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July 28, 2021

The Voice of the West Valley for 36 years

Dad says, ‘I have to find my son’ BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI West Valley View Executive Editor

D NEWS .............. 8 ASU grad dies in hit-andrun crash in Los Angeles

NEWS ............ 10 Thunderbirds donate to Maggie’s Place, Special Olympics

FEATURES ..... 22 3 generations of lifeguards dive headfirst into job

OPINION ...............12 BUSINESS.............. 18 SPORTS ..................20 FEATURES ..............21 YOUTH ..................25 OBITUARIES ...........25 CLASSIFIEDS ..........26 WEST

avid Robinson II would do anything for his son. He traveled from South Carolina to Arizona to search for Daniel Robinson, who went missing June 23 after he arrived at his job site in the desert west of Sun Valley Parkway, just north of Cactus Road, in Buckeye. “If you believe you’re going to lose one of your children, it’s devastating and scary and hurtful,” David said. “You do everything you can do to make sure that doesn’t happen. The 24-year-old field geologist was last seen driving his 2017 Jeep Renegade, heading west, farther into the desert. The geologist had not told anyone where he was going or why he was leaving, Sgt. Zachary Astrup of the Buckeye Police Department said.

Move to Arizona Daniel is 5-foot-8, with black hair and

Son...continued on page 2

Daniel Robinson went missing June 23 after he arrived at his job site in the desert west of Sun Valley Parkway, just north of Cactus Road, in Buckeye. (Photo courtesy David Robinson II)

West Valley NAACP reacts to the signing of HB 2906 BY HOWARD FISCHER AND LAUREN SERRATO

West Valley View Staff Writers

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ov. Doug Ducey signed legislation to block the use of public funds for what he calls “critical race theory.’’ But there appears to be a disconnect be-

tween the description of what has become a favorite talking point of Ducey and other Republicans and what that term actually means. It leaves open the question of what state and local agencies — and, in a separate bill, schools — will and will not be able to do and teach.

On paper, HB 2906 is relatively simple. It says employees cannot be required to go through orientation, training or therapy that presents any “form of blame or judgment on the basis of race, ethnicity or sex.’’

The latest breaking news and top local stories in the West Valley!

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NAACP...continued on page 4 JUST A CLICK AWAY


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Son...continued from page 1 brown eyes and does not have a right forearm or hand, police said. He lives in Tempe. After graduating College of Charleston in 2019, Daniel was hired in June 2019 as a staff hydrogeologist with Matrix New World Engineering and moved to Phoenix. He oversees many sites in remote desert locations, often working in extreme conditions and traveling long distances to work on projects, according to the GoFundMe. On July 19, Buckeye police were notified that Daniel’s Jeep was discovered by a rancher on his property approximately 4 miles southwest of the job site, where he was last seen on June 23. The Jeep was found in a ravine and appeared to have rolled and landed on its side, Astrup said. The Jeep’s airbags deployed, and initial evidence indicates Daniel was wearing a seatbelt at the time of the crash. Clothing, his cellphone, wallet and keys were found at the scene. Subsequently, detectives immediately searched the area by foot and vehicle with the assistance of the Department of Public Safety’s ranger helicopter, the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office and its search-and-rescue dogs. Buckeye Police Department patrol officers and detectives equipped with fourwheel drive vehicles searched the area for several hours on multiple days. David said he doesn’t think the investigating is progressing, so he has hired a private investigator and a desert search-and-rescue team and printed missing person fliers. A GoFundMe has been set up at https://bit.ly/ DanielRobinson, and $19,700 of $40,000 has been raised.

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

“The Buckeye Police Department is still working on the case,” David said. “They found the vehicle, but they didn’t do a forensic-type investigation, because they didn’t see any blood in the vehicle. “They didn’t swab for DNA or some of the typical things they would do in some type of investigation. I expressed these concerns, and they decided — because of that — to swab the vehicle to look for fingerprints at the police compound where the vehicle is stored.” Once detectives finish processing the vehicle, David’s forensics team will scour it and go back through Daniel’s cellphone and computer. David said he feels the Buckeye Police Department just wants to wrap up the case. “The narrative that’s out there is my son just walked off on his own,” he said, holding back tears. “Of course, as a family, we don’t agree with that. We’re still working out some things. “We’re not hearing enough.” The Buckeye Police Department’s latest statement said detectives are continuing to analyze evidence from Daniel’s vehicle and are reevaluating further searches. “Based on the personal effects found in Daniel’s vehicle, no foul play is suspected,” the statement read.

Intelligent and funny David said Daniel is “a very smart, intelligent young man.” “He’s very loved by his family and friends,” David added. “He has four siblings. Growing up, he tried to outdo everybody, academicwise. “He excelled in school in Charleston. He’s a very outspoken person, very energic. He wants to travel and see ev-

BUCKEYE UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT will be offering healthy

Buckeye police were notified on July 19 that Daniel Robinson’s Jeep had been found, but no sign of Robinson. (Photo courtesy David Robinson II)

erything.” David said Daniel landed “the perfect job for him.” “He would call me all the time,” David said. “He wanted me to see the rock formations. He started learning how to hike. He enjoyed nature and things like that. He’s a funny guy. He has a lot of friends. He can make friends easily. He’s a very outspoken guy, but he doesn’t juge people. He’s an extraordinary guy.” Born in Columbus, South Caroli-

Household size and income criteria are used to determine eligibility for free and reduced-price benefits if the household does not receive assistance or the children are not in the other categories mentioned above. Children can get free or reduced-price meals if the household’s gross income falls at or below the limits on the Federal Income Eligibility Guideline chart.

Applications also are available at each of the schools, as well as on the district’s website at www.buhsd.org as of July 23, 2021. Apply online at www.buhsd.schoollunchapp.com.

For more information, you may call The Child Nutrition Department at (623) 327-2284 or e-mail at hilda.alvarado@buhsd.org.

Buckeye police updates Officers contacted numerous friends and family to gather information but have yet to find Daniel. According to

Son...continued on page 3

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

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Home delivery of the West Valley View is complimentary and offered to residents in the southwest region of the Valley of the Sun, saturating parts of Avondale, Buckeye, Goodyear, Litchfield Park, Tolleson & Waddell. The West Valley View can also be found free-of-charge at nearly 600 local businesses in the area. (c) 2021 Strickbine Publishing Inc. All rights reserved. West Valley View is distributed by AZ Integrated Media, a circulation service company owned by Times Media Group. The public is permitted one copy per reader. For further information regarding the circulation of this publication or others in the Times Media Group family of publications, please contact AZ Integrated Media at circ@azintegratedmedia.com or 480-898-5641. For circulation services please contact Aaron Kolodny at aaron@azintegratedmedia.com

Son...continued from page 2 Buckeye police, a ping was established on his phone line but no location data was available because the phone was either off or out of range. Detectives obtained limited call detail records, and it did not appear Daniel made any calls or texts after leaving the site. Detectives and the family checked with Valley hospitals, and Daniel was placed in the national system as missing. That alerts any law enforcement if his name or vehicle was run through it. Astrup also said the department notified Arizona Game and Fish and the Bureau of Land Management. Detectives placed fliers on gate entrances to the desert off Sun Valley Parkway and shared information with Buckeye Airport officials. “Detectives are working with Civil Air Patrol, with plans to review the aerial photos and data to determine if further searches in that area are appropriate,” Astrup said. “The Buckeye Police Department has received multiple requests from citizens who wish to help. If any members of the community intend to organize a search, please prepare accordingly for the extreme heat and challenging terrain. While the support from the community is always appreciated, at this time, we are not asking the public to search the desert area but to be alert for Daniel if you are in the area.” David said he’ll take any help he can get. “I love my son,” he said. “We have a really close relationship. Our family’s really close. He’s close with his mother, his siblings and other family members. We have our own little relationships. Our phone conversations are one to two hours long. We discuss everything. I have to find my son. He wouldn’t quit on anybody. I can’t quit on him.”

NEWS

Avondale ‘Shop with a Cop’ seeks sponsors/donors

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BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

he Avondale Police Department is asking the community for donations to keep its Shop with a Cop program going. Shop with a Cop is a Christmas tradition designed for the department to bring holiday cheer into the lives of some of the children they encounter while responding to calls for service. It is one of the many ways that Avondale police officers try and give back to the community they care about and do their best to protect. For years, the Avondale Police Department has provided an experience for children, who have been victims or witnesses of violent crimes, to shop at a local retail store with a $150 gift card for the holidays. It is a very positive experience not only for children involved but for the officers who share their special day with them. The goal is to continue to raise funds

to keep this program going strong and involving the community in this heartfelt tradition. The Avondale Police Department accepts donations for the Shop with a Cop program throughout the year. The city is also looking for business partners to assist with providing Christmas-themed goody bags and food/beverages for the day of the event. Info: 623-333-7219 or mdodge@ avondaleaz.gov

Florian T. Walter, D.O. Raj S. Rathee, M.D. Jordan Oland, M.D. B.J. Ho, D.O. Sarah Colwell, D.O. Ingrid Gold, CNM Meaghan Gomez, FNP-C Britt Michie, RNC, MSN, WHNP Jennifer Woodruff, RNC, MSN, WHNP Anna Gomez, CNM Yisel Carter, PA-C Tracy Burns, CNM Michaela Wagner, CNM Karline Snyder, CNM Kristen Watras, WHNP Margaret Over, PA-C

The search for Daniel Robinson

Anyone with information about Daniel Robinson’s whereabouts is urged to call the Buckeye Police Department at 623-349-6400. To volunteer to search, visit searchfordaniel.org or pleasehelpfinddaniel.com. To donate, visit https://bit.ly/DanielRobinson.

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NAACP...continued from page 1 Then the bill gives examples of what that includes, like saying one race, ethnic group or sex is inherently morally or intellectually superior to another; that someone is inherently biased, whether consciously or otherwise, due to race, ethnicity or sex; or that an individual should feel discomfort, guilt or psychological stress because of race, ethnicity or sex. Sen. Martin Quezada, D-Glendale, said none of that is being done right now. Instead, he said, it appears to be more of a political move. “They’re kind of making ‘critical race theory’ out to be this bogey man when it’s kind of a false narrative on a whole bunch of different fronts,’’ Quezada said. But the danger of the measure, he said, is it could be used to stop the use of public funds for anything that deals with teaching sensitivity about racial, ethnic or sexual issues. “If anything, we should be mandating that type of training for state employees, and for legislators, too,’’ he said. “The message that it’s going to

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

send is that any training whatsoever that brings up the conversation of diversity, of equity, of differential treatment of people.’’ The West Valley National Association for the Advancement of Colored People said it is “appalled by the actions of our current Governor, Doug Ducey, for signing HB2906 into law.” “The struggle for equality and anti-racism has been fought for, by many, for decades. To see now, that those who are afraid to face the reality of historical racism and its existence in America, have stooped so low as to threaten the livelihood of those who aren’t afraid to speak the truth, is disappointing but not unexpected,” wrote Bishop Holt, WVNAACP president. “Ignorance, fear and hatred have gripped the very foundation of our society. The only way to move forward, into a place of anti-racism and acceptance of all, is to have courageous and difficult conversations about the belief that just because you or your immediate family didn’t partake in or cause the original definition of slavery, and present day racism, doesn’t mean that you are not responsible for the perpetuation

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of ignorance that continues to affect the lives of every person of color today.” The measure made its way into the law books because of a procedural maneuver by Rep. Jake Hoffman, R-Queen Creek, tacking it on to a Senate-passed measure during House floor debate. That avoided any public hearing at all. Hoffman, in describing the measure, said he wants to prevent teaching that there is a premise of institutional racism that he does not believe exists. “America is not racist,’’ he said at the time. Hoffman said that, going back as far as the Civil War, there is a history of “stomping out racism’’ wherever it exists. “This nation is accepting and diverse and loving,’’ he continued. “Sadly, the trend of teaching this hateful, racist and bigoted revision of the story of America has reached a fever pitch amongst the activist community on the left that seek to denigrate and demean nearly every American citizen,’’ Hoffman said. “It must be addressed.’’ He produced statements from others who disputed Quezada’s claim that none of what the new law would ban is happening. “I have seen firsthand taxpayer funds being spent to train hundreds of (school) board members and staff from across the state on the disgusting racist ideology called critical race theory,’’ said Shelli Boggs, a member of the board of East Valley Institute of Technology. Sal DiCiccio, a member of the Phoenix City Council, said his city has multiple programs like that, though they don’t use the phrase “critical race theory.” “Worse, it’s not just employees being indoctrinated with this garbage,” DiCiccio said, saying there are elements of it in the city’s Climate Action Plan and other programs. Ducey, in signing the measure, said using public funds for what he called “political commentary” is not responsible. “I am not going to waste public dollars on lessons that imply the superiority of any race and hinder free speech,” Ducey said. The governor expressed the same sentiments about a similar provision, buried in a budget bill he signed earlier, which imposes fines of up to $5,000 on schools that have similar teachings. Quezada, for his part, said the harm of

the new law is “perpetuating the narrative that they’re trying to push right now.” “That narrative is, one, that any type of training that does address difficult issues, difficult topics is a bad thing, and, two, that, even though this isn’t exactly what it is, that critical race theory as a concept is a bad thing,’’ he said. All that leads to the question of what is critical race theory. Nolan Cabrera, a professor at the Center for Study of Higher Education at the University of Arizona, said what is important about critical race theory is it doesn’t take racism as an individual defect. “Critical race theory started grappling with the idea that … just individual prejudice can’t account for the results that we’re getting,’’ he said. “There needed to be something bigger, something more structurally ingrained in society about race. That’s what they’ve been trying to figure out.’’ He took a swat at the governor’s statement that his signature on the bill will “keep critical race theory out of Arizona classrooms and our government institutions.’’ “Gov. Ducey doesn’t have any clue what critical race theory is,’’ Cabrera said. There are more general definitions, generally centering around the theory that racism is not about individual bias but something built into legal systems and policies. One example has been segregation. For years, banks would not lend to minorities who wanted to buy homes in certain communities, using a practice of “redlining’’ what areas should be reserved for whites. There also have been restrictive covenants prohibiting the sale or rental of homes to minorities. Even zoning policies that preclude affordable housing can be seen as contributing to segregation. Mary Carol Combs, also a UA professor in the Department of Teaching, learning and Sociocultural Studies, said it is important to understand what critical race theory is not. She said that, despite Ducey’s statements, there is nothing about teaching that a particular race, ethnicity or gender is superior to another. Nor, she said, does it teach hate against whites. And, contrary to what the governor claims, it does not limit free speech.


WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

Bashas’, Food City donate 11K pounds of apples BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

D

uring the hotter months, Arizona food banks report that fresh food donations are harder to come by — yet they are crucial to help keep families with children from going hungry, especially when kids are out of school for summer. Thanks to a collaborative campaign to fight hunger, Arizona families with children in need throughout the state can have access to fresh, nutritious apples. Two local grocery chains recently donated more than 11,000 pounds of Red Delicious apples — 11,520 pounds, to be exact — equaling more than eight pallets of apples that were distributed to a dozen different food banks and local nonprofits throughout the state. Bashas’ and Food City supermarkets recently donated thousands of apples to a variety of organizations, including the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Valley in Apache Junction, Avondale, Chandler, Gilbert, Glendale, Guadalupe, Mesa, Peoria, Phoenix and Tempe.

The apple donations are all part of an annual Take a Bite Out of Hunger collaboration that Bashas’ and Food City supermarkets have with FirstFruits, which is based in Washington state. “We all know this has been a tough year, and we feel fortunate to be able to continue making our annual apple donations, now more than ever,” said Joe Vargas, director of marketing for FirstFruits. “We are grateful for the support and partnership we receive from Bashas’ and Food City to donate thousands of pounds of apples every year.” FirstFruits created its Take a Bite Out of Hunger donation program to help feed the underserved while bringing attention to the problem of food insecurity in the United States. In Arizona, as many as 1 in 7 people struggle with hunger, and the number of hungry children is higher yet. About 1 in 4 Arizona children — nearly 435,000 youth — experience hunger or do not have regular access to safe, affordable and nutritious foods.

This is the fourth year the grocers participated in the give-back campaign. Bashas’ and Food City earned the donation based on the number of apples procured for distribution across the state during the first quarter of 2021. “Bashas’ and Food City have always been a constant and steady force of good for our community,” said Jill Johnson, director of strategic partnerships for Boys & Girls Clubs of the Valley. “This donation is a great reminder of the power of helping one another. It also reinforces the importance of shopping with and supporting local organizations.” Since the give-back campaign’s inception in 2010, more than 2 million pounds of fresh apples have been donated to local food banks as part of Take a Bite Out of Hunger. Last year alone, more than 263,000 pounds of

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fresh apples were donated to local food banks in their communities. “This is the first time we have had so many organizations benefit from the donation, which allowed us to cover all parts of the state,” said Edward “Trey” Basha, president and CEO of Bashas’ Family of Stores. “This apple donation helps to put a sizable quantity of fresh produce into the hands of those who could use it the most.”

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

Phoenix Rescue Mission sets record for street rescues

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BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

s the Valley reaches record-breaking temperatures, Phoenix Rescue Mission is also breaking records. The Mission’s Street Outreach Team has rescued 120 men, women and children off the streets since launching its Code:Red Summer Heat Relief effort in May. “Our Street Outreach teams have been working tirelessly to find and rescue people from the hot sun and, frankly, the streets in general,” said Nathan Smith, chief program officer. “We knew they were making an impact, but it wasn’t until the numbers came in that we were truly blown away. In 2020, our average was 27 each month, but we broke our all-time record in May with 60 rescues, which is amazing. Then we hit that number again in June, and that’s when we realized our success was not a fluke. Because of the passion and care our teams bring to the streets, the partnerships we are building in cities around the Valley and the strong support of the community, it makes sense that we’re making incredible progress.” Among the 120 rescues this summer was a single mother and her five children who found themselves in dire straits when a move to Phoenix from Indianapolis didn’t go as planned. Down to her last few dollars, the mother had only one option — to use her car for shelter, a deadly proposition in the Valley of the Sun. But thanks to the Mission’s Street Outreach Team, the mother and her children were rescued before they spent a single night on the streets. After helping the mother reconnect with family back home, the team provided bus tickets for them to make it home safely. That mother’s story is just one of many rescues that could not have been possible without the recent expansion of the Mission’s Street Outreach Team, which now

boasts a fleet of vehicles capable of going where the need it at, searching for and rescuing vulnerable individuals and families like this mother and her children. This coordinated effort is largely possible because of several public-private partnerships between Phoenix Rescue Mission and local municipalities, including Glendale, Goodyear, Peoria, Avondale, Scottsdale and Surprise. Each municipality works closely with the Mission’s Street Outreach Team to identify those in need and connect them with the appropriate solutions to help them re-enter society and reach their potential. Whether addiction recovery, mental health support, vocational development, food assistance or housing, the Street Outreach vans are available to pick up the individuals and transport them to either Phoenix Rescue Mission or an appropriate organization or destination that will serve the needs of that person. The expansion of the Mission’s Street Outreach Team is the latest example of the nonprofit’s continued goal of growing and meeting the needs of those it serves by focusing on community impact in a fiscally responsible way. “For decades, we have been providing Christ-centered, life-transforming solutions to persons facing hunger, homelessness, addiction and trauma,” Smith said. “Our staff and volunteers are equipped with proven, time-tested programming to help those within our residential recovery programs undo lifelong strongholds that may be at the root of their suffering and find their purpose in life.” Info: phoenixrescuemission.org

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ASU grad dies in hit-and-run crash in LA

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

BY LAUREN SERRATO

West Valley View Staff Writer

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Before his podcast, “She Rates Dogs,” Mat George attended ASU and worked as a medical scribe in Buckeye.

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odcaster and ASU graduate Mat George died in a hit-and-run accident in Los Angeles on July 17. The 26-year-old was struck by a white BMW just after 2 a.m., while walking in an unmarked crosswalk in the Beverly Grove neighborhood. He was pronounced dead on the scene. George’s “She Rates Dogs” podcast co-host, Michaela Okland, broke the news on Twitter the next day. “It doesn’t feel like there are any right words to say, but I’m going to miss Mat so much,” she wrote. “He was an amazing person and an even better friend. He was such a light in so many people’s lives, and I’m so thankful for the chance to have known him.” George graduated from ASU in 2017 with a bachelor’s degree in biology. Before joining the podcast, George worked as a medical scribe in Avondale. During his time in Arizona, George touched the lives of many, including Jessica Alvarado, who met George in 2016. “He was always smiling, enthusiastic and so genuine. Everyone loved him so much,” the Litchfield Park resident said. Alvarado worked summers at ASU’s Kids Camp with George as summer camp counselors. “Mat was not only my co-worker but my dear friend,” Alvarado said. “He was a literal ray of sunshine and silliness that everyone would easily gravitate toward him. He was such a genuine person. It was easy to love him. All the kids were always excited whenever Mat would come around and even

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more so when he was on their team during our camp games.” After his career change and commitment to the podcast, George talked about the impact it had on his life during an interview with Shoutout Arizona. “Toward the end of my college days at Arizona State University, I started to share my experiences as a gay man with different people I was close to,” George said. “Their reactions made me realize that a lot of these stories were funny to others, which then gave me more confidence to start sharing them with even more people.” “My hopes for my Twitter account and SheRatesDogs the Podcast is to share my stories and make LGBTQ+ people all across the world feel like they’re not alone.” In addition to identifying the victim of the hit-and-run as a 26-year-old Arizona resident, the Los Angeles Police Department said the driver of the vehicle did not stop or notify emergency services. As of last weekend, the Los Angeles Police Department was still searching for the driver. Despite the loss George’s friends and family are feeling, Alvarado said she will remember him as “the most positive, outgoing, and funniest person to be around.” “He was so fun to play games with because he always gave 110%. I am grateful for him and admired him for always supporting the kids and our peers. There are so many things I can say about Mat but I am so lucky to have met such an inspiring and genuine person. I am so lucky to have been his friend,” she said.


WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

Thunderbirds donate to Maggie’s Place, Special Olympics BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

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Special Olympics of Arizona is hosting its Phoenix Breakfast with Champions in September and Fall Games in October. (Photos courtesy of Special Olympics of Arizona)

aggie’s Place and Special Olympics of Arizona were awarded funds from Thunderbirds Charities — the charitable giving arm of the Thunderbirds, host of the Waste Management Phoenix Open. Maggie’s Place was granted $40,000 to directly support the work of its Family Success Center at 30th Street and Indian School. The Family Success Center opened in 2014 and is committed to providing vital support services, resources and engagement opportunities for all Maggie’s Place moms. It welcomes women living in Maggie’s Place homes and the network of more than 1,000 alumni moms to stay connected through on-site family coaching, resource support, social events and community. “With the challenges of the last year, we could not have continued to remain open, serve our mission, our moms and their children without the continued support and investment of partners like Thunderbirds Charities,” said Maggie’s Place CEO Laura Magruder. “With hundreds of current and alumni moms visiting and connecting with the Family Success Center each month, it is a central pillar of our Maggie’s Place community, and we are so grateful for the support of the board of directors at Thunderbirds Charities.” Special Olympics of Arizona received $120,000 to fund its “Return to Activities” initiative coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic. Special Olympics of Arizona has only hosted a few in-person events since the pandemic shut down programming in March 2020 but is planning to bring back its year-round sports training, competitions and support programs starting this fall, including its Phoenix Breakfast with Champions in September and Fall Games in October. “In-person competition is incredibly

important to Special Olympics Arizona, and we’re obviously thrilled to help bring these athletes back to the playing field after what has been an extremely tough year,” said Scott Jenkins, president of Thunderbirds Charities. “The Thunderbirds and Special Olympics Arizona have a long-standing relationship and we’re very proud to continue our support of the organization and their athletes who give it their all every chance they get.” “Fundraising was extremely limited this past year, and this grant from Thunderbirds Charities will help financially support Special Olympics Arizona and its athletes,” said Jamie Heckerman, Special Olympics of Arizona president and chief executive officer. “This grant from Thunderbirds Charities is so important to Special Olympics Arizona as we look to get back to in-person activities and events this fall, something that is so vital to our athletes, both physically and mentally,” Heckerman said. “With fundraising taking a hit during the pandemic, grants like these are crucial to help us get back on our feet. Thunderbirds Charities has been a great partner for many years, and we can’t thank them enough for their continued support.” The 2022 WM Phoenix Open will be held at TPC Scottsdale in early February. The 2022 edition will mark the 87th playing of the event and the 13th with Waste Management as title sponsor.

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

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Pathfinder’s “growth mindset,” project-based curriculum, and hands-on learning experiences take students beyond academics and prepare them for the jobs of the future. The STEAM+ curriculum at Sequoia Pathfinder adds athletics, entrepreneurship, and innovation to ensure student needs and aspirations are met. The newly added high school is now enrolling 9th and 10th grade students for this coming school year. Classes will begin August 2, at Summit Community Church across the street from the K-8 campus. The new STEAM+ high school building will include state-of-the-art computers, maker space, and science labs; a synthetic turf field; wood floor gymnasium; performing arts stage; and cafeteria. The high school will move out of Summit Community Church as early as possible in the second semester once the new high school buildings are completed in Spring 2022.

