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THE NEWSPAPER OF AVONDALE, BUCKEYE, GOODYEAR, LITCHFIELD PARK & TOLLESON

Avondale Marine drowns in North Carolina PAGE

Former Amish man now selling fresh produce

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westvalleyview.com

INSIDE

This Week

NEWS ............... 6 Students holding benefit for late classmate’s family

SPORTS ......... 14 Curtis beats obstacles to become tennis star

9 DAYS .......... 16 Looking for something to do? Check out the 9 Days a Week calendar

LETTERS.........................10 BUSINESS..................... 12 SPORTS...........................14 FEATURES......................18 NEIGHBORHOOD.......21 YOUTH............................23 OBITUARIES..................25 CLASSIFIEDS.................26 WEST

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The Voice of the West Valley for 34 years

May 15, 2019

LESD increasing teacher pay, other changes BY ANDREA ESTRADA

West Valley View Staff Writer

When the Litchfield Elementary School District held multiple surveys and focus groups for its stakeholders, staff salary and class size emerged as central areas for improvement. In one survey alone, increasing teacher compensation was the highest-ranked choice — with 49% of its 512 respondents deeming it their top priority — while reducing class sizes in kindergarten and sixth through eighth grades was the second highest-ranked choice. In an effort to strengthen those compensation and staffing areas, the LESD governing board voted this spring to increase pay for teachers and staff, reduce class sizes and expand employee benefits. Superintendent Jodi Gunning said addressing the needs of its educators is especially important to the district and will ultimately maintain a high retention rate. “We are in a teacher shortage, and it’s something we’ve been facing for years. One of our district priorities has always been retaining those best and brightest teachers because we know what a direct impact they have,” Gunning said. The last time LESD teachers received a pay increase was last year, Gunning added.

Michelle Steik is a teacher at Verrado Heritage Elementary School, which is in the Litchfield Elementary School District. LESD recently authorized faculty pay increases, among other changes. (Photo courtesy Nicholas Lyle Photography)

“We’ve always focused on teacher compensation. This last year, we were so fortunate that our voters approved an additional percentage in our override, and with those monies we give directly to our teachers.”

Extra funding from the state and that override — which provides district classrooms with additional funding for seven

LESD...continued on page 2

Goodyear closer to building Sonoran Valley Parkway BY CONNOR DZIAWURA

West Valley View Managing Editor

The city of Goodyear has taken a major leap in its long-awaited Sonoran Valley Parkway, which will eventually bridge the northern and southern ends of the city. One month after the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) published an environmental impact statement for the proj-

ect, the federal agency has signed a record of decision saying it plans to grant Goodyear a right of way for the project. The 15-mile roadway will be 250 feet wide and consist of two to six lanes connecting Rainbow Valley Road to the community of Mobile and State Route 238. An initial phase, expected to accommodate around 24,000 vehicles per day, will

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Parkway...continued on page 2

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LESD...continued from page 1 years and is capped at 15% of a school’s budget limit — will fund the new pay increase. “It’s been so tremendous to be able to give back even more due to our override and the additional funding from the state,” Gunning said. Through the pay increases, classified hourly staff — including classroom aides, bus drivers, office and food service staff and custodians — and certified staff — including teachers, coaches, student advisors, psychologists and therapists — will earn a 4% increase in their annual salaries. Administrative staff, which includes principals and directors, will earn a 3% increase. But, annual salary increases for all staff alike — new hires and returning staff — are based on year-end evaluation levels. In addition to a pay increase, Gunning said employees will have access to Teladoc, a feature that provides members with 24-hour access to medical support and prescriptions by phone — at no additional cost to them. “They can actually call in at any time and speak to a doctor over the phone to assess any kind of minor condition.

That way they are able to stay healthy because we know how hard they work,” Gunning said. And class size reductions, which will go into effect for the 2019-20 academic year, will foster a sense of happiness for teachers, Gunning said. “When you look at class reduction, I think you look at the people side of it, the happiness of your teachers and that feel and relationships. It goes back to that retention and keeping your teachers happy and satisfied,” she said. “Happy teachers make happy students.” Kindergarten and grade one and grades six through eight will all reduce the average teacher-to-student ratio by two students, while grades two through five will reduce the ratio by one student. With these additions, Gunning said she hopes the district maintains and improves its retention rate for the next academic year. “We want to keep our happy teachers so that we have that direct link to our students’ success,” she said. Pay increases will go into effect July 1 and do not include additional 2% in performance pay for eligible employees or the increases to Proposition 301 and Indian Gaming amounts.

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parkway...continued from page 1 review and authorize the expansion. Despite having been in the works for more than a decade, residents likely won’t get the new route anytime soon, however, as the city is searching for a new development and funding partner, according to long range planner Joe Schmitz. According to Schmitz, Goodyear annexed the Mobile area in 2007. The city filed the right-of-way application the following year. A developer, Montage Holdings, owned 10,000 acres in the area and partnered with the city for a master-planned community, Amaranth, as well as the eventual roadway. With the economic downturn, however, the city lost its partner — and with it the means to construct the roadway. “We had annexed the property and made a decision to carry on with the right-of-way application because we knew that some day we would need a roadway connection from the northern part of Goodyear to the newly annexed southern part in the vicinity of Mobile,” Schmitz explained. The roadway is intended to improve emergency response times, modernize infrastructure, support economic development and job growth, and increase access to recreational opportunities on public lands, according to BLM. “This project will improve emergency response times, which means lives will be saved,” Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Joe Balash said in a statement. “Additionally, the community will enjoy increased access to rec-

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reation and position the city of Goodyear for economic success well into the future.” Although BLM has completed its final environmental impact statement and signified its intent to grant a right of way, the city cannot begin construction. Rather, the record of decision serves as just another step in a lengthy process. According to the record of decision, the city must provide an updated plan of development that follows the BLM-selected alternative design as well as meet various other pre-construction requirements. BLM Phoenix District Manager Leon Thomas said there is no set timeline for when the right-of-way grant will actually be issued. BLM will move forward when Goodyear’s plan of development is complete, as long as it meets the requirements of the record of decision. Schmitz noted that the BLM-selected alternative is mostly in line with Goodyear’s initial proposal for the roadway. But according to the record of decision, “The BLM Selected Alternative offers the shortest, most efficient and direct route, avoids known historic and cultural resources, and will allow for better management opportunities for vehicle entry into the public lands.” Per the BLM-selected alternative, the roadway would cross approximately 10 miles of BLM-administered land, 1 mile of Arizona State Land Department (ASLD) land and 4 miles of private land. Because of this, right-of-way acquisitions are also required for the ASLD and private lands before Goodyear can progress with the development. Schmitz noted preliminary phase one construction costs are estimated at $45 million. But with a development partner still needed and no funding allotted yet for further right-of-way acquisitions, it’s looking like quite some time will pass before residents see any dirt turning. And when construction does eventually begin, according to BLM, the first phase is estimated to take 32 months. “At this point in time, if we had a developer show up on our doorstep tomorrow, it would probably be a good five years before you would see any indication of construction,” Schmitz added. “And that’s probably being a little optimistic.” For more information, visit https:// go.usa.gov/xP9zF.


NEWS

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

3

Avondale seeking school supply donations

The West Valley View is a controlled-circulation weekly. It is published every Wednesday, and distributed free-of-charge to homes and in high-traffic locations throughout Avondale, Goodyear, Litchfield Park, Buckeye and Tolleson.

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Home delivery of the West Valley View is complimentary and offered to residents in the southwest region of the Valley of the Sun, saturating parts of Avondale, Buckeye, Goodyear, Litchfield Park, Tolleson & Waddell. The West Valley View can also be found free-of-charge at nearly 600 local business in the area.

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Requested mail subscriptions within Maricopa County: $75 annually or $40 for six months. Out of Maricopa County: $88 annually or $45 for six months. (c) 2019 Strickbine Publishing Inc. All rights reserved. West Valley View is distributed by AZ Integrated Media, a circulation service company owned by Times Media Group. The public is permitted one copy per reader. For further information regarding the circulation of this publication or others in the Times Media Group family of publications, and for subscription information, please contact AZ Integrated Media at circ@azintegratedmedia.com or 480-898-5641. For circulation services please contact Aaron Kolodny at aaron@azintegatedmedia.com.

BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

Avondale’s Neighborhood and Family Services Department is collecting backpacks and school supply donations before the next academic year. Each year, Avondale distributes hundreds of backpacks with supplies to students in grades pre-K-8 who are in need, and who live in the communities of Avondale, Tolleson, Litchfield Park and Goodyear. To help students start the year right, Avondale is reaching out to the community for assistance with school supply donations. Supplies suggested for donations include: • Crayons — box of 24 • Colored pencils — box of 12 • Pencils — box of No. 2 • Erasers — red rubber • Markers — box of 12 • Ruler — 12 inch preferred • Glue sticks — 4 oz. preferred • Children’s scissors • Composition notebooks • Loose-leaf paper • Spiral notebooks

• Pocket folders • Ballpoint pens — packaged • Backpacks Donations can be dropped off at the Care1st Avondale Resource Center, 328 W. Western Avenue, through July 12. Monetary donations can be made out to Agua Fria Food and Clothing Bank, and can be sent to P.O. Box 845, Avondale, AZ 85323. A $40 donation will provide one child with two brand new school uniforms and a backpack with school supplies. Backpacks and More registration dates and locations are as follows: • 9 a.m. to noon Wednesdays May 15, 22 and 29 at the Agua Fria Food and Clothing Bank, 405 E. Harrison Drive, Avondale • 1 to 5 p.m. Monday, May 20, through Friday, May 24, at the Salvation Army, 11 N. 3rd Avenue, Avondale

Corella graduates from basic military training BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Ricardo A. Corella graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eightweek program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Ricardo A. Corella the Air Force. earned an associate deCorella is the son of gree in 2018 from Universal Sandra Corella of Rio Technical Institute in Avondale. (Photo courtesy Joint Rico. Hometown News Service) He is a 2013 graduate of Nogales High School in Nogales. He earned an associate degree in 2018 from Universal Technical Institute in Avondale.

