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THE VOICE OF THE EAST VALLEY SINCE 1891 AND WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE FOR LOCAL REPORTING

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Mesa call to action on teen suicides

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This Week

NEWS............................... 4 Merger bill poses changes for EV school districts.

BUSINESS . ................ 17 Mesa snack company runs contest.

SPORTS....................... 22

Mesa’s Mountain View High baseball team is red hot.

GET OUT.................... 26 Mesa comedian makes laughs for charity.

COMMUNITY.................12 BUSINESS........................ 17 OPINION........................20 SPORTS .......................... 22 GETOUT..........................26 CLASSIFIED.................... 27

EAST VALLEY

Mesa legend Wayne Pomeroy dies at 96 PAGE 3 Sunday, April 14, 2019

EVIT chief jettisoned with golden parachute BY JIM WALSH Tribune Staff Writer

T

he suspended superintendent’s long career at the East Valley Institute of Technology is coming to a rocky end, but at least Sally Downey will enjoy a cushy landing. Downey, 71, who spent 19 years as the face of EVIT, agreed to a lucrative separation agreement approved by the EVIT governing board after months of controversy set into motion by an election that overhauled its makeup. The agreement includes Downey’s resignation, effective April 30, giving the technical school an opportunity for a fresh start – a development cheered by EVIT employees and retirees who spoke at a board meeting. The district provides vocational-technical

instruction for about 3,900 high school juniors and seniors – including about 200 from Scottsdale Unified. Downey, who signed a three-year extension from the previous governing board that paid her more than $188,000 a year, will not leave penniless, according to the terms of her separation agreement. Her exit deal calls for her to receive her base pay from May 1, 2019, through Feb. 28, 2020, a sum of $157,177. In addition, she is scheduled to receive another $33,333.33 as an annuity payment and to cover taxes during the same period. Her state pension will be based on the highest three years of earnings. Downey also is entitled to receive another 133 vacation days and 277 days of accrued sick leave, minus what she has used since she

was placed on administrative leave by the new board in January shortly after the election. The agreement would appear to relieve EVIT and taxpayers from the burden created by the third year of Downey’s contract extension, which was to run through 2021. The politically well-connected Downey has many fans who have come to her defense, including former Mesa Public Schools governing board president Ben Smith and longtime EVIT supporter Shon Rasmussen. But her impending departure was cheered by those attending the meeting. They broke into applause after the board met in executive session to confer with an attorney before approving the separation agreement.

see EVIT page 3

Couple’s Mesa center first in state for drug babies BY JORDAN HOUSTON Tribune Staff Writer

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medical facility designed to care for newborns suffering from drug withdrawals is now open in Mesa, making it the first of its kind in the state and the fourth of its kind in the country. Jacob’s Hope, 1150 N. Country Club Drive, is a new interim care center specifically for babies born to moms who are or have been on addicting drugs. Founded by Jo Jones and operated by her and her husband, Brian, the facility provides an alternative to a hospital newborn intensive care unit, where drug-addicted babies are generally treated. Every year, hundreds of babies in Arizona are born exposed to opioids, according to the Arizona Statewide Task Force on Preventing Prenatal Exposure to Alcohol and Other Drugs. From 2008 to 2015, more than half a mil-

lion newborns were exposed to some type of drug during pregnancy, while neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) – in which newborns experience withdrawal symptoms – increased from 145 cases to 470, or 224 percent. NAS can cause low birth weight, body shakes, excessive crying and physical and

see JACOB page 8

Jo and Brian Jones this weekend opened the state’s first nonhospital facility for treating newborns that are suffering drug withdrawal symptoms. (Kimberly Carrillo/Tribune Staff Photographger)

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

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EVIT from page 1

Another separation agreement for Assistant Superintendent Steve Waldvogel was discussed in executive session. The board voted to authorize attorneys to follow the advice that was discussed in private, but a final agreement has not been reached. “I feel a real shift in the energy. It is a positive change,” said Kelley Grantham, a 3D animation teacher. “The atmosphere is more collaborative.” “Even me being able to speak to you is unheard of and this is new to EVIT,” she said. Kim Foulger, an interior design and fashion teacher, said that she and other teachers feel liberated by Downey’s departure. “There was a lot of fear for your job if you stepped out of line,” Foulger said. “There’s been a lot of ongoing suppression of teachers. There wasn’t a lot of freedom.” Foulger thanked the new board, which has been criticized by Downey’s allies. “Thank you for endeavoring to create a new culture of liberation at EVIT,” Foulger said. “It is 2019 and time for a positive change at EVIT.” Foulger said the atmosphere created by Downey revolved around fear and retaliation. She said one example was Downey’s insistence that EVIT remain open during the Red for Ed movement last year and her refusal to allow teachers to participate.

SALLY DOWNEY

“No one dared to wear a red shirt,” Foulger said. “I am excited to be part of the new EVIT organization.” Joyce Hinrichs, a former principal, said she was forced into retirement by Downey. “She would often espouse a plan and we would say, ‘you can’t do it,’” Hinrichs said. Downey would respond, “‘Well, who says I can’t do it?’ Well, the law says you can’t do it.” An investigation by Susan Segal, an attorney and expert in education law hired by the new board, found a list of potential violations of contract and procurement laws, along with an Open Meetings Law

NEWS

3

violation, that are under investigation by the state Attorney General’s Office. Among the allegations was the failure to bid contracts with consultants properly, including one with former legislator and Tempe city council member David Schapira. No wrongdoing has been alleged on Schapira’s part and there reportedly is a disagreement between the previous board and Segal over whether his contract had to be bid. The selection of a construction supervisor on the expansion of the East Valley campus also may have been improperly handled and may have to be re-bid. Smith, who attended EVIT, defended Downey by saying any potential infractions were “minor stuff’’ and that she deserved only a reprimand, rather than losing her job. Smith said the board had removed Downey’s picture from a foyer near the meeting room in anticipation of approving the separation agreement. He said her opponents were invited to attend, and that she has been muzzled until her resignation takes effect. Once Downey officially leaves EVIT, she plans to tell her side of the story, Smith said. “She has impacted thousands of lives and impacted the quality of life of young adults and working professionals,” Smith said. “She understood the value of a technical education and used that to make connections for students.”

Legendary former Mayor Wayne Pomeroy dies BY PAUL MARYNIAK Tribune Executive Editor

W

ayne Pomeroy, a legendary mayor of Mesa who never let his passion for politics, government, community service and business interfere with his devotion to his family, died peacefully at home Thursday, He was 96. Born and raised in Mesa, Mr. Pomeroy dominated the city’s political power structure in the 1970s – first as a city councilman and then as mayor – at a time when it was experiencing the initial stirrings of population growth that have made it the nation’s 30th largest city today. The great-grandson of Francis Martin Pomeroy — one of the pioneers in Mesa’s founding — he was born on March 23, 1923, when the city had only about 3,500 residents. As mayor, he helped guide Mesa through a progressive stage that earned it the award of “All-American City” by the

Former Mesa Mayor Wayne Pomeroy was a World War II hero and went on to become a successful businessman, legendary mayor and devoted father and husband. (Special to the Tribune)

National Municipal League. “He was a big thinker, an action guy when the city was growing,” recalled Mike Hutchinson, the assistant executive

vice president of the East Valley Partnership who started a 30-year career with the city during Mr. Pomeroy’s tenure as mayor. Mr. Pomeroy created a new community center and library, started the Mesa Fire Department and paramedic services, built a new council chambers and the began the computerization of library, police and financial records. He also impacted Mesa in another significant way, Hutchinson said, through Pomeroy’s Men’s Store – a business on Main Street downtown that sold clothing and accessories to missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. “He continually invested in downtown when other businesses were leaving,” Hutchinson said, recalling how Mr. Pomeroy on several occasions renovated his store front to keep it an attractive part of the city’s downtown retail scene. That business is 68 years old and is run

see POMEROY page 4


NEWS 4

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

EV lawmaker pushes school district merger bill BY PAUL MARYNIAK Tribune Executive Editor AND HOWARD FISCHER Capitol Media Services

T

he East Valley’s public-school landscape would be significantly altered by 2024 if an Apache Junction legislator has his way. In getting the Senate Appropriations Committee to approve his bill, Republican Rep. John Fillmore won a crucial first step in his goal of forcing elementary and high school districts to merge by that time and requiring smaller unified districts to examine mergers. The bill not only would force the merger of Tempe Union, Tempe Elementary and Kyrene school districts, but could also pressure Higley Unified and Queen Creek Unified to consider consolidation. Fillmore said consolidation of small

Arizona school districts

Elementary districts: 97 with 434 schools. High school districts: 15 with 70 schools. Unified districts: 95 with 707 elementary schools, 143 high schools and 73 combined schools. Accommodation districts: 8 with 5 elementary schools, 9 high schools and 7 combined schools. - Source: Arizona Department of Education

POMEROY from page 3

by the third youngest of his four daughters, Michel Fluhr, who now owns it. Fluhr started working there in 1976 and her dad ran the store until 1993. But even after turning it over to his daughter, Mr. Pomeroy couldn’t stay away. “He loved it so much. He came in every day,” his daughter said, beaming with pride over the fact that “I worked for 40 years with him, side by side.” That he couldn’t tear himself away from the store may not be surprising. He bragged that he had always had a job since he was 6 years old, when he sold cantaloupes from a red wagon and delivered telegrams and newspapers – including the Mesa Tribune – when he got a little bit older. In high school, he played fullback on

GOT NEWS?

REP. JOHN FILLMORE

districts in Arizona – some that have only one building – could save more than $500 million in administrative costs that could then be plowed into student support, teacher pay and other expenses. “When people have said to me that schools have more money, I’ve always had the quick comeback (that) they have enough money,” he said. “What we need to do is have them spend it a little bit more wisely.” As a business owner, Fillmore said it’s time for the state education system to be run like one. “If we did some consolidation, got rid of the redundancy, duplication and excess waste in the districts, we could have the opportunity to save ... I believe hundreds of millions of dollars,” he said. He prepared his own study pegging the total savings at $506 million out of about $7.8 billion now spent each year in state

the Mesa High School football team, and even though he weighed 104 pounds, he earned the nickname “Toughie.” But he caught an even bigger prize at Mesa High. He met his wife, Cecil, and was married to her for 73 years until she passed away in 2017. After graduating from high school in 1941, Mr. Pomeroy went to California to work for an aircraft company for a short time. He joined the Army Air Force and was a tail gunner on a B-24 bomber during World War II. During a mission over the former Czechoslovakia, his plane was shot by enemy fire. Even though he was wounded, he managed to take down the enemy plane and received the Silver Star, Purple Heart and Air Medal for his actions during the war. After the war, Pomeroy went to Brigham Young University and New York

and local funds for operation and maintenance. Fillmore said this isn’t just a way of cutting state spending, stressing his legislation would allocate 25 percent of whatever is saved for teacher salaries. The bill, which faces an uncertain future in the full Senate and still must go to the House, would force 198 districts to consolidate by 2024. A merger of Tempe Elementary, Tempe Union and Kyrene would create a district with more than 40,000 students. Merging Queen Creek and Higley would create a district of about 19,000. With Republican lawmakers saying too much money is wasted on duplication, the consolidations could occur without voter approval. But HB 2139, approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee on a 6-3 party-line vote, does not stop there. It would require every school board in the state to annually determine how much money could be saved by not just unification but also with consolidation with other adjacent districts. The bill would allow smaller counties, those with just three supervisors, no more than three school districts. Most counties with five supervisors could have up to seven districts; Maricopa County could have no more than 20. Fillmore’s bill provides a carrot for governing boards that can come up with their own consolidation plans without taking it to voters, allowing them to spend more money than would otherwise be allowed

University to earn bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business. In some ways, his civic activism seems to have picked up a notch around 1971 when his beloved horse Snuffles died. “He loved horses and he loved that horse,” his daughter recalled. And through all his community service and business involvement, his family always came first, Fluhr said. “He was literally the most amazing dad,” said Fluhr, who could not single out one moment she will always remember with him “because there are so many.” “We spent a lot of family time together,” she said. “I am not sure how he was able to attend all my and my sisters’ activities but he did.” Mr. Pomeroy was preceded in death by his wife Cecil, his son-in-law Harvey Wood and his grandson Clint Fluhr.

SEN. SEAN BOWIE

for up to three years. But balking appears not to be an option. HB 2139 says if the governing boards don’t come up with a plan by June 30, 2022 to unify and consolidate, then the county school superintendent is directed to come up with a plan. And it spells out that any such plan “shall be executed without an election.” What is bothering some of the foes – and even some of the supporters – is the mandate. Ahwatukee Sen. Sean Bowie said voters in his area have made decisions about how they want their schools organized. Bowie, whose district includes Tempe Union and Kyrene but also Chandler and Mesa unified districts, said voters in some areas preferring smaller districts versus

see MERGER page 5

He is survived by daughters Cassandra Wood, Wendy (Phil) Hildebrand, Michel (Chris) Fluhr and Lisa (Brett) Bargery, 11 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. A viewing will be held 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, April 17, at Bunkers Garden Chapel, 33 N. Centennial Way, Mesa. Funeral services Thursday, April 18, at 11 a.m. at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Mesa 5th Ward, 1718 N. Date, Mesa. A viewing will be held one hour before services begin. Interment will be at the City of Mesa Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Hospice of the Valley, 1510 E. Flower St, Phoenix, 85014; Save the Family Foundation, 125 E. University Drive, Mesa 85201; or A New Leaf, 868 E. University Drive, Mesa 85203.

Contact Paul Maryniak at 480-898-5647 or pmaryniak@timespublications.com


NEWS

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

MERGER from page 4

huge unified districts. “I would be concerned about circumventing voters and circumventing the taxpayers when they’ve clearly made decisions of whether they want to be unified or not unified,” Bowie said. Sen. Heather Carter, R-Cave Creek, said she has no problem with the idea of having school boards study the benefits of consolidation. But Carter, who agreed to support the measure, said she won’t vote for it when it gets to the floor if the mandates remain. Fillmore said that mandate is only partly true. “In my bill, I’ve given them the opportunity to go out for a vote if they want to,” he said. But Fillmore said that it’s going to take more than a simple nudge to get the desired results, saying that dealing with some districts is like “dealing with my employees or children.” He pointed out there already are opportunities for school districts to unify and consolidate. And there even are some financial incentives for those who pursue that path. “But they don’t,” he said. Queen Creek officials declined comment and Higley officials did not return a request for comment. But Kyrene board President Michael Myrick and board member John King, both Republicans, said that while consolidation made sense for some districts, it didn’t make sense for Kyrene and Tempe Union. “While district consolidation may sound appealing on the surface,” Myrick said, “bigger isn’t necessarily better, and the potential savings are overstated when you begin to consider the costs of consolidation.” King said there are too many little districts in Arizona that consist of three and even fewer schools, but that they are re-

quired by law to maintain an administrative infrastructure that is as costly as some districts with more schools. “To some degree, consolidation needs to happen,” King said. “For a school district like ours – with the number of students we have – it doesn’t make sense. It would be disastrous.” During the Senate hearing, Bowie noted that Arizona’s per pupil administrative costs were well below the national average of about $1,300. The latest Arizona Auditor General’s report on school per-pupil spending said the statewide average per pupil cost of administration is $860. The per-pupil administrative cost in Higley is $875 and $845 in Queen Creek. Efforts to force consolidation have been discussed for more than a decade. In 2001, a Senate panel approved a measure creating an independent commission to consolidate the more than 200 school districts in the state to no more than 90. Those that refused would be denied state aid. It died after drawing fire from officials from some smaller districts, who argued with the presumption that small is bad and wasteful. Five years later, a special School District Redistricting Commission created by the legislature proposed at least forcing a vote in each district on consolidation. But that failed to produce the desired results.