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

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OUR READERS’ VIEWPOINTS

SHELTON’S OPINION — mikesheltoncartoons.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Trump ‘dealt a lethal blow’ Editor: The indictment against the Trump organization is nothing at all to sneeze out with the 15 counts against Allen Weisselberg and the company with, very likely, more indictments to come, including the man at the top. But, even without this “Sword of Damocles,” the Trump organization has been dealt a lethal blow as a viable business. Trump was already losing credibility with the major banks like Deutsche Bank, having defaulted on so many of his colossal real estate loans over the years and the six — not four — bankruptcies. No bank will touch a business, even with the most pedestrian services such as checking accounts, with this pall hanging over it. They will probably have to find a funding service that will charge very high rates for even just payroll services. The service will require a very high deposit even just to open the account. Business insurance and bonding for their properties will be next to impossible to obtain even through Lloyds of London because no potential insurer is going to want to touch this organization. Any vendors still willing to do business with Trump will probably only operate COD with them. Legal representation will be impossible to find given Trump’s history of paying lawyers. Trump is like crime; he doesn’t pay. Even in this crazy housing market, I predict the values of condos in Trump properties will drop precipitously until they are able to extricate themselves from the Trump name. If you were in a management position with Trump, how would you like to have that on your resume when you go seeking a new job? Regardless of the further criminal legal action to take place, the name

“Trump” is tainted, it is sullied, it is contaminated with the stench of corruption. In business, the name Trump is dead! David Compton Litchfield Park

The presidents are waiting for you

Editor: If you want to understand the history of the United States, you must study the leaders we have elected as president. We are fortunate that we can visit and learn of their successes and failures by visiting the homes, libraries and museums of these individuals we, as a people, have given the responsibility to lead this great nation for the past 233 years. In his second term in office, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt proposed a public repository to house his papers. That was the start of the presidential libraries that now span the nation. These libraries are administered by the National Archives and Records Administration. There are now 13 libraries in the system, starting with Herbert Hoover in Iowa and ending with George W. Bush in Texas. The Barack Obama Presidential Library is under construction in Chicago. Presidents, prior to Hoover, have homes, museums and libraries that were privately established and administrated. I propose you put on your bucket list a plan to visit all our presidents. That is my plan, and I have been to all 13 in the system and the majority of those from the earliest days of our Republic. For presidential visit No. 1, you may question where to start, and I suggest you begin with our first president, George Washington. Mount Vernon, on the Potomac River, was his home from 1759 till his death in 1799. You can visit the mansion, restored to look like it was in the last year of his life.

The museum has 23 galleries and a theater and gives an in-depth history of his life. On our last visit, we sailed down the Potomac, from Washington, D.C., to dock at Mount Vernon. A lovely and educational day. Make visit No. 2 Abraham Lincoln. There are a number of sites recognizing Honest Abe from birth to assassination. The place to go is Springfield, Illinois. He lived there for 17 years, and you can visit his home and law office. The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum has the finest collection of historic information about our 16th president. For presidential visit No. 3, head to California and visit the Nixon and Reagan libraries and museums in Yorba Linda and Simi Valley. They could not be more different. They are built with private donations to include an endowment for future maintenance. When Nixon left office, he was disgraced and raising money was difficult. Reagan, on the other hand, was popular, and the money rolled in. On the top of the hill, in Simi Valley, sits Air Force One. How it got there is a great story, but you can visit the plane that carried President

Reagan around the world. For presidential visit No. 4, head east on I-10 to Texas and Arkansas to visit the libraries and museums for Presidents Lyndon Johnson, George H. W. Bush, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton. Each unique and powerful. For presidential visit No. 5, fly to Columbus, Ohio, rent a car and hit the road. My wife and I did just that. Why Ohio? Eight presidents have roots in the state, and each of them is worth a visit. They are William Harrison, Rutherford Hayes, Benjamin Harrison, U. S. Grant, James Garfield, William McKinley, William Taft and Warren Harding. My favorite is the James Garfield National Historic Site outside Cleveland. I’m biased since President Garfield is the only president to graduate from my college (Williams College). While in the state, visit the Dayton Aviation Heritage Site, home of the Wright Brothers and the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. In Canton, you can visit the First Ladies National Historic Site and the Pro Football Hall

Letters...continued on page 15


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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

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That couldn’t happen again, could it? 14

OPINION

BY J.D. HAYWORTH

West Valley View Columnist

T

he young family made quite a drive for this special summer vacation. Unlike previous warm-weather sojourns, this trip was not to the beach, nor the mountains. Instead, the parents decided that it was high time for their kids to became better acquainted with their country or — more accurately — with its capital city. The children, with the exuberance of youth, didn’t mind the dog days of summer, with even swampier conditions than those normally found on the banks of the Potomac. Instead, the youngsters were enraptured with the majesty of the landmarks they beheld with their own eyes. The eldest of the three — a boy of 11 — was especially enthralled. As the family station wagon motored ever closer to the District of Columbia, his eyes scanned the horizon for a landmark that he had only seen heretofore on television screens.

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

Suddenly, he saw it. Far in the distance, though the shimmering heat, was the Capitol dome. “There it is!” The young man could scarcely believe his eyes, and so he fixed his gaze on that sight, straining to keep it in view, even as his father negotiated the twists and turns of the wide boulevards originally envisioned by the French architect who designed the city. The next few days proved hectic, as each family member was swept into the “Washington whirlwind.” So much to see! The White House. The Washington Monument. The memorials to Jefferson and Lincoln. The Smithsonian. And, of course, the Capitol. Far too quickly, it seemed, the vacation ended. But the ride home was not drudgery as much as it was discussion time. Prompted by the historical nature of the sights they had seen, the parents entwined personal, familial and national history in a way that compelled their progeny to reflect upon what they had seen — and what they might become. This subject matter struck a responsive chord in their first-born child.

Maybe it was the way his mother made his personal timeline seem so promising: “You started first grade in 1964. So, you’ll graduate from high school in 1976, the year of our national bicentennial! What a special distinction! The class of ’76. … It sounds a lot like the ‘Spirit of ’76,’ doesn’t it?” Perhaps it was the shared experience of his parents. Both of them were born in 1932, so they were third graders when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and were just about to finish elementary school when FDR died in April 1945. Franklin Roosevelt had been in the Oval Office for almost the entirety of their lives until that point. Nearly a quarter-century afterward, on a long drive home, with their kids in the backseat, they reflected on the reality — and the enormity — of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in their lives. “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself!” “Remember those Willkie buttons, ‘No third term for King Franklin’?” “FDR had polio, but you wouldn’t know it. The newspapers never had pictures of him on crutches or in a

wheelchair, but by the spring of ’45, he was in really bad health. “Of course, there was a war on, so no one spoke publicly of his condition. That couldn’t happen now, of course; with television, people can see and judge for themselves.” Over a half-century later, most of those parental pronouncements still resonate, but the final observation about press coverage of presidential health unfortunately rings hollow. Joe Biden loves to invoke the memory of FDR, but it’s the memory of the 46th president that prompts genuine concern. Television cameras reveal his cognitive decline, but the major TV network anchors ignore it. No one should wish bad things on Joe Biden, no matter the nature of policy and political disputes, but there’s no disputing this observation. Kamala Harris is no Harry Truman. J.D. Hayworth represented Arizona in the U.S. House from 1995-2007. He authored and sponsored the Enforcement First Act, legislation that would have mandated enforcement of Federal Immigration Law in the 109th Congress.

Mark Yslas is proud to be superintendent

BY MARK YSLAS

Agua Fria UHSD Superintendent

H

ello, students, parents and community. My name is Mark Yslas, and I feel blessed to be your new superintendent. I appreciate the trust and confidence the Agua Fria Union High School District (UHSD) Governing Board has given me as I lead this great district to new heights during the next decade. It is an exciting time to be part of the Agua Fria UHSD. The Southwest Valley is booming with residential and business growth. The region’s momentum provides opportunities to forge new community partnerships, further develop students as leaders in innovation, and create the

best high school district in the nation. So, I am honored to join this well-respected and well-governed district and set these goals into motion. There is a spirit of collaboration in the community that will help unlock many new possibilities. So, throughout the next year, Agua Fria UHSD will create a Decade of Dreams, which will serve as our 10year strategic plan. This endeavor will provide the community with an opportunity to give their input and help shape the future of education. Additional details about the Decade of Dreams will be shared in the coming months, but I invite you to start dreaming about how, together, we can #MakeItHappen.  As we begin our work together, please look for “Mark’s Message,”

a quarterly communication from me with updates on all that is happening. Agua Fria UHSD is a growing and engaged community. I look forward to working with the board, our profes-

sional and support staff, our students, parents and the school community to achieve the best results for our district. Wishing you a relaxing and safe summer.


OPINION

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

Letters...continued from page 12

of Fame. For presidential visit No. 6, visit Virginia. In addition to Washington, the state is the home of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, John Tyler and Woodrow Wilson. While touring the Revolutionary War and Civil War sites, visit these presidents. For presidential visit No. 7, head to the Northeast. The first shots of the Revolution were fired in Boston, Concord and Lexington. The history of the United States is located in this part of our nation. It is also the homes, libraries and museums of John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Martin Van Buren, Teddy Roosevelt, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Jack Kennedy. For presidential visit No. 8, visit the Heartland. Don’t forget the center of our nation and the presidents who came from the Heartland — Andrew Jackson, Herbert Hoover, Harry Truman, Dwight Eisenhower and Gerald Ford. All are noteworthy, but my favorite is the Truman Library in Independence, Missouri. It is the site where LBJ signed into law Medicare and

Medicaid on July 30, 1965. It revolutionized our health care system, and former President Truman got Medicare card No. 1. For residential visit No. 9, I have left out a few of our past presidents, but I would be remiss in not highlighting the Jimmy Carter Library in Atlanta. It so reflects the personalities of Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter, who are celebrating their 75th wedding anniversary. My wife and I had the opportunity and privilege to participate in two conferences chaired by Rosalynn dealing with the mental health system in our nation. She was inspiring. A trivia question: Joe Biden is recognized as the 46th president of the United States. He is, in fact, the 45th. How can that be? Let me explain. Grover Cleveland was elected as our 22nd president in 1884. He lost his bid for a second term in 1888 to Benjamin Harrison, who was our 23rd president. Cleveland then won the 1892 election to become the 24th president. He is the only person to accomplish that feat. Can it happen for a second time in 2024? Arizona has never had one of our own as president. There have been a

number of mighty efforts. Barry Goldwater in 1964 and John McCain in 2008 won their primaries but lost in the general election. Bruce Babbitt and Mo Udall made runs for their party’s nomination but failed. Doug Ducey is termed out as governor in 2020. Will he make a run for president in 2024? Our history is the bedrock of our nation. Abraham Lincoln said it well. “We can see the past, but we may not claim to have directed it; but by seeing it we can feel more hopeful and confident for the future.” Plan your trip because the presidents are waiting for you. Dr. Leonard Kirschner MPH Col. U.S. Air Force (Retired) Past President AARP Arizona Former AHCCCS Director Litchfield Park

Stop the growth

Editor: Evidently, our local West Valley city mayors and councilmen and women have not gotten the memo that the western United States is in a super mega draught, as they keep issuing one building permit after another.

Everywhere you drive in the West Valley you can see one development after another under construction. There are currently thousands of multifamily and single-family residential units under construction. This is not to mention the scores of additional warehouse facilities that are under construction. Where do these governments think the water is going to come from to support this insane and out-of-control growth? I know that the driving force behind all of this construction is the revenue derived from the development fees that these municipalities collect. The greed for these fees is blinding them from the fact we don’t have water to support this pattern of growth. Someone has to sound the alarm and take a hard look at where this growth is leading us. Every municipality is guilty — Goodyear, Avondale, Tolleson, Glendale, Buckeye and, yes, even West Phoenix. We are all going to end up paying a painful price for their mismanagement and greed down the road. Michael Pekar Historic Goodyear

Letters...continued on page 17

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OPINION

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

This year’s Olympics promises lots of low lights BY DAVID LEIBOWITZ West Valley View Columnist

D

elayed a year by a global pandemic, the XXXII Olympiad has commenced in Tokyo. As a child, I would’ve been thrilled, anxious and mesmerized.

How many gold medals would America win? Who would emerge as the Games’ next big star, our next Mark Spitz, Carl Lewis or Mary Lou Retton, our next Florence Griffith-Joyner or Bruce Jenner? Now, I can barely summon the energy to care. The Olympics just aren’t the same. Of course, neither is Bruce Jenner.