• 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays May 15 and 29 at the Care1st Avondale Resource Center, 328 W. Western Avenue, Avondale All registered students (preschool through eighth grade) will receive two new school uniforms and a backpack with supplies. Pre-registration is required, and students must reside in Avondale, Tolleson, Litchfield Park or Goodyear. Parents/guardians will need to provide photo identification, proof of current address, proof of income, and birth certificates/proof of guardianship for children. The Backpacks and More Project is offered in collaboration with city of Avondale, Agua Fria Food Bank, Salvation Army and Community Impact. For more information, email tere@azcommunityimpact.org or call 623-5362106.


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NEWS

Buckeye residents invited to hear about proposed rate increase BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

Buckeye residents are invited to an open house hosted by the water resources department from 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday, May 16, at the Coyote Library, 21699 W. Yuma Road, to discuss the proposed water rate increase. Residents will also have the opportunity to speak one on one with staff to answer how this proposed increase may affect their monthly bill and also provide written comments. No formal presentation will be given at the open house. In addition, residents are encouraged to bring a recent water bill to the meeting and use the water bill estimator at buckeyemubc.phxweb.com/billcalc to see firsthand how the proposed rate changes may affect them. In January 2018, the water resourc-

es department initiated a rate study to develop a multiyear financial plan that can sustain the long-term financial health of both the water and wastewater utilities. The goal was to ensure: • The rate design recovers costs required to provide service • Customers pay their fair share of costs • Reserve levels are maintained based on industry standards • The long-term financial health of the utility is maintained • The study determined that a multiyear, 3.5% revenue adjustment was needed for the water utility, but that no increase was required for wastewater. To learn more about the rate study, the water capital improvement projects and five-year cash flow, visit buckeyeaz.gov/waterratestudy.

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Avondale libraries trading ‘food for fines’ BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

Through the month of May, Avondale Public Library is partnering with the community to restock the shelves of local food banks with “Food for Fines.” Under the Food for Fines program, library patrons with fines on their accounts may donate nonperishable food items to reduce or pay off their fines. For every nonperishable food item donated, $1 will be deducted off a patron’s account — up to a maximum of $50. The food drive runs through May 31. Donations are being accepted at both

Care1st offering summer food program BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

Children up to 18 years old can enjoy a free, healthy meal and an activity at the Care1st Avondale Resource Center through a partnership with St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance Kids Café this summer. Kids Café is a USDA program that ensures that children in low-income areas continue to receive nutritious meals during long school vacations when they do not have access to school lunch or breakfast. Sample menu items include chicken

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

Avondale Marine drowns while Seniors to honor AAEC student stationed in North Carolina killed by distracted driver BY DARRELL JACKSON

BY ANDREA ESTRADA

A Marine from Avondale has drowned in Emerald Isle, North Carolina, according to officials. Lance Cpl. Justin Andrew Hinds, 28, was stationed at Camp Lejeune when, according to a police report, Emerald Isle police responded to a report of a swimmer in distress at 4:23 p.m. May 4 at the local beach. By the time EMS and fire department personnel arrived on scene, Hinds had already been pulled from the water by friends, who had been performing CPR. Hinds was transported to a local hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. In a statement released by Camp Lejeune officials, they confirmed Hinds’ position as an administrative specialist with Alpha Company, Headquarters and Support Battalion for Marine Corps Installations East. He was a 2010 graduate of Westland Preparatory Academy (now known as Westwind Preparatory Academy) in Anthem. School officials declined to comment. After graduation, Hinds joined the Army in June 2011 as a combat engineer. He deployed to Afghanistan between June 2011 and June 2012. He later joined the U.S. Army National Guard, where he served from April 2014 to December 2015, Lejeune spokesman Nat Fahy said. Hinds then joined the Marine Corps in January 2016. For his service he received numerous awards including the Army Commendation Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal,  Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation, Army Meritorious Unit Commendation and Combat Action Ribbon.

Conner Johnson, 18, was riding his motorcycle one night in late March when he was struck by a distracted driver. After suffering major injuries, the teen, who was a senior at Arizona Agribusiness and Equine Center - Estrella Mountain (AAEC-EM), passed away in early April. To honor the memory of Johnson and alleviate his family’s financial burden, the AAEC-EM senior class is holding a casino night fundraiser from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, May 17, in the Tuscany Falls ballroom at PebbleCreek Golf Resort, 3003 N. 164th Avenue, Goodyear. Tickets, priced at $30 and available for presale at $20 Conner Johnson, 18, was killed by distracted river. So, through Thursday, May 16, his classmates plan to alleviate his family’s financial burden with a casino night fundraiser. (Photo courtesy provide attendees with “casi- Cameron Decker) no cash” that can be used to play casino games with the when he reached out to PebbleCreek goal to increase the amount of cash. Golf Resort, they were just as willAt the end of the night, every $100 in ing to help by providing access their “casino cash” can be exchanged for ballroom for the event at no cost. The one raffle ticket to be entered into a AAEC-EM FFA Alumni chapter, a drawing of raffle items. Presale tickets parent support group, also extended its can be purchased by contacting event support for the fundraiser by reaching directors Cameron Decker and Sarah out to the community for event sponWilson at 602-828-1414. sors and raffle item donations, Decker Decker, a senior at AAEC-EM, said said. the death of Johnson, who he described Sponsorship and raffle donations as an “amazing, upbeat and positive” are still needed, though, Decker addindividual, impacted his entire school ed. Sponsors can make monetary doand even more so the 90 students in his nations through four packages, bronze senior class. ($150), silver ($300), gold ($500) and “All of us know each other. All of platinum ($1,000). From recognition us have been taking classes together in the event’s program to additional since freshman year. It was very hard tickets and “casino cash,” each packto see someone that meant so much age offers different perks. Donations to all of us pass away at such a young are tax deductible via tax credit ID 81age and so unexpectedly,” Decker 1440737. said. Seeing the community come toBut Decker said he didn’t want to sit gether for Johnson has been inspiring, back and mourn. Instead, he wanted to Decker said. find a way to help Johnson’s family. “We have a ton of people excit“I was thinking to myself, ‘If we can ed for the event — not only because come together and do something nice they’re going to be able to have fun at to commemorate Conner, we can go a the event, but because it’s for a good step further and help take away that fi- cause,” he said. nancial burden,’” he said. “We’re there to remember Conner, So, he reached out to Vegas 2 U, a we’re there to show our support for the casino-themed entertainment compa- family, and we’re there to show what ny, and was thrilled when they agreed a community of individuals can do for to provide their services for free. And someone else.”

West Valley View Staff Writer

West Valley View Staff Writer

Lance Cpl. Justin Andrew Hinds, 28, of Avondale drowned in Emerald Isle, North Carolina, while stationed at Camp Lejeune. (Photo courtesy U.S. Marine Corps)

“The sudden loss of LCpl. Hinds is absolutely devastating for the entire command,” said Col. Scott Conway, commanding officer of H&S Battalion, in a statement. “Our heartfelt sympathies and prayers are with his family, friends and fellow Marines during this difficult time. My sincere hope is that his loved ones can take some comfort knowing what a profound impact he had on those with whom he served. He will be missed.” Despite having issued minor warnings about wind — including yellow flags indicating a moderate risk of strong currents placed at the town beach parks — Emerald Isle police said the weather was normal. The incident remains under investigation.

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

EMCC narrows presidential search to two finalists BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

The Maricopa County Community College District has selected two finalists in the nationwide search for the next president for Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC). The finalists visited the EMCC campus earlier this month for public forums — the next step in the selection process. The forums allowed students, employees and the general public to learn more about the finalists and pro-

vide feedback. The finalists being considered for the position of EMCC president are:

Dr. Lamata Mitchell Mitchell currently serves as the vice president of instruction and academic operations at Pima Community College in Tucson, a position she has held since 2016. She has over two decades of experience working at the community college level. She also serves on local, state and

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national committees focused serves as vice president of on college readiness. Among learning at EMCC. He also them are The College to Sucserves as the EMCC reprecess Arizona Advisory Counsentative to Western Marcil, The Achieve 60 Arizona icopa Coalition’s education Committee and the Global and workforce developEducation Commission of ment team and was recentthe American Association of ly elected to the Southwest Community Colleges. She is Valley Chamber of Comalso a member on the Tucson merce’s board of directors. NAACP scholarship commitAdditionally, he serves as tee, the NAACP board and one of the EMCC HLC the Scholarship Committee Dr. Lamata Mitchell is a fi- tri-chairmen for re-accredfor EMCC president. of the Rockford Association nalist itation and is part of HLC’s (Photo courtesy EMCC) of Minority Management, Peer Reviewer Corps. of which she serves as the Rivera previously served co-chairwoman. on the full-time matheShe was recently a fellow matics faculty at EMCC of the Thomas Lakin Instifor over 15 years. He held tute, a national organization several leadership posifocused on preparing senior tions at EMCC by serving executives for presidency. as the division chairman Other leadership institutes of science and mathematshe has completed include ics, faculty senate presithe John Rouche’s Leaderdent, principal investigator ship Institute, the American for two National Science Association of Women in Foundation grants, and inCommunity College Leadterim dean of occupational ers Institute, Loyola Uni- Dr. Rey Rivera is a final- education. Rivera was refor EMCC president. versity’s Strategic Leader- ist cently selected as a 2019 (Photo courtesy EMCC) ship, Hampton University’s Aspen Presidential Fellow Executive Leadership and the Kaleido- and continues to serve as adjunct faculscope Leadership Institute. ty in mathematics to maintain a strong Mitchell earned her Ph.D. in English connection to the classroom, students from Northern Illinois University, a and faculty. Master of Arts in English from Andrews Rivera earned his Ed.D. in higher University in Massachusetts, a Master and post-secondary education at Arof Arts in publishing and journalism izona State University, his Master of from Loughborough University in the Science degree in mathematics at PurUnited Kingdom and a Bachelor of Arts due University, and his Bachelor of in English and philosophy from Trent Science degree in mathematics at The University in the United Kingdom. University of Texas at Austin. For more information about the Dr. Rey Rivera EMCC president search, visit maricoRivera has over 23 years of high- pa.edu/about/careers/emcc-president/ er education experience and currently public-forums.

