force OB-GYN, an Army field medic, a junior high school science teacher and a volunteer fireman, Mesa resident Steve Smith has done it all. Now, he’s focusing on running Arizona’s first-ever Footprints Floors, a national company specializing in diverse flooring services. Located at 625 W. Southern Avenue, Smith opened the franchise with the Valley’s burgeoning housing market in mind. Footprint Floors works with master craftsmen to install floors and baseboards – including tile, vinyl, stone and hardwood, among others. He employs contractors to restore “quality and integrity” with the intention to return floors to original states. “The focus is not about selling floors,” said Smith. “It’s about happy customers and spending time getting to know them.” As far as pricing goes, the franchise offers homeowner financing through Joist, a software platform for trades contractors, Smith explained. Free estimates for individual projects can be given online through the company’s website. Smith told the East Valley Tribune that although he had never owned his own franchise before, he believed his unique work history would prepare him for the new role. “It’s the people thing,” said Smith. “This is about people who do floors, it isn’t a flooring thing. It’s another place for me to go out and enjoy talking to people.” Originally from Minnesota, Smith spent 8 years of his young adult life in the military. With prior experience as the youngest state-certified EMT in the 70s, he worked as a medic for a field artillery

t o Gews? N

Mesa resident Steve Smith, a former Air Force OB-GYN and Army field medic, has opened Arizona’s first Footprints Floors outlet. (Pablo Robles/Tribune Syaff Photographer)

battalion in Minnesota before transitioning to an OB-GYN position with the air force in Illinois. “Most of the patients were called de-

self-sustaining city and everything you need is there.” Smith assisted with the delivery of over 260 babies during his time there.

pendent wives because it’s a training base and you get a lot of young students who are newly married,” Smith explained. “The military is really cool, it’s like a

He later moved to Arizona in 1989 and has kept his hands full ever since. The veteran did a 16-year-long stint with Circle K, in which he won an award for managing the highest number of

This is about people who do floors, it “ isn’t a flooring thing. It’s another place for me to go out and enjoy talking to people. ”

stores in the shortest amount of time. “Half of that time was spent in the stores and in field leadership and the last 7 years I was working for the franchise and was the training manager for the franchise group.” He also did volunteer work at the Gilbert Fire Department for 2 years, in which he helped out with the community assistance branch. Around that same time, he substitute t aught for Mesa Public Schools where he taught 7th-grade science classes. “I have two friends who are school teachers and are a married couple and they were always complaining about how they could never find any quality substitutes, so I thought ‘why not?’” said Smith. “Motivating kids, getting them interested in a topic and watching a light come on is the coolest thing,” he added. An avid M&M collector, Smith went on to become a territory supervisor for a Mars Chocolate sales team, eventually progressing to regional manager. “I’m a free spirit, that’s what my mom would say,” said Smith. “I am excited by change, there are people that are change agents –those are the people that go out there and help other people adjust to change – and I’m a change creator, the one that will make change happen.” As for now, the adrenaline-seeker is enjoying life as a new franchise owner. He said the transition process has been easier than expected, and he’s excited to continue to support the community. “When things got weird with my jobs in the past, and there was realignment or things were going under, I was left wondering where I was going to be,” said Smith. Adding, “I thought, ‘how do I get better control of my world?’ I don’t want to retire, but I would like an opportunity to pay for stuff when I’m not working so hard.” Information: footprintsfloors.com, 480- 571-5335.

Contact Paul Maryniak at 480-898-5647 or pmaryniak@timespublications.com


OPINION 16 THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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Coyotes may have more right to be here than humans BY DAVID LEIBOWITZ Tribune Columnist

M

uch of what makes life in this Valley appealing is the state’s rugged desert feel. The landscape is rough hereabouts, all scrub growth and cactus that can tear flesh. The temperature for many months of the year is too much for weaker beings. And then there’s Arizona’s wildlife, the rattlesnakes, scorpions, javelina and coyotes who have called this place home since long before man moved out West and staked a claim. Life in the Valley isn’t for everyone. I was reminded of that after watching a story on KTVK Channel 3 about a Nov. 6 neighborhood meeting between scores of angry Scottsdale residents and officials from the Arizona Game and Fish Department. The subject of the gathering? A rash of

homicidal urban coyotes who have killed six dogs and a cat since September in the area around Scottsdale and Bell roads. Said one lady neighbor while jabbing a manicured fingernail at Game and Fish officials: “I’ve been here since 1974, and it’s never been the case (of) this many coyotes. And I can tell you it better not start being the case because if I get hurt, I’m gonna sue somebody. I’m gonna say you should’ve been protecting me and you weren’t.” I’ll note for the record that coyote attacks against human beings – manicured or otherwise – are exceedingly rare in Arizona (and non-existent in this TV story). Coyotes mostly eat fruit and garbage and roadkill. They occasionally switch things up by grabbing small dogs and cats who almost exclusively have been left off-leash or allowed to roam the backyard unaccompanied after leaving the house through the doggie door. The chances of a coyote or a coyote

pack cornering and attacking you or snatching your pet while you’re nearby standing sentinel? It’s pretty much zero based on my quarter-century living here. Confronted by humans – and I’ve seen my share of coyotes while hiking and golfing – desert dogs are typically timid, ready to flee the moment you act unafraid and dominant. As for the risk of a coyote killing a small pet that’s off the leash, my response may sound heartless, but here it is: That’s life in the desert. It happens. That’s the life we all chose when we came here. In cities, the greatest danger to pets is a lifetime of confinement and avenue traffic. Here, the desert has predators who kill. The less you account for that and the less vigilant you are as a desert pet owner, the more likely your pet will end up a victim. Again, I don’t mean to belittle the grief of pet owners who loses a dog or cat. That

into the tear gas chamber where we had to remove our masks and endure the burning eyes and coughing spell like we had never done before. Upon completion of our training, I was sent to California and reported to the U.S.S. Galveston, CLG-3. Shortly after that, we set sail for Vietnam. We had to go up into the Gulf of Tonkin in the black of night with Vietcong on both sides of the channel. Upon arriving at our designated area, we had to begin a special mission called “Operation Starlight.” During this mission, we had to shoot Star Shells up at night to light up the battlefields for our troops to see the enemy. During the day we would shoot inland with our 6-inch gun mounts and drive the enemy out to the beach so that we could shoot them on the beach with our 5-inch mounts, or guns. At one time we had to shoot out a

bridge using spotters and not hurt anyone down below. The mission was a success and we were awarded a Presidential Citation for our success. Six months felt like six years over there. There were no parades and welcome home crowds when we returned but I would gladly put the uniform and do it again. This country is the best in the world so tell a Veteran thanks when you see one because he fought for the freedoms you have today. Mesa resident and Pastor Thor Strandholt is associate pastor of Valor Christian Center, 3015 E. Warner Road, Gilbert. Reach him at 480-545-4321.

There were no parades when I came home BY DR. THOR STRANDHOLT Tribune Guest Writer

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t age 17, I dropped out of High School and decided to join the U.S. Navy. This was back in 1964, and the Vietnam Conflict was ramping up so you did not have to have a high school diploma to get in. I was sent to New York to get sworn in with a bunch of local hoods. Somehow the boot camp got word that a bunch of New York wise guys were on their way. So off to the Great Lakes Naval Training Center we went. The training was brutal and by the time we completed our training, there were no more punks in the crowd. We trained and learned to be a team for what was ahead. During the training, we were forced

would be devastating. Still, such losses do not represent blood on the hands of Game and Fish. That department has always been very clear about its role in the Arizona ecosystem: Game and Fish does not remove or relocate “nuisance wildlife” to protect pets. They take action only when human lives are at risk. The metropolitan Phoenix desert remains a place with rough edges, risks and discomforts. That’s part of what makes the Valley unique. We don’t live in desert owned by Disney, with a chorus of smiling coyotes singing “Hakuna Matata.” Here, owning small dogs and cats comes with certain risks and responsibilities. If that’s not what you signed up for, I totally understand. But the proper response isn’t to call the government to demand protection or to call in a SWAT team of lawyers. Perhaps you should consider calling a real estate agent instead?

Share Your Thoughts: Send your letters on local issues to: pmaryniak@timespublications.com


VETERANS DAY PARADE

HONORING OUR VETERANS EV Veterans Day Parade honors 2 major moments TRIBUNE NEWS STAFF

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he dual theme of this year’s East Valley Veterans Parade is “Commemorate and Celebrate,” echoing the World War II saga “War and Remembrance.” In commemorating the 75th anniversary of D-Day – the turning point of World War II – and marking the 100th anniversary of Veterans Day – established in 1919 as Armistice Day – the East Valley Veterans Parade pays tribute to one of the war’s most historical moments as well as the nation’s decision to set aside a special day remembering all who served this country during war and peace times. “War and Remembrance” was novelist Herman Wouk’s sequel to “Winds of War” and both involved World War II’s impact on several fictitious families while it also portrayed some major moments leading up to and during the war. On June 6, 1944, Supreme Allied Commander General Dwight D. Eisenhower gave the go-ahead for the largest amphibi-

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The Stars and tripes will be unfurled in many ways at the East Valley Veterans Day Parade as thousands honor the men and women from the region who served their country. (Special to the Tribune)

HoHoKams, Stearman Guys among EV parade entries TRIBUNE NEWS STAFF

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he East Valley Veterans Day Parade boasts more than 100 marching units and two of them are the Mesa HoHoKams and the Stearman Guys. They’ll be marching. The HoHoKams organization, established in 1951, promotes spring training baseball in Mesa. With 200 members who volunteer their time by serving as parking attendants, ticket takers,

ushers and more at each home game for the Chicago Cubs and the Oakland A’s, the HoHoKams raise significant funds to make grants to East Valley organizations focused on youth sports. The HoHoKams are long-time parade participants, usually featuring a trolley with members riding or walking alongside it. They also help judge floats and other parade entries. “The East Valley Veterans Parade is a great event in our community honoring those who have served to protect the freedoms we enjoy and participating is just one more way our organization serves our town,” said Tim Baughman,

Big Ho of the Mesa HoHoKams. “I walk to honor those who sacrificed to preserve the American way of life,” added former Big Ho Ron Duranti. In 1998, the seven pilots who built and flew experimental WWI replica aircraft, in formation, began the Stearman Guys. The group eventually stopped flying their experimental aircraft to move to the more reliable and “real” WWII trainer, called the Stearman. Although not a requirement to fly formation, all Stearman Guys maintain a formation certification, currently on file and FAA-recognized as FAST – for “Formation and Safety Training”

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PARADE ROUTE AREA MAP


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ous military operation in history. Operation Overload, more commonly known as D-Day, began the Allied invasion of northern France. By daybreak, over 18,000 British and American parachutists were on the ground, with an additional 13,000 aircraft providing air cover and support. At 6:30 a.m., American troops came ashore at Utah and Omaha beaches, while British and Canadian troops landed at Gold, Juno and Sword beaches. By day’s end, 155,000 Allied troops successfully stormed Normandy’s beaches and pushed inland, opening a second front against Germany. The heroism and bravery displayed by Allied troops changed the course of World War II. On Nov. 11, 1918, Allied powers signed a ceasefire agreement with Germany at Rethondes, France, at 11 a.m. bringing the war, now known as World War I, to a close. On Nov. 11, 1919, President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed the first Armistice Day with these words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled

SPOTLIGHT ���� ���� 1

– program. Today, they consist of eight pilots who regularly fly with the group, with the occasional addition of other Valley pilots flying in antique airplanes, also trained in formation flying. The Stearman Guys have flown in the East Valley Veterans Parade for the past eight years. Four to six WWII era Stearman biplanes fly down the parade route during the parade. “We are very proud of our American heritage with several of us being veterans of different services,” said member Kurt Gearhart. “Flying historical aircraft over a Veteran’s celebration (or any event) adds another viewing dimension and allows us to share our aviation heritage with parade

with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory.” Between the world wars, Nov. 11 was observed as Armistice Day, but after World War II, it was recognized as a day of tribute to veterans of both wars. In 1954, after veterans returned from both World War II and the Korean War, President Dwight Eisenhower signed a bill rededicating Nov. 11 as Veterans Day, and encouraged Americans to commit themselves to the cause of peace and to honor America’s veterans for their courage, honor, patriotism and sacrifice. The East Valley Veterans Parade has a storied past. When the annual Mesa Veterans Parade fell victim to necessary budget cuts in 2006, local residents Gerry Walker and Frank “Gunny” Alger spoke out on behalf of the 40-year-old Mesa tradition. “There will be a Veterans Day parade if it is only me marching down the street with Frank watching,” Walker declared. The Marine Corps League Saguaro Chapter in Mesa took the lead and the Mesa Veterans Parade Association was formed. In 2013, the all-volunteer organization

Thousands of spectators from across the region hailed veterans and watched marching units at last year’s parade. (Special to the Tribune)

changed its name to the East Valley Veterans Parade Association to reflect the participation of parade entrants and spon-

sors from most East Valley communities. Donations to this nonprofit are tax-deductible.