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NEWS 6

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

Mesa mayor asks faith groups to address teen suicide See also Opinion ........................ Page 20 BY JORDAN HOUSTON Tribune Staff Writer

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he City of Mesa is calling on the faith community to raise awareness about youth suicide following a spike in teen deaths across the East Valley. Around 120 leaders from different faiths, as well as nonprofits, gathered at the Mesa Arts Center last week for an interfaith breakfast hosted by Mayor John Giles. Presenters took turns shedding light on the crisis, focusing on prevention, intervention and postvention. Superintendent of Schools Dr. Ember Conley was among the speakers. Also speaking was Mesa Chamber of Commerce Sally Harrison, who lost a young son to suicide, and Katie McPherson, a Chandler educator and suicide-prevention activist who has been working in East Valley communities and across Arizona and other states organizing prevention efforts. Since July 2017, 33 young people have taken their lives in Queen Creek, Chandler, Mesa and Gilbert. Five other teens in nearby communities also have been lost. The purpose of the gathering, Giles said, was to provide the faith community with the tools necessary to educate members of all ages. “This is an awkward topic, it’s not something people enjoy talking about. We need to get over that and raise awareness about the situation and how to resolve it,” said the mayor, adding: “Every community has strengths and weaknesses, and one of Mesa’s strengths is the faith community. A lot of good things happen in Mesa at the hands of volunteers

Mesa Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Sally Harrison addresses Mayor John Giles’s prayer breakfast as educator and teen suicide prevention advocate Katie McPherson looks on. In the photo on the left, a montage showing the faces of some of the 33 East Valley teens who have taken their lives since July 2017 formed a somber backdrop during the McPherson’s speech. (Kimberly Carrillo/Tribune Staff Photographer)

and leaders from the faith community, and we need to use all of our strengths.” The Mesa Chamber Education Committee teamed up with the Arizona State University Polytechnic campus to prepare a presentation for the faith leaders to implement into their teachings. The power point outlines mental health red flags, including expressions of hopelessness, isolation, increased substance abuse, increased anger or rage, sleeping too little and posting or talking about wanting to die. It also suggests that checking in on others who appear to be struggling is key for prevention, as well as speaking up to make sure parents and teachers are aware of the situation. “We’re raising awareness and following through with a plan of action as to how to

Faith and community leaders gathered last Tuesday at Mesa Arts Center to discuss a campaign aimed at curbing teen suicides. (Kimberly Carrillo/Tribune Staff Photographer)

respond,” Giles said. The call to action comes at a time when numbers for teen suicides and attempts are escalating across the country. US Centers for Disease Control data reported by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention ranks suicide as the eighth leading cause of death in Arizona, with 1,327 people taking their lives in 2017. Suicide is also the second leading cause of death for 15- to 32-year-olds in the United States. Though there is no complete count, a 2017 CDC Youth Risk Behaviors Survey found that 7.4 percent of young people in grades 9-12 reported that they had made at least one suicide attempt in the past 12 months. “The response needs to come from the entire community, not just the schools and the city government. Everyone needs to come together to bring more awareness,” said Giles. McPherson echoed his sentiments. McPherson has been monitoring teen suicides for the past year and said that while social media might seem like the obvious culprit, there could be myriad factors. “We’ve got deterioration of the family unit and we have academic rigor that’s being pushed starting in the fourth grade – there’s a lot of academic pressure that kids have now. I think social media is a piece, but it’s not the only piece,” she said. “We’re also living much more sedentary lifestyles, kids are isolating themselves on their devices in bedrooms,” she added. McPherson, a mother of four, also touched on today’s parenting, and how

she thinks it has fostered a generation of children that haven’t developed coping skills or emotional resiliency. “My parenting generation has subscribed to this ‘swoop-in-and-save-them’ mentality,” she said. “We want their lives to be easy and perfect, but every time we swoop in we have unfortunately – with good intention – developed kids that have never really felt the outs of failure and have very low coping and resiliency skills. We could do better job at supporting them through failure.” Both McPherson and Giles shared that they believe there is hope, and that nothing is stronger than the power of community unity. To see the presentations: mesaaz.gov/ city-hall/mayor-council/mayor-john-giles/ mayor-s-interfaith-breakfast

Mesa Mayor John Giles called on faith leaders to join him in efforts to prevent teen suicides. (Kimberly Carrillo/Tribune Staff Photographer)


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

7


NEWS 8

JACOB from page 1

mental challenges later in life. Hospital units are “not really equipped for this because we’ve learned, from doctors out there, that drug babies are typically healthy but they’re suffering from symptoms that cause bedlam,” said Brian, who is executive director of the facility. “Oftentimes, they get put into a corner of a NICU and they’re given fairly massive – not big – doses of morphine.” “What we’re trying to say to the medical profession out here is, as politely as we can, we know that you really don’t have a facility that’s equipped for these babies. That’s what we’re here for. That’s what we’re made for.” The couple dedicated the sanctuary to their son, Jacob, who was adopted as a drug-exposed newborn in 1988 and later died during a drug-related incident in his mid-20s. Jacob’s Hope is licensed as a behavioral healthcare facility under the Arizona Department of Health Services and offers immediate short-term care, a detailed plan for withdrawal and therapeutic nurturing techniques. The nonprofit will serve six infants per month before ramping up to 10 a month for a year – eventually catering up to 12 newborns at a time. Unlike the high-paced atmosphere of the NICU, the care center will provide a quiet, calm environment, which is key for babies struggling through withdrawals, the Joneses said. “This looks like a nursery, and yet when you see the oxygen and feeding tubes and all those types of things that we have, you quickly realize that the level of care we’re equipped to give is

significantly higher than just a nursery,” said Brian. Each of the six rooms can house up to two newborns, complete with a rocking chair, cribs and pastel colored walls. A bathing room sits down the hall, stacked with diapers, onesies, warm towels and washcloths, while a small kitchen is available for the nursing staff to prepare bottles and meals for themselves. The ultimate purpose of the center, Jo explained, is to prevent what happened to their son from happening to other drug-exposed newborns. Jacob was 3 days old when Jo and Brian took him in. Medical officials warned he may have been exposed to drugs during his mother’s pregnancy, but other than that, no resources or information regarding the possible long-term side effects were provided. Growing up, Jacob had large brown eyes, tan skin and a handsome smile. He was charismatic, charming and brilliant, with a photographic memory. “We used to say to him, ‘You should

The Jonese has equipped six rooms, each capable of helping housing two babies, with cribs, clothing and other accessories for the newborms who are brought to their center for care. (Kimberly Carrillo/Tribune Staff Photographer)

But looking back, the mother said she now recognizes the warning signs of prenatal substance exposure.

what it’s like creating an entity “ Imagine in the state that doesn’t exist.

There’s no map. There is no list, there is no blueprint. There is nobody out there to tell you this is what we did. That’s what this team for Jacob’s Hope has done.

have been an attorney. You can convince people that the sky is yellow,’” said Jo. “I mean, he just was incredible, smart and all of those things.”

Supporters from across the street have donated cash, furnishings and clothing to the Joneses for Jacob’s Hope. (Kimberly Carrillo/Tribune Staff Photographer)

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

When Jacob approached his teens, he started exhibiting behavioral and emotional problems. “When he turned 15, it was like everything just hit. He started having emotional issues and we were taking him to doctors and counselors and psychiatrists,” said Jo. “He had a volatile temper, it would just build up and then he would kind of explode. It wound up being difficult.” At some point, Jacob was introduced to drugs and alcohol, beginning a lifelong battle with addiction. He went on to serve in the military for four years before he died at the age of 25 after consuming a bad batch of cocaine. Devastated by her son’s death, Jo found solace in a book that changed her life – Barbara Drennen’s “Caring for Drug-Exposed Infants.” The book details the crippling side effects drug-exposed newborns face and highlights the author’s original care facility, the Pediatric Interim Care Center in Washington – which soon became the model for Jacob’s Hope.

It was in this moment that Jo realized her son met the criteria of those newborns. With Barbara’s work as her inspiration, Jacob’s Hope was born about a year and a half later. But the road to success wasn’t easy. The two parents quickly realized the difficulties of starting a nonprofit, especially one that has never existed in the state of Arizona before. “We have had countless situations where a door was closed and God was out there saying, ‘Just keep going, keep going because this is going to happen,’” said Brian, adding: “Imagine what it’s like creating an entity in the state that doesn’t exist. There’s no map. There is no list, there is no blueprint. There is nobody out there to tell you this is what we did. That’s what this team for Jacob’s Hope has done.” After two and a half years of renovating, retrofitting, inspection and licensing reviews, Jacob’s Hope finally secured a license from the Arizona Department of Health Services. The final step of gaining its Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System insurance provider information is in the works and will be completed soon. Both Brian and Jo attribute the facility’s success to its dedicated team as well as donations from supporters across the state. They estimate they have received up to $160,000 in donations and products so far. While the facility only caters to newborns at the moment, Brian expressed that there is a possibility it could expand to caring for the mothers down the road. The facility is in its beginning stages of opening and expects to have its first patients by May.


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

Workplace equity begins in classroom, Chandler panel told BY KAYLA RUTLEDGE Tribune Staff Writer

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survey distributed to Chandler employers suggests companies that hire personnel from around the world want to know what is being done in the city to ensure that workplaces will be inclusive. At a recent meeting with education and equity professionals, Chamber of Commerce President Terri Kimble said education plays a key role in keeping businesses like Intel, Paypal, Wells Fargo and others attracted to Chandler and ensuring that future employees can work well with coworkers of different races and cultures. “[Schooling] is huge when we talk about a growing community being a progressive community as well as attracting new companies and keeping new companies here. We really do use education as an economic development tool,” said Terri. Adama Sallu, director of equity and inclusion for Chandler Unified School District, said practicing equity in the workplace starts by learning about equity in the classroom. She said that through the curriculum, “Kids really begin to see others and themselves, and that is the best pathway to build kids’ cultural sensitivity in our schools.” With tears in her eyes, she highlighted her personal experience as a substitute teacher for a science class to underscore why districts must try to use texts and classroom exercises that connect students to the material as well as to their peers. Students said, “Excuse me, miss. This is dumb, miss. This is stupid, miss,” to Sallu when they were told to create a Facebook profile for famous scientists. The problem was that the scientists were all Caucasian even though a majority of the class was Hispanic. Sallu said the children were unable to see themselves in the material and as a result were incapable of engaging with the assignment. She said she began replacing the names of white scientists with Hispanic astronauts and scientists, and the students were charged with enthusiasm for the assignment. “If they cannot see themselves in the material, they will not want to interact with the material,” Sallu said. Curriculum changes are on the horizon for CUSD to enable students of color to see themselves and their peers in the material

– books and other reading materials will feature storylines and characters that reflect different cultures. T h e changes will be im- Chandler schools’ equity director Adama Sallu said students must see plemented their culture reflected in curricula. next school (Tribune file photo) year, but training has already begun with teachers to jump start inclusion in the classroom. Through educational seminars and training sessions, Sallu said, teachers are learning about equity to “engage in educating the demographic landscape in our schools.” She said that classroom equity is the responsibility of both teachers and students. “Equity is really about raising the bar for kids, holding the kids accountable for learning, demanding excellence not for some of our kids, for all of them. Every day, every child, every school,” Sallu said. “There is a lot of information out there about the work of inclusion and equity and some folks think it is against a group of children, but it is about demanding excellence from all children and ensuring they get what they need,” she added. Though much is being done in the classroom to create employees of the future who can relate to coworkers of different races and cultures, Sallu said there are still many challenges to creating equity in the classroom – many of which have nothing to do with the classroom at all. “Some of the problems we have in our school are poverty, lack of healthcare, families who are homeless, children who are hungry. These are issues that are more societal, but it affects the kids in school,” Sallu said. “If a child is having emotional issues outside of class, they cannot learn, so our teachers must extend grace. These kids are going to come to our public schools and as they come, we must love them, we must see them, we must honor them,” she added. The next diversity and inclusion meeting is set to be held June 26, where the panel will reconvene to further discuss what is being done in the East Valley to create an inclusive workforce.

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

Feds insist schools, including Chandler, use AzMERIT test BY HOWARD FISCHER Capitol Media Services AND KAYLA RUTLEDGE Tribune Staff Writer

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rizona risks losing $340 million in federal funds because state lawmakers allow school districts – including Chandler Unified – to offer an alternative to the AzMERIT standardized tests. In a letter to state education officials, Frank Brogan, an assistant secretary at the US Department of Education, said the federal Every Student Succeeds Act requires that states administer standardized tests that meet certain requirements. That includes an ability to compare results among school districts. But Brogan said that the decision to permit schools to offer alternatives, like the SAT and the ACT college tests, does not comply. So he rejected the state’s bid for a waiver of the requirements. Arizona has offered a standardized test for years. At one point it was AIMS, short for Arizona’s Instrument to Measure Standards. Of note is that high schoolers were required to get passing grades to get a diploma. That was replaced in 2015 by AzMERIT, which stands for Arizona’s Measure-

ment of Educational Readiness to Inform Teaching. One particular difference is that it was not linked to high school graduation. The following year Arizona lawmakers agreed to be the first in the nation to allow schools choose from a “menu” of standardized tests for high schools. Based on that, the state Board of Education came up with a list of permitted options. That includes the SAT and ACT. This is the first year that the substitute tests were allowed, and Chandler Unified School District took full advantage of administering the ACT to the district’s juniors. “Our biggest thing with going with the ACT and going with the menu of assessments was we were able to eliminate six days of testing at the high school level and put those days back into the classroom because the ACT is one day,” said CUSD Assistant Superintendent Wendy Nance. Nance added another advantage to ACT is that it is a college-readiness test that helps students gauge if they are prepared to continue their education after high school. CUSD public information officer Terry Locke also noted that student absenteeism is lower during ACT testing than during the 6-day AzMERIT test period.