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

Costly Joint-Pain Injections Replaced By New $2 Pill Paid Advertisement

New pill boosts the same lubricating joint ϐluid as expensive and painful injections - without using a needle. Users report dramatic relief from swelling, pain and stiffness without side effects and expense. Health News Syndicate HNS— A popular needle injection for people with joint pain is now available in an inexpensive nonprescription pill. The breakthrough came when researchers discovered a way to deliver the injected “relief molecule” through the digestive system. Top US clinics have used these needle injections for years because they deliver powerful relief. Unfortunately, the shots are painful and expensive. They also only work on the joint being treated. The new pill, called Synovia, delivers the same “relief molecule” as the injections. However, it has some impressive advantages. First, it’s inexpensive and nonprescription. Also, relief is delivered to every joint in the body because it enters the bloodstream through the digestive system. This gives it the ability to reduce a much wider variety of pain. Users report greater �lexibility and less stiffness in their knees. Hands and shoulders move painfree for the �irst time in years. Even neck and lower back pain improve dramatically. All this without spending over $600 on needle injections and taking trips to the doctor every week. The medical community is very excited about this new breakthrough. Dr. Jacob Moss says, “Synovia is a great option for

those suffering from joint pain. Injections are usually a last resort because of the pain and expense. However, Synovia should be taken at the �irst sign of discomfort.”

New Discovery

also delivers major relief. One example is a landmark study out of Europe. In the study the active ingredient in Synovia was compared to a popular NSAID pain reliever. The goal was to see if it could reduce pain and swelling around the knee. The results were incredible! After just 30 days, more than 8 out of 10 people who took Synovia’s active ingredient had NO swelling. However, only 2 out of 10 people who took the NSAID experienced reduced swelling. The study also looked at cases of severe swelling. Amazingly, zero cases of severe swelling were detected in the group taking the active ingredient found in Synovia. This means it was 100% effective for the cases of severe swelling! In contrast, 9 out of 10 people taking the NSAID still had severe swelling. McNeill points out, “The impressive thing about this study is the active ingredient wasn’t tested against a fake pill. It was up against one of the most popular NSAIDs people use every day. It’s easy to see why people in pain are excited to get relief without an injection.”

The needle injection procedure has been given to hundreds of thousands of patients over the last several years. Doctors use the shots to boost a critical element of the joint called synovial �luid. This lubricating �luid is found between the cartilage and bones of every joint. According to the �irm’s head of R&D, Mike McNeill, “Researchers have been working for years to �ind a way to boost this �luid noninvasively. The problem was the molecule used in the injections was too large to absorb into the bloodstream.” Top scientists conquered this obstacle by �inding a smaller form of the same molecule. This new glucose form is easily absorbed by your stomach and intestines! Now those who suffer from joint pain can get relief without painful injections. At less than $2 per day, early users like Steve Young are impressed. He says, “I’ve tried more pills than I can The New Way It Delivers Relief count, without any luck. Synovia Getting relief without injections is different. My knees and hands has big advantages. The most haven’t felt this good in years!” obvious is avoiding being stuck Impressive Clinical by a large needle every week for 5 Results Leading clinics use injection weeks. Another downside of injections therapy because it works. Recent clinical trials show the pill form is the doctor can “miss”. The needle needs to be inserted into a precise spot in the joint to work. Otherwise, you risk the treatment being ineffective. However, boosting your lubricating joint �luid by taking a pill delivers relief to all your joints, not just one. There’s an additional reason the active ingredient in Synovia works  ǣ‘Ž—„”‹…ƒ–‹‰ˆŽ—‹†‘”  ǣ›‘˜‹ƒǯ•ƒ…–‹˜‡‹‰”‡†‹‡–• Synovia’s active so well – it nourishes the cartilage. UNHEALTHY: No lubricating HEALTHY: …ƒ”–‹Žƒ‰‡Ž‡ƒ†–‘’ƒ‹ˆ—Ž„‘‡Ǧ‘Ǧ Ž—„”‹…ƒ–‡Œ‘‹–•ƒ†‘—”‹•Š…ƒ”–‹Žƒ‰‡ lubricate joints and �luid or cartilage leads to pain- ingredients McNeill says, “This is vital „‘‡”—„„‹‰Ǥ •‘‹–…ƒ”‡Ǧ‰”‘™Ǩ nourish cartilage ful bone-on-bone rubbing. because cartilage does not have

NO MORE NEEDLES: A popular needle injection pain-killer for joint pain is being replaced. The key molecule in these injections can now be delivered by taking a new low-cost pill called Synovia. to remove any risk for those who might think Synovia sounds too good to be true.” Simply take the pill exactly as directed. You must enjoy fast acting relief. Otherwise, return Approved By Leading the product as directed and you’ll Doctors The new delivery system for this receive 100% of your money back molecule has caught the attention plus an extra 10%. How To Get Synovia of leading medical doctors. Today marks the of�icial release “Needle injections for joint pain have been around for years of Synovia in Arizona. As such, because they work. Being able the company is offering a special to get the same relief molecule discounted supply to everyone through a pill is amazing. who calls within the next 48 hours. Injections may be a last resort, but A Regional Order Hotline has I’d recommend Synovia at the �irst been set up for local readers to call. sign of pain,” said Dr. Marie Laguna. This is the only way to try Synovia Dr. Moss adds, “The research with their “110% money back” behind the active ingredient in guarantee. Synovia is very exciting. This Starting at 6:00 am today the product is a great choice for those order hotline will be open for 48 who haven’t had success with hours. All you have to do is call other joint pain treatments.” TOLL FREE 1-888-583-3542 and provide the operator with the 110% Money Back special discount approval code: Guarantee Amazing feedback from users SYN19. The company will do the of Synovia has generated a wave rest. of con�idence at the company. Current supplies of Synovia So much so that they now offer are limited, and callers that don’t Synovia with a 110% money back get through to the order hotline guarantee. within the next 48 hours may have The company’s president, to pay more and wait until more Michael Kenneth says, “We’ve seen inventory is produced. This could how well it works. Now we want take as long as 6 weeks. blood vessels. The �luid in the joint serves two very important pain-relief roles: lubrication and giving the cartilage the nutrients it needs.”

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. ALL DOCTORS MENTIONED ARE REMUNERATED FOR THEIR SERVICE. ALL CLINICAL STUDIES WERE INDEPENDENTLY CONDUCTED AND WERE NOT SPONSORED BY MAKERS OF SYNOVIA.


10

Opinion WestValleyView.com

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

For more opinion visit WestValleyView.com

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OUR READERS’ VIEWPOINTS

MARGULIES’ OPINION — jimmymargulies.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Message to our socialist readers Editor: The 2020 elections will be very interesting, if not scary. We have some freshman members in Congress who are trying to spread things we never had to deal with before. Oh, let me just touch on the tip of the iceberg for a minute, shall we? Rashida Tlaib’s brother “praises” terrorists. Both Rashida and her Muslim “sister” are both anti-Semitic and have spewed enough hatred for Jews just since they became members of Congress to make Hitler almost look like a nice guy. I said “almost.” Now we have a bunch of progressive, liberal, leftwing nutcases who want to make the country socialist running for president on the Democratic side. They evidently were born after the Soviet Union collapsed and don’t have a clue what socialism is and how connected it is to communism. Apparently they think that socialism means you get to socialize “freely” with friends, and the furthest thing from their nonfunctioning brains is that they will give up their freedoms. Since they evidently never watched TV during the Soviet era, they never saw empty shelves in every grocery store and the long bread and soup lines in the Soviet Union, especially in the harsh winters. Try eating borscht every meal for months. I had family in one of the Soviet block countries and they had stories very similar. Believe me, people running for president who try to hoodwink you into wanting socialized medicine don’t know what they are talking about. Bernie Sanders’ “Medicare for All” proposal is a nightmare, not a dream. He has no clue how his own plan will be funded. He better retire and take what Medicare he can get at age 77, because he’ll never live out his first term if elected by fools who think he’s going to deliver on promises that don’t exist. Then, we have Beto O’Rourke, the guy who eats dirt. He wants to tear down the wall because he doesn’t see

a crisis at the border and he thinks Uncle Sam’s treasury can support all of the caravans that pour across the border, but he offers no solution on how to pay for their upkeep. It’s either we pay for a few more million refugees or we pay for infrastructure that is in dire straits right now. Way to go, Beto. Tell him there is an opening for presidente in Venezuela. I’m sure he’ll last almost a day there. Then we have Pocahontas (Elizabeth Warren). Not worth mentioning because she won’t make it to the debates. Kamala Harris keeps sending me e-mails bragging about what she has not done. Cory Booker: a pathetic loser. Joe Biden: lived on the golf course for eight years of Obama’s presidency and only appeared to sit in the chair behind Obama during his addresses to Congress once a year. Great training for someone to take over the presidency in case of death of the president. I suppose maybe driving a golf cart counts as almost something. He fooled us back then as being “intelligent,” so why not try that approach again? After all, he and his son made a lot of money from deals with Ukraine. I’ll be up all night if I list every one of 20 “geniuses” the Democraps have put forward so far. My point is some of them want to give prisoners the right to vote, and when you become a criminal, one of the first things you do is give up your right to vote. Not one Republican suggests such an idiotic thing like giving voting rights to prisoners who gave up voting rights when they were convicted. James Logan Buckeye