Two of the more than 100 parade entries are the Mesa HoHoKams , above, and The Stearman Guys, both beloved institutions in the region that have given much to the community.. (Special to the Tribune)

participants,” he added. “The noise and site of WWII era aircraft flying in a military formation is an experience that may not be around forever. Both

the WWII Stearman aircraft as well as formation flying skills are becoming rarer as time goes on.” To learn more about the history of this

PARADE SPONSORS

group, visit: captainbillywalker.com/formation-flying/formation-flying-lafayetteescadrille-d-arizona. Mesa Community College Albertson-Safeway SRP Visit Mesa Mesa HoHokams Larry H. Miller Ford Downtown Mesa Association. Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport Gateway Bank Boeing DAV-Chapter 8 VFW Dode Morris Post Mesa Sunrise Rotary Club Copa Health


NOVEMBER 11, 2019

VETERANS

WWII hero is the grand marshal in EV parade TRIBUNE NEWS STAFF

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he 2019 Grand Marshal of the East Valley Veterans Parade is Lieutenant Henry DuBay, 95, of Gilbert. Born in Massachusetts and raised in northern New York, DuBay graduated from high school in 1941, six months before Pearl Harbor and signed up for a new pilot training program. DuBay trained at various bases, including Lawson Army Airfield, where he was trained in dropping paratroopers. Once the US entered the war, DuBay found himself in the European Theater. His first mission was flying supplies from Africa to Sicily in July 1943. During this time, 64 C-47s were shot down in a “friendly fire” incident over Gela, Sicily, costing more than 465 lives. The following months brought a variety of missions, eventually leading to the Normandy Invasion, beginning June 6, 1944, as part of Operation Overlord, now commonly referred to as D-Day. DuBay piloted a C-47 transport during the Normandy Invasion, the massive Allied invasion opened western pressure on the German army and ultimately contributed to ending the war in Europe. “He is my hero, as every soldier in World War II is. I have such admiration for these men who risked their lives for freedom,” said his daughter, Dr. Holly West of Gilbert. “My father tells stories of flying through air so thick with smoke, that staying in formation was nearly impossible because you couldn’t see the other planes 15 feet away. With one navigator for every eight planes, finding your target was your one consuming thought. There was no time to be afraid.” “Henry DuBay certainly qualifies as a member of ‘The Greatest Generation’ and a true war hero, delivering troops, supplies and fuel, often behind enemy lines,” said Rick Hardina of Honor Flight Arizona. During his 2 1/2 years of active service,

JEAN ANN BOTWRIGHT

The parade’s grand marshall is World War II veteran Lt. Henry DuBay, 95, of Gilbert, who flew dangerous missions running suppkes in the European Theater. (Special to the Tribune)

DuBay’s service included delivering supplies to Gen. George Patton’s Third Army and the Red Ball Express, dropping paratroopers, tugging gliders and, during the Battle of the Bulge, landing at night and in bitter cold with only the lights of runway jeeps to assist him. Completing his duty in September 1945, at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, he married, earned this architectural degree and went on to design international airports. He worked on the ICBM and the Apollo Project for NASA, which 50 years ago this last July put Americans on the moon. The 95-year-old Gilbert resident personifies the thousands of quiet everyday heroes demonstrating courage, skill and resolve without regard for personal fame. His service in face of the threat of almost constant danger resulted in him receiving the Air Medal – the Armed Forces decoration created in 1942, awarded for single acts of heroism or meritorious achievement while in flight – and eight Bronze Stars. Added his daughter:

“Looking beneath him, he saw men swarming the beaches of Normandy and saw with his own eyes what you and I can only imagine from D-Day films,” his daughter said. “How these men had such bravery I cannot imagine or ever understand, but thank God they did, thank God they did.” The 2019 service marshals for the parade are: Coast Guard: Lt. Commander Scott K. Savela, who serves as operations officer for Port Security Unit 311, providing support for military and humanitarian operations worldwide. His previous deployments included many overseas locations. He also served 10 years on active duty for the U.S. Air Force. Navy: Chief Radioman Frederick Peterson enlisted in the US Navy in 1943, at the age of 17 and served on nearly a dozen different Naval ships. After World War II, he enrolled in Radioman school, launching the remainder of his 22-year naval career focused on com-

PARADE MARSHALLS

FREDERICK PETERSON

OLIVER BABBITTS

RICHARD MICHAUD

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munications. He also developed a passion for Marshal Arts. At 94, he is the eldest living, active Grand Master in the United States. Army: Chief Warrant Officer 3 Oliver Babbitts joined the U.S. Army in 1942, studying engineering and becoming a part of the Army Corps of Engineers, with special expertise in water purification and distillation. It was this expertise that brought him to Iwo Jima, site of an epic military campaign between U.S. Marines and the Imperial Army of Japan. Babbitts was stationed for 11 months on the island to support the Marines with water supply. Marines: Lt Colonel Jean Ann Botwright entered the U. S. Marine Corps 1954. She served as drill instructor at Paris Island South Carolina. In 1961, she attended Officer Candidate School in Quantico, and in 1962 served in Communications during the Cuban Missile Crisis. She was the first woman unit commander of Marine Reserve Fleet Marine Force. Since retiring from the Corps in 1980, she has logged an extraordinary number of hours and travel miles in support of Veterans Administration Medical Centers in Pennsylvania, Missouri and Arizona, and to develop programs to address acute issues affecting women veterans. Air Force: Lt. Colonel Richard E. Michaud joined the U.S. Navy at the age of 18, serving in the Philippines and the Admiralty Islands during WWII. After the War, he graduated from college as a Distinguished Military Graduate and entered the U.S. Air Force as an intelligence officer in the 330th bomb squadron and soon thereafter completed the Air Force’s select “Top Gun” school. A pilot and the squadron commander of the 602nd Search and Rescue Squadron in South Vietnam, he flew 193 combat missions that helped rescue 76 of 78 downed pilots, earning him 5 Distinguished Flying Crosses, a Bronze Star and 14 Air Medals.

SCOTT SAVELA


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NOVEMBER 11, 2019

Mesa policeman and Army veteran helps his brothers BY HALEY LORENZEN Tribune Staff Writer

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hen Mesa veteran Sean Stoddard founded a nonprofit two years ago, choosing to call it “Archangels,” it had a much deeper meaning for him. “Our platoon was called the Archangels,” Stoddard recalled of his 2007 and 2008 tours of duty in Iraq as a member of the U.S. Army. “The logo that we use is actually the patch that was made by one of the soldiers that I served with. It’s very sacred to me. Some of the original Archangels are no longer with us, so it’s really special to all of us.” The Mesa native attended Kino Junior High and Mountain View High School before joining the Army, which also deployed him for two years in Afghanistan. Stoddard, the 13-year Mesa Police Department veteran policeman founded Archangels in 2017, to provide services to veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. He knows – not only from his service to his country but also as a first responder how – how PTSD can impact an individual’s mental health. “When he returned from his service overseas, he said, “I started hearing about a lot of the challenges a lot of my brothers I served with in Iraq were going through, and so I started looking into possibly starting a nonprofit.” “I worked with a lawyer and the lawyer

Officer Sean Stoddard served in the U.S. Army and did two tours in Iraq in 2007 and 2008. (Special to the Tribune)

Mesa Police Officer Sean Stoddard, an Army veteran, founded Archangles to help his former comdrades in arms who suffer PTSD as a result of their service in war zones. (Special to the Tribune)

said, ‘Oh it’s too much money. It’s too painful. It’s too hard, don’t try to do it,’” Stoddard said. The Archangels began as a group of volunteers before becoming an official nonprofit organization. However, right after he founded Archangels, Stoddard was deployed once again. “As I started to get ready for the deployment, I thought you know what, I really need to just put this thing to the next level,” he said. “I wanted to also focus on first responders.” Today, Archangels provides a wide range of services for both veterans and first responders – including equine therapy, military dinners and fundraising for other organizations in the Valley. For veterans or first responders who are struggling financially, Archangels works

with businesses throughout the Valley to provide them with free or low-cost services. They can call Archangels, which will then connect them with the appropriate service provider, even a plumber or hairstylist. The nonprofit also raises money for the families of fallen service members to help with funeral costs and other necessities. “What’s nice about us is we don’t charge a dime. I don’t make a dime, I’m a volunteer, my board is volunteer, everyone who’s involved is volunteer, so when people donate it’s not like we take off 25 percent. It just goes to the family.” “It’s a beautiful thing to be able to do that,” Stoddard said. Archangels next big event, the Victory Run, will be held on Veterans Day this year

at Magma Ranch Veterans Park in Florence. “It’s going to be a 5K with every different service organization, the Marines will be out there, the Army will be out there. We’re going to have face painters and balloon twisters,” he said. One of Archangel’s recent projects was also held at the Veterans Park, where they “installed a really beautiful sign there,” he added. “It’s 10 feet wide, six feet tall and solid steel; it has all the military emblems. It’s incredible.” Stoddard is currently working on completing his master’s degree and is studying ethics and the treatment of PTSD. “I think the most immediate, pressing need is trying to fight PTSD and suicide,” he said. “It’s such an epidemic everywhere, and not just across the country, but specifically in the service community.” Information: archangel.rocks.

Mesa couple helping vets with bottles and cans BY PAUL MARYNIAK Tribune Executive Editor

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ack in 2007, Gary Cherms of Mesa said he “made a deal with the Man upstairs” as he prayed for the safe return of his eldest son Michael from his sixth and final tour of duty in the Middle East. “I said, ‘You take care of my son and I will take care of the veterans who need some help,” he said. They both kept their ends of the bargain. Indeed, Cherms continues to keep up his end – one empty bottle or can at a time. Just about any day on the doorstep or at the curb in front of his Leisure World home, evidence abounds of his

promise-keeping efforts in the form of bags and boxes filled to the brim with hundreds, often thousands, of plastic bottles and cans. He sells them to raise money for the 625 Christmas stockings he and wife Lisa buy and stuff with toiletries, playing cards and other simple treasures for Phoenix VA Hospital patients. “I never know what I’ll find when I walk out my front door in the morning,” said Cherms. This year, though, the pressure is really on the couple. In keeping with the age-old adage, no good deed goes unpunished, Phx. VA Hospital officials were so delighted with the Cherms’ Christmas magic, now want the couple to extend it to the Gilbert and Tucson VA Hospitals.