Everything changes, often for the better, though the Olympics seem to be gasping like a marathoner hitting the wall. Why so? A few reasons. The formulaic television doled out by NBC. The athletes’ desire to tie personal politics to performance. And the changing position of America in the eyes of neighbors near and far. Olympic TV was a staple once, with Jim McKay, Al Michaels and experts like Donna De Varona narrating. Every night at prime time, we’d all gather before the Zenith. In 1976, ABC broadcast 76 hours of coverage from Montreal. NBC won the broadcast bidding in 2014. They’re planning 7,000 hours of coverage from Tokyo, boasting they’ve created “the biggest media event ever.” To fill this broadcast abyss — and justify nearly $8 billion investment in broadcast fees — NBC now focuses less on sports and more on storylines, making every athlete a hero out of Marvel comics. The United States is sending 600 competitors to these games. To hear NBC tell it, each of them has led a life of systemic deprivation and loss, full of tragedies physical, emotional, personal or societal. If it sounds like I’m minimizing the struggles of my fellow Americans — well, I am. None of us has it easy in this life, nor should we expect to. Success in any endeavor is hard: That’s why when you perform an Olympic feat, you get a gold medal before the world. Turning the Olympics into a 7,000-hour “After School Special” numbs the viewer the way formulas always do. When every story feels the same — when we all know the plot — no story feels significant. The same can be said of social justice protests: Familiarity breeds disinterest.

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This summer, I followed the story of Sha’Carri Richardson, America’s fastest woman, suspended from the U.S. Olympic Team after testing positive for marijuana. I agree with President Joe Biden on this one: “Rules are the rules” was how he put it. Where I lost the thread was when Richardson’s suspension became evidence of racism. As USA Today headlined, “Opinion: Sha’Carri Richardson’s positive marijuana test one example of how anti-Blackness triumphs in sports.” Rep. Alexandra Ocasio Cortez weighed in: “The criminalization and banning of cannabis is an instrument of racist and colonial policy,” she said, calling for Richardson’s ban to be overturned. You can feel it building as these games begin: the smashing of an alltime record for protests against every -ism worth detesting. While I share many of those dislikes, where I change the channel is when the protesting feels endless. Turns out, I only have so much hate in me. Sometimes I just want to watch great athletes compete without being force-fed politics in the process. Other folks, not so much, especially where America is concerned. Before the games started, American hammer thrower Gwen Berry turned away from the Stars and Stripes during the Trials award ceremony. Expect many more such protests during a games full of discord, plus a daily COVID-19 positive test tally. It’s an apt metaphor: the Olympics, diseased and trending toward life support. I’ll catch the highlights on the news. And the lowlights, too, of which I’m sure there will be many. David Leibowitz has called the Valley home since 1995. Contact david@leibowitzsolo.com


OPINION

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

Letters...continued from page 15

Filibuster used by both parties Editor: Every time there is a change of political parties occurring in the U.S. Senate, the filibuster becomes an issue — mainly by the Democrats. On June 28, 2021, I researched senate.gov and Politico for who used the filibuster rule while that party had control of the Senate. Here are the results of what I found: In 2020, the Democrats used it 327 or 328 times, whatever search engine used. Republicans once. From 2013 to 2020, both parties used it 909 times. Democrats during 2013-14 and 2019-20 used it 580 times, or 64%. The Republicans, during that same time frame, 2015-16 and 2017-18, used it 329 times, or 36%. Based on the Democrats’ history and the comments made, I read in the newspaper they want to cancel the filibuster rule. Yet, they are the largest user of the filibuster. This shows that the filibuster is not some policy from the Jim Crow era they keep saying it is. This policy has been around for over 100 years, and it stopped many bad bills from becoming a law when only party votes for it. We are a Republic, government of the people, by the people and for the people. We can’t have only one party passing bills without the other party having input. This is not what democracy is all about. Rollin Neumann Goodyear

Low information voters

Editor: I am constantly amazed at the level of ignorance people allow themselves to be subjected to, and they still vote as if they know the entirety of what they are voting for. Ellen Williams is a good example of this, not a personal attack just a suggestion that she (and everyone else) actually investigate what is put forth out of Washington, D.C. Ellen endorses all the good things the infrastructure bill would accomplish in Arizona without considering all the damage and loss of freedom we would all endure. She says the bill would rebuild our roads, expand light rail, protect clean water and ensure reliable

energy. These are all good things, to be sure. However, you have to look at the whole picture. If the items she mentions were all the bill contained, then I would imagine it would be passed tomorrow. Some people view icebergs and think, “Isn’t that beautiful? A mountain of ice floating in the ocean.” Ms. Williams sees this pretty picture but, when you stop to think, you are only seeing 10% of the danger that lurks under the surface of the water. It becomes a very different picture. Can anyone say Titanic? People need to read the entirety of what they endorse, including members of Congress as well as Ms. Williams. Most of this bill is a disaster that has absolutely nothing to do with infrastructure. Irrelevant items in the bill are not being broadly advertised by those who put it forward are numerous. Here are just a few: $100 billion to make school lunches greener; billions to eliminate racial and gender bias in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math, for those who don’t know); $100 billion to expand broadband and government control of it; $20 billion to advance racial equity and environment justice, whatever that is; and $10 billion to create a Carbon Climate Corp. (great, another government bureaucracy). These are just a few; the list goes on and on. It is no wonder we have do-nothing, incompetent, incapable buffoons at all levels of government running our lives, taxing us to oblivion and ruining our freedoms bit by bit. My advice to all is get a clue, wake up and read what you are voting for; otherwise, eventually you won’t be able to vote. T.M. Rico Goodyear

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

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Business Briefcase

BY LAUREN SERRATO

West Valley View Staff Writer

H

ello and welcome back to Business Briefcase! This week we are going to take another look at what Goodyear residents can expect to see in the community within the next year. As one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, it’s no surprise Goodyear is quickly becoming home to many businesses, including large corporations and family-owned businesses. Here’s a look at another law firm making its way to the Goodyear Professional Plaza.

Faith, Ledyard, & Faith PLC The city of Goodyear welcomes a new Class A office project underway as of June. The 25,773-square-foot office complex will be located at the northwest corner of I-10 and Bullard Avenue. Faith, Ledyard, & Faith (FLF) was established in 1979 and is the largest full-service law firm based in the West Valley. Its Avondale firm is located at 919 N. Dysart Road, Suite F. Attorneys and partners Michael Faith and Paul Faith will own the building, and their law firm will occupy half of the top floor, while the rest

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of the building will be leased to advanced business service and medical professionals in search of high-quality Class A office space. “The West Valley is primed for new office development, and Faith, Ledyard, & Faith will be a great fit among the new office developments in the city of Goodyear,” Mayor Georgia Lord said. “Construction equipment is on-site and dirt is moving, preparing the site for a beautiful new office building.” FLF has grown to become a general practice law firm, specializing in a variety of legal fields, including construction and real estate law, employment, business and government law, personal injury, criminal law, bankruptcy and estate planning. Understanding the growth the city has experienced in the last decade, Faith knew it was the right location for

the firm. “We feel like Goodyear, and in particular this area, is the future of the West Valley,” he said. The area is already surrounded by two new hotels, new restaurants and retail options. In addition to this project, the Goodyear Professional Plaza will also be home to a Class A medical office project for which plans state construction will begin in late 2021. The city of Goodyear is focused on bringing high-scale office developments to the community. Goodyear Civic Square at GSQ is another example of that commitment. In partnership with Globe Corp., the project includes a new city hall, library, 2-acre community park, a 100,000-plus-square-foot Class A office building and parking garage. It’s anticipated to open in summer 2022. The West I-10, including the Goodyear, Litchfield Park and Buckeye office submarket, continues to perform well, with office vacancy rates at 8.6% versus 13.8% for the Phoenix metro, according to the Colliers 2021 Q1 Greater Phoenix Office Market Report. Faith, Ledyard & Faith’s new Goodyear location is estimated to open in late 2022. For more information about the firm, visit faithlaw.com.

Have an item for Business Briefcase? Please email your business news and tips to Lauren Serrato at lserrato@timespublications.com


BUSINESS

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

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Fulton Homes purchases 187 acres, plans 675 lots BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

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and Advisors Organization’s local homebuilding team represented the seller in the $14.78 million sale of 187 acres in the West Valley to Fulton Homes. The builder plans to develop a master-planned community on the parcel. The site, located at the northwest corner of Perryville and Indian School roads in Maricopa County, is planned for 675 lots. A dairy farm previously sat on the land, which is on a county island between Goodyear and Buckeye. Land Advisors Organization’s team of Greg Vogel, Wes Campbell, Bret Rinehart, Ben Heglie and Ryan Semro represented the seller. “This was a complex deal with the land requiring rather extensive work, including rezoning, dairy cleanup and working through technical challenges involving utilities and other infrastructure associated with its location in unincorporated Maricopa County,” said Vogel, Land Advisors Organization CEO.

Fulton Homes purchased 187 acres in the West Valley with plans to develop a master-planned community. (Submitted image)

“I commend Fulton Homes for their work and investment on the front end of this deal, which is an unusual strategy. But, as the amount of available land in the area dwindles, particularly with regard to large parcels, we’re seeing

more builders willing to get creative on solutions to fill their lot inventory pipelines.” Tempe-based Fulton Homes will offer four product lines in the new master-planned community. The site plan

also calls for an aquatic center and sports park. The builder has closed on numerous land deals in the West Valley in recent months, with plans to build 3,500 homes in one of metro Phoenix’s fastest-growing markets.


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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

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Arizona Coyotes’ trade and draft rep ‘new culture’ BY GRANT GREABELL

West Valley View Staff Writer

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The Coyotes traded fan-favorite forward Conor Garland to the Canucks. He will head to Vancouver as a restricted free agent. (Photo courtesy of Getty Images)

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won championships,” Armstrong said. “What we need is a little grit and a little toughness, and we got that with Roussel. That also fits our new culture and where we’re moving to as an organization.” The Coyotes are ecstatic that Guenther fell to them with the ninth pick, as he was projected to go higher. He brings a versatile skill set on the offensive side of the puck. “We felt very, very comfortable with not only the top-end talent that we are getting but the quality person we’re getting, too. It fits our culture and where we are moving to,” Armstrong said. Guenther has similar sentiments toward the Coyotes’ organization and his upcoming career with them. “To hear my name called was just a huge honor, and I’m pumped to be a Coyote,” Guenther said. “They’re an up-and-coming team and they made some big moves today, and I’m excited to be a part of the future.”

he Coyotes moved on from captain and defenseman Oliver Ekman-Larsson, along with fan-favorite forward Conor Garland, in a trade with the Vancouver Canucks on July 23. The ’Yotes received forwards Loui Eriksson, Jay Beagle and Antoine Roussel, as well as the ninth overall pick in this year’s draft, which was subsequently used on forward Dylan Guenther. The Coyotes also received a 2022 second-round pick and a 2023 seventh-round pick in return. “I want to thank Oliver,” Coyotes general manager Bill Armstrong said. “He is a class act. He’s given 10 years of his career to this organization. I wish him the best. “Also, Conor is just somebody who has a tremendous amount of energy and will to play the game and has willed his way all the way to the NHL. I want to wish those guys the best in Vancouver.” Ekman-Larsson was one of the longest-tenured Coyotes before his departure to Vancouver. The captain has six years left on the eight-year contract he signed with Arizona in 2018. Garland was a top goal scorer for the Coyotes the past few years and will head to Vancouver as a restricted free agent. It truly is the start of a new era for the Coyotes, as they bring in a plethora of draft picks and a mesh of young stars and wily veterans as they build for the future. “The thing that I love about the guys coming Conor Garland was a top goal scorer for the Coyotes the past few years. (Photo courtesy of Getty Images) in is two of them have


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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

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Goodyear woman’s product helps mental health community BY LAUREN SERRATO

Though she credits her exceptional therapists with her progress, the fter Savanna Parafox was sex- 22-year-old said her therapy animals ually assaulted at a Colorado Shelby, an American bulldog, and her college, she returned to Arizo- rabbit, Monroe, are truly the ones that na and started her journey of recovery had the largest impact. and healing. “Monroe actually saved my life,” SaFast forward to the start of the pan- vanna said. “There were several times demic, and her mother, Georgie Para- where I wanted to just end my life, but fox, lost her job along with millions of after thinking, ‘Who is going to take Americans. care of him?’ I stayed.” The Goodyear mother-and-daughA year later, Shelby came into her ter duo, along with Georgie’s mother, life; and Savanna said when others met Doris Koine, took their adversity and her therapy animals, she was told, “I tackled it head-on by starting a busi- wish I could take him home.” ness to help others. Savanna wanted to help others who “We are a mission-based company,” faced similar trauma or struggle with said Georgie, Exceptional Heroes’ mental illness. She knew she had to inchief executive officer and founder. corporate her animals. “We are a manufacturing compaAlas, Exceptional Heroes was born, ny; however, Savanna created a pat- and Savanna created two therapeutic ent-pending product that is for mental devices that modeled Shelby and Monhealth, as well as mental wellness. She roe. The stuffed Shelby is 8 pounds, developed it two years ago, during her while Monroe is 4 pounds. own healing process.” Exceptional Heroes’ patent-pendAfter the assault her sophomore year, ing devices are soft, plush, comfortSavanna sought therapy and therapeu- ing therapeutic companions backed tic devices to help her with PTSD. by cognitive science and endorsed by mental health care professionals, Georgie said. The two devices combine multiple mental health and grounding techniques for complete inclusion, like coherent breathing, deep pressure therapy and tactile stimulation. “Immediately we started vetting it, and everyone said this is brilliant and this is going to help a lot of people not just with trauma but with autism, with dementia, Alzheimer’s, At just 22 years old, Savanna Parafox, owner and inventor of anyone that has mental Exceptional Heroes, created a device that can help a wide conditions, or for mental wellness to maintain range of people in the mental health community. (Photo courtesy of Doris Koine) their emotional balWest Valley View Staff Writer