“AzMERIT was prone to students unofficially opting out,” Locke said. “There is no process for opting out of AzMERIT testing. Many just didn’t go to school on those days. Absences were much greater under AzMERIT than we experienced with ACT.” Brogan’s rejection of the state’s bid for a waiver of the requirements won’t immediately affect the school districts that already have opted for an alternative to AzMERIT. State Education Department spokesman Stefan Swiat said they remain free to use the tests this spring but will have to return to the AzMERIT test next year unless the department and the state Board of Education can convince federal officials to change their minds. At this point, however, Swiat said the federal law requires that there be a standardized test that meets the federal requirements in at least one year of high school. AzMERIT meets that mandate. In a joint letter to school officials, state schools chief Kathy Hoffman and state Education Board President Lucas Narducci said the plan at this point is to require all schools to administer the AzMERIT test to students in grades 3-8 and again in ninth grade. “That will meet federal requirements,” they said. It also will meet one of the

original goals of allowing alternatives to AzMERIT by eliminating that test in Grades 10 and 11. Hoffman and Narducci said that schools remain free to choose assessments from that alternate menu. But they said it has to be in addition to the AzMERIT test. And they said it is “undecided” whether the state will pay to administer any other test. What makes Brogan’s denial crucial is that he is threatening to place Arizona’s Title I grants into “high risk” status. It is that which endangers the $340 million the state gets in that type of federal aid this year. Swiat said plans are underway to prevent that from happening and that the state board will meet later this month to decide what to do next. But Swiat conceded that his agency had not provided to federal officials the information they said they needed to approve an alternative to the AzMERIT test before schools were given the go-ahead to start offering those options. He said, though, that both the state Department of Education and the Board of Education were instead counting on Arizona getting the waiver from having to provide all that – the waiver that was just denied.

Foundation gives 22 EV schools A+ awards for excellence TRIBUNE NEWS STAFF

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ed by Chandler Unified, 22 East Valley schools last week were designated A+ Schools of Excellence by the Arizona Education Foundation. Applicant schools are evaluated in the areas of student focus and support, school culture, active teaching and learning, curriculum, leadership, community and parent involvement and assessment data. They were among 52 pre-K-12 public schools across the state to receive the coveted honor for passing evaluations with flying colors in student focus and support, school culture, active teaching and learning, curriculum, leadership, community and parent involvement and assessment data. Chandler Unified fielded the most schools with the designation with seven

while Mesa and Kyrene districts each had five. Gilbert Public Schools and Tempe Elementary each had two A+ schools and Higley had one. Stating that the award calls “attention to the positive stories and successes occurring in public schools,” said foundation Executive Director, Kim Graham applauded the awardees “for exceeding expectations to meet their students’ needs and for achieving overall success despite the many challenges that face the education community statewide.” Chandler Unified winners and their principals are: Shumway Leadership Academy, Korry Brenner; Arizona College Prep Erie, Robert Bickes; Audrey and Robert Ryan Elementary, Diane Wells; Basha Elementary, Jessica Edgar; Chandler High, Larry Rother; Chandler Traditional Acad-

emy - Freedom, Abby Druck; and Chandler Traditional Academy- Independence, Frank Hendricsen. Mesa schools are Zedo Ishikawa Elementary, David Shill; Ramon S. Mendoza Elementary, Deb Lynch; Sirrine Elementary, Renee Parker; Emerson Elementary, Christel Swinehart-Arbogast; and Lincoln Elementary, Joshua Henderson. Kyrene schools are Aprende Middle, Renee Kory; CI Waggoner Elementary, Lisa Gibson; Kyrene de la Mariposa, Spencer Fallgatter; Kyrene Monte Vista, Suzanne Ramundo; and Kyrene Traditional Academy, Marianne Lescher. Other winners included: Gateway Pointe Elementary, Higley Unified, Tim Fountain; the Gilbert Public Schools of Playa del Rey Elementary and Principal Darrin Praska and and Towne Meadows Elementary and

Principal Chip Pettit won in Gilbert Public Schools. Tempe El winners were Ward Traditional Academy, Taime Bengochea; and Arredondo Elementary, Alison Bruening-Hamati. The evaluation process for the award includes a lengthy written application and a rigorous site visit conducted by a team of trained judges and documentation across a variety of categories, from parent and community involvement to programs and practices. Schools receive $500 and a banner designating for the award, which is valid for three and a half years. “Recognition through the A+ School of Excellence™ program can help increase confidence in Arizona’s public schools and create greater parent and community support,” the foundation noted.

GOT NEWS? Contact Paul Maryniak at 480-898-5647 or pmaryniak@timespublications.com


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Mahnah Club marks 65 years of service BY COTY DOLORES MIRANDA Tribune Contributor

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or 65 years, Mahnah Club of the East Valley, Inc. has helped others, many others, improve their lives. Its list of charities and families helped is nearly endless, and as the club moves toward seven decades of service, its members continue their largesse. The nonprofit club comprises women who took the name from the Hopi word “mahnah,” which they interpret as “leading women of the community.” The 65 members are indeed women leaders who have, since the club’s founding in 1954, served the East Valley communities not only by financially supporting nonprofits and awarding post-secondary school scholarships, but volunteering with charities they support. “We’ve given hundreds of thousands of dollars to charities and scholarships, and our members donate more than 5,000 volunteer hours annually,” said member and

Helping to celebrate 65 years of service are Mahnah Club members, from left, Ann Randall, Mary Ann Betti, Joan Saba, Jean Zidan and Marie Gerz. (Mahnah Club/Special to the Tribune)

event’s fashion show, continues to be especially proud of the organization’s founding of the Child Crisis Center in Mesa 38 years ago. After merging with Crisis Nursery three years ago, the nonprofit is now Child Crisis Arizona, but their mission is as it was when it was founded by Mahnah Club: they remain dedicated to “Safe Kids and Strong Families.” Chris Scarpati, the CEO of Child Crisis Center from its founding until her retirement three years ago, said throughout her three decades, Mahnah Club never ceased to amaze her with its financial and physical support. She was a main speaker for the Mahnah Club’s anniversary celebration, titled “Sentimental Journey,” that drew more than 130 guests. “I reminded them Saturday that because of their foresight in seeing the need for a shelter in the East Valley decades ago,

Mesa resident Connie Little. “And we’ve done this continually for 65 years. That’s a lot for a club that’s 100 percent volunteer.” Thee members and guests recently celebrated their 65th year with an afternoon

of fun and fellowship at the Las Sendas Golf Club. Little, who has been with the club 17 years and was co-chair with Karen Shoemaker for the 65th anniversary

“that incredibly special and priceless moment of piquing a student’s interest” led him to begin judging the National History Day competition eight years ago. “The critical thinking and creativity that the kids get out of [the competition] is tremendous,” Carras said. “At the beginning of the year they may know nothing about their topic of choice, but then come competition time they are experts in and out on primary and secondary sources,” he added. Carras also views the competition as an opportunity to switch roles with the students and learn a new fact or two about the area, such as historical prisoner of war camps in Parker, Arizona, and interesting details he has “never even thought about” on the artist Vincent Van Gogh. After long days spent teaching fourthgraders at Kyrene de la Mirada Elementary School, Carras spends his free time coaching middle school students from other schools to ensure they are prop-

Teacher Dave Carras celebrates a morning spent at National History Day with his students Samantha Ennis, left, and Erin Chiu. (Special to the Tribune)

see MAHNAH page 13

Chandler history teacher nominated for national award BY KAYLA RUTLEDGE Tribune Staff Writer

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ave Carras’ love for Arizona’s history has landed him in the history books himself, as the teacher was recently nominated for an award of notable proportions. The MacGregor History Teacher of the Year Award is given to one middle school and one high school teacher that is able to “demonstrate a commitment to engaging students in historical learning through innovative use of primary sources, implementation of active learning strategies to foster historical thinking skills, and participation in the National History Day contest.” The National History Day competition encourages students to investigate a historical, cultural, scientific or social topic from the past throughout the year and present their findings in the form of a written essay, an interactive website, a documentary film, an exhibit or a dramatic performance. Carras said his love of past events and

see TEACHER page 15


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

MAHNAH from page 12

they’ve touched the lives of tens of thousands of children who needed to feel safe and loved; 17,000 during my 34 years,” said Scarpati. “Because of them, thousands of families received hope through the many and diverse services we provided. Although the club never sought recognition and would probably never see many of the lives they touched, it was my pleasure to remind them and honor them at their anniversary event,” she said. Scarpati thanked them “for allowing me the privilege of serving children and families in such a special way.” She recounted how a small shelter “became an agency filled with long-term, dedicated and passionate staff, and hundreds of volunteers, all with the same goal, no matter which program they worked in – that of making life better each day for one child and family at a time.” All that was made possible because “Mahnah Club paved the way for all the positive outcomes for those families.” Scarpati recalled the Child Crisis Center’s first year in 1981, working with Mahnah Club members to renovate the first little building so it could be licensed for seven infants and children who needed a safe place while their future was determined by the courts, “or while we worked with the parents to help them through a crisis,” she said. “They worked tirelessly cleaning, painting and at the same time putting together their annual fundraising event to fund the center,” Scarpati said. “We were all thrilled and exhausted

Celebrating the Mahnah Club’s anniversary at a recent luncheon were, from left, Shawn Games, Susan Backus, Mary Mills, Judy Warnock and Kathy Knowlton. (Mahnah Club/Special to the Tribune)

when the First Lady of Arizona, Hattie Babbitt, celebrated our open house towards the end of that year,” she added. “We welcomed the first of thousands of babies and young children into our shelter around Thanksgiving of that year.” She said Mahnah members stayed involved year after year, volunteering hands-on in countless ways, assisting in capital drives for needed expansions and serving on committees and the board. Two members – Betty Kerr, now deceased, and Nancy Sheridan – served as board chairs. Scarpati said it was “only fitting” that the first wing of the larger 42-bed shelter was named Mannah Wing. “As the center added buildings and programs, they walked the walk with us,” she said. Torrie A. Taj is now CEO for Child Crisis Arizona.

Ann Randall of Mesa has been a Mahnah Club member for 30 years, serving as a past president and personally volunteering with area nonprofits supported financially by the club. “From 1954 until now, women in the East Valley have worked to contribute to other families and children in many ways,” she said, “from rocking babies to wrapping gifts, providing food for those in need over the holidays and throughout the year. “We’ve raised funds to provide college scholarships to ease the burden for students with so much potential but not enough funds to make higher education a reality,” she said proudly. Randall said Mahnah members “are so committed to making our community a better place and have stood side by side with the Child Crisis Center, Child Crisis Arizona, Save the Family Foundation, Kaity’s Way and many others over these 65 years.”

Said Nan Ater, board chair of Gabriel’s Angels executive committee: “It is wonderful to share our mission of inspiring confidence, compassion and best behaviors in at-risk children through pet therapy.” Ater said the nonprofit plans to use the money to support its 190 pet therapy teams. “These Pet Therapy teams deliver healing pet therapy to Arizona’s at-risk children, nurturing their emotional development and enhancing the quality of the lives forever at over 125 child serving agencies, and visit 15,200 children annually,” she said. WWC has groups around the US, Canada and worldwide; two WWC chapters are located in the Valley: WWC Phoenix and WWC Valley of the Sun.

WWC Valley of the Sun has three groups: one in Scottsdale, one in Ahwatukee and an East Valley branch. The East Valley branch will meet 5:307:30 p.m. April 18 at JC’s Steakhouse, 25 East Ray Road, Gilbert. Guests are welcome and more information is at 100WWCValleyOfTheSun.org. Tarnopolski makes it clear that WWC Valley of the Sun isn’t a charity. Nor is it a nonprofit. “We, simply, are a philanthropic group of women,” Tarnopolski said. “Our members write their checks directly to the charity.” Tarnopolski formed the Valley of the Sun WWC chapter five years ago, in 2015, after attending one of the WWC Phoenix chapter’s giving circles. “I thought, you know what, I’m going to

COMMUNITY

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Among other long-term members are Jo Godfrey who joined in 1961; Joyce Staebell, 1965; Ann Eagleberger, 1967; Linda Free and Becky Weinberg, 1969. Members since the 1970s include Ruth Shoen, Barbara Bennett (cq), JoAnn White, Jean Zidan, Anna Kempf, Norma MacDougall, Sally Moore and Kathleen Shelton. Betty Kerr, who died this year, was active in any capacity she could be after joining in 1957. As with many social/service clubs, Mahnah Club of the East Valley, Inc. is struggling to find both new and younger members. But, said Ann Randall, they remain undeterred even if it means a little downsizing. “We are struggling with membership. It is such an amazing club, with lots of fun and friendship and bonding that’s been so special over the years, but younger members aren’t easy to attract,” she said. “Mahnah Club has decided to restructure and scale down for now,” Randall added. “We will continue our service and some fundraising, but on a smaller scale.” Members agree it’s an old-school kind of service club with each membership meeting beginning with the recitation of the Mahnah Club pledge, followed by singing of ‘The Mahnah Song’, written by Addaline Gates with a musical arrangement by Mary Fulop. The fourth stanza of their song echoes their mission: “We reap what we sow, Our special star will shine, Give help along the way, And never failing to be kind.” Information: MahnahClub.org

Philanthropic women’s group keeps on growing BY KRISTINE CANNON Tribune Staff Writer

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arlier this year, around 60 women, checks in hand, gathered at the Scottsdale Hilton Resort & Villas. For one hour, from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., three women addressed the room, speaking about the charity of their choosing – a charity they hope will be on the receiving end of a multi-thousand-dollar check. That night, the group – 100+ Women Who Care (WWC) Valley of the Sun – chose Phoenix-based nonprofit Gabriel’s Angels. And on March 7, WWC Valley of the Sun Chief Community Builder Kim Tarnopolski and co-founder Jacqueline Destremps presented a check to Gabriel’s Angels for $9,050.

do this on my own,” she said. “I called up some friends and said, ‘Hey, I think I’ve found our next thing.’” Tarnopolski was looking for a new venture. She had recently retired as an HR executive and consultant for over 18 years, and her daughter was going into middle school. “I decided it was time to take a hiatus and just be really present for [my daughter],” she said. “And I’ve always been involved with the charitable world and sat on boards.” And so WWC Valley of the Sun was formed. As the name of the group suggests, each group has more than 100 women, with the exception of East Valley, which was

see WOMEN page 14


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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

WOMEN from page 13

recently formed in 2018 but continues to grow. Tarnopolski describes the Valley of the Sun chapter’s women as 35 to 70 years of age, both retirees and working women. But the common denominator is all the women have a big heart and want to give back. “Yes, it’s about giving and supporting a charity, but it’s also about just learning about charities,” Tarnopolski said. “That’s the great thing about this.” Many women attend the Valley of the Sun chapter giving circles to seek potential business partners. During the giving circles, three nominated and approved charities are randomly drawn. The WWC members who nominated the charities then make an informal presentation, stating why they believe the charity is deserving of the members’ vote and check. After a Q&A, anonymous ballots are then cast, and the charity with the most votes receives the members’ donations. Each member writes a $100 check made directly to the charity, no exceptions. Those who are not in attendance at the giving circle can send a blank check to the chapter or donate directly to the char-

Kim Tarnopolski, left, and Realtor Christie Ellis are big supporters of, and evangelists for, 100+ Women Who Care Valley of the Sun. (Special to the Tribune)

ity via their website or other preferred method. It’s not necessarily $100 per person, either. The Valley of the Sun chapter allows teams, so the $100 can be split two, three, four different ways, depending on the size of the team.

The final step of the quarterly giving circle is the executive committee collects all of the checks and gives the money to the charity within one month of the giving circle. In total, WWC Valley of the Sun has raised and donated $375,325 to 46 local charities.