How left can you go? Editor: In their rush to the far left, one Democratic candidate has emerged as a front runner: Bernie Sanders. This scowling, angry, old socialist has a history of supporting socialist and communist regimes. A self-professed socialist, Sanders in 1985 praised the repressive communist regimes of Cuba, Nicaragua and the Soviet

Union. In 1988 he honeymooned in communist USSR, which contradicted his recent assertion that he never “believed in authoritarian communism that existed in the Soviet Union.” He also traveled to Nicaragua and Cuba, where he hoped to meet his hero, Fidel Castro. Maybe Bernie has since mellowed, except his April 22 statement in support of allowing jailed murderers and rapists to vote shows how radical he still really is. Like a Pied Piper, Bernie leads his enthusiastic, unsuspecting youthful followers down a path of broken promises and ruin. His phony promise of free college tuition only promotes an entitlement attitude among students instead of promoting a healthy work ethic that involves students paying for their own education. His promise of “free” health care really consists of paying very high taxes regardless if you need it or not. If you are healthy and don’t abuse your body you essentially pay for the health care of those who do. This unfair, expensive form of government health care has led Finland, Bernie’s favorite country having socialized medicine, to announce that its government has recently collapsed due not being able to reform the rising and unsustainable health care costs. In addition to his spurious promises, Bernie likes to appeal to people’s bas-

er instincts of jealousy and envy by constantly ranting about the “rich,” of which he is actually one. His favorite target is the top 1%. That is the group that pays nearly 40% of all federal income taxes and the top 5% who pay over 90% of all federal income taxes. Instead of complaining about the 1%, Bernie should thank them for their success and contribution. Actually, what people earn is none of Bernie’s or anyone else’s business. His concern about income inequality is also ridiculous, as no one’s earning potential is equal to anyone else’s, because we all have different skills, education, work ethics, creativity, etc. And his complaint about the recent tax cut benefiting only the rich rings hollow; it actually benefited everyone because it expanded the economy, which led to job creation and reduced unemployment. Abraham Lincoln stated, “You cannot help the poor by destroying the rich.” Instead of acknowledging an economy with record-low unemployment, making it the envy of the world, Bernie is only left with using the classical socialist tactic of promoting class envy and hatred, of which he is the master. Igor Shpudejko Goodyear


OPINION

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

11

Tucson case shows nonsensical immigration policy BY DAVID LEIBOWITZ

dy of Torres-Maytorena.” Torres-Maytorena spent the next It’s been 24 years since I moved to five days in an Immmigration and Arizona and nothing much has changed Customs Enforcement facility in Casa about immigration politics Grande. in all that time. The sad, On May 6, his Desert strange case of 18-year-old View classmates staged Thomas Torres-Maytorena a walk out on his behalf, proves as much. trudging four miles from Thomas, a senior at Desthe school to the Sheriff’s ert View High School in Office in a protest covTucson, is said to be virered across Arizona and in tually everything we look the New York Times. Late for in a teenager today: A on May 7, ICE released student with graduation Thomas, but not before robes hanging in his closet putting him into deportafor a May 22 diploma ceretion proceedings. Leibowitz. (Photo mony. A cornerback on the David “An immigration judge courtesy Advisor Group) Jaguars football team who with the Department of bussed tables and did yard work to earn Justice Executive Office for Immicash. gration Review will determine if Mr. A young man with dreams of be- Torres-Maytorena has legal basis to coming an electrical engineer. A teen remain in the United States,” an ICE described by his friends to reporters as spokeswoman explained. hard-working, down-to-earth and kind. All of which leaves me grappling These are all qualities which typical- with the same question I’ve been askly generate zero news coverage, if not ing for nearly a quarter century whenfor the fact that Torres-Maytorena is in ever the subject of illegal immigration the United States illegally, brought to arises. Arizona as a toddler by his family. Is Thomas Torres-Maytorena really With his kin gone back to Mexi- the sort of human being we want to co, the 18-year-old currently lives in spend our limited law enforcement and Tucson with the family of his closest judicial resources deporting? buddy. A teenager for whom Mexico has It’s an arrangement that made na- never been much of a home? A hardtional headlines last week after Pima working kid whose most serious crime County Sheriff’s deputies pulled appears to be overstaying his visa to over Torres-Maytorena and two avoid going back to the Third World? friends on the night of May 2 for It’s the same question I asked myself driving in a vehicle with suspended back in the mid-1990s, when I trekked insurance. to the Arizona-Mexico border for the The deputy asked Torres-Maytorena first time, meeting people walking for his driver’s license and ID, accord- north who looked starved of everying to police. This the teen could not thing from food to opportunity. provide. Questioning ensued. It’s the same question I asked in 1999 Torres-Maytorena ultimately “ad- and 2000, when we spent months demitted to the deputy that he was in the bating the fate of a little Cuban 5-yearcountry illegally,” according to a Pima old named Elian Gonzalez, whom the Sheriff’s press release. “It was at this feds ultimately deported after seizing point Border Patrol was contacted. him at gunpoint from his American relBorder Patrol proceeded to take custo- atives. West Valley View Columnist

How to get a letter published 250 N. Litchfield Road, Ste. 130, Goodyear, AZ 85340 E-mail: editor@westvalleyview.com The West Valley View welcomes letters that express readers’ opinion on current topics. Letters must include the writer’s full name, address (including city) and telephone number. The West Valley View will print the writer’s name and city of residence only. Letters without the requisite identifying information will not be published. Letters are published in the order received, and they are subject to editing. The West Valley View will not publish consumer complaints, form letters, clippings from other publications or poetry. Letters’ authors, not the View, are responsible for the “facts” presented in letters.

In 2010, Arizona passed Senate Bill 1070 and we debated the same question. Nowadays, the same question comes up whenever President Trump boasts about his “big, beautiful wall.” My answer? It’s simple. The only smart immigration solution is one that draws a bright line between deporting real criminals and real threats versus arresting and deporting 18-year-olds like Thomas Torres-Maytorena.

That young man is not the problem. The problem is that we have spent the better part of the past 25 years chattering, bickering and twiddling our thumbs, meanwhile doing next to nothing to protect this country or to grant a teenage boy his chance at the American Dream. David Leibowitz has called the Valley home since 1995. Contact david@ leibowitzsolo.com.

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12

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

Business WestValleyView.com

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Business Briefcase

BY CONNOR DZIAWURA

West Valley View Managing Editor

Hello, readers! Are any of you out there mead enthusiasts? Because the first item on today’s agenda may pique your interest. Scale and Feather Meadery’s public opening is set for 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 21, when the business will enact its regular business hours: 4:30 to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 4:30 to 10 p.m. Fridays, noon to 10 p.m. Saturdays, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays. Eight different meads — broken down in its simplest form as honey, water and yeast — will be available in 2-oz. tasting flights, 4-oz. full pours for traditional strengths and 12-oz. options for sessions. Bottles aren’t available yet. The meadery also offers unisex shirt designs and women’s tank tops. Also available for purchase are 5-oz. branded glasses. Scale and Feather Meadery is at 1050

N. Fairway Drive, Building E, Suite 112, Avondale, between Van Buren Street and I-10. For more information, find it on Facebook @scaleandfeathermead or visit its website, scaleandfeather.com. Over in a different industry — and locale — international real estate firm Hines announced plans for a new storage facility in Litchfield Park. The 96,000-squarefoot, Class A storage facility is set to break ground next month, with construction completion planned by the end of the year. The 673-unit facility will be on 4.2 acres in a mixed-use development at the southeast corner of Camelback and Dysart roads. It will be air conditioned and feature amenities such as conference rooms, security systems enhanced by artificial intelligence, a fully automated rental process and personalized access. Pennsylvania-based national operator CubeSmart will manage the day-to-day operations

of the facility, which was designed by RKAA of Phoenix. “Class A self-storage facilities are desirable amenities for upscale residential areas,” said Chris Anderson, senior managing director and Arizona leader for Hines. “Building self-storage projects continues our desire to diversify our portfolio.” Luis Castellanos, director of Hines’ Self-Storage Platform, added, “These facilities provide a convenient, clean and secure alternative for people safe-guarding their belongings outside of the home. They also help accommodate small businesses that need flexible storage space near their customers.” Hines is also the owner of Goodyear Crossing II, a “Class A” industrial warehouse in — you guessed it — Goodyear. On a different note, and for those of you perhaps looking to open a new business or build from the ground up, Avon-

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dale will implement new building construction codes on July 1. Codes to be implemented, as adopted by city council this spring, are the 2018 international building, residential, fuel gas, plumbing, mechanical, energy conservation and existing building codes and the 2017 national electric code. Plans designed to the new codes may be submitted prior to the effective date. After July 1, plans submitted must be designed to the new codes. Updated building codes are a regular process, with the city of Avondale periodically updating them to stay current with industry standards, be consistent with building regulations of neighboring jurisdictions and promote safe and healthy construction throughout the city. To find the amendment package, visit avondaleaz.gov/government/departments/development-engineering-services/building-division. For more information, contact the Avondale development and engineering services department’s building safety division at 623-333-4005 or emailbuilding@avondaleaz.gov. Rounding out with one more for good measure, T&T Bakery Sandwiches has finally opened. If you’re no stranger to Business Briefcase, you should be no stranger to T&T, who we at the Briefcase have been anticipating since last year. Because we haven’t gone in depth on what exactly you can expect to eat at this bakery, here are a few categories: pastries, sandwiches, coffee and smoothies. And whether you select the T&T Special Rolls or a French baguette, or maybe even an apple pie or chocolate frappe, prices are affordable. They range from $0.65 for bread rolls to $8.75 for items like grilled pork with rice. T&T is at 560 N. Estrella Parkway, Suite B13, north of the northwest corner of Van Buren Street and Estrella Parkway. Stop by or visit it on Facebook, @tandtbakerysandwiches, to view more of the menu or find additional information. That’s all the briefs for this week. Thanks for reading! Have an item for Business Briefcase? Email Connsor Dziawura at cdziawura@timespublications.com.