That means 2,200 Christmas stockings and all the $15 worth of stuff they put in each one. “We really need some help,” said Gary, who already gets some help from American Legion Family Post 26 Mesa, Maricopa Gardens Memorial Park and the Mesa Chamber of Commerce. “My goal is simple: to put a smile on every veteran’s face this Christmas,” Gary said. Christmas is not the only time the Cherms think of veterans. They sponsor “Christmas in July Military Style” and assemble packages of hard candy, trail mix, books and magazines and other useful diversions and necessities and package them for troops overseas. They also have started a pen pal pro-

gram so entire families can write to them. But it’s the bottles and cans that are the lynchpin of the Christmas operation. ”The city might not want some of them now, but I have someone who does,” Gary said, referring to the company that pays him 25 cents a pound for his loot. The Cherms want all the bottles and cans you can give them – though they also accept cash donations for their programs. You can drop off bagged bottles and cans at their home – Lot 25, 2455 S. 56th St., Mesa – or send a check to that address, which is in ZIP code 85206. Information: 480-788-3204 or garyjamescherms@gmail.com.


SPORTS

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Two Chandler teams bound for Open playoff BY ZACH ALVIRA Tribune Sports Editor

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ootball programs from Chandler will represent the city in the inaugural Open Division playoff when it kicks off in two weeks. Chandler and Hamilton make up two of the eight teams in the Open Division, which pins the top eight programs from the 4A, 5A and 6A conferences against one another in a state-championship bracket. Teams are chosen based on a formula used by the AIA, which takes into a team’s record and strength of schedule to compile the rankings. The final rankings were released Saturday morning in Tempe during the Arizona Interscholastic Association’s bracket release show. “You have to earn each win now that it’s one-and-done,” Chandler coach Rick Garretson said. “If you don’t bring your A-game, you’re going to be out. My staff knows how to prepare for two weeks.

finish 10-0 on the year, are the No. 1 overall seed in the tournament. It’s the second straight season Chandler will enter the postseason as the top-ranked team. Last year, the Wolves were No. 1 in the 6A Conference tournament and ran the table to win their third straight championship. Chandler will open up the tournament on Friday, Nov. 15 against Chaparral, who used a last-second touchdown pass from senior and Ohio State-bound quarterback Jack Miller to defeat Liberty, securing the Firebirds spot in the Open playoffs. “Chaparral is a great team,” Garretson said. “We’ve played them quite a few times in the passing tournaments Chandler High players last week were already eyeing their so we are a little familiar with them bid for the first Open Division crown. (Chris Mortenson/Tribune in that. Staff Photographer) “It’s going to be a great game and we are proud to represent the Premier Re“We will have those kids ready.” The Wolves, who defeated rival Ham- gion in the super-8 as the 1-seed.” Hamilton entered the regular-season fiilton Friday night in thrilling fashion to

nale on Friday, Nov. 1, against Chandler as the No. 5 team in the Open rankings. Despite nearly knocking off their rival, the Huskies fell two spots to No. 7 and will face a tough task in the opening round as they will travel to Peoria to take on the three-time defending 5A champion Centennial, the second-ranked team in the Open. “We feel good about everything we’ve done,” Hamilton coach Mike Zdebski said. “We’ve improved throughout the season. We’ve learned from all of our setbacks and we are excited to move forward.” After winning just three games in 2018, Zdebski’s first year, the Huskies look to be back to their old ways. Led by a plethora of senior talent on both sides of the ball, Hamilton has been dominant at times this season. The Huskies only losses this year have come against Brophy, the No. 2 seed in the 6A Conference tournament and Chandler on a last-second touchdown Friday night.

tember practice. “When she said yes to that, I knew she wouldn’t back out of joining the team.” Donahoo saw it less as a favor for a Red Mountain High senior coach, than an Makayla Donahoo began playing badminton after first- opportunity. year coach Jake Kober asked “To be honher to participate in the team’s est with you, summer camp. From there, my seshe fell in love with the sport. it’s (Simon Williams/Contributor) nior year, so I thought I would try something new,” she said. “It was a little bit of a push and a pull, but I came out to their summer camp and I have a ton of fun just out there playing and practicing so I thought I would give it a shot.” After summer camp, Donahoo found herself having fun and succeeding in her first go-around with the sport. That, and

playing with fellow softball player-turned badminton player, Brooklyn Urlich, made the transition from sport to sport that much easier. Ulrich, a junior, has been by Donahoo’s side for the last four softball seasons at the varsity and travel team levels. The comfort of playing as a pair has been evident on the court, too. Having run together as the Lions’ No. 1 doubles duo in five of their nine times together — the most of any pair — it shows the confidence Kober and assistant coach Jackie Kennedy have in them. Kober calls them “bulldogs” for their raw ability and personal tenacity. Kennedy cites Donahoo’s ability to communicate, regardless of who she is playing with. That makes meetings during timeouts easy from a coaching side. “When I come over and talk to them, I just want to like give them some positivity,” she said. “They know what they want to do. I don’t have to say anything. That’s just the type of competitors they are.”

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Makayla Donahoo embraces badminton with softball success BY SIMON WILLIAMS Tribune Contributor

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akayla Donahoo was not supposed to be on the badminton court, especially with her heading to college on a Division I softball scholarship at Weber State. At the start of the summer, the Mesa native had no intention of adding anything to her already busy schedule. Playing travel softball for the Arizona Suncats, the rising senior had her eyes set on the fall being dedicated to her club commitments and preparing for the spring season at Red Mountain High School. That was until the first-year badminton coach Jake Kober asked her if she would come out for the team’s summer camp. Kober, the assistant on the Red Mountain softball staff, took up badminton duties and was in need of players. He knew that, in order to fill a team, he would need players who are athletes, not just people who knew how to play the sport. And, with only five players returning

Makayla Donahoo has had most of her success on the diamond as a softball player, as she is planning to attend Weber State on a full athletic scholarship in the fall. (Eric Newman/Tribune Staff)

from the previous season, he took a flyer on one of the most dependable athletes he knew. “I offered for her to be on the badminton poster since she was going to be a senior,” Kober said, laughing after an early Sep-

�ee DONAHOO page 18


18 THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019 SPORTS

OPEN from page 17

Zdebski recognizes the challenge ahead against Centennial, who has been a perennial power in the West Valley for years under coach Richard Taylor. “I know they’re well-coached and they get better as the year goes on,” Zedebski said of Centennial. “We are excited to be in the open-8 and we are excited to go to Centennial. It’s going to be a great crowd. “Playing in that type of environment is great for your kids because it rewards them for their hard work. We just need to prepare these two weeks and put a good product on the field.” Along with Chandler and Hamilton, Saguaro, Horizon and Chaparral will also be in the Open tournament representing Scottsdale. Saguaro, whose only loss this season came against California power Cathedral Catholic (San Diego, Calif) back in August, finished as the No. 3 seed in the Open Division bracket. The Sabercats will take on fellow Scottsdale-area school Horizon in the opening round on Nov. 15. The Huskies finished as the 7-seed in the Open Division. It will be the first-ever meeting between the two programs. “We just wanted to have a high seed and have a home playoff game,” Saguaro coach

Cathedral Catholic, among others. Mohns believes matchups with outof-state competition of that caliber helps prepare his team for the grind of the season. That remains especially true this year with the installment of the Open Division. “We weren’t very comfortable being uncomfortable. We really Hamilton High School’s football program will play as the No. 7 seed in the Open played out of characDivision tournament later this month. (Pablos Robles/Tribune Staff) ter in that game and Jason Mohns said. “We are excited to be at against Chaparral in the first half,” Mohns home and it will be an exciting matchup said. “When you don’t get tested, you get against Horizon. A lot of our kids know comfortable and you just think you’re goeach other, and we’ve never played, so that ing to show up and beat teams. “Those games prepare you to get in a dog will be fun.” The Sabercats have been dominant at fight and help you become a better team. the 4A level, winning the last six confer- That’s why we schedule those games.” Salpointe Catholic (4) from Tucson and ence titles. Saguaro last lost to an in-state school in Pinnacle (5) also made the Open Division 2015, when the Sabercats fell to Centen- bracket after finishing a combined 17-2 nial and Pinnacle, who played a division this season. Salpointe Catholic was the up. Mohns regularly schedules out-of-state second-ranked team for several weeks opponents early on in the season. In recent before the final rankings came out, but years, Saguaro has faced Liberty (Hender- a canceled game likely made the Lancson, Nev.), East (Salt Lake City, Utah) and ers drop to No. 4 as they only played nine Serra (Gardena, Calif.) and most recently, games.

DONAHOO from page 17

While a 2-7 record as a pair in doubles rounds is not the cleanest of marks, they have shown that they can compete. In their losses, five times have they kept the score within five points, revealing how easily matches could have come down to a few whiffed birdies. Even with close losses, Kober is willing to take the results if he can have someone like Donahoo on his team because he wants to build a program. “They are doing everything we asked of them at the beginning of the season,” he said. “But when you are in these tight games, you just want to win the damn thing.” Players of high character and work ethic, like Donahoo, help create an environment that, in due time, will begin to turn into a history of winning. From the softball side of things, the Lions’ accomplishments are unrivaled in the state. In Donahoo’s three years on the diamond, they have compiled a 66-20 record with three regional championships to their name. As of August, he was just trying to get enough kids to come out. Now, Kober is going to try and turn Red Mountain “from a softball school to a badminton school.”


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Arts Center hosts a dazzling display of dynasty BY SRIANTHI PERERA Guest Writer

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o bring to stage the story of China spanning 2,200 years, from the �irst Qin dynasty to modern times, is no easy feat. The Phoenix Wushu Academy, which recently moved from Chandler to Gilbert, is attempting to do just that. Seventy of the school’s students under, the age of 18, will dance their way through “Dynasty: A Martial Arts & Dance Epic” Nov. 17, at Chandler Center for the Arts. The Qin Dynasty began in 221 B.C., and was during the construction of the Great Wall of China. It follows 10 major time periods, including the Golden Age of the Han Dynasty, when martial arts �lourished; the Song Dynasty, paper money and gun powder emerged; and ends in modern China, where martial arts, dances and ancient art forms have become sporting and cultural activities passed to younger generations. Scriptwriter Jane Ho co-directs with Bonnie Fu and Andrew Ho.

Fu (also known as Wushu, a modern form of traditional Chinese martial arts), dance, music and acting. “However far we progress into our future, it is our past that de�ines who we once were and reminds us of where we came from,” said Jane Ho, who teaches Wushu and piano at the school. “We believe it is our duty to bring awareness of our cultural heritage and encourage the people around Martial arts as well as dance is part of the Phoenix Wushu Academy’s elaborate us to also appreciate production at Chandler Center for the Arts next Sunday. (Yeung Photography) the breathtaking hisDynasty promises to be a rich spectacle tory and culture of China.” Jane Ho called the show the school’s of entertainment where dynasties rise and fall, battles are won and lost and ad- “most elaborate” production so far. “Dynasty is a visually stunning show ventures unravel. In essence, it is a treasury of Chinese that combines advanced technological history and culture, which is performed moving backgrounds as well as beautiful without dialogue but instead with Kung staging and on-set props,” she said.

3 jazz musicians to celebrate a legacy label BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI GetOut Editor

J

azz musician James Carter considers his situation “blessed.” He’s toured around the world on solo and band jaunts, but this November, the James Carter Organ Trio will tour with fellow Blue Note artists vocalist Kandace Springs and pianist James Francies in celebration of the label’s 80th anniversary. The musicians will perform a set of their own music followed by a �inale with

If You Go...