Tarnopolski said the group welcomes new members. “We’re always looking for opportunities,” Tarnopolski added, “whether it’s foundations here in the Valley who would be interested in what we’re doing and we want to do some matching donations with us.” Nominated charities are vetted by the executive committee, which includes Tarnopolski. Two requirements are charities must have been a 501(c)(3) for at least three years, and they must be actively implementing their mission in the community. “We’d go through and make sure they’re in good standing and that they’re a business, not a hobby, because there’s a lot of charities out there that people start just because they like the cause, but they’re not really actively working the charity.” Once the committee has approved the charities, they go on the approved list. This vetting process is unique to WWC Valley of the Sun. “One of the things that [WWC Phoenix doesn’t] do is vet their charities,” Tarnopolski said. “The women can literally just show up, put a charity in the hat, and it can be presented. And for me, I thought, if I’m going to stand at the front of the room and ask somebody to give money to an organization, I need to know that it’s viable and credible.”


COMMUNITY

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

TEACHER from page 12

erly utilizing primary and secondary sources throughout their research for the competition. The contest is catered to students from sixth to 12th grade, but Carras is hoping to soon tap into the interest of younger students, such as those in fourth and fifth grade, through an after-school club that will start next year. Though younger students are unable to compete at the national level, they are allowed to participate in regionals and advance to the state competition. “Our goal is to get them introduced to the idea of national history day and see if they want to continue with it,” Carras said. The idea of starting a club for younger students with an interest in history originated from his very classroom. As an elementary school instructor for a gifted class, Carras is required to teach several different subjects throughout the academic year, leaving little room for topics such as social studies. However, throughout his last 12 years of teaching, Carras has learned to utilize every window of opportunity he can to get his kids curious about the world that

came before them. He now makes room to explore a plethora of subjects with students, including early Arizona tribes and the state’s most famous landmarks. “It’s a fun challenge and it’s fun to bring new ideas to their world, and the club and competition will allow them to portray and evaluate history in their point of view, which is always fun for me,” Carras said. Nominated alongside just 56 other teachers from the junior division, Carras’ designation for the award is a strong representation of his immense love for his students and his passion for learning something new every day. The national winner of the award is given $5,000, which Carras hopes to win in order to spread his love of learning to others in his family by sending his mother and sister to Ireland. “My [great grandmother] is from Ireland so [my mother] has always wanted to go and see the history and lifestyle there, and I just think it’d be so cool to send her there. She’s a teacher also, so she loves learning and being a lifelong learner,” Carras said. The national winners are set to be announced June 13.

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

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Mesa snack manufacturer focuses on healthy living BY SIERRA POORE Tribune Contributor

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o those familiar with the Lehi Valley Trading Company, it’s no surprise the business has launched a Snack Outdoors challenge. Snacks are what the Mesa company is all about. The company, which was started back in 1985 by Arthur and Anita Freeman, is now co-owned by their son, Lewis Freeman, and his wife, Trecia. With over 450 products, Lewis said the company sells everything from popcorn and granolas to trail mixes and puffs and specializes in creating “a brand label that a customer wants” for the retailers that buy from them, said Christie Frazier-Coleman, vice president of marketing. “Our products are branded under several different brands, which is largely driven by the retailer,” she said. In addition to picking from their in-

said they have the advantage of tailoring their goods to what the consumer is looking for and “being able to say they’re fresh.” “We don’t set it on the shelf for months before we send it out to the marketplace,” he said. “We make it to order.” Frazier-Coleman said the company is more concerned with doing what’s right than just getting something out Lewis Freeman now runs the Lehi Valley Trading Company in Mesa that his the door. parents founded in 1985. (Sierra Poore/Tribune Contributor) “The care and the house brands – Snack Worthy, High Valley amount of energy that’s placed around Orchard and Lehi Valley Trading Compa- getting a product developed and absony – Frazier-Coleman said customers can lutely perfect is a testament to the fact also create their own private label. that the company genuinely believes that Because Lehi Valley Trading manufac- if a product is going to have our name or tures the majority of its products, Lewis a retailer’s name on it, it’s going to be the

best we can offer,” she said. “The culture is very much about getting it right.” With six generations living in Arizona, the family-owned company also feels like a family for its employees, Freeman said. “We have some fantastic people who work here, and we try really hard to create an environment where people can flourish,” he said. The Snack Outdoors challenge, which runs through May 15, has been designed to raise awareness about the importance of spending time outside and eating healthy snacks. “We want to contribute to the outdoors movement and health and wellness,” said marketing manager Mya Mejia. In order to be eligible to win a share of gift cards valued at $500, participants must visit a local participating store, post a picture of their favorite Lehi Valley Trading Company snack in the store or out-

see LEHI page 18

The Alan adds new views to canal, groves in East Mesa BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI Tribune Staff Writer

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nfill projects are few along McKellips Road in Mesa, but a Scottsdale developer found a prime slice of land along a canal to be the perfect spot for The Alan Luxury Townhomes. Taylor Shultz of Porter Kyle Multifamily Developers and Builders eyed the former orange grove with his partner Mike Stephan, who grew up in the area, and Matt Long. The Alan – located on the north side of McKellips Road, east of Gilbert Road, and west of Lindsay Road – comprises three two-story buildings with private yards attached to each unit. Shultz and his partners went “to great lengths” to maximize the views and space afforded by the canal. They worked with SRP to permit direct access for The Alan’s residents so they could jog along the path. “My partner actually knew the gentleman whom we bought the land from,”

now, and we’re acquiring dirt right now to build more communities.” The petfriendly The Alan, w h i c h starts at A picnic area is on one end of The Alan’s property. (Photo courtesy $ 1 , 5 0 0 Porter Kyle) per month, is near The private balco- Hale Elementary, Stapley Junior High The kitchens, which lead into a living room, have granite countertops and stainlessnies off the master and Mountain View High schools. Starsteel appliances. (Photo courtesy Porter Kyle) bedrooms have ar- bucks and Dutch Bros. are nearby, as Shultz said. “It used to be an old orchard tificial grass to give it a homey feeling. are Sprouts and Fry’s Marketplace. The and we rezoned it with the city of Mesa.” The master bedrooms also have a picture gated community has a picnic area and a The units have two-car direct-access window for plenty of natural light. dog park on site as well. garages, and the homes’ interior has “It’s not your traditional apartment “There are a lot of tenants who moved 10-foot ceilings throughout. They boast building,” said Shultz, whose company in here just so their kids could stay in the stainless steel appliances, granite coun- transitioned into a multifamily developer school district or they sold their house tertops, full-size, front-loading washers about two years ago. “We’re in the process and they wanted to stay in the neighborand dryers and a bathroom downstairs. of building two more communities right hood,” Shultz said.

The Alan: 2340 E. McKellips Road, Mesa 480-210-5050, |leasing@porterkyle.com alantownhomes.com


BUSINESS 18

LEHI from page 17

doors on their Instagram with the hashtag #SnackOutdoors, tag Lehi Valley Trading Company in their post, follow Lehi Valley Trading Company on Instagram and accept the page’s “follow” request. Photos getting the most likes will progress to the final round. Lehi Valley Trading Company will request a final vote from Instagram followers on May 16 and announce three winners on May 17. Mejia said they will also “do an honorable mention for someone with a really great story or experience,” awarding a basket with several participating snack products. A full list of the participating stores as well as updates about the challenge can be found at Go-Snack.com. Having come from a background of health and wellness herself, Mejia said this topic really hits home for her. “We’re trying to create some awareness that there is a way to snack smarter,” she said. For example, Frazier-Coleman said, the company clearly marks which of their products are free from a list of “101 unworthy ingredients.” “It’s a very common list and it’s about getting your products clean,” she said. The full list, which can also be found on

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

In addition to wanting to inspire people to eat healthier and go outside, Frazier-Coleman said Lehi Valley Trading Company also wants to make itself accessible to customers on whatever “avenue of social media” they prefer. “We’re becoming more digitally focused,” she said. While the challenge raises awareness for Lehi Valley Trading Company, FrazierLehi Trading Company offers its customer-vendors choices in packaging Coleman said it also “drives of their products. (Special to the Tribune) people back into the retailer to purchase product.” Since the start of the challenge, Methe company’s website, consists primarily of “preservatives, artificial flavors, ar- jia said “they’ve had a lot of positive retificial colors, dyes, all of those things the sponses” from people who want to know government and the health care industry” where they can find their products lohave deemed unhealthy for people to con- cally. People who are already consuming the sume, she said. “It’s a standard that a lot of our retail- products can now also see the health beners have put out there for the customer,” efits of doing so, she said. As a result of the challenge, Mejia said Mejia said. While not all of their products are she hopes more individuals see that “Lehi free from every item on the list, Frazier- Valley has wholesome snacks that benefit Coleman said “a lot” of them are and are the mind and body.” In addition to making sure employees marked accordingly. She said items that are gluten-free, high are working in a physically clean and safe in protein, low in cholesterol and contain space, Lewis Freeman said, the company also sees to creating an environment in no trans fats are also listed.

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which they feel “comfortable” and “that their values are not infringed upon.” Frazier-Coleman said some employees have even come up with their own flavor combinations for the company to market and produce. “We embrace the people here,” she said. “They feel like they can share ideas and that they can offer ways to improve the company. “ One employee’s suggestion for a product with Hispanic-inspired flavors will be launching soon, Frazier-Coleman said. She said she is “amazed by the dedication” of the people working in the manufacturing and packaging lines. “They’re not here just to punch a clock,” she said. “They’re here to be involved in the company. It’s a nice environment.” While the challenge is geared toward enhancing Lehi Valley Trading Company’s relationship with its retailers, Freeman said the company is also focused on helping “people step away from their day-today lives and challenges.” Stepping outside is a great way for people to clear their minds and get ready to step back into what they have to do every day, Freeman said, explaining: “There is a great means of regrouping your thought process and re-motivating yourself when you get away from all the media that today has and all the influences that are around us constantly.”

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OPINION 20

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

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Forget the tip. Pay employees a decent wage BY DAVID LEIBOWITZ Tribune Columnist

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aving recently endured another in a long line of lunches with my friend Bad Tipper Guy, I feel compelled to wonder aloud if it isn’t about time that we as a nation phased out the archaic custom of tipping service workers like restaurant servers and valet parkers. For one thing, tipping creates a business model that screws customers and employees in favor of increasing employer profits. And don’t we all have enough guilt and shame in our lives without piling on still more every time we dine out, visit a coffee shop, ride in an Uber or have a pizza delivered? Me, I’ve had enough guilt tripping – and guilt tipping – for three lifetimes. Take the aforementioned lunch. Because I know Bad Tipper Guy will do one

of two things when the lunch check arrives – deliver a dissertation on the 1938 federal Fair Labor Standards Act and subminimum wages or simply leave a single crumpled dollar bill on the table – I feel duty bound to offer to pay for lunch. Sometimes, BTG loudly insists that it’s his turn to buy. Him winning that argument means I have to lag behind as we leave the restaurant, usually by lying about needing to use the restroom. Then I have to double back to our table and add enough cash to his buck to get us to a 20 percent tip, minimum. Why go to all that trouble? Partially it’s my fear of bad karma. But mostly it’s the years I spent waiting tables for more Bad Tipper Guys and Gals than I care to remember. I earned $2.13 an hour in those days and was obligated to “tip out” a percentage of each check to the host staff and busboys. If a diner stiffed me or left behind a buck, that meant I actually paid for the privilege of waiting on their table.

A quarter century later, I still go out of my way to tip well, even though I strongly dislike the concept – and the way “tip creep” seems to be impacting more areas of society. Nowadays, there’s a tip jar on every counter: the bakery, the ice cream shop, the pet groomer, the car wash. That often leads to customers standing register-side, 53 cents in hand, waiting for the barista to return for the ceremonial dropping of the coins. Because if a tip falls in a Starbucks and no employee sees it or hears it jingle, was it really a tip at all? Then there’s the newfound popularity of Square, the app that allows anyone with a dongle and an iPad to take credit cards. Each Square transaction comes with a gratuity opportunity and suggested amounts – no tip, 15%, 20%, 25% – helpfully pre-calculated. Talk about a chance to feel like a grinch.

Now I find myself tipping people for labor-intensive acts like handing over an empty self-serve coffee cup or stuffing a wienie in a hot dog bun. The latest weird tip request? As of Jan. 1, cheapo airline Frontier has started encouraging tips for flight attendants who sell travelers a pre-packaged sandwich or a can of soda. What’s next? Maybe a dental hygienist with a tip jar next to the tool tray. Or it’ll become customary to start slipping the minister a folded twenty after a particularly moving eulogy. Or, better yet, maybe we will move away from the gratuity model and instead pay people what they’re worth – even if that means a price hike. I’d rather hear Bad Tipper Guy complain about paying an extra two bucks for his stromboli than listen to him whine one more time about how tipping encourages indentured servitude in 21st century America.

tick in 23 percent more calls and texts for support from our teens. While the finality of prom, graduation and “becoming an adult” sounds fun, for many it marks the end of a journey, and an unknown step to a new beginning. State testing, final exams and the loss of connection to friends can also provoke feelings of anxiety as summer looms. As a consultant to schools and nonprofit agencies, I travel regionally and nationally almost weekly. There is not a zip code that I have visited that is not facing this crisis. Last week, a young man at one of my presentations in Lake Havasu City waited until the very last question was asked and then stood up asking where the administration was from his high school? How had he been encouraged to come to share solutions to stop the mental health crisis yet the adults had not? The room was eerily silent as the adults looked to each other with no response for this young man.

We have to show up, stand up and speak up to save lives. A coalition of thoughtful and civicminded children as part of Arizona March For Our Lives have drafted with bipartisan support a Student Bill of Rights as part of HB 295. School districts would be required to create a school-safety plan, which would outline how each school will respond to students in mental-health crises. It would also mandate that schools develop partnerships with outside community organizations or agencies that students can be referred to when counselors cannot provide long-term care. The alarm has been sounding in the Valley of the Sun for a while, specifically in the zip codes through which we in the East Valley drive. A verse in a song written by Joseph Malins and performed by John Denver says: “Let us stop at its source all this hurt,” cried he.

Come, neighbors and friends, let us rally. If the cliff we will fence, we might almost dispense With the ambulance down in the valley. Mayors are mobilizing, Superintendents are acting. Church leaders are calling for prayers of immediate healing. Kids are asking for help. The building of the fence is long overdue. As we enter May, Mental Health Awareness month, I hope you will join forces with me in your own communities by building a sturdy fence of prevention resources to protect our most important assets so there won’t be a need for ambulances or 14-year-old funerals. Arizona Teen Lifeline phone or text: 602-248-8336.

Kids, teens need a sturdy fence of prevention BY KATIE MCPHERSON Tribune Guest Writer

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new study out of the United States Centers for Disease Control looked at data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and found there were 1.12 million emergency room visits for suicide attempts or suicidal thoughts by children ages 5 to 18 years in 2015. That number had risen sharply from 580,000 in 2007. Of those visits, 43 percent were ages 5 to 11 with the average patient age of 13. Statistics in most college mental health clinics across the country are reporting help seeking is up 168 percent. Our PreK-12 population is trending the same need. Spring is the time of year that we see a spike in the need for crisis supports. Our local nonprofit Teen Lifeline logs an up-

- Katie McPherson is an East Valley educator and advocate for improved mental and emotional support for young people.