BUSINESS

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

13

Former Amish man selling fresh produce at a discount BY CARRIE SNIDER

West Valley View Contributing Writer

John Zortman knows what a real tomato should taste like. Several years ago when he was freshly retired and living in Colorado, he searched 26 grocery stores in a 90-mile stretch but wasn’t happy with what he found. “Somebody had to have a ‘real’ tomato — vine raised, grown in dirt, tastes like a real tomato — but I couldn’t find one,” he said. He reached out to vegetable growers associations, and about 10 calls later he connected with an Amish man in Missouri who told him to come on over to find what he was looking for. “I got in the car and drove all night. By golly, he had some real tomatoes. I bought 10-12 cases,” Zortman said. “Came home, sat down on the corner in Boulder, Colorado, and sold tomatoes. I got kind of crazy about it.” As it turned out, the man in Missouri knew Zortman’s grandfather, who was also Amish. Zortman was raised Amish in Iowa until he was about 7 years old, and then he worked with many Amish over the years. Zortman knew he had a good thing going with these fresh tomatoes, so he started transporting more tomatoes plus other kinds of produce from Missouri and selling it in Colorado regularly. “It really took off,” he said. Eventually he moved to Goodyear and got married, but his produce venture didn’t stop. He connected with local growers and even grew some of his own produce. And then he realized he had hit a nerve, because he couldn’t grow produce fast enough to meet his loyal customer base’s demand. Named John’s Amish Country, his venture offers a variety of produce.

Some is organic and some is conventional, but all is grown in what Zortman believes is the right way to grow it. “Really the problem with store-bought stuff, I don’t call it real food. It’s so sad. I’m bringing out real food for real people,” he said. The now 70-year-old sources produce from several growers, including ones in Colorado, Los Angeles, Phoenix and, of After retiring, John Zortman started his own produce business and has been participating in farmers marcourse, Amish country. throughout the Valley. He spends Saturdays at Uptown Farmers Market, and Sundays he sells what From 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. kets hasn’t sold yet at his discount market in Goodyear. (Photo courtesy John Zortman) Saturdays he and his business partner, John McClendon of “I recently had major medical issues, “His produce is awesome. It’s deliMcClendon’s Select Produce, sell at so now I am limited with what I can cious. It’s just not like the food in the a stand at Uptown Farmers Market. eat,” she said. grocery stores,” she said. They’re located on the northeast park“I go to his market first thing Sunday ing lot, just east of the Bethany Home morning, and sometimes I’ll go back JOHN’S AMISH COUNTRY Road entrance to the North Phoenix later.” What: Sunday Sell-Down Market Baptist Church, 5757 N. Central AveIt helps that the market is so close When: 7 to 11 a.m. Sundays nue. to her house. Besides the produce, she Where: 1130 N. 186th Drive, When the market ends, Zortman also appreciates Zortman’s knowledge Goodyear brings the leftovers to Goodyear to sell of food and where his produce comes at a discount. He calls it his Sunday from. Sell-Down market, which is 7 to 11 a.m. Sundays at 1130 N. 186th Drive, off Perryville Road. Customers are encouraged to come early for the best selection, as products sell quickly. Prices start at 30% off and discounts grow through the morning. For updates, visit John’s Amish Country on Facebook. One of Zortman’s regular Sunday customers is Barbara D’Elia O’ConBenevilla is the nell, who loves the variety. “one stop shop” for the She takes a salad to work every day, highest quality resources. so she looks for lettuces, radishes, red onions and anything else that looks apWhether you are looking petizing. She also purchases oranges, for information on Benevilla apples, peaches and strawberries.

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Sports & Athletics WestValleyView.com

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

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Curtis climbs ranks of Agua Fria tennis with motivation BY GRIFFIN FABITS

West Valley View Contributing Writer

Before Calvin Curtis, a senior tennis player at Agua Fria High School, competed at the Division II state tournament, before he climbed the ranks to become the Owls’ No. 1 player, before he ever stumbled onto a tennis court and vouched to give the sport a try, he languished alone in his bedroom — a dark, lonely place that, along with the constant playing of video games, served as an escape. An escape Curtis desperately craved at the time. On September 17, 2013, Curtis’ older brother, Carter, was killed in a car accident. A freshman at Agua Fria and two years older than Calvin, he had been on his way to a church event in a car full of friends. Their car was struck by an oncoming vehicle, resulting in his brother’s fatality. Curtis became numb in response to his

brother’s unexpected passing. An accomplished student, a Boy Scout in his childhood, active in multiple sports and extra-curriculars, Curtis flipped the switch and became disengaged with it all. “I kind of emotionally put up barriers and walls around myself. I wasn’t able to emotionally connect with anyone or feel emotions because at any point I could just start crying,” he said. The only coping method he knew came in the form of an Xbox game console, stored away in his bedroom. After school, throughout the summer months, the only way to escape the absence of his older brother came in the form of burying himself in another reality, controller in hand. This, an unhealthy coping mechanism he now acknowledges, saw him put on nearly 60 pounds of what he calls “depression fat.” But this contradicts everything Curtis

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had previously subscribed to. He was a great student, but soon began to see his grades slip. He had done martial arts for numerous years, but removed himself from it. And most alarming to him was the excessive weight he quickly put on. “I realized the only thing that’s in my way of being fit is myself,” he said. So, he vowed to redirect the current trajectory of his life. It started toward the end of his freshman year, and early sophomore year. “When I wanted to turn my life back around I was looking for something to do and I joined tennis. That’s when I decided I’m in a sport, I’m trying to fix the problems in my life, and I knew I needed to lose all this ‘depression fat’ that I built up. I started working on it,” he said. Soon after, in the spring of his sophomore year, Curtis began to notice his revamped lifestyle paying off. He was shedding weight and got back to what he was used to — thanks to his mother, who he said inspired him to get fit and routinely made him healthy meals — he saw his grades on the mend and he was enjoying the sport of tennis he had recently started. Several of his friends were on the tennis team, and they pleaded for Curtis to try out. He did the spring of his sophomore year, and soon became enamored with the sport. Now, as Curtis is less than two weeks away from graduating high school, it’s impossible to do anything but look back on the long, rollercoaster path he’s taken to get to where he is today. Just three years into playing tennis, Curtis spent much of this season as the Owls’ No. 1 player. He was instrumental in getting Agua Fria to the Division II team state tournament. He also qualified for the doubles’ state tournament, alongside partner David Morales. It was the first time in Curtis’s three-year career that he had appeared in the state tournament. He spoke at length with the West Valley View about the healing and grieving process of losing a loved one. The word he frequently circled back to was “progress.” Even Curtis is overwhelmingly proud of the progress, for lack of a better term, that he’s made. “I’ve just made a ton of progress,” he

Calvin Curtis, a senior at Agua Fria, was a key figure in getting Agua Fria to the Division II state tournament. (Photo courtesy Calvin Curtis)

said. “I’ve made a ton of progress physically. I’ve made a ton of progress in my performance in tennis. I’ve made a ton of progress in my school work. I’ve made a lot of progress emotionally, recovering and being able to function again like a normal kid. “That’s not to say that, therefore, I don’t still mourn and grieve over the loss over my brother, but I’ve gotten to the point where that mourning, that grieving, that suffering doesn’t inhibit my ability to function.” Instead of stunting his future by continuing to grieve and mourn, Curtis has tackled it head on. Upon graduating high school, Curtis will serve a two-year mission for his church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, spreading the word of Jesus Christ around the world. The location of his mission is yet to be determined, he said. And when he returns, he will study mechanical engineering — “I love math; that’s my thing” — at Arizona State University. He boasts a clean 4.0 grade point average at Agua Fria, is an Eagle Scout, has 55 Merit badges and looks forward to the hearty scholarship waiting for him at ASU. He’ll put those plans on pause for the next two years until he returns from his mission.


15

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

Agua Fria relay team captures state title, school record BY GRIFFIN FABITS

David Espinoza, the first-year head track-and-field coach at Agua Fria High School, said in March he wanted to see his program take steps in the right direction this spring. That was all — nothing flashy; no lofty expectations in the inaugural season of his head-coaching career. Simply, glimpses that the Owls were taking encouraging strides under his guidance would suffice. If those desires of his were to be granted, he’d be a happy man entering the off-season months of summer. What ultimately unfolded at the state championships at Mesa Community College on May 4 blindsided Espinoza: The Agua Fria girls’ 4x100 relay team captured the Division II state title with a time of 48.19. The contingent, made up of freshman Jaida Steward, sophomore Neveah Cole and juniors Riley Roberts and Tyya Skaggs, set a new personal best and school record with their time in the finals round. This, though immensely welcomed, wasn’t really supposed to happen. “We never really had the mindset of trying to win it,” Roberts said. “The relay was more of a fun event that we did consistently and really well.” Perhaps they were naïve to the notion that a state title was within reach, but the writing was on the wall. Their relay team had improved leaps and bounds all spring. Not once during the regular season did they have competition, Espinoza said. They simply blew every opponent out of the water. “Every invite we had gone to, we had been so far ahead of the other teams that there was always a substantial gap

that nobody was running next to us,” Espinoza said. “When you run relays, you want to have that gap between you and someone else, but you don’t want to have so much of a gap that you can’t even feel the feel the presence to where anybody is going to push you.” On May 4, and even days before at the preliminaries, they were finally pushed. Among the state’s most elite runners, the Owls had opposing relay teams breathing down their necks during the race. “And so our girls had to push a little harder,” Espinoza said. “They finally got to that level of competition.” After competing at the preliminary events on May 1, the Owls’ 4x100 group earned the two-seed going into the state finals. Their time of 48.19 edged second-place Cactus Shadows, who finished with a 48.71 clip. “I credit our hard work, consistency and determination to winning the 4x100m relay and becoming the state champions in that event. We worked so hard from pre-season through the whole season and had been chasing after that first place at every track meet,” Roberts said. Much to the chagrin of opposing teams, all four members of the Owls’ championship 4x100 relay team are set to return next spring. “Back-to-back state champions” has a charming ring to it, and it’s something they believe is within their grasp. “It’s a high probability for us coming back next year and dominating just like we did this past year, we are going to work hard to go back to back and win that gold,” Roberts said. Because of their first-place finish, the Owls’ 4x100 relay team was invited to the Meet of Champions, a bonus week-