What: “Blue Note 80th Anniversary Celebration: The State of Jazz 2019”. Where: Tempe Center for the Arts, 700 W. Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16 Cost: $17-$50 Info:: 480-350-2822, tempecenterforthearts.com

all the acts coming together to perform a classic Blue Note tune. The show comes to the Tempe Center for the Arts at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, November 16. Carter said this is his �irst Arizona show since the 1990s. “I’ve recently heard of The Nash, which is in Phoenix,” he said. “I’ve been dying to get out there to see it.” The three musicians are stellar in their own right. Springs—a Nashville singer and pianist—will release her third Blue Note album, “The Women Who Raised Me,” in early 2020. After her head-turning 2014 self-titled EP (which caught the attention of Prince who raved “Kandace has a voice that could melt snow”), Springs released her Larry Klein-produced debut album Soul Eyes in 2016, followed by her 2018 album, “Indigo,” produced by Karriem Riggins. Francies was born in Houston, but is now based in New York City. He released his acclaimed debut album, “Flight,” on

Blue Note in 2018. Francies has played with jazz headliners like Pat Metheny, Chris Potter, Jeff “Tain” Watts, Stefon Harris, Eric Harland and Terrace Martin, and racked up equally impressive credits in hip-hop and R&B: from gigs with Lauryn Hill, José James, Common and Nas, to studio time with Chance the Rapper and appearances with The Roots on “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.” The Detroit-born Carter released his Blue Note debut, “James Carter Organ Trio: Live from Newport Jazz,” on August 30. On the album, he reinvented Django Reinhardt. He’s well known in the Motor City. As a �ledgling musician, Harry Connick Jr. pulled Carter on stage during a gig at the Fox Theatre in 1991. “I’ve de�initely been in a blessed situation,” he said. “I’ve worked with different heroes and musical people. I’ve

��� JAZZ ���� 21

As visual director, she has worked hard the last three months to bring to life every scene in Dynasty. She has even collaborated with international visual effect artists to create some of the scenes. The production uses 250 sets of costumes. Head of wardrobe, Chloe Cheng, who has handled similar shows for six years, has custom-ordered the costumes from factories in China that specialize in creating realistic ancient Chinese costumes. The show is also an opportunity to listen to ancient Chinese music. “Throughout the show, there will be traditional Chinese music that varies from epic to sorrowful, depending on the scene,” Jane Ho said. “Since it is traditional Chinese music, most of the songs in the show were composed many years back and have been passed on from one generation to the next.” The performing arts school, which was established nearly a decade ago by Andrew Ho and Bonnie Fu, moved to a larger facility in Gilbert.

��� WUSHU ���� 20

Jazz musician James Carter will be playing his heart out next Saturday at Tempe Center for the Arts. (Special to the Tribune)


20

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

1964: The Tribute mirrors a Beatles experience BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI GetOut Editor

W

hen Mark Benson founded 1964: The Tribute, he thought Baby Boomers would enjoy the act that honors The Beatles. That was 36 years ago the audiences are all ages. “We never intended for this to be full time,” Benson said with a laugh. “We thought it would be a Baby Boomer thing; you know, class reunions. We’ve played Carnegie Hall 14 times. We played Red Rocks in Colorado every year since 2004. “The crazy thing was we were not really prepared for the fact there’s no age group that doesn’t like this.” He chalked it up to The Beatles’ universal theme of love and happiness. “So many of the songs are positive and about love,” Benson said. “We can see three generations of a family sitting together there.

WUSHU ���� ���� 19

No one’s complaining and no one’s leaving early.” When 1964: The Tribute plays the Celebrity Theatre on Friday, November 15, it will focus on the seven American releases, before, Benson said, the psychedelic music or solo material—from “Meet the Beatles” to “Revolver.” “We show you what it was like if you were lucky enough to see The Beatles when they were touring in the early ’60s,” he said. “It’s more of a replication of a Beatles concert than a Beatles story.” Through his work with 1964: The Tribute, Benson had learned about the importance of pop music. Thanks to The Beatles, pop music was legitimized. “It was never thought of as a ‘real living,’” he said. “Suddenly four guys were on the most popular television show of the time. None of them went to college and the place was packed with screaming girls.

Currently, about 100 students are enrolled and they come from every city in the East Valley as well as parts of the San Tan Valley, Peoria, Glendale and Phoenix. Intake isn’t limited to those of Chinese ethnicity, however, and it welcomes anyone who would like to study the country’s heritage. “We are blessed to have this facility because it offers a professional and spacious environment for our students to train in,” Jane Ho said. “I like that I get to perform with other people and get to play characters that are very different,” said Elise Yeung, 11, of Chandler, who has studied there for �ive years. “Even though training takes a lot of hard work and practice, I enjoy being able to perform in both Wushu and dance in Dynasty.” Elise performs three roles, like Wu Tang tai-chi master, Ming Dynasty assassin-in-

If You Go...

What: Dynasty: A Martial Arts & Dance Epic,” presented by Phoenix Wushu Academy. Where: Chandler Center for the Arts, 250 N. Arizona Avenue When: When: 7:30-9:30 p.m. Nov. 17. Cost: Tickets start at $20 and discounts are available for groups of 20, seniors and juniors. Info: chandlercenter.org/events/dynastymartial-arts-dance-epic or phoenixwushu.com.

Many men thought, ‘This looks like a good job.’” After that, creativity in music “took off,” Benson explained. “With the British invasion, I remember you didn’t have to be good looking and talented, you just had to be English,” he added with a laugh. Based in Akron, Ohio, 1964: The Tribute sticks with the Fab Four’s exact moves. Improvising is out of the question. “It’s not easily understood by people who don’t do this for a living,” Benson said. “An actor studies a part. When they do it for a movie, they’re done. We have to learn a song and body and stage movements, and we can never change them. If you’re an artist of any sort—a dancer, photographer, painter—your natural tendency is to progress in some direction. Our

��� TRIBUTE ���� 21

Expoect elaborate costumes and elgant dancing at the Phoenix Wushu Academy’s production next Sunday. (Yeung Photography)

training and a Chinese ethnic tribal dancer. “For Wushu, I will do hand forms and tai-chi and also use weapons like the straight sword and broad sword,” she said. “I will also do different styles of Chinese dances; some of them use long ribbons and tambourines.” The school is home to some top athletes that are currently in the US Wushu Team, representing America in the Pan American and World Championships, Jane Ho said. They include Song Tian Ou and Allyson Huang, who have trained there since the beginning of their Wushu studies.

“The sport of wushu entertains the idea of pushing past your limits almost to your breaking point,”16-year-old Allyson said. “It requires a deep understanding of the borderline between ambition and exhaustion.” Allyson, a Chandler resident, is a soloist in Dynasty and performs several

roles with an assortment of weapons and styles, each re�lective of a speci�ic dynasty. One such weapon is a straight sword from the Qing Dynasty, a long, thin blade without curved edges. “I gracefully slice my sword through the air while sprinting and leaping across the stage. My quick, light movements wow the audience. The brightly colored silk uniforms represent the silk clothing often worn by nobility in Ancient China,” she said. Allyson said she enjoyed the “hospitable environment” that the school provides. “Families are able to create and maintain strong bonds between one another,” she said. “We support each other with humble cheers and shouts of encouragement. They teach discipline, moral values and respect for others.” In addition to Wushu, the school teaches Sanda, (Chinese kickboxing), Tai-chi, Chinese dance, piano and linguistic Chinese studies. One of the school’s missions is to preserve and promote Chinese culture and the arts because some of its ancient art forms and customs are fading away. An example is the ancient ink painting skill known as “Guo Hua.” The East Valley is home to a large Chinese-American community, with a steady rise in population over the span of a few years. Arizona has an estimated 200,000plus community and it’s growing, according to the school.


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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

JAZZ ���� ���� 19

enjoyed all the blessings that have come as a byproduct and continue to �low as a result.” Besides Connick, Carter has enjoyed hanging out with jazz trumpeter Lester Bowie, who died in 1999. “He was one of the individuals who really stressed diversity in terms of bands’ portfolios,” he said. “He brought different

TRIBUTE ���� ���� 20

challenge is to learn something a certain way and never ever change it. Some days, I just want to do a Pete Townshend windmill with my arms, but I can’t.” The band’s process works. Benson said he was particularly moved by a 6-year-

If You Go...

What: 1964: The Tribute. Where: Celebrity Theatre, 440 N. 32nd Street, Phoenix. When: 8 p.m. Friday, November 15, Cost: Tickets start at $25. Info: 602-267-1600, celebritytheatre.com, 1964thetribute.com.

GetOut. GetConnected.

�lavors while being artistically ful�illed. He was one of the main catalysts that stuck with me.” What has really stuck with Carter is Blue Note Records’ legacy. “The items that have been rolling off the assembly since 1939 have been the soundtrack to all of our lives,” Carter said. “That roster is very exhilarating. To be able to contribute something seminal in the near future is amazing.” old girl’s thoughts after a show. “This 6-tear-old girl was totally into meeting us—smiling, jumping up and down and excited,” Benson recalled. “She was 6 years old. She came up to the table and I said, ‘What is your name?’ She said Angel. I told her she looked really happy. She said to me, ‘It’s because of love.’ “I started thinking about all the music we played, the entire song list. I counted every time love, lover, lovely was used. If you watch our entire show, you hear that word over 100 times in one night. It brought into focus for me why people like this music so much. It’s �illed with goodness. How can you not be happy?”

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GET OUT 10, 29 THESUNDAY SUNDAY EASTFOOTHILLS VALLEYTRIBUNE TRIBUNE 3, OUT GETNEWS OUT THE EAST VALLEY | |NOVEMBER 2019 3741 AHWATUKEE |NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 6, 2019 2019

THE SUNDAY EAST TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 27, 2019 GET OUT 22 GET OCTOBER 30, 23, 2019 | VALLEY AHWATUKEE FOOTHILLS NEWS GET OUT 22 OCTOBER 2019 |OUT AHWATUKEE FOOTHILLS NEWS 40

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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Landscape laborers, 35 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation or mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. N/A Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Mesa, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645011. Employer: Unique Landscapes By Griffin, Inc. 114 S Extension, Mesa, AZ 85210. Contact: Pamela Rambus, fax (480) 733-7912. Landscape laborers, 39 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care pruning, fertilization, irrigations systems maintenance and repair, general clean up procedures and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Work in the outdoors, physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (7:00am-3:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri. Dates of employment: 01/20/2011/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance.

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Make your choice Everlasting

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644940. Employer: Agave Environmental Contracting, Inc. 1634 N 19th Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85009. Contact: Eric Mahler, fax (602) 254-1438.