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ance,” Georgie said. Savanna has committed to Exceptional Heroes 100% since returning to Arizona and said she goes beyond the walls of their Goodyear business to raise awareness for mental health. “I’m an advocate for those in the disability community, trauma, PTSD and mental health,” Savanna said. “This is my full-time job. I help a lot of people. I actually have a show on Instagram where I bring on my therapist, other therapists and a lot of other people who are licensed in this area to educate because I don’t want anyone else to go through what I went through, and if they did, now they’re a little bit more educated.” When creating the product, Savanna said she wanted to combine every type

of grounding practice and technique into one, as well as have four of the five senses incorporated. The heroes have weight for pressure therapy, a natural diffuser collar that essential oils can be placed in for aromatherapy, a soundbox in the head for controlled breathing with installed 20 minutes of controlled breathing sessions, texture on the paws, and resistance stress balls in the back paws. “We solved an issue by taking all of these different components and putting it into one all-inclusive product,” Savanna said. The uses of the therapeutic companions are endless, as many people have

Health...continued on page 23

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

3 generations of lifeguards dive headfirst into job

BY LAUREN SERRATO

West Valley View Staff Writer

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he Goodyear Community Pool at Loma Linda Park has been home to many summer jobs for locals in the West Valley for decades, including three generations of the Duell family. Mary Duell moved her family to Goodyear in the late 1950s, when the city had a population of fewer than 2,000 residents. “We were like a little island,” she said. “It seemed like forever to get even to Litchfield.” Mary was the first of her family to work at the pool in 1961, which was also the first year the community pool opened. Bryan Duell followed in his mother’s footsteps and became a lifeguard in 1991. “My favorite memories are all the relationships that we built. As a team, we did team-building exercises all the time,” he said. “It’s just a fun job with

a lot of added responsibility. I think it starts building that character of work ethic and what’s required of you in the workforce.” After his time as a lifeguard, Bryan followed his dream of becoming a firefighter. He started in 1992 as a volunteer firefighter and was then brought on full time in 1995. Bryan now serves as a battalion chief for the Goodyear Fire Department. He said his time as a lifeguard foreshadowed his future career as a firefighter. “I definitely think there’s a correlation there,” Bryan said. “It’s about serving — serving others and serving the community. Start with that added responsibility as a lifeguard and the medical side of that, to now working as a firefighter being able to serve the community.” His current job and time as a lifeguard collided when he realized one of his swimming students is now a firefighter. “It’s kind of neat because I taught

Mary, Bryan and Rilee Duell have each served as a lifeguard at the Goodyear Community Pool at Loma Linda Park. Mary began working at the pool when it opened in 1961, Bryan in 1991 and Rilee began her first year at the pool this summer. (Photo courtesy of the city of Goodyear)

swim lessons to someone when he was 4 to 5 years old, and he’s a firefighter now in Goodyear,” Bryan said.

Now, in a city with nearly 90,000

Lifeguard...continued on page 23

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Lifeguard...continued from page 22 residents, the Goodyear Community Pool offers activities including swim lessons, fitness classes, swim and dive teams, open swim, private pool rentals and lifeguard training for residents and surrounding communities. Knowing the positive experience both he and his mother had during their time as lifeguards, Bryan knew it was the perfect place for his daughter to work when the time came for her first summer job. “I would talk about what a great job it is for someone who’s 16, and you get that team atmosphere. You feel like you’re providing added value to the community and in the friendships and relationships that you build along the way,” Bryan said. “That was really valuable to me, so I would talk about that; and when she would talk about what she might want to do for the summer, I suggested that she look into it, and she did.” Rilee is now the third Duell to work at the community pool, a job she simply puts is “just fun.” “My dad really prepared me for the

whole interview part and just lifeguarding in general, because of his experiences,” she said. “I love the whole environment. Everyone’s so friendly, and I’ve made so many new friends, and all the patrons are super nice.” During Mary’s time as a lifeguard about 60 years ago, the facility had yet to finish the locker room and showers. Now, the pool features eight lanes for competitive swimming, a diving well, two one-meter diving boards and a bleacher area. The growth of the pool is miniscule compared to the growth of the city that the Duell family experienced firsthand. When Bryan began working at the pool, Goodyear had grown to just over 6,000 residents and all lifeguards reported to the assistant city manager. Despite the growth the city has seen, Bryan said Goodyear still has the same welcoming feeling he experienced growing up. “It’s been able to maintain that hometown feel even though it’s a big city, and the residents and the community, they’re the ones that really make it feel like home, no matter how big it grows,” he said.

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telling us how many people were developing so many more mental conditions, anxieties and depression that they didn’t have before COVID,” Georgie said. “I could have stayed sad, or I could say, ‘What can we do to help?’ And so we pulled all the resources we had and said let’s go as far as we can possibly go.” Looking to the future of Exceptional Heroes, the three-generation, all-female-owned company hopes to see its product sell internationally. “We just really hope to help a lot of people worldwide, because this product is for everyone, everywhere,” Savanna said. Georgie is proud of her daughter for wanting to help those with similar struggles. “We poured our hearts, our tears, our healing, our hurt into these heroes so that when you receive them, when your mother receives them, when your grandmother, your sister, your friend, your patient receives them, they can feel the love of what this family, my daughter, our team put together for you,” she said.

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the chance to benefit from them. Georgie referred to her sister who teaches kindergarten students with autism. She explained that when children have episodes during class, they needed a weighted vest to comfort them. The hassle of struggling to put the vest on sometimes made the situation worse and prolonged. “With this guy, she’s able just to lay it on their chest and then they can feel it and they can work with it, or they lay it elsewhere for survivors like Savannah who can’t put anything on her chest, but she uses hers for the weight on her lap,” Georgie explained. “The grounding is telling the brain I’m here, I’m present, I’m OK. I’m safe, and I have my companion. I have my Exceptional Hero with me.” Georgie and Savanna said their determination to continue the business and product was heightened by the pandemic. “We started seeing the news; we started seeing panic. Savanna’s therapist became our friend, and she was

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FEATURES

GOby FIGURE! Linda Thistle

ANSWERS ON PAGE 14

King Crossword ACROSS 1 Mattress option 5 NASCAR advertiser 8 Wild guess 12 Supervisor 14 “Yes --?” 15 Accidentally 16 Late July babies 17 Since Jan. 1 18 12-year-olds, e.g. 20 Bjorn Borg, for one 23 Salon request 24 Actress Elisabeth 25 Act of contrition 28 Knight’s address 29 Persnickety 30 Fez, e.g. 32 Woo 34 City district 35 BMW rival 36 Follows 37 Mississippi city

40 Venus, to Serena 41 Mine, in Montreal 42 Astaire specialty 47 Scepters 48 Valuable volume 49 Make a sweater 50 “Rah!” 51 Not busy

DOWN 1 Watch chain 2 Wall climber 3 Fun and games 4 Dr. Jekyll’s alter ego 5 Fax 6 Sleuth 7 Sham 8 Grave 9 Genealogy chart 10 Soon, poetically 11 Employer 13 Fill fully

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

19 Fay of “King Kong” 20 Snake’s warning 21 Spinning sound 22 Modern money 23 Joe of “GoodFellas” 25 Talking heads’ opinions 26 Spiced tea 27 British noble 29 Ersatz 31 Pro Bowl stats 33 Zedong follower 34 Sushi condiment 36 Ocean motion 37 Fir coat 38 “-- a roll!” 39 California city 40 Agile 43 Motorist’s org. 44 Silent assent 45 Army rank (Abbr.) 46 Scrape (out)

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Each numbered row contains two clues and two answers. The two answers differ from each other by only one letter, which has already been inserted. For example, if you exchange the A from MASTER for an I, you get MISTER. Do not change the order of the letters.

SCRAMBLERS Unscramble the letters within each rectangle to form four ordinary words.

Then rearrange the boxed letters to form the mystery word, which will complete the gag!


25

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

OBITUARIES Ronald Warrington

/WestValleyView WestValleyView.com For more youth visit westvalleyview.com

Student Chronicles

Know of a student doing something remarkable? Tell us about it! Email christina@timespublications.com.

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ore than 6,500 undergraduate students at the University of Kansas earned honor roll distinction for the spring 2021 semester. The list includes Brianna Gomez of Avondale, who is studying in the School of Education & Human Sciences. Ivette Mendoza of Avondale earned a degree from Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in biology. Levi P. Kaiser of Avondale made the president’s honor roll at the University of Wyoming for the spring semester. The president’s honor roll consists of regularly enrolled undergraduates who earned a 4.0 (“A”) grade-point average for the semester. To be eligible, students must have been enrolled for a minimum of 12 credit hours taken for letter grades. Brynisha Griffin from Avondale graduated with a Bachelor of Science in nursing (baccalaureate in nursing) from the College of Health Sciences and Professions at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. More than 4,800 students graduated with bachelor’s, master’s or doctorate degrees from Ohio University for spring semester 2021.

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Ronald Warrington passed away peacefully at the age of 79 at his home in Goodyear, Arizona on June 21, 2021, after a courageous 3 1/2 year battle with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. His family surrounded him with love and prayers throughout his illness. Ron was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Dec. 3rd, 1941, to William and Lilian Warrington. To read the full obituary and to leave condolences for the family please visit https://www.simplycremationaz.com /obituary/ronald-warrington/

Maureen Elaine Johnson Pugsley

Maureen Elaine Johnson Pugsley, 77, of Goodyear, Arizona died July 21, 2021 in Goodyear, Arizona. She was born in Pickering, Ontario, Canada on June 29, 1944 to John and Ellen Johnson.

A memorial service will be held at a latter date in Bay View, Michigan and will be interned at Bay View Memorial Garden. You can view the full obituary and to leave the family condolences at https://www.thompsonfuneral chapel.com/obituary/maureen-elaine-johnsonpugsley/

Karen Wiscombe Barber Karen Wiscombe Barber was a fun-loving, feisty Mom of 7, Grandma of 14, and GreatGrandma of 25 and Great-GreatGrandma of one. She left this world suddenly on July 16, 2021 at the age of 84. She was born to Leland Wiscombe and Helen Allred on November 13, 1936 in Roosevelt, Utah. At the mature age of 15 she married the "Bad Boy of Centerville" James Raymond Barber. Her wit will be missed and we can only wish we could hear her account of her exit from this Earth to her loved ones that left before her. These include both her parents, husband Ray Barber, brother Roy Wiscombe, and eldest son Rod Barber. Karen had a passion for the Gospel, loved teaching, serving in the Temple and sharing her musical talents as ward organist. Her sisters Peggy Richman and Elaine Andreason, as well as her children Jolene Barber, Wendi BarberJones, Bret Barber, Kelly Thomas, Lori Guest and Jeff Barber will have to live with their memories of her butt dialing, amusing chuckle and hilarious music videos until they are together again in the next life. Services will be held at the LDS chapel located at 1002 E. Eason Ave. Buckeye, AZ 85326 at 11am on July 24th, 2021. In lieu of flowers, please serve your neighbor and love one another.

Delaina Andrea Mcminn DeLaina Andrea McMinn (Rojas) was born on May 23, 1986, died on June 9, 2021 at 35 years old. DeLaina's greatest accomplishment in her life was her three daughters: Yasmeen Esemeralda, Liliana Rubi, and Alexis Denise. DeLaina was raised by her parents Denee Noelle and Booker Tory Woodard Jr., she grew up in a blended family and is survived by her siblings: Terran D. McMinn, Jarred A. McMinn, and Breeauna K. Woodard. DeLaina is survived by her maternal grandmother Francene McMinn, her maternal aunt Destene McMinn, and is proceeded in death by her biological father LaVal Dewayne Tingey, her paternal grandparents Florence McAllister Tingey, Neville (Val) Tingey, and her maternal grandfather Glenn Duane McMinn. Arrangements entrusted to Advantage Crystal Rose Funeral Home in Tolleson, AZ.