Curtis clarified that tennis was not something he viewed as an escape of the grieving process. The escape was video games. Tennis, he said in more or less words, was healthy. He loved the one-on-one competition and the team-sport aspect a match provides. After doing marching band for four years — following in the footsteps of his older sister and brother — Curtis wanted to find something else to do in the off-season band months. He found tennis. Or did tennis find him? The relationship seemed to benefit both parties. Through tennis, Curtis became motivated again — mentally, physically and academically. Through

Curtis, Agua Fria tennis clinched a postseason berth. And because of it all, the entire process and what’s unfolded over the last five years, Curtis is eager to leave his own print on the world. His brother will be there every step of the way, as a sign of encouragement and motivation to hold forth. That feeling is something only a brother could provide. “I’ve just been always very driven to doing my best in everything I do,” he said. “I know that I’m capable of achieving something, and when I know I’m capable of it, I push myself to be able to do it.”

West Valley View Contributing Writer

end of competition amongst all champions from every division in the state. The meet was on May 9 at Arizona State University. Results were not available at print time. Had you told Espinoza that, in his first season as a track-and-field head coach, he’d have four state champions in his program after year one, he might’ve humbly balked at the idea. It’s not that he didn’t believe he had the personnel to do it; he just simply wasn’t focused on results this spring. But the results are in, and they look awfully ravishing for the future of Agua Fria’s track-and-field program. “It kind of just validates what we, as coaches, have been teaching and what our hopes of the program are,” he said. “You stick with the Top, from left, Riley Roberts and Jaida Steward, and bottom, from left, Neveah Cole and Tyya program, believe what we’re doing, Skaggs, are members of the Agua Fria 4x100 recommit. The results will be there as lay team, which won the state championship with a personal-best and school-record time of 48.19. long as you put forth the effort. (Photo courtesy David Espinoza) “It’s very positive for us as a program because it’s like, ‘Yes, what to this, then we should be able to send we’re doing is working. Now, if we more athletes and more relay teams to get everyone to buy in, fully commit state in the years coming.’”

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16

CALENDAR

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

Agua Fria Toastmasters

Visit a weekly Toastmasters Community meeting to become a stronger public speaker and leader from 6 to 7:15 p.m. in the Zane Grey Room at Avondale Civic Center Public Library, 11350 Civic Center Drive. For information, call 623-398-5550.

ferent loan programs available from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Avondale Civic Center Library, 11350 W. Civic Center Drive. For information, call 623-333-2602.

Full Moon Hike

Enjoy a free guided night hike from 8:15 to 9:45 p.m. at Skyline Park, 2600 N. Watson Road, Buckeye. To register, visit goo.gl/oYWFQ5.

Paws for Reading

The West Valley View publishes on Wednesday. The 9 Days a Week calendar — a listing of entertainment events such as concerts, theatrical performances, events for schools, churches, county parks and nonprofit groups — runs every issue. Events must be open to the public to be considered and generally must be held within the View’s coverage area, which is south of Northern Avenue, west of Loop 101, plus all of Tolleson, extending to Estrella in the south and Tonopah in the west. Events such as concerts and theatrical performances that fall outside the View’s circulation area will be considered because there are no concert halls or theater venues within our boundaries. 9 Days a Week calendar items print on a space-available basis. The only way to guarantee that an item will print is to purchase an advertisement. Submissions must reach our office by 4 p.m. Wednesday to be considered for the following Wednesday publication. Submissions must be in writing and may be emailed to Rachel Hagerman, rhagerman@timespublications.com or faxed to 623-935-2103.

MAY

Al-Anon Stepping Stones

Litchfield Park Museum

The Litchfield Park Museum has returned to its winter schedule: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Friday. Admission and parking are free. The museum is located at 13912 W. Camelback Road. For information, call 623-535-4414 or visit litchfieldparkhistoricalsociety.org.

Junior Book Club (Ages 8-12)

Children are encouraged to read a book each month before joining Lila for a book discussion and activities from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the Tolleson Public Library, 9555 W. Van Buren Street. For information, call 623-936-2746.

Come and Play with Me

Sam Garcia Western Avenue Library hosts a weekly open-play group at 495 E. Western Avenue, Avondale, at 11 a.m. for children through age 5. For information, call 623-333-2601.

Children’s Christian Community Choir

The Church at Litchfield Park offers a free music program for children in kindergarten through fifth grade at 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays at 300 N. Old Litchfield Road. For information, call 623-935-3411.

More to Explore

Kids ages 6 to 12 can build structures, experiment, play games and make crafts at this interactive learning program from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Avondale Civic Center Library, 11350 W. Civic Center Drive. For information, call 623-333-2602.

Song-Ercise for Toddlers and Preschoolers

Join Ms. Maria and Ms. Gabby for exercise for parents and their children from 10 to 10:45 a.m at White Tank Branch Library, 20304 W. White Tank Mountain Road, Waddell. For information, call 602-652-3000.

The Christ Presbyterian Church at 925 N. Sarival Avenue, Goodyear, hosts a weekly Al-Anon meeting at 7 p.m. Al-Anon seeks to support the friends and families of alcoholics. For information, call 623-882-0721.

Toddler Storytime

Bring children to the Tolleson Public Library at 9555 W. Van Buren Street, so they can hear picture books read aloud and play with other toddlers at 11 a.m. For information, call 623-936-2746.

CrossFit at Fitness in the Park

Fitness in the Park is a free workout program that will cover basic strength and bodyweight training from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursdays at the Buckeye Sundance Park, 22865 W. Lower Buckeye Road. For information, call 623-349-6350.

West Valley Healthcare Career Expo

WESTMARC and Career Connectors are proud to present a free hiring event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Avondale Sports Center, 755 N. 114th Avenue. This event is open to anyone seeking employment in major healthcare organizations in the Phoenix West Valley. Please register at careerconnectors. org/healthcare-career-expo.

Toddler Time

Help prepare children ages 2 to 3 for reading through music, books, games and more from 11:15 a.m. to noon at the Litchfield Park Branch Library, 101 W. Wigwam Boulevard. For information, call 602-652-3000.

United Way Storytime (Ages 0-5)

Children can sing, listen to stories and make crafts at 11:15 a.m. at the Sam Garcia Western Avenue Library, 495 E. Western Avenue, Avondale. The first 25 children will receive a free book to take home. For information, call 623-333-2601.

POUND at Fitness in the Park

Fitness in the Park is a free workout program that will feature an interactive workout with lightly weighted drumsticks from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Fridays at the Buckeye Sundance Park, 22865 W. Lower Buckeye Road. For information, call 623-349-6350.

Lunch and Learn: Mental Health First Aid

Learn to identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Harmony Health and Wellness Center, 5200 N. Dysart Road, Building C, Litchfield Park. Continental breakfast and lunch will be provided. To register, call 623-230-2978.

Hope Fore Kids

Join Hope Community Services for the first annual Hope Fore Kids Charity Golf Challenge at Topgolf, 6101 N. 99th Avenue, Glendale. The charity golf challenge will take place from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Attendance costs $85 and includes food and beverages. The proceeds will benefit Hope Community Services’ mission to support children in the welfare system who need behavioral therapy programs to recover from the trauma of past abuse. To register, visit hcd-az.org/hope-fore-kids.

Preschoolers and school-age children can visit Goodyear Branch Library with a parent to practice reading with a registered therapy dog. The Paws for Reading program starts at 2 p.m. at 14455 W. Van Buren Street. For information, call 602-652-3000.

Hiking Yoga

Take a scenic hike in the Skyline Mountains with yoga integrated throughout from 8 to 9 a.m. at Skyline Regional Park, 2600 N. Watson Road, Buckeye. This is a beginner level class. To register, visit goo.gl/oYWFQ5.

Integrity Meeting

Integrity will host a guest speaker from the nonprofit charitable organization “one n ten,” which provides LGBTQ youth with tools to improve their self-esteem and self-acceptance. The meeting will take place at 6 p.m. at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, 400 Old Litchfield Road, Litchfield Park. For information, email Jim at arizonaintegrity@gmail.com.

Free Stroke Screenings

Abrazo Health is offering free stroke screenings from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Abrazo Buckeye Emergency Center, 525 S. Watson Road. These screenings include blood pressure and heart rate checks, body mass index reports, glucose screenings (for those who fast 6 to 8 hours before testing), risk factor assessments and stroke education and materials. Please drink plenty of water before the free screenings. For more information, call 844-361-7452.

Texas Hold ’Em

Come down to the American Legion Post 53 at 402 E. Narramore Avenue, Buckeye, from 5 to 7 p.m. for Texas Hold ’Em. Games have a $15 buy in. For information, call 623-327-0227.

St. Peter’s RePete Boutique

Stop by St. Peter’s Episcopal Church at 400 S. Old Litchfield Road, Litchfield Park, for casual and formal apparel, jewelry, books, household items and home décor between 9 a.m. and noon. For more information, call 623-935-3279.