24 THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Public Notices

Public Notices

CITY OF MESA, ARIZONA ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

City of Mesa Public Notice

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS (RFQ)

First Substantial Amendment to the City of Mesa’s Annual Action Plan FY2019-20

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Mesa is seeking a qualified firm or team to act as the Construction Manager at Risk for the following:

Notice of 30-Day Public Comment Period November 11, 2019 – December 10, 2019

LIBRARY IMPROVEMENTS - DOBSON RANCH AND MAIN LIBRARY KIDS’ ZONE

Notice of Public Hearing November 25, 2019

PROJECT NUMBER: CP0903 The City of Mesa is seeking a qualified Construction Manager at Risk (CM@Risk) to provide PreConstruction Services assistance and complete Construction Services as the CM@Risk for the Library Improvements Project. All qualified firms that are interested in providing these services are invited to submit their Statements of Qualifications (SOQ) in accordance with the requirements detailed in the Request for Qualifications (RFQ). The following is a summary of the project. The required tasks will be reviewed with the selected CM@Risk and defined to meet the needs of the project as part of the contract scoping. Dobson Ranch Improvements: construction of approximately 2,000 SF addition that includes a Thinkspot area, Maker Space, Studio, storage and restroom. Renovations to the entrance façade are included. Main Library Kids’ Zone Improvements: Interior renovations, creating a themed children’s library area of up to 8,000 square feet. The estimated construction cost is: $1,100,000 for Dobson Ranch Improvements $1,100,000 for Main Library Kids’ Zone Improvements A Pre-Submittal Conference will be held on Tuesday, November 19, 2019, at 10:00 am, at the City of Mesa Plaza Building, 20 E. Main Street, Suite 501, Mesa, AZ 85201. At this meeting, City staff will discuss the scope of work and general contract issues and respond to questions from the attendees. Attendance at the pre-submittal conference is not mandatory and all interested firms may submit a Statement of Qualifications whether or not they attend the conference. All interested firms are encouraged to attend the Pre-Submittal Conference since City staff will not be available for meetings or to respond to individual inquiries regarding the project scope outside of this conference. In addition, there will not be meeting minutes or any other information published from the Pre-Submittal Conference. Contact with City Employees. All firms interested in this project (including the firm’s employees, representatives, agents, lobbyists, attorneys, and subconsultants) will refrain, under penalty of disqualification, from direct or indirect contact for the purpose of influencing the selection or creating bias in the selection process with any person who may play a part in the selection process. This policy is intended to create a level playing field for all potential firms, to assure that contract decisions are made in public, and to protect the integrity of the selection process. All contact on this selection process should be addressed to the authorized representative identified below. RFQ Lists. The RFQ is available on the City’s website at: http://mesaaz.gov/business/engineering/construction-manager-at-risk-and-job-order-contractingopportunities. The Statement of Qualifications shall include a one-page cover letter, plus a maximum of 10 pages to address the SOQ evaluation criteria (excluding resumes but including an organization chart with key personnel and their affiliation). Resumes for each team member shall be limited to a maximum length of two pages and should be attached as an appendix to the SOQ. Minimum font size shall be 10pt. Please provide seven (7) hard copies and one (1) electronic copy (CD or USB drive) of the Statement of Qualifications by Thursday, December 5, 2019, at 2:00 pm. The City reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Qualifications. The City is an equal opportunity employer. Delivered or hand-carried submittals must be delivered to the Engineering Department reception area on the fifth floor of Mesa City Plaza Building in a sealed package. On the submittal package, please display: Firm name, project number, and/or project title. Firms who wish to do business with the City of Mesa must be registered in the City of Mesa Vendor Self Service (VSS) System (http://mesaaz.gov/business/purchasing/vendor-self-service). Questions. Questions pertaining to the Construction Manager at Risk selection process or contract issues should be directed to Donna Horn of the Engineering Department at donna.horn@mesaaz.gov. BETH HUNING City Engineer ATTEST: DeeAnn Mickelsen City Clerk Published: East Valley Tribune Nov 10, 17, 2019 / 25694

Date of Publication: November 10, 2019 Ray Thimesch, Housing & Revitalization Administrator City of Mesa P.O. Box 1466 Mesa, AZ 85211-1466 480-644-4521 Notice of the First Substantial Amendment to the City of Mesa’s Annual Action Plan FY2019-20 The City of Mesa is proposing a First Substantial Amendment (Amendment) to its Annual Action Plan FY 2019-20. The purpose of this notice is to solicit comments from Mesa residents regarding the proposed Amendment. The Amendment will be available for review by the general public beginning on November 11, 2019. The Amendment is necessary to re-allocate Five Hundred Thousand ($500,000) of HOME funds that was awarded to The Legends of Mesa, an affordable senior housing complex, who has since declined their award of those funds. The City of Mesa proposes to use these funds as follows: • $50,000 towards the City of Mesa Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) Program to assist individuals with security deposit and utility deposits. • $450,000 HOME Homeowner Rehabilitation Program to assist individuals and families with the full rehabilitation of their home. A printed copy of the Amendment will be available for review beginning on November 11, 2019 and can be found at the City of Mesa’s Housing and Community Development Department located at 20 East Main Street, Suite 250, Mesa, AZ, 85211-1466. An electronic copy of the Amendment will also be available for review at the same time and may be found on the City’s Housing and Community Development website under Public Notices: https://www.mesaaz.gov/residents/community-development Notice of 30-Day Public Comment Period A 30-day public comment period regarding the City’s proposed Amendment to its Annual Action Plan FY 2019-20 will begin on Monday, November 11, 2019 and end on Tuesday, December 10, 2019. Approval of the proposed Amendment to the Annual Action Plan FY2019-20 is tentatively scheduled on January 13, 2020, at the regularly scheduled City Council meeting at 5:45 p.m. in the Upper-Level Council Chambers (57 E. First Street, Mesa AZ 85201). Written and oral comments regarding the City’s proposed Amendment may be submitted by the general public. Written comments should be submitted by mail to: The City of Mesa, Housing and Community Development Department, Attn: Ray Thimesch, Housing & Revitalization Administrator, P.O. Box 1466, Mesa, AZ 85211-1466; or, by e-mail to ray.thimesch@mesaaz.gov. All written comments must be received no later than December 10, 2019 to be considered. Oral comments will be accepted at the public hearing mentioned below and/or the Council meeting on January 13, 2020_. Notice of Public Hearing A public hearing will be held to review the City of Mesa’s proposed Amendment to its Annual Action Plan FY2019-20. The public hearing will occur at 4:00 p.m. on November 25, 2019 in Room 170 West of the Mesa City Plaza Building located at 20 E. Main Street, Mesa, AZ 85201. The public hearing will provide an opportunity for residents to comment in person regarding the proposed Amendment to its Annual Action Plan FY2019-20. The City of Mesa endeavors to make all public meetings accessible to persons with disabilities. If you are a person with a disability and require a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in programs and services offered by the City of Mesa Housing and Community Development Department, please contact Andrea Alicoate at 480-644-5034 or andrea.alicoate@mesaaz.gov. Hearing impaired individuals should call 711 (Arizona TDD Relay). To the extent possible, accommodations will be made within the time constraint of the request, and you may be required to provide information to support your reasonable request. Ray Thimesch, Housing & Revitalization Administrator November 10, 2019 Published: East Valley Tribune, Nov 10, 2019 / 25xxxx


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

25

Public Notices

NOTICE TO READERS:

CITY OF MESA

Most service advertisers have an ROC# or "Not a licensed contractor" in their ad, this is in accordance to the AZ state law.

CADENCE COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT MESA, ARIZONA CRISMON RD PHASE 3 INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS CRISMON ROAD PHASE 3 INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS CADENCE PARKWAY AND CRISMON ROAD, MESA, AZ PROJECT NO. CA200 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received until December 5, 2019 at 1:00p.m. All sealed bids will be received at Mesa City Plaza Building, Engineering Department at 20 East Main Street, 5th Floor, Mesa, Arizona; except for bids delivered 30 minutes prior to opening which will be received at the information desk, 1st floor, Main Lobby of the Mesa City Plaza Building. Any bid received after the time specified will be returned without any consideration. A mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held on Thursday, November 21, 2019 at 1:00p.m. in the upper level Council Chambers at 57 E. First Street, Mesa, Arizona. There will not be a pre-bid review of the site. This contract shall be for furnishing all labor, materials, transportation and services for the construction and/or installation of the following work: Sewer, water, storm drain, concrete, paving, adjustments, signage, striping, streetlights and landscape for Crismon Road from Cadence Parkway to Williams Field Road as outlined by the Improvement Plans for Crismon Rd Phase 3 Infrastructure Plans. Excludes rough grading (by others) and dry utility mainline trench and conduit. The Engineer’s Estimate range is $1,000,000 – $1,400,000. For all technical, contract, bid-related, or other questions, please contact Stephanie Gishey at stephanie.Gishey@mesaaz.gov. Contact with City Employees. All firms interested in this project (including the firm’s employees, representatives, agents, lobbyists, attorneys, and subconsultants) will refrain, under penalty of disqualification, from direct or indirect contact for the purpose of influencing the selection or creating bias in the selection process with any person who may play a part in the selection process. This policy is intended to create a level playing field for all potential firms, to assure that contract decisions are made in public, and to protect the integrity of the selection process. All contact on this selection process should be addressed to the authorized representative identified above. Contractors desiring to submit proposals may purchase sets of the Bid Documents from ARC Document Solutions, LLC, at https://order.e-arc.com/arcEOC/PWELL_Main.asp?mem=29. Click on “Go” for the Public Planroom to access plans. NOTE: In order to be placed on the Plan Holders List and to receive notifications and updates regarding this bid (such as addenda) during the bidding period, an order must be placed. The cost of each Bid Set will be no more than $24.00, which is non-refundable. Partial bid packages are not sold. You can view documents on-line (at no cost), order Bid Sets, and access the Plan Holders List on the website at the address listed above. Please verify print lead time prior to arriving for pick-up. For a list of locations nearest you, go to www.e-arc.com.

Arizona Registrar of Contractors (ROC): The advertising requirements of the statute does not prevent anyone from placing an ad in the yellow pages, on business cards, or on flyers. What it does require under A.R.S. §321 1 2 1 A 1 4 ( c ) www.azleg.gov/ars/32/01165.htm is that the advertising party, if not properly licensed as a contractor, disclose that fact on any form of advertising to the public by including the words "not a licensed contractor" in the advertisement. Again, this requirement is intended to make sure that the consumer is made aware of the unlicensed status of the individual or company. Contractors who advertise and do not disclose their unlicensed status are not eligible for the handyman's exception. Reference: http://www.azroc.gov/invest/licensed_by_la w.html

As a consumer, being aware of the law is for your protection. You can check a business's ROC status at: http://www.azroc.gov/

Work shall be completed within one hundred eighty (180) consecutive calendar days, beginning with the day following the starting date specified in the Notice to Proceed. Bids must be submitted on the Proposal and Schedule Form provided and be accompanied by a Bid Bond, certified check, or cashier’s check (PERSONAL OR INDIVIDUAL BID BONDS ARE NOT ACCEPTABLE) for ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the Bid, payable to Otago Development, Inc., as a guarantee that the contractor will enter into a contract to perform the proposal in accordance with the plans and specifications. The successful bidder will be required to execute the Otago Development, Inc. Contract and respective Addenda for construction within five (5) days after formal Notice of Contact Award. Failure by bidder to properly execute the Contract and provide the required certification as specified shall be considered a breach of Contract by bidder. Otago Development, Inc. shall be free to terminate the Contract or, at option, release the successful bidder. Payment and Performance Bonds will be required for this Work. The successful bidder, simultaneously with the execution of the Contract, shall be required to furnish a Payment Bond in the amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the Contract Price, and a Performance Bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the Contract Price. The successful bidder shall name Otago Development, Inc. as obligee on both the Payment and Performance Bonds and name the City of Mesa as an additional obligee on the Performance Bond using a Dual Obligee Rider form. An approved Dual Obligee Rider Form is included in Chapter 2. The right is hereby reserved to accept or reject any or all bids or parts thereto, to waive any informalities in any proposal and reject the bids of any persons who have been delinquent or unfaithful to any contract with Otago Development, Inc., the City of Mesa or Cadence Community Facilities District. BETH HUNING District Engineer ATTEST: Dee Ann Mickelsen District Clerk Published: East Valley Tribune, Nov. 10, 17, 2019 / 25722

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26 THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

East Valley Tribune

1620 W. Fountainhead Parkway #219 • Tempe, AZ 85282 480.898.6465 class@timespublications.com

Deadlines

Classifieds: Thursday 11am for Sunday Life Events: Thursday 10am for Sunday

The Place “To Find” Everything You Need | EastValleyTribune.com Employment General Nursery workers, 3 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa County. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644947. Employer: Ana P Perez, LLC. 7202 S 7th Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85041. Contact: Ana Perez, fax (602) 276-4300. Landscape laborers, 36 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Preemployment drug testing.