Share Your Thoughts: Send your letters on local issues to: pmaryniak@timespublications.com


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

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Sports & Recreation 22

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

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Mtn. View baseball sticking to the basics amid success BY ZACH ALVIRA Tribune Sports Editor

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here’s nothing flashy about Mike Thiel and his Mountain View varsity baseball team. They stick to the basics, taking things day-by-day and hope to improve with every practice and game. It’s the culture that Thiel has built at Mountain View since he took over the baseball program in 1998, and the one he will leave behind when he calls it a career at the end of this season. “When you overcomplicate things, it doesn’t always work,” Thiel said. “Our goal is to have a good practice one day and then hopefully we have a good game the next day. One day at a time. “It’s simple and that’s what works.” The Toros spend little time looking at personal stats or team rankings. None of that matters to them unless they have a trophy at the end of the season. Based on how the season has pro-

Mountain View senior outfielder McKay Barney’s .529 batting average, 9 RBIs and a home run has helped lead the Toros to the top of the 6A rankings. (Zach Alvira/ Tribune Staff)

gressed thus far for Mountain View, winning a state title isn’t out of the question.

“We know have to play and do things right,” Thiel said. “Sometimes you may get a little unlucky but you have to overcome those things. “We are in a good spot right now as far as how our kids are feeling about things and how they’re playing the game.” Mountain View headed into a match up with Skyline on Thursday, April 11 as the top-ranked team in 6A with an 19-3 overall record. According to MaxPreps, the Toros are No. 12 in the nation. Much of Mountain View’s success has stemmed from strong defensive play and big bats at the plate. Senior outfielder McKay Barney, a Brigham Young University commit, has been one of the most effective in the batter’s box this season. In 70 at-bats, Barney has a .529 average with 9 RBIs and a home run. He also has a team-high 19 stolen bases. “We’ve focused a lot as a team on seeing pitches and not reaching,” Barney said. “We try to be patient until we really see a

pitch we want to hit. That’s really helped me this season and also the team.” Mountain View has been resilient this season, battling back from late deficits in games. The Toros have proved they have the ability to win in many ways. “I feel like that is the biggest attribute our team has this year,” Barney said. “Even when we aren’t performing 100 percent we are still together as a team. That’s helped us win a lot of games.” Mountain View outscored rival Red Mountain 18-1 in two games on April 4 and 6. The next day on April 7, the Toros scored a late run to beat then secondranked Westwood 3-2. Whether they put up big numbers at the plate or rely on their defense, the Toros are battle-tested for anything that comes their way heading into the tournament. “We all know what we can do, we all just need to stay consistent,” senior infielder

see BASEBALL page 23

BenU men’s volleyball gearing up for run at national title BY ZACH ALVIRA Tribune Sports Editor

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n many ways, the Benedictine University Mesa men’s volleyball team is experiencing déjà vu. This time last year, the Redhawks were preparing for the 2018 NAIA men’s volleyball national championship tournament. BenU entered as an at-large bid, designated for teams that did not win its conference championship but were among the top in the nation. The Redhawks made an improbable run to the national title game. But that’s where it ended. “I don’t think anybody has stopped thinking about that,” said Ray Lewis, BenU men’s volleyball coach. “It was tough. We want to be on the other side of that coin this year.” One year later, the Redhawks are back

in the gymnasium at Eagles Community Center in Mesa again preparing for the national championship tournament. This time, however, BenU’s involvement was expected. At 21-4, the Redhawks are the thirdranked team in the nation. They captured the Golden State Athletic Conference championship on April 5 after defeating Menlo College. It was the program’s first year in the GSAC. BenU earned an automatic bid to the national tournament with the win. “It’s amazing. We were able to bring something to the school when nobody knew who we were before,” said Jaron Jones, a senior setter for BenU. “Now we are just trying to do the same thing again.” Jones came to BenU two years after graduating from Marcos de Niza High in 2013. As a sophomore, he received Setter of the Year honors from the Independents

Trennon Udall, a Gilbert native and junior defensive specialist for Benedictine University’s men’s volleyball team, has become a vocal leader for the Redhawks since joining the team after serving a twoyear church mission. (Benedictine University photo)

Conference with 1,046 assists. As a junior, he recorded 1,131 assists, 26 serving aces and 206 digs and was

named an NAIA All-American as well as the Independents Conference Player of the Year. His 827 assists this season leads the team and is among the highest in the nation. He also has the second-most digs with 165. He once again received Conference Player of the Year honors and was named Setter of the Week eight times. Jones has become a silent leader for the Redhawks during his time with the program, as he prefers to lead by example with his play on the court. While the personal accolades are nice, he credits his teammates for his success. “I can’t get the stats I get with-

see VOLLEYBALL page 23


SPORTS

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

BASEBALL from page 22

Cam Jowaiszas said. “We hit the ball well and we can play really good defense. We are definitely a state contender and I think we all know that.” Jowaiszas has made plays at the plate for Mountain View this season. He’s batting .414 with a team-high 37 RBIs and 6 home runs. He’s seen himself evolve into a vocal leader for the Toros. Jowaiszas credits the previous senior classes for his personal growth and development. He also believes their willingness to compete and make the program better as a whole has helped the entire team’s determination. “The (past) seniors helped motivate all of us,” Jowaiszas said. “They really helped the seniors this year to keep it going from there and be confident.” Mountain View has steadily improved each of the last four seasons. Barney, who played varsity as a freshman, was a part of the 2016 team that went 10-17 and missed the playoffs. The Toros’ record improved to 13-15 in 2017. The largest improvement came last season when Mountain View finished 26-8 and was among the final four teams in the 6A tournament. The Toros’ run to the semifinals instilled confidence in this year’s

returning players. “We know that if we play well we can play with anybody in the state and beat anybody,” Thiel said. “But to do that, you have to play well. If you don’t play well, you’re going to get beat. We are confident and know Mountain View senior infielder that if we do Cam Jowaiszas has become a leadwhat we are er both on the field and in the dugout for the Toros this season. (Zach supposed to Alvira/Tribune Staff) do, we have a good chance to be successful.” Mountain View has no plans to slow down as the end of the regular season nears. The team remains confident, yet humble. And even through the success, they remain focused on the ultimate goal: Being crowned 6A state champions.

VOLLEYBALL from page 22

out them,” Jones said. “Without passing, without attackers that can put the ball away, I can’t get those stats. Without a team, I am nothing.” While Jones has become a quiet leader on the court, Gilbert High alum Trennon Udall has become a vocal leader off of it. “Trennon is that guy that just grinds it out,” Lewis said. “He comes in and works his butt off every day for us.” Udall spent three years on the varsity roster at Gilbert, helping guide the Tigers to the state playoffs each season. In 2009, Gilbert fell to Mountain Pointe in the state title game. In 2011, Udall’s senior year, the Tigers made it to the semifinals. Inside the gym at Eagles Community Center, the Redhawks appeared relaxed as they warmed up for practice. It’s a common characteristic of the team, according to Lewis. Once practice begins, however, a look of determination comes across each player’s face. While excited for a chance at redemption, they are well aware that they head into the tournament with a target on their backs. “We know it’s going to be a battle,” Lewis said. “Every team we will play is really good. We have our work cut out for us.”

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Jaron Jones, a senior setter for Benedictine University’s men’s volleyball team, leads the Redhawks this season with 827 assists and 165 digs. (Benedictine University photo)

The Redhawks will depart for Des Moines on Sunday. Their first match of the tournament tips off on Tuesday, April 16 against Aquinas College at 8 a.m. “We have unfinished business,” Lewis said. “Winning would mean everything to this school. We just need to persevere and bring a trophy back to Mesa.”

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Dance raising teen-suicide awareness, funds GET OUT STAFF

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ou Are Not Alone,” a new fulllength spring production, draws upon experiences from its dancers and artistic director Bridgette Borzillo to create an emotionally charged show with themes high school students often experience. “I have been working in high schools for about three years now and I cannot believe how much it has changed due to cell-phone use, social media and the rise in teen suicide,” Borzillo said, adding: “My hope is that this show will create dialogue between parents, teens and everyone in between to let them know that they are not alone in their emotions and experiences, that all we need to do is look up, reach out and know that there are many people that care.” “You Are Not Alone,” performed by the CaZo Dance Company, premieres at 7:30 p.m. April 19 and at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

“You Are Not Alone” draws upon experiences from its dancers and its artistic director to create an emotionally charged show with themes that high school students often experience. (Stephanie Tippi Hart/Dragonfly Studio Photography)

April 20 at the Mesa Arts Center NesbittElliot Playhouse. Portions of all proceeds will be donated to Chandler-based JEM Foundation to provide services to those in need. Heart Spoke Clothing will be selling items from

its line, with proceeds donated to NAMISouthern Arizona. The production is geared toward anyone who has ever felt alone in a crowd or wondered if they would be missed if they didn’t show up some place. According to a 2018 loneliness index prepared by Cigna, 46 percent of Americans, mostly younger individuals, feel lonely, isolated or left out. Whether dealing with bullies, peer pressure, coming out, thoughts of suicide or wearing a mask to fit in, everyone has struggled to find their place. “I was involved in countless activities in high school: softball, soccer, cheerleading, dance team, Black Student Union, but I never felt like I truly belonged anywhere,” Borzillo said. “I was always the friend everyone asked for help, and many times it was never reciprocated. It felt very lonely at times.” The struggles of being a teenager in the age of social media are revisited with this

emotional journey that Borzillo hopes leads to discussions among loved ones and friends about those personal battles. Borzillo’s decision to use her dancers’ and her own experiences came after hearing a few of their personal stories. “It was amazing to find out how closely related to one another we all were based solely on the experiences we all had in high school,” Borzillo said. “The moment I heard some of these stories I knew I wanted to find a way to perform them onstage to create dialogue.”

IF YOU GO What: ‘You Are Not Alone’

Where: Mesa Arts Center Nesbitt-Elliott Playhouse, 1 E. Main St., Mesa When: Friday, April 19, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, April 20, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tickets: Tickets: $26 general, $21 students, $45 VIP (quantities limited) Info: www.cazodance.com, thejemfoundation.com

Mesa comedian hosting benefit for Boys/Girls Clubs BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI Get Out Editor

C

omedian Paul Arnold once used his craft as a way to support himself. Now he has a different ambition: raise money for organizations that support kids. The northeast Mesa resident is scheduling a series of fundraisers at Apache Greyhound Park 7-10 p.m. Friday, April 19. His and his comedic friends’ performances will benefit the Boys and Girls Clubs of Mesa and Apache Junction. “The Boys and Girls Clubs is a nonprofit and receives no government assistance,” said Arnold, who formerly worked as a server at Red, White and Brew. “I decided to do a show where $5 from every ticket

IF YOU GO What: Function in the Junction

hosted by Paul Arnold, featuring Valley comics Where: Apache Greyhound Park, 220 S. Delaware Drive, Apache Junction When: 7 p.m. Friday, April 19 Tickets: $10 in advance Info: 925-200-7317

goes toward the Boys and Girls Clubs of Mesa and Apache Junction.” For Arnold, it’s personal. “I grew up in Boys and Girls Clubs in the (San Francisco) Bay Area,” he said. “Being black in a white town, they weren’t giving me the opportunities they were giving the kids next to me. The Boys and Girls Clubs helped me get better with football and basketball and allowed me to move on to college hoops and football. “Parents drop off their kids at the club, but nobody helps the clubs.” Arnold is a well-known figure in northeast Mesa. At Red, White and Brew he preserved his sanity by slapping hands with coworkers and having secret handshakes for customers. “There are a lot of things going on in life nowadays,” Arnold said. “I was always taught that if you’re laughing you don’t have time to think about the negativity. Everybody needs that.” Arnold has had a storied life. When he was a youngster, Arnold and his family moved from St. Louis to Oakland, Calif., where his home had a basement. “My mom kept her records down there,

PAUL ARNOLD

the 78s, the 45s,” he said. “I went down to the basement as a kid and started fumbling through things. I saw Redd Foxx, Flip Wilson and Moms Mabley recordings. “My mom had a loose tongue, too, and she rocked it. She’d drink her Johnny Walker Red and all hell broke loose.” It’s easy to see that Arnold’s mom meant a lot to him. “She’s the one who really inspired me to

do what I wanted to do,” he said. When Arnold’s mother died, Arnold, a single father, packed up his kids and moved to Mesa. He wanted to spare his children of California’s crime. While here, he has performed at Rick Bronson’s House of Comedy on High Street in north Phoenix and Tempe Improv. “Anyone can tell a joke,” Arnold said. “But can you sit there and tell a story and get the crowd going? I want the crowd to visualize what I’m saying. I might trigger something that’s familiar, and that’s hella funny.” Arnold said he’s been blessed through life, no matter how rough it has been. He wants to show his son not to be selfish. “You do things because you love it and it’s in your heart,” Arnold said. “It’s not because you’re forced to do things, either. Don’t be conditional.” Arnold acknowledged that he’s trying to step away from the spotlight and, instead, act as an organizer. “I just want to host the shows, promote the shows and do more things for the community,” he said. “The dog track, it’s empty. It’s empty space. I’m hoping to turn that around, too.”


THE 7, THE EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14,2019 2019 24 SUNDAY 22 GET OUTFOOTHILLS 44 44 MARCH 27, GET 2019 |OUT AHWATUKEE FOOTHILLS NEWS APRIL 3, 2019 | AHWATUKEE NEWS

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With JAN JAN D’ATRI D’ATRI GetOut GetOut Contributor Contributor Contributor