Kathryn Darlene Mears

She passed away peacefully at her home in Litchfield Park on July 7, 2021 after a long battle with breast cancer. She was born on March 18, 1949 to Floyd and Letha Toombs in Phoenix, Arizona. Kathryn graduated from Camelback High School and received her Bachelor's degree from Grand Canyon University. She taught primary grades at Littleton Elementary School and later served as juvenile probation officer for Maricopa County. Known to her family as Darlene, she loved and cared for all kinds of flowers and many other plants outside as well as inside her house, certainly being blessed with a green thumb. She loved her cats and really enjoyed bird watching. Above all, her love for family, her kindness and generosity were well-known. Kathryn Darlene was preceded in death by her parents, her brother Donald Toombs and sister Rose Archer. She is survived by her husband William Mears of the home, daughter Teresa McDonald and her husband Brian, grandsons Liam and Nolan McDonald, all of Glendale; sisters Ellen Watson of Peoria and Veda Barnes of Litchfield Park; several nieces, nephews, cousins and friends who loved her. No services are scheduled.

Need help writing an obituary? We have articles that will help guide you through the process. Deadline for obituaries is Thursday at 5pm for Wednesday. All obituaries will be approved by our staff prior to being activated. Be aware there may be early deadlines around holidays.

Call 623-535-8439 Mon-Fri 8:30-5 if you have questions. Visit: obituaries.WestValleyView.com


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CLASSIFIEDS

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

OBITUARIES Verna E. Williamson

Verna E. Williamson was born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1939. Verna was the second of five children born to Frank and Onezia Haywood. In 1943 the family migrated to Vallejo, California where she attended local schools, graduating from high school in 1957. In 1958 Verna met and married the love of her life, Robert (Pat) L. Williamson. From that union three children were born, Johnny (Ricky), Robin, and Gregory. You can view the full obituary and leave the family condolences at https://www.thompsonfuneralchapel.com/obituary/verna-e-williamson/

Fredrick Earley Fredrick Earley, 42, of Youngtown, Arizona died on May 20, 2021 in Goodyear, Arizona. Fredrick was born November 16, 1978 in Phoenix, Arizona to Roy and Ola Earley. Fredrick is survived by his parents, Roy and Ola Earley, girlfriend, Audra Matthews and daughters, Syane McGee Earley, Jahmya Mason Earley, Jordan Mitchell, Jonet Mitchell, and Jaylin Reed, and brothers, Roy C Earley, Daniel Earley, and Jayce Earley, and sister, Juanita Early.

Destiny Chaneice McClain

Ms. Destiny Chaneice McClain, 23, of Phoenix, Arizona died July 18, 2021 in Phoenix, Arizona. She was born November 28, 1997 to Cory McClain and Brenda Gilliam-Miller in Phoenix, Arizona. Destiny was very creative and she could do anything and everything, sew, make-up, hair, etc. She was also an amazing designer. She graduated with honors. Destiny was humble and kind-hearted; she always had a kind word for everyone. She is survived by her sisters, Bryana McClain, Essence McClain, Faith Ford and Kennadi Espinoza, brothers, Cory McClain Jr., Akil Miller, Warren Ford, and Ezzy Miller, parents, Cory McClain and Brenda GilliamMiller, step-parents, Jermel Ford and Ayo Miller, grandparents, Janet Mayhand, Sammie Miller, Shirley McClain, and Donald Ford. Destiny was preceded in death by her brother, Dominique McClain and her grandparents, Glenn and JoAnn Gilliam. A visitation will be held at 6pm on Saturday, July 31, 2021 at Thompson Funeral Chapel. A funeral will be held at 7:30 on Saturday, July 31, 2021 at Thompson Funeral Chapel. The family suggests that donations be made to Destiny's Memorial on gofundme.com. You can leave the family condolences at https://www.thompsonfuneralchapel.com/ obituary/ms-destiny-chaneice-mcclain/

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Gregory Michael “Mike” Thomas

Gregory Michael “Mike” Thomas was born March 17, 1955, Mike left this earth peacefully surrounded by family on July 6, 2021. Mike was a friend to everyone and didn’t know a stranger. He was a fixture at the Wigwam Country Club, where he worked in the golf industry for over 45 years. It was at the Wigwam that Mike met his wife Carol and they were married for 40 years. Mike’s lifelong love of golf began at The Wigwam in 1963 while learning to golf with his dad, Jerry. Growing up in Litchfield Park, Mike enjoyed all the friendships that living in a small community could offer. Mike was preceded in death by his parents Jerry and Mary Lou Thomas. Mike leaves behind his wife Carol, stepchildren, Dale Cresse (Louise), Debbie Cresse, Jennifer Turner (Chris), grandchildren, Shawn, Megan, Seth, Chelsea, Zach and Hayden. He also leaves behind his sister Susie Kissell (Dave), nephew, Tyler Kissell (Anjali) and niece Kara Farrow (Ben), as well as many lifelong friends. We will see you again on the golf course in Heaven…. until then. You can leave the family condolences at https://www.thompsonfuneralchapel.com/ obituary/gregory-michael-mike-thomas/

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w w w.t hompsonf unera lchapel.com


CLASSIFIEDS

Classifieds

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

West Valley View 1050 E. Riley Dr., Avondale, AZ 85323

EMPLOYMENT

TANNER TERRACE APARTMENTS Now Accepting Applications For Full Time Light Janitorial Maintenance Position. Must have own tools. Some experience. Immediate Opening. All inquiries call 623-939-9447

623.535.VIEW (8439) • Deadlines

Classifieds: Friday 4pm for Wednesday

EMPLOYMENT

CAREGIVER

Female Required. 1:1 Full-Time Private Home in Buckeye. We Train 623-826-6715

HANDYMAN

EMPLOYMENT

LOOKING for experienced compassionate CNA's. Certified Caregivers. Part time/ full time. 623-547-7521 West Valley View CLASSIFIEDS WORK! Call 623-535-8439

VALLEYLIFE is a non-profit organization that provides programs and services to men, women, and children with developmental disabilities.

Full Time and Part Time Caregivers Needed!

Must have reliable transportation We are currently looking for caregivers to work in group homes throughout Glendale, Phoenix, Peoria and Scottsdale. Must pass background check.  

Please apply at www.valleylifeaz.org

Help Needed Sonoran Scavengers Local Farmer's Market Vendor Own Transportation Selling Skills Lift 40+ Weekends, Possible weekdays, Same day pay Text Karen @ 623-258-5566

HANDYMAN - 37 years experience. Drywall, framing, plumbing, painting, electrical, roofing and more. Stan 602-434-6057

JOEL Cedillo- I do construction work! Concrete, Block, Stucco, Bobcat work, Haulaway, Demolition. Call for free estimates, 623-707-6072. *Not A Licensed Contractor

HOMES FOR SALE BLOCK HOME FOR SALE BY OWNER

Corner Lot 3Bd / 2Ba. Mostly Remodeled. Approx. 1700 Sq Ft. Extremely Clean Enclosed Garage. Concrete Pad RV or Boat Parking. New Trane AC., Evap Cooler 2 Yr. Old Copper Water Lines In Attic. Irrigated By City. $350K OBO. See Zillow For Pictures. 802 E Clanton, Buckeye (Hwy 85 & 8th St)

EMPLOYMENT LIKE WORKING ON OLDER TRUCKS & CARS?

— MECHANIC WANTED —

To Work on 1956 Chevy Pickup Truck AT My Home, or Yours if Close By.

AZCANS DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details. 866-932-4184 (AzCAN)

ANNOUNCEMENTS

AGUA FRIA UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT

will be participating in the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program Seamless Summer Option (SSO) beginning August 2, 2021 until June 30, 2022. As part of this program, we will offer healthy meals every school day. SSO Program will provide breakfast and lunch meals at NO Cost to students, parents and families. Students will receive a reimbursable breakfast and lunch meal, each school day, at NO Cost. Families are encouraged to complete a F&R Application. Qualified students may receive P-EBT benefits and discounted test/college/sports fee. For more information, you may call the AFUHSD Food Service Department at 623-932-7009 or visit www.aguafria.org. This institution and the USDA is an equal opportunity provider.

27

If interested Email Jack.Gannon4@att.net Located in Litchfield Park


28

CLASSIFIEDS

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Categorical Exclusion For the City of Buckeye Sundance Wastewater Treatment Repairs Project The Water Infrastructure Finance Authority of Arizona (WIFA) has received a request for financial assistance from the City of Buckeye to repair and replace components of the Sundance Water Reclamation Facility. The purpose of this notice is to inform the public. WIFA staff analysis concluded that this project qualifies for a CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION following the requirements of A.A.C. R18-15-106, as amended. The proposed project will not impact the environment either by itself or in combination with other projects, and the environmental information provided has met statutory intent of the WIFA’s environmental review requirements. CW-003-2022 – Sundance Wastewater Treatment Repairs Project 21760 W. Watkins St, Buckeye, AZ 85326 Documentation regarding the proposed project is available for review at WIFA, 100 N. 7th Avenue, Suite 130, Phoenix, Arizona 85007. WIFA complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Alternative formats for the project documentation are available upon request. Please contact Lindsey Jones, Environmental Program Supervisor, (602) 364-1324 for any requests or inquiries. Published: West Valley View, July 28, 2021 / 40145

WANTED TO BUY $100-$500+ Cash for Junk Cars all "as is" autos! Good condition more $$$$. Best Prices! Fast, free pickup. 623-329-2043

Want to purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests Send details to: P. O. Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201 WEEKLY DEADLINES for the View Classifieds is

FRIDAY AT 1 PM

623.535.VIEW (8439)

EMPLOYMENT

Car for Sale?

PUBLIC NOTICE ARTICLES OF ORGANIZATION HAVE BEEN FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE ARIZONA CORPORATION COMMISSION FOR I Name: PELTOLA CONSULTING LLC II The address of the registered office is: 9828 E Seven Palms Drive, SCOTTSDALE, AZ, 85262, The name of the Statutory Agent is: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. III Management of the Limited Liability Company is vested in a manager or managers. The names of each person who is a manager and each member who owns a twenty percent or greater interest in the capital or profits of the limited liability company are: MEMBER Jeff Peltola 9828 E SEVEN PALMS DR SCOTTSDALE, AZ 85262. Published PUBLICATION, July 22, 29, Aug 5, 2021 / 39995

Advertise It Here! CALL CLASSIFIEDS TODAY!

623.535.8439

AZCANS TRAIN ONLINE TO DO MEDICAL BILLING! Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 866-459-5480. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (AzCAN)

NEED NEW FLOORING? Call Empire Today® to schedule a FREE in-home estimate on Carpeting & Flooring. Call Today! 877591-3539 (AzCAN)

NOTICE AND CALL OF SPECIAL ELECTION TO THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS OF AGUA FRIA UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 216 OF MARICOPA COUNTY, ARIZONA: A special election has been called by, and will be held in, Agua Fria Union High School District No. 216 of Maricopa County, Arizona (the “District”), on November 2, 2021 (“Election Day”). The purpose of the election is to permit the qualified electors of the District to vote on authorizing the District to adopt a General Maintenance and Operation Budget that includes an amount of up to 15% in excess of the revenue control limit for the fiscal year 2022/2023 and for six subsequent years (subject to certain reductions provided by statute in years six and seven). The District’s current budget override is by law required to be reduced by one-third in fiscal years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025. Because the existing override does not reduce by one-third until fiscal year 2023/2024, the proposed override budget will equal the 2022/2023 alternate budget. The full budget override amount is estimated to be $8,224,899 and would be funded by an estimated $0.50 tax rate per one hundred dollars of net assessed valuation used for secondary property tax purposes, which is approximately equal to the current tax rate levied for the existing override. In future years the amount of the increase will be as provided by law. The election will be a mailed ballot only election. No polling places will be provided. Ballots will be mailed to qualified electors residing within the District no earlier than 27 days prior to the election and no later than 15 days before the election. Ballots must be received or dropped off at one of the designated ballot drop box locations as designated by the County Elections Department and as set forth in the informational pamphlet and/or the ballot no later than 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. The informational pamphlet will be mailed to the homes of qualified electors. If a ballot is lost, spoiled, destroyed or not received by the elector, the elector may receive a replacement ballot at the ballot replacement locations designated by the County Elections Department. The last day to register to vote in order to be eligible to vote in this election is Monday, October 4, 2021. For more information about the foregoing, please review A.R.S. § 15-481, or contact the Agua Fria Union High School District, 1481 N. Eliseo Felix Jr. Way, Avondale, AZ 85323, telephone: (623) 932-7000. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------AVISO Y CONVOCATORIA DE ELECCIÓN ESPECIAL A LOS ELECTORES CON DERECHO A VOTO DEL DISTRITO ESCOLAR SECUNDARIO NÚM. 216 DE AGUA FRIA UNION DEL CONDADO DE MARICOPA, ARIZONA: Una elección especial ha sido convocada por, y se llevará a cabo en el Distrito Escolar Secundario Núm. 216 de Agua Fria Union del Condado de Maricopa, Arizona (el “Distrito”), el 2 de noviembre de 2021 (“Día de la Elección”). El propósito de la elección es permitir que los electores con derecho a voto del Distrito voten sobre la autorización al Distrito para adoptar un Presupuesto General de Mantenimiento y Operaciones que incluya una cantidad de hasta un 15% superior al límite de control de ingresos para el año fiscal 2022/2023 y por seis años subsiguientes (sujeto a ciertas reducciones proporcionadas por la ley en los años seis y siete).