Employment General

Employment General

Landscape laborers, 34 temporary full-time positions.

Landscape laborers, 85 temporary full-time positions.

Duties: Laborers will be needed for pruning, fertilization, irrigations systems maintenance and repair, general clean up procedures and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Work in the outdoors, physical work. 3 months EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation or mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol.. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Cave Creek, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix AZ, 85040. 602-7710630 Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645789. Employer: Aaron Clark Industries, LLC 36815 N Cave Creek Rd, Cave Creek, AZ 85331. Contact: Aaron Clark, fax (480) 488-6230.

Landscape laborer, 12 temporary full-time positions.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644952. Employer: Gothic Landscaping, Inc. 2526 E Southern Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Contact: Matt Busse, fax (480) 557-7879.

Nursery workers, 46 temporary full-time positions.

Employment General Landscape laborers, 20 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Tempe, AZ - Maricopa County. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645014. Employer: Valley Rain Construction Corporation. 1614 E Curry Rd, Tempe, AZ 85281. Contact: Carin Brodland, fax (480) 966-1450.

Landscape laborers, 55 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation systems maintenance and repair, general clean up procedures around properties. Outdoor work, physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Mesa, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Queen Creek, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645614.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645393.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644929.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645762.

Employer: Caretaker, Inc. 741 N Monterey St, Gilbert, AZ 85233. Contact: Patricia Myers, fax (480) 545-8020.

Employer: Fairco, Inc. 828 E Isabella Ave, Ste B, Mesa, AZ 85204. Contact: Gerry Kelly, fax 1 (844) 210-8904.

Employer: Arizona Wholesale Growers, Inc. 24032 N 19th Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85085. Contact: Shawn Cox, fax (623) 581-9984.

Employer: Westar Environmental, LLC 42768 N. Murphy Avenue, Queen Creek, AZ 85140. Contact: Kathy Kiefer, fax (480) 279-1414.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Gilber, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Employment General

Landscape laborers, 40 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Landscape or maintain grounds of property using hand or power tools or equipment. Workers typically perform a variety of tasks, which may include any combination of the following: sod laying, mowing, trimming, planting, watering, fertilizing, digging, raking, sprinkler installation, and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri. Dates of employment: 01/20/2011/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Employment General

Landscape laborers, 15 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation or mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Work in the outdoors, physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Mesa, Arizona - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Housing optional - $185/month, plus utilities.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644965.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645869.

Employer: Greenway Property Maintenance, Inc. 2740 E. Rose Garden Lane. Phoenix, AZ 85050. Contact: Amy Mahan, fax (602) 468-8693.

Employer: Hernandez-Mesquite Landscape Services, Inc. 1043 S. Lewis, Mesa, AZ 85210. Contact: Jose Hernandez, fax (480) 615-9887

Landscape laborers, 120 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Work in the outdoors. Physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Landscape laborers, 15 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation or mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri. Dates of employment: 01/20/2011/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Mesa, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644945.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645012.

Employer: ELS Companies, Inc. 3329 E Southern Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Contact: Daniel Bang, fax (602) 268-5040.

Employer: Blue Marble Landscape, LLC 840 E Southern Ave, Mesa, AZ 85204. Contact: Dennis Lynch, fax (480) 899-7639.

Employment General

27

Announcements

Landscape laborers, 65 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up procedures around properties. Work in the outdoors, physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ. - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645010. Employer: Native Resources International, Inc. 1540 W. Happy Valley Road, Phoenix, AZ 85085. Contact: Raquel Coronel, fax (623) 869-6769.

Amusement & Recreation Attendants. 36 temp, f/t positions 12/29/19-10/28/20. Midway West Amusements, Inc. located in Sun City, AZ. Email: mjmidwaywest@gmail.com. Duties: perform variety of attending duties at amusement or recreation facility. May schedule use of recreation facilities, maintain & provide equipment to participants of sporting events or recreational pursuits, or operate amusement concessions & rides. Must be able to lift 50 lbs. Postemployment drug testing may occur based upon the employer’s reasonable suspicion of an employee’s drug use. Work hours: Monday and Tuesday 9:00am-5:00pm, Wed - Friday 4:00pm-10:00pm, Saturday 12:00pm-10:00pm, Sunday 8:00am5:00pm, days off vary, 40 hrs/wk. Wage is a range of $12.01/hr to $12.32/hr depending on the location, OT may be available at $18.02/hr to $18.48/hr depending on the location, OT hrs vary. Raises/bonuses at company’s discretion, based on individual factors incl work performance, skill and tenure. No education and no experience req’d. Optional housing provided at no cost to the worker. Employer provided transportation to/from worksites in the following counties: Pinal (AZ), Maricopa (AZ), Yavapai (AZ), Mohave (AZ), La Paz (AZ), Salt Lake (UT), Davis (UT), Weber (UT), Duchesne (UT), Utah (UT), Elmore (ID), and Canyon (ID). OTJT prov. Transp (incl meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to place of emplymnt will be prov, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if worker completes half the emplymnt period. Return transp will be prov if worker completes the emplymnt period or is dismissed early by emplyr. Emplyr will prov w/o charge all tools, supplies, and equipt reqd to perform job & guarantees to offer work hrs equal to at least 3⁄4 of the workdays in each 12 wk period of total employment period. Apply at the nearest Workforce Agency at 735 N. Gilbert Rd, Ste 134, Gilbert, Maricopa County, AZ 85234 PH: 602-372-9700 or at the office nearest you, or email resumes to mjmidwaywest@gmail.com. JOB ORDER #3608178

Holiday Deadlines: Special Thanksgiving Day Issue on Nov. 28th Deadlines on Tues. Nov. 19th at Noon Don't miss out on our biggest audience of the year!

480-898-6465 Employment General JJ & Sons Concessions, LLC, 3458 E. Illini St., Phoenix, AZ 85040. PH: 480-748-3510. 1st Wrksite: 1933 S Ballpark Way, Goodyear, AZ 85338 – 14 temp/FT Carnival Workers 1/22/20-11/21/20. Perform duties @ amusement facility (traveling carnival) serve customers in eating places specialized in fast svc & inexpnsive carry-out food carnival settings food stand, on-site clean & organize, prepare typical food/bev such as sandwich, salad, soup, corndog, pizza, using proper safety/sanitary measures. Set-up, stock/clean, ready for svc, tear down/pack up, stock/close booth; heavy lifting & physically mobile, operate food concessions, games, rides. Hrs/schedule/days vary - typically a 9-hr shift b/w 10am–11pm; (sample shift: 10am-7pm, 1 hr unpd break); 35- 60hrs/wk (42 median), extra hrs may be req/avail may incl wkends/holidays. Pay varies, $11.32 - $14.07/hr. Merit/sick pay savings program, wage pre-pay @ emplyr discretion. Trvl reqd & prvd’d to work in Maricopa, Pima & Pinal Co., AZ; Skagit, Pierce, Snohomish, Spokane, Whatcom, Benton & King Co., WA; Clark Co., NV; Multnomah Co., OR; Salt Lake Co., UT; & Sacramento Co., CA. Trvl prvd’d to all events as per itinerary. Must commute from home @ prior wrksite to next wrksite. Opt transp to wrksites prvd’d @ no cost to wrkr. Wrk outside in all weather. Emplyr may prvd addl pay (performance /tenure). OT is defined by & paid as reqd by prevailing law, varies @ $16.98 $21.11/hr. No min edu/exp reqd. bi-wkly pay, single wrkwk used to compute wages. Emplyr will make all deductions from wrkr paychk reqd by law. Emplyr’s opt shared housing ($120/wk) is avail for wage credit &/or deduction, or any lesser amt to the max extent not prohibited by law. Emplyr will pay cost of housing to extent such cost would reduce pay below the offered wage for areas of intended emplymt. Local convenience trvl ($20/wk value), food avail for wage credit &/or deduction, or any lesser amt to max extent not prohibited by law. Emplyr provds wrkr @ no charge all tools, supplies, equip reqd to perform job. OJT prvd’d. Transp (incl meals, lodging if nec) to place of emplymt prvd’d if wrkr completes 1/2 the emplymt period. Rtrn transp prvded if wrkr completes emplymt period or dismissed early. Wrkr reimb visa/border fees in 1st wrkwk & apprvd trvl expns w/in 1st pay period. Rcpts reqd. Must be qualified, willing & avail entire emplymt @ designated wrksites under adverse weather; to enter into & comply w/ emplymt contracts; follow wrkplace rules/meet job performance standards; comply w/ grooming reqrmnts/dress code/complete job app & interview truthfully. Subject to discharge for cause. Must be willing to work up to 7 days/wk. Apply @ AZ SWA–1840 N. 95th Ave, Ste 160, Phoenix, AZ 85037; 602-372-4200 www.azjobconnection.gov EOE/M/F/D/V JO#3646855


28 THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Employment General Landscape laborers, 50 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for pruning, fertilization, irrigations systems maintenance and repair, general clean up procedures and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Work outdoors, physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/17/20 - 11/16/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Tempe, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix AZ, 85040. 602-7710630 Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644282. Employer: R. H Dupper Landscaping, Inc. 1020 W Ranch Rd #105, Tempe, AZ 85284. Contact: Lesley Barner, fax (480) 893-6846. Nursery workers, 20 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (7:00am-3:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa County. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645395. Employer: Canterbury Enterprises, Inc. 2744 E Utopia Rd, Phoenix. AZ 85050. Contact: Shawn Ryan, fax (602) 569-0064.

OUR JOB BOARD HAS THE TALENT YOU’RE LOOKING FOR. FIND THE BEST TALENT. EASILY POST JOBS. COMPETITIVE PRICING AND EXPOSURE More info: 480-898-6465 or email jobposting@evtrib.com

Most jobs also appear on Indeed.com

J BS.EASTVALLEYTRIBUNE.COM

Employment General Software Engineer: M.S. in Industrial Engineering or Comp. Sci. req’d. Send resumes to: Rancher Labs, Inc. 1400 E. Southern Ave., Ste. 1020, Tempe, AZ 85282, Attn: M. Salcius.

DO YOU OFFER Lessons & Tutoring? Children need your help! Place your ad today Contact us: class@times publications.com or Call 480-898-6465

Your newspaper. Your community. Your planet. Please recycle me. Nursery workers, 10 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Queen Creek, AZ - Pinal County. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645777. Employer: Westar Environmental, LLC 42768 N. Murphy Avenue, Queen Creek, AZ 85140. Contact: Kathy Kiefer, fax (480) 279-1414. Nursery workers, 65 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (7:00am-3:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri. Dates of employment: 01/20/2011/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Queen Creek, AZ - Maricopa County. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645792. Employer: V & P Nurseries, Inc. 21919 E Germann Rd, Queen Creek, AZ 85142. Contact: Dominick Carissimo, fax (480) 917-2856.

Merch andise

Auto - All Makes 1996 Cadilac Deville 55k original miles. 2nd owner, beautiful condition, $3,200 480-219-5179

Employment General Nursery workers, 12 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6am2:30pm or 9am5:30pm); multiple shifts; Mon-Fri , may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa County. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602-7710630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644936. Employer: Dream With Colors, Inc. 3635 E Southern Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Contact: Monica Vega, fax (602) 266-6092.