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By the way, I wondered where the saying Honey Maid Chocolate Graham Crackers for you. for the produce section or the frozen food area of “cookies ’n cream” came from, and it’ s actually an 2 boxes (3 oz.) Instant Hershey’ s In a bowl, you pour some flamin’ hot crunchy Directions: iceIngredients cream milkshake combination that apparently your grocery store and bake up your own Peach-AWhiteor Chocolate Pudding Boil Pie, thewithbrisket 1 (54 lb.) corned beefpudding) brisket (plus packet) became the best-selling flavor of spice ice cream in 1983. Berry plenty with cups milk (for the contents of 12 small red potatoes When I started making 1 (21 oz.) can cherry piethis fillingpie, I wanted both fla- of vanilla ice the spice for sauce, severaldivided hours or until fork-tender. In 6Ingredients: large carrots Ingredients: 1cream. cup pizza vors to come through separately, 2 cups heavy whipping cream so I cooked them in packet olive oil another pot, steam veggiesmilk until fork tender. 1 2green cabbage 1¼tablespoons pint white mushrooms, diced small 1 small container (16 the oz.) whole ricotta cupfresh powdered sugar 121large sweet yellow onion, diced Slice the corned beef, surrounded with steamed Olive oil and vinegar for drizzling over vegetables, 1 8 oz. package shredded mozzarella tablespoons butter bar (approx. 3.5 oz.) dark chocolate bar 4Ingredients: cloves garlic, veggies drizzled with olive oil and vinegar. optional 2 large tablespoons olive oilminced 8 thin slices of pepperoni 221/2 pounds leanpieground largedish onion, minced 4-5 large leaves of basil, rough chopped deep shells beef Directions: 26-8 teaspoons chili powder or 2 (16 oz.) packages 4 tablespoons milk 1 leek,cups diced fine peaches sliced Line a 12x4 bread loaf pan with enough plastic wrap1 to linebag therefrigerated, bottom and have plenty over 1frozen teaspoon smoked 3-4 cloves fresh garlicpaprika 16 oz. bakehanging pizza dough peach slices cloves, peppercorns, ready garlic toand onion. Pour Ingredients: the side to wrap over the cake when layered. Pinch offresh red pepper flakesor 2 packages frozen 1 quart pound ground beef Salt for sprinkling on top ofcover doughthe corned beef. blueberries enough water in pot to 3-4 lb. Corned Beef Brisket with spice packet Open can of cherry pie filling and reserve 10-12 cherries for the top. 1 tablespoon (7butter, oz.) Chipotle in Adobo tablespoons dividedPeppers and cook on medium high for several 34Directions: bay leaves pudding Prepare according to package instructions. Cover Set aside. Sauce, chopped fine orequal baked variety 1 cup sugar plus 4 cookies tablespoons hours orportions. until tender. beefletpackage 5-6 cloves Place pizza dough on a floured surface and cut in two Cover with(corned a cloth and rise for Lay 2 full-sized side by side in the bottom of the bread pan.fork 1 (15 oz.) can crushed or petite diced tomatoes 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese as well.) should have cook time instructions 10about peppercorns, optional two hours. Meanwhile, make the filling. Spoon a thin layer of white chocolate pudding over the cookies. Spoon about 3 tablespoons of cherry 1Directions: (15 oz.) can tomato sauce 2 When avocados, dicedbeef is cooked, turn heat off corned 3-4 cloves fresh garlic a large skillet, heat ground butter addpepper mushrooms. Cook until mushrooms browned. Removegraham and set pieIn filling pudding. Repeatand process until you have 6cup layers, ending withare a layer of chocolate Kosher saltover and freshly black 1 fresh cilantro, chopped Preheat oven to 350 degrees. and cover pot with lid. In another pot, add cab1 aside. large sweet yellow onion, quartered In the same skillet, heat olive oil and sauté onion, leek and garlic until soft and translucent. 1 crackers. (8.5 oz.) bag Flamin’ Hot Crunchy Cheetos, fried Sprinkle one pie 1 tablespoon sugar and bake until golden brown,and about 12-15 minutes. bage potatoes Add 3-4 1 large head green cabbage, quartered Add in the mushrooms, stirring toplastic combine. Add beef andquarters, cook browned. Add ¼carrots. cup pizza sauce, Carefully seal theshell cakewith with the wrap, gently pressing theuntil sides together to compress. Slip cardSet aside to cool. inches ofcake water steam veggies. Keep 6Directions: large carrots peeled and cutinfor into stirring tocake combine. 30thirds minutes, stirringwrap-sealed occasionally. When done, setto aside to cool. Inchecking amore. bowl, board or boardSimmer pieces between the plastic andto the pan compress even In a in saucepan, heat peaches, ½ cup6 hours. sugar and 2 Using tablespoons of butter. (If enough peaches are add toAdd make have water in tart, the pot. 12combine small redfreezer potatoes ricotta and shredded mozzarella. Set aside. a rolling pinyou orand by hand, roll firsttoo pizza dough Place to harden least In a large skillet, heat theforoilat over medium-high heat. thesure onion garlic andout sauté until soft and more sugar.) Cook over medium high heatpizza untilsauce peaches are softened. Add more if needed. Cook vegetables until fork Olive oil and vinegar for drizzle into approximately 8-inch rounds. Spread over entire round, leaving 1/2 inch border. On the When ready serve, whipping creamAdd andchili powdered sugar to stiffpaprika peaks. and red pepper translucent. Addtothe beefbeat andtogether cook until browned. powder, smoked Inand another saucepan, do the4 same with the blueberries. Consistency should remain fairly thick tender. potatoes may take few minutes Salt pepper to taste bottom halfcake ofto the dough, place slices of Remove from freezer andchipotles spread whipping ondiced top(The and sides of tomatoes cake. flakes, stirring combine. Add inpepperoni. adobocream sauce, or crushed anda tomato sauce, with both fruits. longer to cook.) Mustard for spreading on corned beef, optional Spread of peeler the cheese mixture top of the pepperoni, and then add four tablespoons Usingtoahalf carrot or paring knife,onscrape chocolate bar to create chocolate curlstoorsix shavings. Sprinkleof stirring combine. Pour fruits onto baked pie shells in basil layers, one pera pastry layer. brush, Reserve a few berries and Place beef, sliced the peach grain, the filling onDottop cheese. Sprinkle over top.fruit With brush outer of the over cake.with topofand ofthethe cake with reserved cherries. Cake will take about one hourthetooragainst thaw completely. Season salt pepper to taste. (If chili is too mild, addcorned more adobo sauce chili edges powder.) slices for top of pie. on a platter. Surround the corned beef with Directions: dough. Slice and serve. Simmer for about 15 minutes, stirring often. In a serving bowl, add 1 cup of Flamin’ Hot Crunchy CheePlace remaining pie shell over topthat of fruit andfilling. seal the edges with your fingers. Place Remove spice packet fromdough brisket. Place brisvegetables. Drizzle virgin Carefully fold half2uncooked of the the on half has the Press together toextra seal.Sprinkle Brush Bread Pan Alternative: tos. Sprinkle about tablespoons ofover cheese top ofsteamed Cheetos. Spoon chiliedges over top with of cheese. reserved fruit in the center for garnish. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon sugar. Bake for about 25 minutes olive oil and vinegar. Salt and pepper the vegeket in a large pot or Dutch oven. entire calzone with milk. Sprinkle lightly with salt. loaf Repeat pizza Bake at 350 degrees for If using anon 8x8 inch pan instead of avocado bread pan,with you may getdough. 2-3Serve layers. Line with enough more cheese top of cake the chili. Dot with cubes andsecond freshonly cilantro. immediately. or until25-30 top minutes is golden brown. Servebrown. with good vanilla ice cream. Add contents of or spice packet, bayabove leaves, tables aswith needed. mustard if desired. about until golden Serve immediately a sideServe of are thewith remainder sauce. cookies to cover the bottom and follow instructions until ingredients used up. pizza Watch my how-tovideo: video:jandatri.com/recipe jandatri.com/recipe Watch my jandatri.com/recipe video: jandatri.com/recipe my how-to how-to

W SNo Bake Black Forest Cake

Jan’s Family Corned Beef and Cabbage (Serves 4)

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Cajun Fest to offer taste, sound of the bayou GET OUT STAFF REPORT

P

eople can get a taste of Louisiana and bayou treats like crawfish boil, jambalaya, po-boys and other Cajun food at a festival in downtown Chandler later this month. Southwest Cajun Fest brought to the public by sponsor Abita Brewing will jazz up the culinary scene noon-9 p.m. April Bayou favorites like crawfish boil, etouffee, jambalaya and other 20 at Dr. A.J. Chandler Cajun food will abound at the Southwest Cajun Fest. (HDE Agency) Park, 178 E. Commonwealth Ave. HDE Agency is producing etouffee, jambalaya, fried catfish, fried chicken, spicy hot links, as well as red the festival. Many different vendors will sell food beans and rice, cornbread and other inspired by the passion of New Orleans food. Jasperz Island Fusion Cuisine will mixed with Arizona fusion and flavors while the festival will also feature live add to the Cajun selection with jerk Cajun crawfish boil, jambalaya, Caribbean musical performances. Hoodoo Casters, Bluesman Mike, NO- curry chicken and rice, as well as jerk LAZ Band, D. on Darox & the Melody Joy chicken, catfish and beignets. JJ’s Louisiana BBQ will provide pulled Bakers and headliner Souled Out Jazz Band will hit the stage. Ticket holders pork, brisket, turkey legs, chicken, hot can also participate in eating competi- links, rib tips, beans and potato salad. tions, a kids’ zone and other interactive Pearson’s Catering will sell catfish, shrimp, frog legs, gator, jambalaya, experiences. A new highlight this year will be an ex- hush puppies, po-boys, Cajun fries and panded, family-friendly Big Easy Lounge oysters. Vegan diners can check out Maya’s Cawhere people can relax and get out of jun Kitchen, which will sell vegan Cajun the sun. Some of the food vendors this year in- po-boys, jambalaya and bread pudding. General admission tickets for the clude Angry Crab Shack, which will sell crawfish boil, shrimp boil, crawfish roll, Southwest Cajun Fest online are $8 each turkey legs, gumbo and cornbread, as for anyone over 12. Children 12 and well as Cajun bowls; and Bayou Bistro, younger will get free general admission. For military and first responders, diswhich will offer crawfish, etouffee, jambalaya, shrimp, po-boys and other Cajun count tickets are $10 each at the gate only, limited to four tickets per each treats. Other vendors at the festival include qualified customer. For anyone 13 and older, access to the Cantaguas, which will sell handcrafted aguas frescas in horchata, mango-pine- Big Easy Lounge is $45 for presale online apple, lavender watermelon and other only and $55 each the day of the event at flavors and Delicious Beverage AZ, a the gate. People can upgrade any ticket company that sells custom-made sweet to the Big Easy Lounge for $40. The Big Easy Lounge admission altea and lemonade. Family Squeezed Lemonade will sell lows the ticket-holder to get general its fresh, fruit-infused drinks and Farm- admission into the event plus four alcoboy American Fare will bring corn dogs holic beverages, a large lounge area with and give those with a sweet tooth choic- shaded seats, snacks, private restrooms es in desserts – ice cream, funnel cakes and unlimited water and soft drinks. Access to the Big Easy Lounge for peoand deep-fried Oreos. Hogg Doggs will sell andouille, gumbo, ple 12 and younger is $25 presale online dirty rice, pulled pork and brats while and $35 on the day of the event. Information: southwestcajunfest.com Honey Bear’s BBQ will offer shrimp

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

In Memoriam In Loving Memory of Peter Alexander Price Born in Christ April 16, 1991 Returned to God Sept. 26, 2007 Sadly missed along life's way, quietly remembered every day. No longer in our lives to share, but in our hearts you're always there. Happy 28th Birthday, Peter Man! Love, Gram Lani & Gramps Keith Myers

Obituaries Emma Jean Montgomery June 24, 1928 – April 3, 2019 Emma “Jean” Montgomery, 90, beloved wife, mother of two, grandmother to two, and greatgrandmother to five, passed away from pulmonary failure brought on by pneumonia on April 3, 2019 in Mesa, Arizona. She had been living with her daughter in Mesa since May of 2017. She was greatly loved by all who knew her as a sweet, kind, fun, and loving person. She and her husband, Monte “Joe” Montgomery, were both born and raised in Oklahoma, but moved out to California after his discharge from the Army Air Corps in 1947. They remained in California for 56 years. But in 2003, they moved to the Las Palmas mobile home resort in Mesa, AZ, to be closer to their daughter, who lived in nearby Gilbert. While there, they became members of the Velda Rose United Methodist Church, and the local VFW chapter. Joe also purchased season tickets every year for the SF Giants’ spring training games in Scottsdale, which they thoroughly enjoyed. In 2007, they were joined by their daughter in a move out to the Atlanta, GA area to be closer to their son, Stephen, and his family. In 2013, Marilyn purchased a retirement/vacation home in The Wells mobile home community in Mesa, AZ, and in 2017, at the age of 88, Jean and her daughter decided to return to Mesa, AZ permanently so that she could enjoy warm weather, the spring training games, her old friends, community potlucks, and bingo “to her heart’s content”. The world is a much darker place without her. A memorial service and reception will be held at the Apache Wells Community Church to celebrate her life on April 12, 2019 at 2115 N. Gayridge Rd, Mesa, AZ, 85215 starting at 2:00 pm. A second service and reception will follow approximately two weeks later at the Buford First United Methodist Church at 285 E Main St. NE, in Buford, GA 30518. Following that service, her ashes will be interred at Broadlawn Memorial Gardens, 5979 New Bethany Rd, Buford, GA, next to Joe’s.

Obituaries Emma Jean Montgomery June 24, 1928 – April 3, 2019 Emma “Jean” Montgomery, 90, beloved wife, mother of two, grandmother to two, and great-grandmother to five, passed away from pulmonary failure brought on by pneumonia on April 3, 2019 in Mesa, Arizona. She had been living with her daughter in Mesa since May of 2017. She was greatly loved by all who knew her as a sweet, kind, fun, and loving person. She and her husband, Monte “Joe” Montgomery, were both born and raised in Oklahoma, but moved out to California after his discharge from the Army Air Corps in 1947. They remained in California for 56 years. But in 2003, they moved to the Las Palmas mobile home resort in Mesa, AZ, to be closer to their daughter, who lived in nearby Gilbert. While there, they became members of the Velda Rose United Methodist Church, and the local VFW chapter. Joe also purchased season tickets every year for the SF Giants’ spring training games in Scottsdale, which they thoroughly enjoyed. In 2007, they were joined by their daughter in a move out to the Atlanta, GA area to be closer to their son, Stephen, and his family. In 2013, Marilyn purchased a retirement/vacation home in The Wells mobile home community in Mesa, AZ, and in 2017, at the age of 88, Jean and her daughter decided to return to Mesa, AZ permanently so that she could enjoy warm weather, the spring training games, her old friends, community potlucks, and bingo “to her heart’s content”. The world is a much darker place without her. A memorial service and reception will be held at the Apache Wells Community Church to celebrate her life on April 12, 2019 at 2115 N. Gayridge Rd, Mesa, AZ, 85215 starting at 2:00 pm. A second service and reception will follow approximately two weeks later at the Buford First United Methodist Church at 285 E Main St. NE, in Buford, GA 30518. Following that service, her ashes will be interred at Broadlawn Memorial Gardens, 5979 New Bethany Rd, Buford, GA, next to Joe’s.