EMS Open House

Meet emergency medical professionals, see fire department equipment and learn hands-only CPR and “stop the bleed” first aid at a free open house from 9 a.m. to noon at the Goodyear Fire Station 183, 3075 N. Litchfield Road, Goodyear. For information, call 623-882-7308.

Sea Lions at Shipwreck Cove

Come see an educational show starring California sea lions and skilled trainers at 11:30 a.m. in a pirate-themed exhibit at Wildlife World Zoo, 16501 W. Northern Avenue, Litchfield Park. This show is free with admission. For information, call 623-935-9453.

Food for Fines

Through the month of May, Avondale Public Library is partnering with the community to restock the shelves of our local food banks with “Food for Fines.” Under the Food for Fines program, library patrons with fines on their accounts may donate nonperishable food items to reduce or pay off their fines. For every nonperishable food item donated, $1 will be deducted off a patron’s account up to a maximum of $50. Stop by Sam Garcia Western Avenue Library at 495 E. Western Avenue between 1 and 5 p.m. to donate food items. For information, call 623-333-2665.

Mental Health Awareness Fair

Harmony Health and Wellness Center will host a fair to provide education on mental health, free screenings and resources from noon to 5 p.m. at 5200 N. Dysart Road, Building C, Litchfield Park. The fair will have food, games, prizes and kids activities.

Home Buying and Selling 101

Gain inside knowledge of the home buying process from beginning to end. The class will also cover the dif-

field Road, Goodyear, for the Hope support group from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The goal of the group is to provide help for those struggling with any mental disorder by sharing experiences and supporting others. For information, call 480-994-4407.

Ignite Yoga at Fitness in the Park

Fitness in the Park is a free workout program that will feature yogic postures, alignment and breathing on Mondays from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Buckeye Sundance Park, 22865 W. Lower Buckeye Road. For information, call 623-349-6350.

Babies and Books (Ages 0-2)

The Avondale Civic Center Library at 11350 W. Civic Center Drive invites parents to bring their babies from 10:15 to 11 a.m. to promote early development. Babies will learn with books, music and playtime activities. For information, call 623-333-2602.

Latin Dance Aerobics

Strengthen cardio fitness from 9 to 10 a.m. with a free dance class provided by the Dr. Saide Recreation Center at 1003 E. Eason Avenue, Buckeye. For information, call 623-349-6350.

Teen Leadership Club

Teen Leadership Club is a group that creates and carries out new programs for the Goodyear Branch Library. The team meets from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the library, 14455 W. Van Buren Street. Registration is required. For information, call 602-652-3000.

Baby Time

Hope

Stop by Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church’s Classroom C at 918 S. Litch-

Preschoolers Storytime

The Tolleson Public Library at 9555 W. Van Buren Street invites preschool-age children to read books, sing songs and take part in activities at 11 a.m. For information, call 623-936-2746.

Disciple Outreach Ministries Bible Study

Disciple Outreach Ministries, a nondenominational ministry, invites all to a Bible study at 7 p.m. Wednesdays at 10486 W. Emerald Lane, Avondale. For information, call 623-772-0144.

Estrella Republican Club

The Estrella Republican Club meets from 7 to 8:30 p.m. fourth Wednesdays of the month to listen to a guest speaker at Estrella Foothills High School, 13033 S. Estrella Parkway. For information, call 623-695-2435.

Zumba at Fitness in the Park

Fitness in the Park is a free workout program that will feature a dynamic and aerobic Zumba dance on Wednesdays from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Buckeye Sundance Park, 22865 W. Lower Buckeye Road. For information, call 623-349-6350.

Needle and Thread

Bingo

The American Legion Post 61 hosts bingo Tuesdays at 6:45 p.m. These bingo nights have 17 games including Quickie, Early Bird, Double Action and a $1,000 progressive game. Come down to 35 N. Dysart Road, Avondale, to support the area’s youth and veterans. For information, call 623-932-4960.

Buckeye Business Connection

Buckeye Chamber hosts the Buckeye Business Connection from 7:15 to 8:30 a.m. every Tuesday at the chamber office at 508 E. Monroe Avenue. This group serves coffee and a light breakfast and networks with business members in the community. Each week, there will also be a different guest speaker. For information, call 623-386-2727.

Estrella Toastmasters

Visit a Toastmasters Community meeting to become a stronger public speaker and leader from 6:30 to 7:45 a.m. at the Southwest Valley Chamber of Commerce, 289 N. Litchfield Road, Goodyear. For information, call 602-391-5781.

PiYo at Fitness in the Park

Fitness in the Park is a free workout program that will feature pilates and yoga on Tuesdays from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Buckeye Sundance Park, 22865 W. Lower Buckeye Road. For information, call 623-349-6350.

Teen Volunteer Orientation for Summer Reading

The Tolleson Public Library at 9555 W. Van Buren Street invites babies and their caregivers to an interactive play time at 10 a.m. For information, call 623-936-2746.

3457 to register. The orientation will take place from 6 to 7 p.m. at the library at 101 W. Wigwam Boulevard.

The Litchfield Park Library is looking for twenty friendly and eager-tolearn volunteers to help with the summer reading program. Teen volunteers must attend the mandatory orientation session to be considered for one of these positions. Please complete a paper application that can be picked up at the library’s customer service desk prior to attending the orientation. Email glenbrown@mcldaz.org or call 602-652-

The Avondale Civic Center Library at 11350 W. Civic Center Drive invites adults to bring a coffee mug and materials to join fellow crafters for needlework, knitting and crocheting at 10:30 a.m. For information, call 623-333-2602.

Community Center Bookmobile

The Bookmobile, a library on wheels, will be at the Buckeye Community Center at 201 E. Centre Avenue from 11 a.m. to noon. Visitors can get a library card to check out and return books. For information, call 623-349-6300.

In Stitches in Goodyear

Enjoy tea and coffee and meet fellow crafters and work on crochet, knitting or sewing projects. Come by the Goodyear Branch Library at 14455 W. Van Buren Street from 1:30 to 3 p.m. to join. For information, call 602-652-3000.

Agua Fria Toastmasters

Visit a weekly Toastmasters Community meeting to become a stronger public speaker and leader from 6 to 7:15 p.m. in the Zane Grey Room at Avondale Civic Center Public Library, 11350 Civic Center Drive. For information, call 623-398-5550.

Goodyear Lions Club

Goodyear Lions Club is a service group that provides free eye screenings, raises funds for veterans and their families, collects hearing aids and glasses, and more. The Goodyear Lions meet at 6 p.m. fourth Thursdays of the month at Haymaker, 1800 N. Litchfield Road, Goodyear. For information, call 623-455-3253.

Computer Classes (Ages 18+)

Master mouse skills, Microsoft Word, basic internet, email and more at 11 a.m. at the Avondale Civic Center Library, 11350 W. Civic Center Drive. For information, call 623-333-2602.


17

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

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18

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

Features WestValleyView.com

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African lions, warthogs, Wildlife World helping jackals born at zoo sustain biodiversity BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

Wildlife World Zoo, Aquarium and Safari Park has announced the birth of three African lion cubs, two baby warthogs and a litter of jackals. The babies are receiving around-the-clock care by Wildlife World’s expert hand raising and veterinarian team. The lion cubs receive bottles of formula several times a day and are weighed daily. Over the next few weeks, they will begin the transition to include meat in their diet. As one of the most recognizable animal symbols in the world, African lions were accurately the “King of the Jungle.” However, they are now listed as vulnerable by the IUCN due to habitat loss and pursuit in unprotected areas. The pop-

ulation is believed to have fallen by up to 50% in the last 50 to 60 years. Habitat loss and degradation along with increased poaching remain the biggest threats to their survival. Wildlife World strives to maximize genetic diversity in the zoological population with its breeding programs. With more than 600 species and 6,000 animals on display, there are always new arrivals at Wildlife World Zoo, Aquarium and Safari Park. Other babies on display include Jr., the sea lion pup; a colobus monkey; spider monkey; twin red-handed tamarins; several hoofed animal species like baby goats in the petting zoo; and other youngsters throughout the 100-acre park.

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BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

Despite volumes of data currently available on mankind, it is surprising how little is known about other species. A paper published recently in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) — using data recorded by Wildlife World Zoo in collaboration with other zoos and aquariums worldwide — confirms critical information, such as fertility and survival rates, is missing from global data for more than 98% of known species of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians. That changed when researchers added data from a previously untapped source: the Zoological Information Management System (ZIMS). Across classes of species, key blanks fill with salient data. Wildlife World Zoo, Aquarium and Safari Park records its animal data in ZIMS, which is curated by wildlife professionals working within zoos, aquariums, refuge, research and education centers in 97 countries. It is maintained by Species360, a nonprofit, member-driven organization that facilitates information sharing among its nearly 1,200 institutional members and is the world’s largest set of wildlife data. Wildlife World Zoo has been contributing data on its animals since 1985. “It seems inconceivable,” said Dalia

A. Conde, lead researcher and Species360 Conservation Science Alliance director. “Yet scientists tasked with saving species often have to power through with best-guess assumptions that we hope approximate reality.” A multidisciplinary team led by Species360 Conservation Science Alliance, with participants from 19 institutions, believes knowledge can be substantially increased by applying new analytics to data that has been long overlooked — using data contributed by Wildlife World Zoo and other zoos and aquariums around the world. The team of 33 scientists including data analysts, biologists and population dynamics specialists developed the first Species Knowledge Index to map just how much we know about species worldwide. The index aggregates, analyzes and maps data from 22 databases and the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. “Wildlife World has added data on 10,361 birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals of 840 species, making a huge impact on the understanding of those species’ life histories,” said Mickey Ollson, director of Wildlife World Zoo, Aquarium and Safari Park. “Providing that missing data — filling in those gaps — is game-changing for these species.”