Garage Sales/ Bazaars

Sunland Village East Arts & Craft Show

Sat. 11/16 8am-1pm. In auditorium 8026 E. Lakeview Ave. Mesa. Sossaman & Baseline 480-380-0106 Parkwide Patio Sale Sunrise RV resort Furniture, Tv's Dishes, HP Print, Vacuum Cleaner, And More 1403 W. Broadway Ave. Apache Junction. Saturday Nov 16 7am-noon

COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE GOLD CANYON EAST Sat. 11/16 Betw 7am-2pm Many homes! Follow signs from Hwy 60 & Superstition Mtn Dr & from Hwy 60 & Kings Ranch Rd Major intersection in center of community is King's Ranch & Golden Rim

Need to hire some help? Call Classifieds Today!

480.898.6465

CLASS@TIMESPUBLICATIONS.COM

Miscellaneous For Sale Dining Table Set Autumn Lane Farmhouse,Hunter Green & Wood with 4 Windsor Chairs Matching Open Hutch,$400 480-586-1751

Wanted to Buy Diabetic Test Strips by the box, unused. Any type or brand. Will pay top dollar. Call Pat 480-323-8846

Manufactured Homes 2008 Cavco

16x70 3/2 F&R B/Rs. Central Air, Concrete drive & patio. Awnings, wood laminate flooring t/o, vaulted ceilings t/o, 4 fans, wood siding, shingle roof, newly refurbished. $39,999 Call Bill at 480-228-7786 GET 1 YR FREE RENT*

Cash 4 Diabetic Strips! Best Prices in Town. Sealed and Unexpired. 480-652-1317

Manufactured Homes 1995 Cavco 12 x 34 Repainted inside, laminate flooring, 2bd/2ba, W/D hookups. Beautiful view from porch. $53,900. Call Woody 480-433-6245 1987 DeRose

Brand New 2019 Clayton MH 16X56, 2B/2B, 3 Ton Cent A/C, Concrete Drive W/Awning, Landscaped, Steps, W/D Hkups, 18 CF Fridge, Gas Range, Dishwasher Ready, Walk in Shower in a 55+ Resort Community in Apache Junction. $52,900. *with a credit score over 700!

Does not include furniture.

Call Bill at 480-228-7786 BRAND NEW NEVER LIVED IN 2 BED / 2 BATH HOMES $58,900 Financing Available. Also Available Affordable Homes Between $5K - $15K

14x66 3/2 F&R, central air, concrete drive & awning. Wood laminate floors. 2 fans, wood siding, newly refurbished, Furnished. New storage shed $24,900. Call Bill at 480-228-7786

Manufactured Homes

THE LINKS ESTATES Why Rent The Lot When

YOU CAN OWN THE LAND And Own Your New Home

FROM THE UPPER 100’S

ASK US HOW YOUR $105,000 CASH INVESTMENT AND OUR SENIOR LOAN PROGRAM ENABLES QUALIFIED 62+ SENIORS MAKING THE LINKS THEIR PRIMARY RESIDENCE HAVE NO MORTGAGE PAYMENT & NO LOT RENT AS LONG AS YOU LIVE IN HOME.

Gawthorp & Associates Realty 40667 N Wedge Dr • San Tan Valley, AZ 85140

602-402-2213

www.linksestates.net

55+ Mobile Home Park in Great Chandler Location. Call Kim 480-233-2035

Real Estate

For Rent Apartments ALMA SCH & MAIN Partially Furnished 1bd/1 ba. Bad Credit OK. No Deposit. Starting at $600 Includes utilities (602) 339-1555

Commerical/Industrial/Retail Outdoor commercial/personal Storage Yards for lease. Secure, gated 24 hour access, and much more. Call 480-926-5957 for details


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Cleaning Services

Air Conditioning/Heating

QUALITY, VALUE and a GREAT PRICE!

Lifetime Warranty on Workmanship Seasonal AC Tune Up - $99 New 3-Ton AC Units - $3,995 We are a Trane dealer & NATE-Certified!

SPARKLE & SHINE CLEANING SERVICE Immaculate, Dependable Service. Affordable Rates. Commercial & Residential services All supplies included. " You've tried the rest, now try the BEST!" Ask for Martha or Annie 480-495-5516 or 480-797-6023

0% FINANCING - 60 Months!! ‘A+’ RATED AC REPAIR FREE ESTIMATE SAME DAY SERVICE

Sell Your Stuff! Call Classifieds Today!

480.898.6465

CLASS@TIMESPUBLICATIONS.COM

Garage/Doors GARAGE DOOR SERVICE East Valley/ Ahwatukee

Broken Springs Replaced Nights/Weekends Bonded/Insured 480-251-8610

Not a licensed contractor

Handyman HANDYMAN 37 years experience. Drywall, framing, plumbing, painting, electrical, roofing and more. Stan, 602-434-6057

Contractors

480-405-7588

ItsJustPlumbSmart.com Appliance Repairs

Appliance Repair Now

If It’s Broken, We Can Fix It! • Same Day Service • On-Site Repairs • Servicing All Major Brands • Quality Guaranteed

We Also Buy, Sell & Trade Used Appliances Working or Not

480-659-1400 Licensed & Insured

Cleaning Services

SIR JOHNS CONTRACTING HOME IMPROVEMENTS REMODEL& REPAIR Painting of All Types Interior & Exterior Cabinets Stains & Paints

Weekly, biweekly, tri-weekly, or monthly; same talented crew each visit Flexible, customized services to meet individual needs of each client GREEN eco-friendly products used to clean and sanitize Move-in/move-out and seasonal deep cleans Small, family-owned company with GUARANTEED high quality services Always dependable, excellent references, bonded, and insured

FreeFree estimates estimatesat at 480-802-1992 480-802-1992 or or dennis@simplygrandcleaningaz.com reed@simplygrandcleaningaz.com

DESERT ROCK

BLOCK FENCE DRIVEWAY Since 1999 PLANTERAffordable, Quality WorkSIDEWALK rk Since 1999 PATIO BBQ Affordable, Quality Wo

Small Man!”

“No Job Too Work Since 1999 Quality le,Small 2010, 2011 Affordab Man!”

HIG

H

QUA Lice LITY nse ROC d & B 251 ond 661 ed

Est Free ima tes

602-315-5470

4960 S. Gilbert Rd. Suite #1 Unit #260 John McMillan-Owner Chandler, AZ 85249 sirjohn53@gmail.com

Drywall

JOSE DOMINGUEZ DRYWALL & PAINTING House Painting, Drywall, Reliable, Dependable, Honest!

2010, 2011 2010, 2011 2012, 2013, 2012, 2013, 2014 2014

Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not aBruce Licensed at Contractor Call 602.670.7038

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED! Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor Call Bruce at 9 FREE ESTIMATES • 16 YEARS EXPERIENCE Quality Work Since 199 Affordable,Ahwatukee 2010, 2011 Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor RESIDENTIAL CALL JOHN: 480.797.2985 COMMERCIAL 2012, 2013,

602.670.7038

Call Bruce at 602.670.7038

Not a licensed contractor.

Home Improvement

Electrical Services

ACTION CONTRACTING INC.

HONESTY • INTEGRITY • QUALITY

• Panel Changes and Repairs • Installation of Ceiling Fans • Switches/Outlets • Home Remodel

ALL RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL ELECTRICAL Call Jim Endres 480.282.7932 Over 28 Years Experience • ROC #246019 Bonded/Insured

WE DO IT ALL! Bath & Kitchen Remodels • Drywall & Stucco Repairs Plumbing • Electrical • Can Lights Windows • Doors • Cabinets • Painting Block Fences • Wrought Iron Gates Remodeling • Additions • Patios • Tenant Improvements

A+

East Valley 480-833-7353

Please call Elaine at 480-898-7926 to inquire or email your notice to: legals@evtrib.com and request a quote.

I

19

78

-

aaaActionContractingInc.com

Irrigation

Block Fence * Gates

• Sprinkler/Drip Repairs • New Installs Poly/PVC • Same Day Service

602-789-6929 Roc #057163 Lowest Prices * 30 Yrs Exp Serving Entire Valley

NTY

5-YEAR WARRA

480.654.5600

YOU’LL LIKE US - THE BEST!

azirrigation.com Cutting Edge LLC • ROC 21671

Landscape Maintenance Handyman

Insured/Bonded Free Estimates

LLC

• Drywall Repair • Bathroom Remodeling • Home Renovations

• Electrical Repair • Plumbing Repair • Dry rot and termite damage repair

SERVING THE ENTIRE VALLEY

Deadline for Sunday's Edition is the Wednesday prior at 5pm.

-S

E NC

LIC/BONDED/INSURED Res/Comm’l ROC#218802

Fencing/Gates

GENERAL CONTRACTOR / HANDYMAN SERVICES

LEGAL NOTICES

2014

Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor

480.266.4589 josedominguez0224@gmail.com

2010, 2011 2012, 2013, 2014

2012, 2013,

2010, 2011 “No Job Call Bruce2014 at 602.670.7038 Call Bruce at 602.670.7038 2012,92013, PAVER • CONCRETE REMOVAL • HARDSCAPE e 199 Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a LicensedToo Contractor “No Man!” Job Too Work SincAhwatukee Small QualityContractor 2014 Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ Insured/ Notle,a Licensed Affordab Call Bruce at 602.670.7038 BONDED & INSURED • ROC#321648 Small Man!”

Over 30 Years Quality Experience

QUICK RESPONSE TO YOUR CALL! 15 Years Experience • Free Estimates RESIDENTIAL & SMALL BUSINESS CLEANING SPECIALISTS SINCE 2007

Concrete & for ALL Your Handyman Needs! Handyman Marks the Spot Masonry Marks the Spot for ALL•Your Handyman Needs! Painting Flooring • Electrical Painting • Flooring • Electrical Plumbing • Drywall • Carpentry Marks the Spot for ALL Plumbing • Decks Drywall • Carpentry • Tile • More! Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman Needs! Your Needs! Decks • Tile • More! PaintingHandyman • Flooring • Electrical Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman Needs! • Drywall • Carpentry Plumbing Painting • Flooring • Electrical • Plumbing Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman Painting • Flooring • Electrical • Tile More! Needs! CONCRETE & MASONRY DrywallDecks • Carpentry • •Decks • Tile • More! Plumbing • Drywall • Carpentry Painting • Flooring • Electrical Decks • Tile • More! BLOCKWALL CONCRETE “No Job Too Plumbing • Drywall • Carpentry Too Man!” RETAINING WALL FOUNDATION “No JobSmall Decks • Tile • More! “No Job Too Small Man!”

- Ahw Resident Since 1987 -

Bonded/Insured • ROC #289252

29

All Estimates are Free • Call:

520.508.1420

www.husbands2go.com

Licensed, Bonded & Insured • ROC#317949 Ask me about FREE water testing!

Your Ad can go ONLINE ANY Day! Call to place your ad online!! Classifieds 480-898-6465

ALL Pro

T R E E

S E R V I C E

L L C

Prepare for Monsoon Season! LANDSCAPING, TREES & MAINTENANCE

Tree Trimming • Tree Removal Stump Grinding Storm Damage • Bushes/Shrubs Yard Clean-up Commercial and Residential PMB 435 • 2733 N. Power Rd. • Suite 102 • Mesa dennis@allprotrees.com

480-354-5802


30 THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Painting

Landscape Maintenance Juan Hernandez

Juan Hernandez

SPRINKLER

TREE

Drip/Install/Repair & Tune ups!