NOW HIRING! MULTIPLE LOCATIONS VALLEYWIDE!

H APPOINTMENT SETTERS WANTED! RETIREES WELCOME! H AVG PAY $27.56 - $35.12 PER HOUR Home improvement company looking for Promoters to work in the following locations: • ARROWHEAD MALL (GLENDALE, AZ) • MESA FARMERS MARKET (MESA, AZ) • SUPERSTITION MALL (MESA, AZ) • CHANDLER MALL (CHANDLER, AZ) Must be able to approach people.

H PAID TRAINING H HOURLY PAY PLUS COMMISSION H FLEX SCHEDULE H PART TIME & FULL TIME H HEALTH AND DENTAL BENEFITS

Call Steve Today to Set Up Interview! 480-298-3688

El actual aumento al presupuesto del Distrito tiene requerido por ley reducirse por un tercio en los años fiscales 2023/2024 y 2024/2025. Debido a que el existente aumento al presupuesto no se reduce por un tercio hasta el año fiscal 2023/2024, el propuesto aumento al presupuesto será igual al presupuesto alternativo de 2022/2023. La cantidad total del aumento al presupuesto se calcula en $8,224,899 y se financiaría de una tasa de impuestos que se calcula en $0.50 por cien dólares de valoración neta tasada usada para fines de impuestos secundarios sobre la propiedad, lo cual es aproximadamente igual que la actual tasa de impuestos percibida para el existente aumento al presupuesto. En los años futuros, la cantidad del aumento será de acuerdo con lo proporcionado por la ley. La elección será una elección solamente de boletas electorales enviadas por correo. No se proporcionarán lugares de votación. Las boletas se enviarán por correo a los electores con derecho a voto que residen dentro del Distrito no antes de 27 días antes de la elección y a más tardar 15 días antes de la elección. Las boletas deben ser recibidas o dejadas en una de las urnas de votación de los lugares determinados conforme a lo designado por el Departamento de Elecciones del Condado y como se establece en folleto informativo y/o la boleta electoral a más tardar a las 7:00 p.m. del Día de la Elección. El folleto informativo se enviará por correo a los hogares de los electores con derecho a voto. Si la boleta electoral se pierde, se estropea, se destruye o no es recibida por el elector, el elector puede recibir una boleta electoral de reemplazo en los lugares de reemplazo de boletas designados por el Departamento de Elecciones del Condado. El último día para inscribirse para votar para tener derecho a votar en esta elección es el lunes 4 de octubre de 2021. Para obtener más información sobre lo anterior, por favor revise A.R.S. § 15-481, o comuníquese con el Distrito Escolar Secundario de Agua Fria Union, 1481 N. Eliseo Felix Jr. Way, Avondale, AZ 85323, teléfono: (623) 932-7000. Published: West Valley View, July 28, Aug 5, 2021 / 40098


CLASSIFIEDS

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

29

PUBLIC NOTICE 623.535.VIEW WEST VALLEY BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY

ELECTION NOTICE

The Adaman Irrigation Water Delivery District NO. 36 will hold an election for two trustees on November 17, 2021. The polls will be open from 9am to 4pm at 16251 W. Glendale Ave., Litchfield Park, AZ 85340. The last day to file a petition for candidates is July 20, 2021.

TOLLESON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT #17 Notice of Destruction of Special Education Records All special education data and information on students who were in special education will be destroyed five years after the child has withdrawn, transferred, promoted from the district, or phased out of special education. It is the responsibility of the parent(s) or adult age student (18 years of age or older) to obtain copies of the information they may need for other purposes before special education data and information is destroyed. (Authority – 20 USC, 1412(a) (8), 1417(c)). Should you have any questions or would like to obtain copies of special education records you can call the Tolleson Elementary School District at (623) 533-3900. Tolleson Elementary District Provides Screening for Children with Special Needs Parent of School age Children If you think your school age child (k-8) may have a delay in academics, speech/language, motor skills, adaptive (self-help), or social skills, please contact your child’s teacher or the Special Programs office at (623)533-3923. Parents of Preschoolers Do you have a child in your home who is 3 or 4 years old? Tolleson Elementary School District provides free screening for children who may be delayed in the following areas: • Physical: fine and/or gross motor muscle development; sensory (vision and hearing) • Cognitive: thinking, mental or problem-solving development • Communication/ Language: receiving Information (receptive) and expressing understood information (expressive) development • Social/ Emotional: internal and external adaptation to environmental stimuli development • Adaptive: self-help development to attain basic needs. • Sensory: vision and hearing If you think your child may have a delay in any of these areas, please contact the Special Programs office at (623)533-3923. Parents of Child Birth to Three Years Old A child from birth to 36 months of age will be considered to exhibit developmental delay when that child has not reached 50 percent of the developmental milestones expected at his/her chronological age, in one or more of the following domains: • Physical: fine and/or gross motor muscle development; sensory (vision and hearing) • Cognitive: thinking, mental or problem-solving development • Language/communication: receiving information (receptive) and expressing understood information (expressive) development • Social/Emotional: internal and external adaptation to environmental stimuli development • Self-help: adaptive development to attain basic needs. • Sensory: vision and hearing If you have questions regarding developmental delays for your child birth to three years old, call your local Arizona Early Intervention Program, 602-532-9960.

Your newspaper. Your community. Your planet. Please recycle me.

INVITATION TO BID Bids Due: September 9, 2021 – 10:00am Project: Exeter Blvd Ph4 EAST CFD Landscape Improvements

DMB White Tank LLC seeks qualified General Contractors, with a minimum CR-21 Landscaping and Irrigation Systems, to submit sealed bids for the above referenced project which consists of, but is not limited to, all work associated with installation of the landscape and irrigation in accordance with the plans and specifications (the “Work”). The Successful Contractor shall be responsible for all coordination associated with the Work. Copies of the plans, bid documents and detailed information for this project will be available on August 6, 2021. All interested parties should contact Deana Burris at dburris@dmbinc.com to obtain access to the electronic bid documents. Please reference the project name listed above in the email subject line. A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on August 11, 2021, at 1:00pm. The prebid meeting will be held via Zoom call. A meeting invitation will be sent to all interested parties. Sealed bids will be received until 10:00am on September 9, 2021, at the DMB Verrado Offices – 4236 N. Verrado Way Suite A200, Buckeye, AZ 85396. Bids submitted after 10:00am will not be accepted. Bids will be opened privately but read aloud at 10:05am via Zoom call. A meeting invitation will be sent to all interested parties. Unless all bids are rejected, the Contract will be awarded within twenty-one (21) days. The Contract will be awarded to the lowest qualified bidder that submits a complete and accurate bid. A complete and accurate bid will include all information requested in the bid documents. Every bid made by a Contractor pursuant to this Notice shall be accompanied by a surety bond for ten percent (10%) of the bid amount, listing DMB White Tank LLC as the Obligee, as a guarantee that the Contractor will enter into a contract to perform the Work, or as liquidated damages in the event the Contractor refuses or fails to enter into the Contract with DMB White Tank LLC upon award. The bonds will be returned to all Contractors whose bids are not awarded the Contract, and to the successful Contractor, upon execution of the Contract, and receipt of Payment and Performance bonds for the Work. The cost for providing Payment and Performance bonds shall be included in the bid submittal. A Payment and Performance bond will be required in the amount of 100% of the original Contract value for the duration of the Contract. All bidders shall be required to submit, with their bid proposal, a completed Certificate of Insurance evidencing their ability to meet the insurance requirements for this project. The Contractor shall carry property damage and public liability insurance and shall hold and save harmless DMB White Tank LLC, the City of Buckeye and the Verrado District 1 Community Facilities District from any employer’s liability and from any and all liens for materials or labor in connection with this Work as specified in the bid documents. Any bids submitted without the bid bond, certificate of insurance and any other items as required in the bid documents will be deemed incomplete and will be rejected. DMB White Tank LLC reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to withhold the award for any reason DMB White Tank LLC determines necessary and appropria te. Award of the successful bid shall be subject to approval by DMB White Tank LLC or its representatives. Interested parties shall refer to the bid package and addendums for further information or contact Deana Burris at dburris@dmbinc.com – reference Exeter Blvd Ph4 EAST CFD Landscape Improvements. No engineer’s estimate will be distributed.

AIR CONDITIONING

COOPER’S CARPET CLEANING TILE & GROUT

25 OFF $

A/C Repair! COUPON REQUIRED

H Emergency Service H ALL Makes & Models H FREE Quotes for New Units H Financing Available H Local Family Owned Business H Friendly Service Every Time!

623.537.4830 LICENSED ROC#166569 BONDED & INSURED

Submit your notice to:

legals@westvalleyview.com Questions? Elaine 623-535-8439

37 Years Experience OwnerOperator

623-872-8552

www.acexpertek.com

APPLIANCE SERVICES

CLEANING

Appliance Repair Now If It’s Broken, We Can Fix It!

• Same Day Service • On-Site Repairs • Servicing All Major Brands • Quality Guaranteed

We Also Buy, Sell & Trade Used Appliances Working or Not

480-659-1400 Licensed & Insured

AUTO SERVICES

100-$500+ ABANDONED CARS All “As Is” Autos!

Carpet, Tile-Grout, & Air Duct Cleaning

Commercial & Residential Housecleaning

FREE ESTIMATES

www.pnponecarecleaning.com

Call Today/Clean Today

602.550.7732

Licensed/Bonded/Insured

CONCRETE / MASONRY

$

PATIOS, WALKWAYS, DRIVEWAYS, RV PARKING COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL CONCRETE DEMOLITION & PLACEMENT SPECIALTY CONCRETE FREE ESTIMATES

ROC Lic. #K-09 149540 • Insured • References Available

Office 623-872-7622 ELECTRICAL

SUPERCHARGED

WEST Valley View

LEGAL ADS

CARPET CLEANING/ REPAIR

ELECTRIC

Good Condition = More $$$ Best Prices! Fast, free pickup!

623-329-2043

FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL

Indoor/Outdoor Lighting Spa Circuits Panel Replacement/ Upgrade

Ceiling Fans Troubleshooting/ Inspection Repairs Remodels/Additions

623-546-7714

Family - Owned and Operated LICENSED ROC#181530 BONDED • INSURED www.superchargedelectric.com

AS $45 PE


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CLASSIFIEDS

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

623.535.VIEW WEST VALLEY BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY ELECTRICAL

AIR CONDITIONING

20 YEARS IN BUSINESS | FREE ESTIMATES

We do it RIGHT the first time! Electric & Solar

602-510-1529

allstarelectricaz.com

World Class Service Hometown Feel

A/C Problem? Call us 24/7 FREE Second Opinion Anytime!

www.airnowac.com We offer HVAC • Repair • Service and • Upgrades **FREE QUOTES ON NEW EQUIPMENT** “FINANCING AVAILABLE” FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED WESTSIDE BUSINESS

Licensed ROC #313262 • Bonded • Insured

“World Class Service Hometown Feel”

ROC#321507 Licensed, Bonded & Insured

• Service & Installation • Door Off Track • Routine Maintenance • Licensed, Bonded & Insured • Valley Wide Service 24/7 • Hablo Español

BROKEN SPRINGS

623-225-1930

www.azbestgaragedoors.com

Honey Do List Too Long? Check out the Handyman Section!

GARAGE DOOR/ SERVICES

RESIDENTIAL SPECIALISTS FOR ALL YOUR INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PROJECTS

RESIDENTIAL SPECIALISTS FOR ALL YOUR INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PROJECTS

Garage Doors

Repair • Service • Installation Family Owned & Operated

623.556.8378

15 Years in Business and Still A+

Avondale Garage Doors Inc.

623.466.3712

Pavers. Artificial Grass. Putting Greens Fireplaces. Outdoor Kitchens. Curbing. Custom Landscaping and Hardscaping Concrete. Walls. Irrigation and Repairs Pavers • ArtifiInstallation cial Retaining Grass • Putting Greens Fireplaces. Outdoor Curbing. Tree• and PlantKitchens. Installation Concrete Retaining Walls Fireplaces Irrigation Installation and• Repairs Outdoor Kitchens • Cubring Tree and Plant Installation ES FREE T Licensed-Bonded-Insured Irrigation Installation and Repairs IMATES ROC#202397. ROC#219652 TreeLicensed-Bonded-Insured and Plant Installation

D:(623)670-0080 D:(623)670-0080

ROC#202397. ROC#219652

stonecreek-az.com stonecreek-az.com

LANDSCAPING DEL DEL DEL DEL SOL SOL SOL SOL LANDSCAPE LANDSCAPE LANDSCAPE LANDSCAPE

Irrigation Install Install && Repairs Repairs Irrigation Irrigation Install Install Repairs Irrigation Pavers&& Repairs Pavers Pavers Pavers Outdoor Lighting Lighting Outdoor Outdoor Lighting Outdoor Lighting Arbor Care/Cleanups Arbor Care/Cleanups Arbor Care/Cleanups Care/Cleanups Arbor

vistadelsollandscape@q.com vistadelsollandscape@q.com vistadelsollandscape@q.com vistadelsollandscape@q.com

602.301.3429 (Call/Text)

623.910.0742

Landscape Maintenance Services * Irrigation system and repairs (Valves, drip, timers, & sprinklers) * Pavers * Artificial grass * Malibu lights * Maintenance, general clean-ups & hauling * House painting, interior & exterior AND MUCH MORE. CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE.