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

Public Notices

Public Notices

CITY OF MESA, ARIZONA ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

CITY OF MESA EASTMARK COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 1 MESA, ARIZONA

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS (RFQ)

SIGNAL BUTTE ROAD PHASE 2 EASTMARK PARKWAY PHASE II

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Mesa is seeking a qualified Consultant for the following: BROADWAY ROAD (PHASE 1) – MESA DRIVE TO STAPLEY DRIVE

PROJECT NO: S885 / S893 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

PROJECT NO. CP0666CAP The City of Mesa is seeking a qualified Consultant to provide design services for the Broadway Road (Phase 1) – Mesa Drive to Stapley Drive Project. All qualified firms that are interested in providing these services are invited to submit their Statements of Qualifications (SOQ) in accordance with the requirements detailed in the Request for Qualifications (RFQ). The following is a summary of the project. The required tasks will be reviewed with the selected Design Consultant and defined to meet the needs of the project as part of the contract scoping. • Proposed roadway improvements include removal and replacement of vertical curb and gutter. • Full depth pavement reconstruction of 12' wide center two-way left turn lane, two through lanes in each direction and 4' wide bike lanes. • Reconstruction of Stapley Drive to ultimate configuration with dedicated right turn lanes in all directions. • Complete replacement of traffic signal equipment at Horne and Solomon to comply with current City standards. • Replace all existing street lighting with new LED lighting. • Install new or upgrade existing underground utilities (water, wastewater, storm drain, gas, and electrical power) to meet current city standards. This includes installation of about half a mile of new storm sewer on Stapley Drive from Broadway Road to 8th Avenue. • Underground 2,500 LF of City of Mesa 12 kV overhead electrical lines. • Coordinate with SRP, the underground conversion of 5,350 LF of existing 12kV overhead power • Enhance existing landscaping and irrigation. • Four new bus stops with shelter and four bus stops with landscaping. • Relocate/Replace SRP irrigation line/structures

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received until Thursday, May 2, 2019, until 1:30 p.m. All sealed bids will be received at Mesa City Plaza Building, Engineering Department at 20 East Main Street, 5th Floor, Mesa, Arizona. Please mark the outside of the bid envelope with the name of this bid document. Any bid received after the time specified will be returned without any consideration, except for bids delivered 30 minutes prior to opening which will be received at the information desk, 1st floor, main lobby of the Mesa City Plaza Building. No bid shall be altered, amended or withdrawn after the specified bid due date and time. A non-mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held Thursday, April 18th, 2019 at 1:00 p.m. in the upper level Council Chambers at 57 E. First Street, Mesa, Arizona. A pre-bid review of the site has been scheduled. Please refer to Special Provision Section titled ''Pre-Bid Review of Site" for additional information. The site visit is recommended but not mandatory. PHASE II SIGNAL BUTTE IMPROVEMENTS / EASTMARK PARKWAY This contract shall be for furnishing all labor, materials, transportation, and services for the construction and/or installation of all improvements shown on the Plans, including, but not limited to the following: Signal Butte Road Phase 2 (S885) - The Project consists of approximately ¾ of a mile of half street surface improvements to include concrete curb and gutter, sidewalk, box culvert extensions, bridge widening, paving, striping, signage, street lights, street sleeves, landscaping & irrigation. The improvements also consist of storm drain installation to stub west of the Flood Control District of Maricopa County (FCDMC) channel. Box backfill per ADOT. Eastmark Parkway Phase 2 (S893) - The Project consists of approximately 180 linear feet of half street improvements. Improvements include water service relocation, box culvert extension, dry utilities, concrete curb and gutter, sidewalk, paving, signage, sidewalk sleeves, landscaping and irrigation. Box backfill per ADOT. The Engineer’s Estimate Range is $3.0 million to $3.5 million.

A Pre-Submittal Conference will be held on April 23, 2019, at 8 am, at the City of Mesa Plaza Building, 20 E. Main Street, Conference Room 501, Mesa, Arizona 85201. At this meeting, City staff will discuss the scope of work and general contract issues and respond to questions from the attendees. Attendance at the pre-submittal conference is not mandatory and all interested firms may submit a Statement of Qualifications whether or not they attend the conference. All interested firms are encouraged to attend the Pre-Submittal Conference since City staff will not be available for meetings or to respond to individual inquiries regarding the project scope outside of this conference. In addition, there will not be meeting minutes or any other information published from the Pre-Submittal Conference.

Contact with City Employees. All firms interested in this project (including the firm’s employees, representatives, agents, lobbyists, attorneys, and subconsultants) will refrain, under penalty of disqualification, from direct or indirect contact for the purpose of influencing the selection or creating bias in the selection process with any person who may play a part in the selection process. This policy is intended to create a level playing field for all potential firms, to assure that contract decisions are made in public, and to protect the integrity of the selection process. All contact on this selection process should be addressed to the authorized representative identified above.

Contact with City Employees. All firms interested in this project (including the firm’s employees, representatives, agents, lobbyists, attorneys, and subconsultants) will refrain, under penalty of disqualification, from direct or indirect contact for the purpose of influencing the selection or creating bias in the selection process with any person who may play a part in the selection process. This policy is intended to create a level playing field for all potential firms, to assure that contract decisions are made in public, and to protect the integrity of the selection process. All contact on this selection process should be addressed to the authorized representative identified below.

Contractors desiring to submit proposals may purchase sets of the Bid Documents from ARC Document Solutions, LLC, at https://order.e-arc.com/arcEOC/PWELL_Main.asp?mem=29. Click on “Go” for the Public Planroom to access plans. NOTE: In order to be placed on the Plan Holders List and to receive notifications and updates regarding this bid (such as addenda) during the bidding period, an order must be placed. The cost of each Bid Set will be no more than $54.00, which is non-refundable regardless of whether the Contractor Documents are returned. Partial bid packages are not sold. You can view documents on-line (at no cost), order Bid Sets, and access the Plan Holders List on the website at the address listed above. Please verify print lead time prior to arriving for pick-up. For a list of locations nearest you, go to www.e-arc.com.

RFQ Lists. This RFQ is available on the City’s website at http://mesaaz.gov/business/engineering/architectural-engineering-design-opportunities.

One set of the Contract Documents is also available for viewing at the City of Mesa’s Engineering Department at 20 East Main Street, Mesa, AZ. Please call (480) 644-2251 prior to arriving to ensure that the documents are available for viewing.

The Statement of Qualifications shall include a one-page cover letter, plus a maximum of 10 pages to address the SOQ evaluation criteria (excluding resumes but including an organization chart with key personnel and their affiliation). Resumes for each team member shall be limited to a maximum length of two pages and should be attached as an appendix to the SOQ. Minimum font size shall be 10pt. Please provide six (6) hard copies and one (1) electronic copy (CD or USB drive) of the Statement of Qualifications by May 2, 2019, at 2 pm. The City reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Qualifications. The City is an equal opportunity employer. Delivered or hand-carried submittals must be delivered to the Engineering Department reception area on the fifth floor of Mesa City Plaza Building in a sealed package. On the submittal package, please display: Firm name, project number, and/or project title. Firms who wish to do business with the City of Mesa must be registered and activated in the City of Mesa Vendor Self Service (VSS) System (http://mesaaz.gov/business/purchasing/vendor-selfservice). Questions. Questions pertaining to the Consultant selection process or contract issues should be directed to Donna Horn of the Engineering Department at donna.horn@mesaaz.gov. BETH HUNING City Engineer ATTEST: DeeAnn Mickelsen City Clerk Publish: East Valley Tribune, April 14, 2019 / 19989

For information contact: Stephanie Gishey, City of Mesa, Stephanie.Gishey@mesaaz.gov

Work shall be completed within 210 (two hundred ten) consecutive calendar days, beginning with the day following the starting date specified in the Notice to Proceed. Bids must be submitted on the Proposal Form provided and be accompanied by the Bid Bond for not less than ten percent (10%) of the total bid, payable to JEN Arizona 4 LLC, or a certified or cashier's check. PERSONAL OR INDIVIDUAL SURETY BONDS ARE NOT ACCEPTABLE. The successful bidder will be required to execute the JEN Arizona 4 LLC Contract and respective Addenda for construction within five (5) days after formal Notice of Contact Award. Failure by bidder to properly execute the Contract and provide the required certification as specified shall be considered a breach of Contract by bidder. JEN Arizona 4 LLC shall be free to terminate the Contract or, at option, release the successful bidder. Payment and Performance Bonds will be required for this Work. The successful bidder, simultaneously with the execution of the Contract, shall be required to furnish a Payment Bond in the amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the Contract Price, and a Performance Bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the Contract Price. Successful Bidder shall name JEN Arizona 4LLC as obligee on both the Payment and Performance Bonds and name the City of Mesa as an additional obligee on the Performance Bond using a Dual Obligee Rider form. An approved Dual Obligee Rider Form is included herein as Exhibit E in the Contract Documents. The right is hereby reserved to accept or reject any or all bids or parts thereto, to waive any informalities in any proposal and reject the bids of any persons who have been delinquent or unfaithful to any contract with the JEN Arizona 4 LLC; City of Mesa or Eastmark Community Facilities District No. 1. BETH HUNING District Engineer ATTEST: Dee Ann Mickelsen District Clerk Publish: East Valley Tribune, Apr 7, 14, 2019 / 19929


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

31

Public Notices

Public Notices

CITY OF MESA MESA, ARIZONA

CITY OF MESA, ARIZONA ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

HIBBERT STREETSCAPE – MESA ART SPACE LOFTS 155 S. HIBBERT CITY OF MESA PROJECT NO. CP0879

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS (RFQ) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Mesa is seeking a qualified firm or team

2nd AVENUE STREETSCAPE 2nd AVENUE – BETWEEN MORRIS AND ROBSON CITY OF MESA PROJECT NO. GR0288

SOUTHERN AVENUE AND STAPLEY DRIVE GAS AND WATER LINE REPLACEMENT

HUD PROJECT NO. IDIS 746

Southern Avenue from Horne to Harris Drive and Stapley Drive from US 60 to 8th Avenue

DAVIS BACON WAGES APPLY

PROJECT NO. CP0800GAS and CP0800WTR

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

The City of Mesa is seeking a qualified Construction Manager at Risk (CM@Risk) to provide PreConstruction Services and complete Construction Services as the CM@Risk for the Southern Avenue and Stapley Drive Gas and Water Line Replacements Project. All qualified firms that are interested in providing these services are invited to submit their Statements of Qualifications (SOQ) in accordance with the requirements detailed in the Request for Qualifications (RFQ).

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received until Thursday, May 2, 2019, at 1 p.m. All sealed bids will be received at Mesa City Plaza Building, Engineering Department at 20 East Main Street, 5th Floor, Mesa, Arizona; except for bids delivered 30 minutes prior to opening which will be received at the information desk, 1st floor, Main Lobby of the Mesa City Plaza Building. Any bid received after the time specified will be returned without any consideration. This contract shall be for furnishing all labor, materials, transportation and services for the construction and/or installation of the following work: Hibbert Streetscape – Within the public right-of-way, provide and install landscaping and irrigation improvements, unit pavers, concrete flatwork for public sidewalk, and benches and bike racks per the project plans. 2nd Ave Streetscape - Within the public right-of-way, provide and install landscaping improvements per the project plans.

to act as the Construction Manager at Risk for the following:

The following is a summary of the project. The required tasks will be reviewed with the selected CM@Risk and defined to meet the needs of the project as part of the contract scoping. This project consists of various water and gas improvements along Southern Avenue from Horne to Harris Drive and along Stapley Drive from US 60 to 8th Avenue. These improvements include replacement of 5,300 LF of 6” gas pipe and 2000 LF of 2” gas pipe. The work includes all required trenching, valves, services, and other required appurtenances. Only those Contractors on the City of Mesa Approved Gas Line Contractors List shall perform on the City of Mesa gas system.

Engineer’s Estimate range is:

The estimated construction cost is $6,000,000.

Hibbert Streetscape = $60,000.00, 2nd Ave Streetscape = $35,000.00, Total = $95,000.00.

A Pre-Submittal Conference will be held on April 25, 2019 at 10:00amat the City of Mesa Engineering Department, 20 E. Main Street, Conference Room 501, Mesa AZ 85201.At this meeting, City staff will discuss the scope of work and general contract issues and respond to questions from the attendees. Attendance at the pre-submittal conference is not mandatory and all interested firms may submit a Statement of Qualifications whether or not they attend the conference. All interested firms are encouraged to attend the Pre-Submittal Conference since City staff will not be available for meetings or to respond to individual inquiries regarding the project scope outside of this conference. In addition, there will not be meeting minutes or any other information published from the Pre-Submittal Conference.

For all technical, contract, bid-related, or other questions, please contact Donna Horn at donna.horn@mesaaz.gov. Contact with City Employees. All firms interested in this project (including the firm’s employees, representatives, agents, lobbyists, attorneys, and subconsultants) will refrain, under penalty of disqualification, from direct or indirect contact for the purpose of influencing the selection or creating bias in the selection process with any person who may play a part in the selection process. This policy is intended to create a level playing field for all potential firms, to assure that contract decisions are made in public, and to protect the integrity of the selection process. All contact on this selection process should be addressed to the authorized representative identified above. Contractors desiring to submit proposals may purchase sets of the Bid Documents from ARC Document Solutions, LLC, at https://order.e-arc.com/arcEOC/PWELL_Main.asp?mem=29. Click on “Go” for the Public Planroom to access plans. NOTE: In order to be placed on the Plan Holders List and to receive notifications and updates regarding this bid (such as addenda) during the bidding period, an order must be placed. The cost of each Bid Set will be no more than $20, which is non-refundable. Partial bid packages are not sold. You can view documents on-line (at no cost), order Bid Sets, and access the Plan Holders List on the website at the address listed above. Please verify print lead time prior to arriving for pick-up. For a list of locations nearest you, go to www.earc.com.

Contact with City Employees. All firms interested in this project (including the firm’s employees, representatives, agents, lobbyists, attorneys, and subconsultants) will refrain, under penalty of disqualification, from direct or indirect contact for the purpose of influencing the selection or creating bias in the selection process with any person who may play a part in the selection process. This policy is intended to create a level playing field for all potential firms, to assure that contract decisions are made in public, and to protect the integrity of the selection process. All contact on this selection process should be addressed to the authorized representative identified below.

One set of the Contract Documents is also available for viewing at the City of Mesa’s Engineering Department at 20 East Main Street, Mesa, AZ. Please call 480-644-2251 prior to arriving to ensure that the documents are available for viewing.

RFQ Lists. The RFQ is available on the City’s website at http://mesaaz.gov/business/engineering/construction-manager-at-risk-and-job-order-contractingopportunities.

In order for the City to consider alternate products in the bidding process, please follow Arizona Revised Statutes §34.104c. If a pre-bid review of the site has been scheduled, details can be referenced in Project Specific Provision Section #3, titled “Pre-Bid Meeting.” Work shall be completed within 60 consecutive calendar days, beginning with the day following the starting date specified in the Notice to Proceed. Bids must be submitted on the Pr oposal Form provided and be accompanied by the Bid Bond for not less than ten percent (10%) of the total bid, payable to the City of Mesa, Arizona, or a certified or cashier's check. PERSONAL OR INDIVIDUAL SURETY BONDS ARE NOT ACCEPTABLE. The successful bidder will be required to execute the standard form of contract for construction within ten (10) days after formal award of contract. In addition, the successful bidder must be registered in the City of Mesa Vendor Self-Service (VSS) System (http://mesaaz.gov/business/purchasing/vendor-self-service). The successful bidder, simultaneously with the execution of the Contract, will be required to furnish a Payment Bond in the amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the Contract Price, a Performance Bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the Contract Price, and the most recent ACORD® Certificate of Liability Insurance form with additional insured endorsements. The right is hereby reserved to accept or reject any or all bids or parts thereto, to waive any informalities in any proposal and reject the bids of any persons who have been delinquent or unfaithful to any contract with the City of Mesa. BETH HUNING City Engineer ATTEST: DeeAnn Mickelsen City Clerk Publish: East Valley Tribune, Mar. 31, Apr 7, 14, 2019 / 19606

The Statement of Qualifications shall include a one-page cover letter, plus a maximum of 10 pages to address the SOQ evaluation criteria (excluding resumes but including an organization chart with key personnel and their affiliation). Resumes for each team member shall be limited to a maximum length of two pages and should be attached as an appendix to the SOQ. Minimum font size shall be 10pt. Please provide eight (8) hard copies and one (1) electronic copy (CD or USB drive) of the Statement of Qualifications by 2:00 pm onMay 2, 2019. The City reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Qualifications. The City is an equal opportunity employer. Delivered or hand-carried submittals must be delivered to the Engineering Department reception area on the fifth floor of Mesa City Plaza Building in a sealed package. On the submittal package, please display: Firm name, project number, and/or project title. Firms who wish to do business with the City of Mesa must be registered in the City of Mesa Vendor Self Service (VSS) System (http://mesaaz.gov/business/purchasing/vendor-self-service). Questions. Questions pertaining to the Construction Manager at Risk selection process or contract issues should be directed to Donna Horn of the Engineering Department at donna.horn@mesaaz.gov. BETH HUNING City Engineer ATTEST: DeeAnn Mickelsen City Clerk Publish: East Valley Tribune, April 14, 2019 / 19990


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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

East Valley Tribune

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Deadlines

Classifieds: Thursday 11am for Sunday Life Events: Thursday 10am for Sunday

The Place “To Find” Everything You Need | EastValleyTribune.com

Obituaries

Employment

Employment General

Employment General

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THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

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Real Estate

Real Estate

For Sale For Rent Manufactured Homes BRAND NEW NEVER LIVED IN 2 BED / 2 BATH HOMES $48,900 Financing Available. Also Available Affordable Homes Between $5K - $15K 55+ Mobile Home Park in Great Chandler Location. Call Kim 480-233-2035 YOUR CLASSIFIED SOURCE

Air Conditioning/Heating

Apartments ALMA SCH & MAIN Partially Furnished 1bd/1 ba. Bad Credit OK. No Deposit. Starting at $600/mo. Includes utilities (602) 339-1555

ROC156315, ROC285317

AC-HEAT-PLUMBING FREE ESTIMATES! FREE DIAGNOSIS!