TRIMMING

Not a licensed contractor

25 Years exp (480) 720-3840

25 years exp. Call Now (480) 720-3840

A-Z Tauveli Prof LANDSCAPING LLC We will give you totally new landscaping or revamp your current landscaping! Tree/Palm Tree Trimming Storm Cleanups Sprinkler Systems

Desertscape • Concrete Work Gardening • Block Wall Real & Imitation Flagstone

Free Estimates 602-471-3490 or 480-289-1673 ROC#276019 • Licensed Bonded Insured

Irrigation Repair Services Inc. Licensed • Bonded • Insured Technician

Specializing in Controllers, Valves, Sprinklers, Landscape Lighting, P.V.C. & Poly Drip Systems

Call Lance White

480.721.4146 www.irsaz.com

ROC# 256752

RAMIRO MEDINA LANDSCAPING ➧ LANDSCAPING ➧ TREE TRIMMING & REMOVAL ➧ IRRIGATION ➧ YARD CLEAN-UP ➧ GRAVEL ➧ COMMERCIAL ➧ RESIDENTIAL LICENSED • INSURED • OVER 25 YEARS EXPERIENCE

Plumbing

Jose Dominguez Painting & Drywall SEE OUR AD IN DRYWALL! Quick Response to your Call! 15 Years Exp 480-266-4589 Not a licensed contractor

Pool Service / Repair

Affinity Plumbing LLC 480-487-5541 affinityplumber@gmail.com

www.affinityplumbingaz.com

All Complete Pool Renovations

Your Ahwatukee Plumber & East Valley Neighbor

Pebble • White Plaster • New Pool Builds Tile • Deck • Pump & Filters

Anything Plumbing Same Day Service

HOME IMPROVEMENT & PAINTING Interior/Exterior Painting 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE Dunn Edwards Quality Paint Small Stucco/Drywall Repairs

Water Heaters

24/7

Inside & Out Leaks

Bonded

Toilets

Insured

Faucets

Estimates Availabler

FREE Estimates • BEST Prices

We Are State Licensed and Reliable!

$35 off

Any Service ROC#309706

602-505-8066 Cell Se Habla Espanõl

Lic’d, Bonded • ROC #235771 • ROC #235770

Disposals

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts

480-338-4011

AE &Sons Pool Plaster Company

ACCREDITED BUSINESS ®

CDM

POOL SERVICE & REPAIR

Not a licensed contractor

East Valley PAINTERS

ACID WASH SPECIALIST  PUMPS  MOTORS  WEEKLY SERVICE  FILTER CLEANING  DRAINING  GREEN POOL CLEANUP  INSPECTIONS  OWNER OPERATED 

Voted #1 Paint Interior & Exterior • Drywall Repair Light Carpentry • Power Washing • Textures Matched Popcorn Removal • Pool Deck Coatings Garage Floor Coatings • Color Consulting

CALL CLAY FOR FREE ESTIMATES

10% OFF

480.710.8790

We Beat Competitors Prices & Quality Free Estimates! Home of the 10-Year Warranty!

Plumbing

480-688-4770

www.eastvalleypainters.com Family Owned & Operated

Now Accepting all major credit cards

Bonded/Insured • ROC#153131

Call or Text Today for a FREE ESTIMATE

Carlos Medina - 602-677-3200

Plumbing

PlumbSmart Plumbing Heating & Air

Water Heaters

 A

As Iowas

$42Month

A

.II._

700 5-Star Reviews

ROC223709

Nonnalbusinesshours

Nonnalbusinesshours

480-405-7099 ROC 304267 • Licenced & Bonded

• Employees Background Checked • Up-Front Pricing • Tankless Water Heaters • Tank Water Heaters • Fixture Replacements

• Plumbing & Drain Repairs • Water Treatment • Best Warranties • Fully Stocked Vans • Fix It Or It’s Free Guarantee

Drain Specialists…

SERVICE CALLS MONDAY-FRIDAY $BS SAVINGS

What we do…

www.itsjustplumbsmart.com www.itsjustplumbsmart.com

• FREE Camera Inspection With Every Drain Cleared • Hydrojetting

$45 off Any service call With service performed

Financing Available

• Pipe Relining • Clean Out Installation • Sewer Repair/Replacement • Pipe Bursting

*$69 drain good Monday thru Friday during normal business hours and not combined with any other offers.

480-281-7564


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019 NOTICE TO READERS:

Pool Service / Repair

Most service advertisers have an ROC# or "Not a licensed contractor" in their ad, this is in accordance to the AZ state law.

Juan Hernandez Pavers • Concrete • Water Features • Sprinkler Repair

Again, this requirement is intended to make sure that the consumer is made aware of the unlicensed status of the individual or company.

Professional service since 1995

Window Cleaning $100 - One Story $140 - Two Story

showing, Pool Light out? I CAN HELP!

FALL SPECIAL! $500 OFF COMPLETE REMODEL! 25 Years Experience • Dependable & Reliable

Includes in & out up to 30 Panes Sun Screens Cleaned $3 each Attention to detail and tidy in your home.

Call Juan at

480-720-3840 Not a licensed contractor.

(480) 584-1643

Remodeling

Roofing

General Contacting, Inc. Licensed • Bonded • Insured • ROC118198

One Call, We Do It All! 602-339-4766

Owner Does All Work • All Honey-Do Lists • All Remodeling • Additions • Kitchen • Bath • Patio Covers • Garage • Sheds • Windows • Doors

• Pointing • Drywall • Roofing Repairs • Painting • All Plumbing • All Electrical • Concrete • Block • Stucco

Bonded & Insured

LLC

What it does require under A.R.S. §32-1121A14(c) www.azleg.gov/ars/ 32/01165.htm is that the advertising party, if not properly licensed as a contractor, disclose that fact on any form of advertising to the public by including the words "not a licensed contractor" in the advertisement.

PPebbleOcracking, O L Plaster R Epeeling, P ARebar IR

APPEARANCE

Public Notices

COUNTS

Arizona Registrar of Contractors (ROC): The advertising requirements of the statute does not prevent anyone from placing an ad in the yellow pages, on business cards, or on flyers.

Window Cleaning

PHILLIPS ROOFING LLC Member of ABM

• Drywall & Roofing Repairs • Stack Stone • All Flooring • Wood • Tile • Carpet • Welding • Gates & Fences • Tractor Services

Licensed • Bonded • Insured ROC 223367

Valleywide

CR 42 DUAL

623-873-1626 All employees verified Free estimates on all roofs 36 Years experience in AZ Licensed contractor since 2006

Free Estimates with Pride & Prompt Service!

Roofing

Contractors who advertise and do not disclose their unlicensed status are not eligible for the handyman's exception. Reference: http://www.azroc.g ov/invest/licensed_ by_law.html As a consumer, being aware of the law is for your protection. You can check a businesses ROC s t a t u s a t :

http://www.azroc .gov/

Tiles, shingles, flat, repairs & new work Free Estimates • Ahwatukee Resident Over 30 yrs. Experience

phillipsroofingaz.com phillipsroofing@cox.net

480-706-1453

Licensed/Bonded/Insured • ROC #236099

Roofing The Most Detailed Roofer in the State

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS (RFQ) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Mesa is seeking a qualified firm or team to act as the Construction Manager at Risk for the following: THE GRID MIXED USE PROJECT SITE IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NO. M99-2019-012 The City of Mesa, on behalf of Palladium GRID, LLC, (“Developer”), is seeking a qualified Construction Manager at Risk (CM@Risk) to provide Pre-Construction Services assistance and complete Construction Services as the CM@Risk for the the GRID Mixed Use Project Site Improvements Project. All qualified firms that are interested in providing these services are invited to submit their Statements of Qualifications (SOQ) in accordance with the requirements detailed in the Request for Qualifications (RFQ). The following is a summary of the project. The required tasks will be reviewed with the selected CM@Risk and defined to meet the needs of the project as part of the contract scoping. The scope of work will include upgrades to the Pomeroy Parking Garage, streetscape related improvements, upgrade to Gateway Park, City Court security measures, improvements to Gateway Park Drive and other associated work. The estimated construction cost is $2,500,000 to $4,500,000. A Pre-Submittal Conference will not be held. Contact with City and Developer Employees. All firms interested in this project (including the firm’s employees, representatives, agents, lobbyists, attorneys, and subconsultants) will refrain, under penalty of disqualification, from direct or indirect contact for the purpose of influencing the selection or creating bias in the selection process with any person who may play a part in the selection process. This policy is intended to create a level playing field for all potential firms, to assure that contract decisions are made in public, and to protect the integrity of the selection process. All contact on this selection process should be addressed to the authorized representative identified below.

Tim KLINE Roofing, LLC Roofs Done Right...The FIRST Time! 15-Year Workmanship Warranty on All Complete Roof Systems

www.timklineroofing.com

480-357-2463

The Statement of Qualifications shall include a one-page cover letter, plus a maximum of 8 pages to address the SOQ evaluation criteria (excluding resumes but including an organization chart with key personnel and their affiliation). Resumes for each team member shall be limited to a maximum length of two pages and should be attached as an appendix to the SOQ. Minimum font size shall be 10pt. Please provide eight (8) hard copies and one (1) electronic copy (CD or USB drive) of the Statement of Qualifications by December 4, 2019 at 2:00pm. The City reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Qualifications. The City is an equal opportunity employer. Delivered or hand-carried submittals must be delivered to the Engineering Department reception area on the fifth floor of Mesa City Plaza Building in a sealed package. On the submittal package, please display: Firm name, project number, and/or project title. Firms who wish to do business with the City of Mesa must be registered in the City of Mesa Vendor Self Service (VSS) System (http://mesaaz.gov/business/purchasing/vendor-self-service).

TK

MAKE A LOT!

CITY OF MESA, ARIZONA ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

RFQ Lists. The RFQ is available on the City’s website at: http://mesaaz.gov/business/engineering/construction-manager-at-riskand-job-order-contracting-opportunities.

®

SPEND A LITTLE…

31

FREE Estim a and written te proposal

R.O.C. #156979 K-42 • Licensed, Bonded and Insured

Questions. Questions pertaining to the Construction Manager at Risk selection process or contract issues should be directed to Stephanie Gishey of the Engineering Department at stephanie.gishey@mesaaz.gov. BETH HUNING City Engineer

ATTEST: DeeAnn Mickelsen City Clerk Published: East Valley Tribune, Nov 3, 10, 2019 / 25491


32 THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

SEE WHAT 1.4 BILLION IN CHINA

Reviving 5,000 Years of Civilization Based in the U.S., Shen Yun is able to present on the world stage authentic Chinese culture untainted by communism.

“A fascinating insight into what China’s culture used to be and what I hope one day will be restored to China.” —Edward McMillan-Scott, former Vice-President of the European Parliament

Exquisite beauty from the heavens, profound wisdom from dynasties past, universal values from timeless legends all spring to life through classical Chinese dance, enchanting orchestral music, glamorous costumes, and patented digital backdrops. Shen Yun offers an immersive experience that will uplift your spirit and touch your soul. It’s 5,000 years of civilization reborn!

Early Purchase Special

FEB 22–23

Get the best seats & waive fees by 11/30/2019

Tucson Music Hall

Code: Early20

TUCSON

“Powerful choreography... Truly magical. A must-see!” —IN New York magazine

MAR 3–8

MAR 12–15

Orpheum Theatre

Mesa Arts Center

PHOENIX

MESA

Tickets 800-880-0188

ShenYun.com/AZ

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East Valley Tribune West Mesa 11-10-2019  

East Valley Tribune West Mesa 11-10-2019  

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