Weekly, Biweekly, Monthly & Quarterly Residential & Commercial, Big Properties Not a licensed contractor

For Discount Coupons Visit www.AlbrechtandSon.com Listed HOA/PORA

LICENSED - CONTRACTED - BONDED • ROC 054363

MEDICAL SERVICES

“A Passion for Caring” The most experienced and compassionate home care service in the West! • In-Home care service for your loved ones • On Call 24/7 Customized Care • Experienced Staff • RN Supervised • Serving the Greater Phoenix West

623.547.7521

BRANDENBURG PAINTING Interior & Exterior FREE ESTIMATES

CALL BOB

623-972-9150 623-695-3390

Bonded & Insured - ROC #123818

Lawn Care

PRO PERFORMANCE PAINTING INC.

Exterior & Interior • Tree Trimming

• Weed Removal/Spray • One-Time Cleanup

Specializing in LARGE TREE TRIMMING Antonio or Laura 623.206.3403

PAINTING ERIC SAUNDERS

PAINTING

9

▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲ ▲ ▲▲ ▲

11126 W. Wisconsin Ave, #5 - Youngtown

stacy@romackbuilders.com | john@romackbuilders.com

LANDSCAPING

▲▲

623-933-4312

Call for further information regarding our services

623-824-4481 OR 602-540-4940

Insured&&Bonded Bonded Insured Insured Bonded Insured &&Bonded ROC#230926 ROC#230926 ROC#230926 ROC#230926

8 CE 19

Your Custom Remodeling Specialist For All Your Home Improvement Needs!

• Superb customer service from start to finish

D:(623)670-0080 O:(623)536-8275 O:(623)536-8275 O:(623)536-8275 Licensed - Bonded - Insured • ROC#202397 ROC#219652

S

IN

• Local, family owned West Valley commercial / residential custom builders for over 40 years • Specializing in up to date architectural designs • Provides innovative and high quality products and services

stonecreek-az.com

▲ ▲▲ ▲

★★C

Same Great Service! Pavers. Artificial Grass. Putting Greens

Same Owners, Same Service! Custom Landscaping andGreat Hardscaping Concrete. Retaining Walls.

YEARS

Kitchen & Bathroom • Designer Showroom

Licensed/Bonded/Insured Limited Liability Corp • ROC #155822 KB02

Custom Landscaping and Hardscaping Same Owners, formerly Flatiron Landscape

G ★▲▲▲▲▲▲

▲▲▲▲▲▲▲ ▲▲ ▲▲ ▲

N

E

GLASS SERVICES

Quality Attention to Every Detail

Same Owners, Same Great Service!

“We’ll work together to make your dream project come true.” Featured in Architectural Digest and Phoenix Home & Garden

PAINTING

ROC#198687

30

LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING Landscape

LOW PRICES!

Painting, Remodeling and Construction

602-931-0904

GARAGE DOOR/ SERVICES

Bonded • Insured • Licensed AvondaleGarageDoors.com

Licensed, Bonded, Insured • ROC 209166

www.acompassionatehomecare.com

Garage Doors & Openers

▲ ▲

•No Job Too Small • Free Estimates

Uriel 623-297-0114 Uriel 623-297-0114 Uriel623-297-0114 623-297-0114 Uriel 623-297-0114 Uriel

Fix & Replace

B R AT L E ▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲ I

HOME REPAIR L.L.C.

Minnesota Ethics in an Arizona Economy

Licensed, Bonded & Insured ROC #289066

432 N. Litchfield Rd. Unit 300. Showroom & Parts Store

ALBRECHT AND SON

HANDYMAN I AM

VISTA VISTA VISTA

Same Day Service & Free Estimates

REMODELING

CONTRACTORS

HandymanIam@cox.net

GARAGE DOOR/ SERVICES

ROC# 319202

HANDYMAN

AS LOW AS $45 PER ISSUE

• Painting Services • Commercial • Residential

602-329-8532

Bobby Rocha - Owner Licensed • Bonded • Insured • ROC 328599

BRUSH STROKE PAINTING

FREE ESTIMATES POWER WASH • WINDOW CLEANING • CABINETS DRYWALL REPAIR • ACOUSTIC CEILINGS BRUSH / ROLL / SPRAY • INTERIOR / EXTERIOR brushstrokepaintingllc@gmail.com MOBILE: Licensed, Bonded

602-722-7696

& Insured ROC #170982

PAINTING

JIMMY’S

PAINTING SERVICES Dependable/Trustworthy Painter

30+ YEARS’ EXPERIENCE SPECIALIZING IN: INTERIOR/EXTERIOR RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES INVESTMENT PROPERTIES APARTMENT TURNOVERS

(623) 206-1396

CALL FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!

ONLY 1-STORY HOMES


CLASSIFIEDS

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

623.535.VIEW WEST VALLEY BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY ROOFING

PEST CONTROL

PLUMBING

• TERMITE • • PEST • • PIGEON PROS •

PLUMBING & DRAIN CLEANING

New Roofs, Repairs, Coatings, Flat Roof, Hot Mopping & Patching & Total Rubber Roof Systems

FREE ESTIMATES & MONSOON SPECIALS

Licensed • Bonded • Insured ROC 229722 • PORA & HOA Gold Member

Family Owned and Operated 43 Years Experience in Arizona

PEST CONTROL

POOL SERVICES

L&M PEST & WEED CONTROL

TRIPLE “R”

Free Estimates Monday through Saturday

The Bug Stops Here

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

Our Goal is not to be the Biggest – Just the best!

• Fleas / Ticks • Bed Bugs

MITCH STEVENS OWNER-OPERATOR

• Roaches • Weed and Turf control • 6 month guarantee

A REFERRAL IS THE BEST COMPLIMENT

Bus: 623 932 4168 Cell: 623 810 6035 Lic. #8555 ld.lmpest@yahoo.com

PLUMBING

30 Years Experience References Available

Senior & Military Discounts

623-522-9322

WE DO IT ALL! U.S.A.F. Retired. 25+ Yrs. Exp.

“No Nonsense” www.triplerpool.com

Remodel All Repairs Cleaning SVC 1 Call Doe It All! s

Veteran Owned

Buckeye Plumbing

• Water Treatment Specialists • Residential & Commercial • Water Heaters Sr & Military Discount • Slab Leaks FREE Water Heater Flush with Service call. Valley Wide Service

Licensed Contractor ROC C-37-120135 • ROC C-05-159059

623-935-9221

triplerpool@gmail.com

Veteran & Senior Discounts Available

PLUMBING

ROOFING

623-386-0710

602-622-2859 623-936-5775

Honest • Integrity • Value Locally & Veteran Owned FREE SERVICE CALL

FINANCING AVAILABLE Water Heaters • Drain Cleaning • Faucets/Sinks • Slab Leaks Water Softeners • Toilets • Garbage Disposals

SENIOR DISCOUNTS • MILITARY DISCOUNTS $

35 OFF

Any Plumbing Service Call for details. Some restrictions may apply. Exp 8/31/21

49.95

Water Heater Flush

100 OFF Water Heater Install

Call for details. Some restrictions may apply. Exp 8/31/21

Call for details. Some restrictions may apply. Exp 8/31/21

$

$

623-688-5243 www.theplumberguy.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured ROC 185143, 192987

Total Care Plumbing LLC Water Heaters from

585 Unclog Drains from $ 4400 $

includes labor

Remodels • Repairs Leaks • Toilets Water Softeners Gas • Sink/Faucets

We raise the roof with our quality, service and value!

ALL TYPES OF ROOFING! RE-ROOFS NEW ROOFS • REPAIRS

FREE ESTIMATES!

Years Experience in the Valley! w26 ROC Lic. 133241 • Bonded • Insured #

HAVE A SERVICE BUSINESS?

623-385-9580 ROC 233444 Licensed • Bonded • Insured

623-873-1626

Licensed 2006 ROC 223367 Bonded Insured

PhillipsRoofing.org PhillipsRoofing@cox.net

UPHOLSTERY

WATER TREATMENT Veteran Owned

Commercial & Residential Expert Custom Upholstery Since 1976

DAVID’S UPHOLSTERY (623)

872-3047

Buckeye Plumbing

• Water Treatment Specialists • Residential & Commercial • Water Heaters Sr & Military Discount • Slab Leaks FREE Water Heater Flush with Service call. Valley Wide Service

623-386-0710

www.1buckeyeplumbing.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured ROC Lic #138051

ROOFING

Almeida Roofing Inc. All Types of Roofing

602-743-3175

• Free Estimates / Free Inspections • Tile

• New Roofs

• Shingles

• Re-roofs

• Foam

• Repairs

• Coating • Modified Bitumen

www.almeidaroofing.com

Senior Citizen Discount FREE Estimates • Service/Repair

COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL

FREE Estimates

Built Stronger to Last Longer

Licensed • Bonded • Insured ROC Lic #138051

PLUMBING

ROOFING LLC

623-322-9100

NO CONTRACTS • PAYMENT PLANS

Licensed Bonded Insured ROC 286561

PHILLIPS

623-869-7378

• Residential / Commercial

SAME DAY SERVICE

ROOFING

Lic. 8166 BC / Est. 1981

WINTER BROS PESTS, inc.

Your leaks stop here!

AS LOW AS $45 PER ISSUE

24 Hour Service Plumbing Service & Repair Sewer & Drain Cleaning Free Estimates Free Plumbing Inspection

FREE Quotes, Family Co. All phases of PEST control.

Licensed • Bonded • Insured • ROC #215758

We can make your phone ring!

623-535-VIEW

dacosta@TIMESPUBLICATIONS.COM

31


32

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | JULY 28, 2021

$AVE $1000’$!

2014 HYUNDAI ELANTRA SE

P9568

$

10,499

2017 JEEP RENEGADE LATITUDE

P9581

$

14,597

2016 HYUNDAI TUCSON SE

P9548

$

16,329

2015 JEEP CHEROKEE SPORT

P9588

$

17,495

2016 KIA SORENTO LX

P9564

$

18,994

2018 FORD F-150 XLT

P9461

$

40,324

ALL BELOW KBB WHOLESALE!

2015 HYUNDAI SONATA 2.4L SPORT

$

P9535

11,997

2017 NISSAN ROGUE

P9524

$

14,659

2017 SUBARU LEGACY PREMIUM

P9542

$

16,579

2018 FORD FUSION HYBRID SE

$

P9517

17,749

2018 FORD ESCAPE SE

P9521

$

20,896

2018 FORD F-150 XLT

T9549

$

LOWE$T TA X LOWE$T PRICE

41,978

2017 NISSAN SENTRA LX

$

P9575

12,174

2018 FORD FOCUS SE

P9519

$

14,886

2017 FORD FUSION SE

P9574

$

16,739

2020 CHEVROLET TRAX LS

P9547

$

17,958

2018 FORD EDGE SE

P9556

$

21,619

2019 FORD F-150 XLT

T9586

$

43,749

24600 W. YUMA ROAD, BUCKEYE JUST SOUTH OF I-10 BETWEEN MILLER AND WATSON ROADS

623.386.4429 | JONESFORDBUCKEYE.COM All prices and offers cannot be combined with any other offers or promotions. Prices do not include sales tax, license, $499.00 dealer doc fee and dealer add ons. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Prices valid through 08/03/2021. Sales vehicles may have scratches, dents or dings.

2015 KIA OPTIMA EX

P9539

$

12,988

2015 HONDA ACCORD SPORT

P9526

$

14,998

2018 FORD ECOSPORT

P9555

$

16,838

2018 HONDA CIVIC SEDAN LX

P9579

$

17,992

2016 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED

P9562

$

23,495

2019 FORD F-150 LARIAT

T9584

West y! Valle

$

44,457

2017 FORD FUSION SE

P9545

$

14,539

2018 FORD FOCUS SE

P9518

$

16,244

2017 BUICK REGAL SPORT TOURING

P9525

$

16,844

2015 NISSAN NV200

SOLD

P9540

2020 FORD MUSTANG GT

T9552

$

39,676

2019 FORD F-150 XLT

T9583

$

45,724

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West Valley View - Zone 1 - 7.28.2021  

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