Appliance Repair Now

If It’s Broken, We Can Fix It!

480-659-1400

YOU CAN OWN THE LAND And Own Your New Home

Licensed & Insured

Carpet Cleaning Best Cleaning You Will Ever Have! ASK US HOW YOUR $105,000 CASH INVESTMENT AND OUR SENIOR LOAN PROGRAM ENABLES QUALIFIED 62+ SENIORS MAKING THE LINKS THEIR PRIMARY RESIDENCE HAVE NO MORTGAGE PAYMENT & NO LOT RENT AS LONG AS YOU LIVE IN HOME.

Gawthorp & Associates Realty 40667 N Wedge Dr • San Tan Valley, AZ 85140

602-402-2213

Service Directory

SPECIAL! 3 Rooms for

99!

$

East Valley/ Ahwatukee

Broken Springs Replaced Nights/Weekends Bonded/Insured 480-251-8610

Not a licensed contractor

Call us to place your ad online!

THE LINKS ESTATES

FROM THE UPPER 100’S

GARAGE DOOR SERVICE

Appliance Repairs

We Also Buy, Sell & Trade Used Appliances Working or Not

Why Rent The Lot When

Mila's House Cleaning. Residential & Commercial. Weekly/Monthly/Bi Weekly. Experienced and Reference's Available. 480-290-5637 602-446-0636

MISSED THE DEADLINE?

Manufactured Homes

CLASS@TIMESPUBLICATIONS.COM

Garage/Doors

(480) 524-1950

• Same Day Service • On-Site Repairs • Servicing All Major Brands • Quality Guaranteed

480.898.6465

Cleaning Services

OPEN 24/7/365

Commerical/ Industrial/Retail Outdoor commercial/personal Storage Yards for lease. Secure, gated 24 hour access, and much more. Call 480-926-5957 for details

33

*

*(a room is up to 200 sq. ft.)

Call or Text

• 25 years Cleaning Our Gilbert Neighbors’ homes • Family Owned and Operated • Truck Mounted Steam Cleaning for Fast Drying • Carpet, Tile & Grout, Upholstery, Rugs • Pet Stain Specialists

480-635-8605

allstarcleaning3@gmail.com The All Stars of Cleaning!

Drywall

JOSE DOMINGUEZ DRYWALL & PAINTING

480-898-6465 Electrical Services HONESTY • INTEGRITY • QUALITY

- Ahw Resident Since 1987 -

• Panel Changes and Repairs • Installation of Ceiling Fans • Switches/Outlets • Home Remodel

ALL RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL ELECTRICAL Call Jim Endres 480.282.7932 Over 28 Years Experience • ROC #246019 Bonded/Insured

Fencing/Gates

Block Fence * Gates

602-789-6929 Roc #057163 Lowest Prices * 30 Yrs Exp Serving Entire Valley

YOU’LL LIKE US - THE BEST!

Accounting

House Painting, Drywall, Reliable, Dependable, Honest!

Garage/Doors

Mobile Tax $ervices

QUICK RESPONSE TO YOUR CALL! 15 Years Experience • Free Estimates

GARAGE DOORS

We come to you!

Personal • Business • LLC • Rental Estate & Other States Returns

179 Call today for a FIRM price quote

$ Average cost for a 1040 is only

Peteris Berzins, EA, MBA, CLDP

(Enrolled Agent preparing taxes for over 30 years)

480-232-9645 WE RESOLVE IRS ISSUES

480.266.4589 josedominguez0224@gmail.com Not a licensed contractor.

See MORE Ads Online! www.EastValleyTribune.com

Unbeatable Customer Service & Lowest Prices Guaranteed!

10%

Discount for Seniors &Veterans

FREE

Opener & Door Lubrication with Repair

480-626-4497

www.lifetimegaragedoorsaz.com


34

Handyman

ACTION CONTRACTING INC. WE DO IT ALL! Bath & Kitchen Remodels • Drywall & Stucco Repairs Plumbing • Electrical • Can Lights Windows • Doors • Cabinets • Painting Block Fences • Wrought Iron Gates Remodeling • Additions • Patios • Tenant Improvements

A+

East Valley 480-430-7737

-S

IN

CE

1

8 97

LIC/BONDED/INSURED Res/Comm’l ROC#218802

Small Man!”

“No Job Too Work Since 1999 Quality le,Small 2010, 2011 Affordab Man!”

2012, 2013, 2010, 2011 2014 2012, 2013, Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor 2014 2010, 2011

r 2.670.7038 ured/ Not a Licensed Contractor

Small Man!”

Call Bruce at 602.670.7038 9 Quality Work Since 199 Affordable,Ahwatukee 2010, 2011 Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor

Advertise It Here!

Call 480.898.6465

CLASS@TIMESPUBLICATIONS.COM

Handyman

REASONABLE HANDYMAN • Painting • Plumbing • Carpentry • Drywall • Roofing • Block

- Free Estimates -

480-276-6600 *Not a Licensed Contractor

2010, 2011 2012, 2013, 2014

“No Job Call Bruce at 602.670.7038 038 “No Man!” Job Too Work Since 1999 Too Small Contractor 2010, 2011 2012, 2013, 2012, 2013, 2014 2014

HANDYMAN 37 years experience. Drywall, framing, plumbing, painting, electrical, roofing and more. Stan, 602-434-6057

-

ur Handyman Needs! aaaActionContractingInc.com dyman Needs! ng • Electrical lectrical all • Carpentry Marks the Spot for ALL earpentry • More! Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman Needs! Your Handyman Needs! re! Painting • Flooring • Electrical Spot for ALL Your Handyman Needs! • Drywall • Carpentry Plumbing Painting • Flooring • Electrical • Plumbing Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman ng • Flooring • Electrical • Tile More! Needs! DrywallDecks • Carpentry • •Decks • Tile • More! ing • Drywall • Carpentry Painting • Flooring • Electrical Decks • Tile • More! “No Job Too Plumbing • Drywall • Carpentry “No JobSmall Too Man!” Decks • Tile • More! “No Job Too Small Man!”

99

Car for Sale?

Handyman

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

Landscape Maintenance

Landscape Maintenance Juan Hernandez

Juan Hernandez

TRIMMING

Drip/Install/Repair

TREE

SPRINKLER

Not a licensed contractor

25 Years exp (480) 720-3840

25 years exp. Call Now (480) 720-3840

Handyman “When there are days that you can’t depend on them, you can depend on us!” LLC

Handyman

Services

ROC# 317949

Garbage Disposals Door Installs & Repairs Toilets / Sinks Kitchen & Bath Faucets Most Drywall Repairs

Bathroom Remodeling All Estimates are Free • Call: 520.508.1420 www.husbands2go.com

Ask me about FREE water testing!

Your Ad can go ONLINE ANY Day! Call to place your ad online!! Classifieds 480-898-6465

Irrigation

Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor

• Sprinkler/Drip Repairs • New Installs Poly/PVC • Same Day Service

Home Improvement

Why re-do when you can RE-NEW?

NTY

5-YEAR WARRA

YOUR #1 CABINET REFACING COMPANY IN THE VALLEY 39 Years of Masterful Craftsmanship

480.654.5600

azirrigation.com Cutting Edge LLC • ROC 21671

WE DO ALL THE WORK

Licensed • Bonded • Insured Technician

Specializing in Controllers, Valves, Sprinklers, Landscape Lighting, P.V.C. & Poly Drip Systems

Call Lance White

480.721.4146 www.irsaz.com

ROC# 256752

A-Z Tauveli Prof LANDSCAPING LLC We will give you totally new landscaping or revamp your current landscaping! Tree/Palm Tree Trimming Storm Cleanups Sprinkler Systems

Desertscape • Concrete Work Gardening • Block Wall Real & Imitation Flagstone

Free Estimates

602-471-3490 or 480-289-1673 ROC#276019 • Licensed Bonded Insured

2012, 2013, 2014

Bruce at 602.670.7038

Irrigation Repair Services Inc.

Landscape Design/Installation

INCLUDED IN EVERY PACKAGE: • New custom doors • New dovetail drawers • Soft-close hinges, tracks and more

Insured/Bonded Free Estimates

ALL Pro

T R E E

S E R V I C E

L L C

Prepare for Monsoon Season! LANDSCAPING, TREES & MAINTENANCE

Tree Trimming • Tree Removal Stump Grinding Storm Damage • Bushes/Shrubs Yard Clean-up Commercial and Residential PMB 435 • 2733 N. Power Rd. • Suite 102 • Mesa dennis@allprotrees.com

ALL OUR PRODUCTS ARE PROUDLY MADE IN THE USA!

480-354-5802

0% DOWN (OAC) Credit Union West

FREE HARDWARE

with any cabinet replacing project

FREE SINK & FAUCET

with purchase of a granite or quartz countertop Minimum required. Must present ad. Expires 6-30-19

WE WILL BEAT ANY WRITTEN ESTIMATE FREE In-Home Estimates

480-361-3121

Re-NewCabinets.com Visit Our Showroom!

6503 W Frye Rd, Suite 1 Chandler, AZ 85228 Licensed, Bonded, Insured - ROC#293053

SHARE WITH THE WORLD! Place a Birth, Anniversary, Wedding Announcement, In Memoriam, Obituary or any life event in this paper today! Call us for details. class@timespublications.com or call 480-898-6465

Serving the Valley for over 28 years

The Possibilities are Endless

Custom Design and Renovation turning old to new

You never know what you’ll find inside

Custom Built-ins, BBQs, Firepits, Fireplaces, Water Features, Re-Designing Pools, Masonry, Lighting, Tile, Flagstone, Pavers, Culture Stone & Travertine, Synthetic Turf, Sprinkler/Drip, Irrigation Systems, Clean ups & Hauling

Call for a FREE consultation and Estimate To learn more about us, view our photo gallery at: ShadeTreeLandscapes.com

480-730-1074

Bonded/Insured/Licensed • ROC #225923

480.898.6465

class@timespublications.com


THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

Painting

Plumbing

Pool Service / Repair What we do…

HOME IMPROVEMENT & PAINTING Interior/Exterior Painting 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE Dunn Edwards Quality Paint Small Stucco/Drywall Repairs

We Are State Licensed and Reliable!

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts

480-338-4011

☛ Never a service call fee

10 YEARS FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED LICENSED, BONDED, INSURED • ROC242432

SPECIAL! $30 OFF 480.888.0484

www.ezflowplumbingaz.com

Interior/Exterior Painting RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL

☛ Up-front pricing ☛ Tank water heaters

☛ Tank-less water heaters

☛ Fixture

Replacements drain repairs

We accept all major credit cards and PayPal • Financing Available ET01

Treatment

Juan Hernandez

POOL REPAIR

Pebble cracking, Plaster peeling, Rebar showing, Pool Light out?

I CAN HELP!

25 Years Experience • Dependable & Reliable

Call Juan at

480-720-3840 Not a licensed contractor.

Affinity Plumbing LLC 480-487-5541

• Free Estimates • Drywall • Senior discounts

Remodeling

Pavers • Concrete • Water Features • Sprinkler Repair

☛ Plumbing & ☛ Water

ROC#309706

35

Publishing

Roofing

affinityplumber@gmail.com

www.affinityplumbingaz.com

References Available Not a licensed contractor

Call Jason:

Your Ahwatukee Plumber & East Valley Neighbor Anything Plumbing Same Day Service

East Valley PAINTERS

Water Heaters

24/7

Inside & Out Leaks

Bonded

Toilets

Insured

Faucets

Estimates Availabler

Tiles, shingles, flat, repairs & new work Free Estimates • Ahwatukee Resident Over 30 yrs. Experience

480-706-1453

Disposals

Licensed/Bonded/Insured • ROC #236099

$35 off

Any Service

Voted #1

Remodeling

Not a licensed contractor

Pool Service / Repair

Window Cleaning

General Contacting, Inc.

APPEARANCE

Licensed • Bonded • Insured • ROC118198

Professional service since 1995

One Call, We Do It All! 602-339-4766

10% OFF

Window Cleaning $100 - One Story $140 - Two Story

Owner Does All Work • All Honey-Do Lists

We Beat Competitors Prices & Quality Free Estimates! Home of the 10-Year Warranty!

480-688-4770

• Pointing • Drywall • Roofing Repairs • Painting • All Plumbing • All Electrical • Concrete • Block • Stucco

• Drywall & Roofing Repairs • Stack Stone • All Flooring • Wood • Tile • Carpet • Welding • Gates & Fences • Tractor Services

Free Estimates with Pride & Prompt Service!

Includes in & out up to 30 Panes Sun Screens Cleaned $3 each Attention to detail and tidy in your home.

(480) 584-1643

Bonded & Insured

LLC

• All Remodeling • Additions • Kitchen • Bath • Patio Covers • Garage • Sheds • Windows • Doors

COUNTS

Paint Interior & Exterior • Drywall Repair Light Carpentry • Power Washing • Textures Matched Popcorn Removal • Pool Deck Coatings Garage Floor Coatings • Color Consulting

ACCREDITED BUSINESS ®

www.eastvalleypainters.com Family Owned & Operated Bonded/Insured • ROC#153131

Roofing

Now Accepting all major credit cards

Medical Services/Equipment

The Most Detailed Roofer in the State

TK

®

Tim KLINE Roofing, LLC $

100 Off!

See store for details.

Roofs Done Right...The FIRST Time! Arizona Mobility Scooters 9420 W. Bell Rd., #103, Sun City, AZ 85351

Mobility Scooter Center 3929 E. Main St., #33, Mesa, AZ 85205

480-250-3378 480-621-8170 www.arizonamobilityscooters.com

15-Year Workmanship Warranty on All Complete Roof Systems

www.timklineroofing.com

480-357-2463

FREE Estim a and written te proposal

R.O.C. #156979 K-42 • Licensed, Bonded and Insured


36

THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | APRIL 14, 2019

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