As a USDA-licensed, private institution accredited by the Zoological Association of America and the Alliance of Marine Mammal Parks and Aquariums, Wildlife World Zoo, Aquarium and Safari Park receives zero taxpayer funding. No tax dollars have ever been spent to build or operate Wildlife World in its 35-year history. Wildlife World Zoo, Aquarium and Safari Park is located at 16501 W. Northern Avenue, Litchfield Park, at the southeast corner of State Route 303 and Northern Avenue. It is open seven days a week, 365 days a year, including all holidays. Zoo exhibits are open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Last zoo admission is at 4:30 p.m.) Aquarium exhibits are open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Admission includes access to the zoo, aquarium and safari park. For more information, call 623-935-WILD (9453) or visit Facebook, Instagram or Twitter @zoowildlife, and wildlifeworld.com.


FEATURES

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

Wildlife World Zoo named best zoo in Arizona

BY ANDREA ESTRADA

West Valley View Staff Writer

Mickey Ollson, owner and director of Wildlife World Zoo, Aquarium and Safari Park, remembers collecting jokes out of Reader’s Digest and telling them aloud in a public speaking class he took in college in the early ‘60s. At the time, though, he never imagined he would go on to open his own zoo in 1984 — let alone World Zoo, Aquarium and Safari Park that it would be recognized by that Wildlife was recently selected by Reader’s Digest as the very same widely-distributed mag- best zoo in Arizona. (West Valley View file photo) azine. In April, Reader’s Digest issued a list the Baby Animal Nursery and Dragon called “The Best Zoo in Every State in World, which Reader’s Digest highAmerica,” and Wildlife World Zoo, lighted as must-see attractions. Aquarium and Safari Park was named Ollson said baby animals end up in the best zoo in the state of Arizona. the nursery because sometimes the Ollson said such recognition speaks to mother does not take care of them, for the hard work and dedication of his staff. a number of reasons, or simply because “It’s easy to have a vision and to they’re better off being hand raised. want to do something. But if you’re re“We are really pleased with the fact ally going to be successful, you have that we’ve been able to raise multiple to have good people that help you,” generations of some very rare animals he said. “I’ve had people that have put by hand in our animal nursery,” he said. down their roots here, and they’ve realAnd the zoo’s rare, endangered anily taken it upon themselves to make the mals — like Arabian oryx from North zoo the very best it can be.” Africa, which were down to 13 indiThirty five years ago, the zoo sat on vidual animals in the ‘60s, and albino 30 acres, displayed less than 100 spe- alligators, which are down to less than cies, was operated by a staff of six, and 100 — are bred on site through a spehad a picnic table with a sheet over it cies survival program that is made up for furniture. Today, the zoo spans 150 of a consortium of zoos that control the acres, exhibits more than 600 different animal gene pool. species and 6,000 animals, employs “We’ve become very good at breed115 people in the springtime, houses ing animals. We’re no longer taking an Adventure Land with rides, boasts animals out of the wild. We are now an interactive sea lion exhibit and fea- producers of animals,” Ollson said. tures five restaurants and cafés: DilOllson, who has not only watched his lon’s Restaurant, Skyride Cafe, Safari zoo grow throughout the years but has Grill, Congo Cooker and Zooberto’s. witnessed cutting-edge advancements The growth of the zoo, which has in the “zoo world,” said the genuine never received or used taxpayer fund- love for animals is the drive for all of it. ing, is attributed to its entrepreneurism, “In this business, nobody gets rich. Ollson said. You’re not working because it’s a good “We’ve been very strong about in- paycheck or a nice salary. You’re working vesting back into the zoo. The profits because you love animals, and it’s what from the zoo are put back into it to you’ve always wanted to do,” he said. better things for the visitors; to better While being recognized by a nationthings for the animals; to better things al publication like Reader’s Digest is for our employees; to enlarge the zoo; an absolute honor, Ollson said he valto build new exhibits and to increase ues the compliments he receives from the animal collection,” he said. everyday people just as much. And that entrepreneurism made way “The compliments from people like for activities that are unique to the zoo us, those are just as important,” he — including the Giraffe Feeding Sta- said. “It verifies what my staff has been tion and Lory Parrot Feeding, which doing here and what we’ve done here Ollson said Wildlife World opened be- for the last 35 years is appreciated, and fore any other zoo — and exhibits like that we’re doing some things right.”

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

Westview teacher develops historic library tool BY OCTAVIO SERRANO

West Valley View Staff Writer

A mother of three who teaches U.S. history at Westview High School, Lisa Kallmes has a strong appreciate for the history of Arizona. So, Kallmes created a library tool that will help her share that appreciation with others. “I think I have such a love for history and love sharing that with the students and really helping them see why it matters,” Kallmes said. Kallmes collaborated with the Arizona Research Library to create The Arizona Historic Place Names Story Map, an interactive tool that students and teachers can use to learn about the history of Arizona. “The thing that I love about this project is that I can help students from all grade levels,” Kallmes said. Kallmes, 35, said she has a profound passion for teaching history, but the educational field was not always her goal. When she was in high school, she had her sights on becoming an anchor reporter on the news. Her journalistic

dream crashed when she interviewed a reporter as part of a project. “When I was interviewing (the reporter), one of the questions I asked was whether she was married and had kids and she answered, ‘I don’t have time for that because of my job.’ Right in that moment I changed my mind,” Kallmes said. Kallmes soon realized she had a passion for history and went on to attend ASU, where she majored in secondary education with a specialization in history. She earned her master’s degree in American history at the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, which is in partnership with Pace University and will graduate Thursday, May 23. As part of Kallmes’ capstone project, she partnered up with the State of Arizona Research Library, which is part of the Arizona State Library Archives and Public Records, and began the project in October. The Story Map was a two-part project, Kallmes said. Before building the map, she created a digital collection of

Coming July 17, 2019 Back To School The Back to School section will contain important information for students and parents, pre-school to college. They’ll learn about start dates, supplies, after-school activities, child care and more. It’s a great vehicle for you to reach an audience that’s ready to spend money before the first bell rings.

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newspaper clippings named the Arizona Memory Project, which now serves as a reference to many historic places in Arizona. The Story Map itself is a tool that students, researchers and visitors can use to learn the history behind various locations around Arizona. “It allows people to link to different locations and get a little glimpse of what they look like, but also get a background of the history of how that location was named,” Kallmes said. “Twenty seven of the locations on the story map link back that original digitized newspaper collection.” Ryan Ehrfurth, digital history and maps librarian, said, “This was the first time we had an intern create a collection on the Memory Project and a Story Map at the same time.” Ryan said the Story Map is a tool that can help anybody who is interested in the history of Arizona. “It allows people to see the diversity that Arizona has in a lot of the photos that are represented in the Story Map,” Ehrfurth said. “Some are really old historic photos; some are modern-day photos that Lisa herself took.” As much as this tool can help researchers and historians, Kallmes always keeps her students in mind when speaking of the Story Map. “As you get into the older grades for high school, they can click into the locations and get the background and the history, but then they can also con-

Lisa Kallmes is a mother of three and a teacher at Westview High School who will graduate with her master’s degree in American history on May 23. (Photo courtesy Joseph Ortiz)

nect back to those primary sources,” Kallmes said Kallmes said building the Story Map was not an easy project, with her working and raising three children. But she is proud to have created something her students can use to learn the details of the state in which they live, and she is looking forward to more people knowing about the Story Map. “I’m happy with the project because I can put it into the hands of the public and students, and really created something that can be utilized by anybody,” Kallmes said. For more information or to use the Story Map, visit azlibrary.gov/dazl/arizona-maps-online.

Buckeye holding art contest BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

Buckeye residents are invited to vote for their favorite elementary, middle or high school artist in the city’s art contest, “Draw a Better Buckeye.” Winners will be announced at the Tuesday, May 21, city council meeting, but artwork will be on display at City Hall, 530 E. Monroe Avenue, through Wednesday, May 22. The contest from the city’s public works department focuses on sustainability measures, recycling and preventing pollution. The students demonstrated the importance of sustainability and keeping Buckeye a thriving community through artwork. Prizes are awarded in three catego-

ries and donated by Republic Services: • Third through fifth grade • Sixth through eighth grade • Ninth through 12th grade To learn more about the contest and to see last year’s winners, visit buckeyeaz.gov/draw-a-better-buckeye.


FEATURES

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

around the neighborhood

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West Valley View photos by Pablo Robles

Peoria Firefighters Charities Benefit

Just days before Easter, the West Valley first responder community was rocked by the severe injuries sustained by four Peoria firefighters — Capt. Hunter Clare, Engineer Justin Lopez and firefighters Matt Cottini and Jake Ciulla — in an explosion at an APS substation in Surprise. That impact culminated with a charity benefit held at CrossFit Unwavering in El Mirage on May 11. Put together by Buckeye firefighter Haley Haltmar, the event donated all proceeds to Peoria Firefighters Charities. Firefighters and other people from around the Valley journeyed to El Mirage to donate $20 and participate in 10-minute, firefighter skill-inspired workouts donning full SCBA (self-contained breathing apparatus) gear. The “course” included box step ups, sledgehammer hits and a hose drag. 1. Anne Giamundo of the Sun City Fire Department puts equipment away; 2. Jacqui Seidel puts on firefighter gear; 3. Buckeye firefighter Haley Haltmar helped organize the charity workout fundraiser; 4. Mark Merry of Colorado’s Lasalle Fire Department participates in the box step ups; 5. From left, John McGill, 8, and Tristan McGill, 4, watch participants during the charity workout; 6. Participants wear full firefighter gear while doing the box step up; 7. Kate Chambers of Litchfield Park does the hose drag and pull during the charity workout fundraiser.

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FEATURES

ANSWERS ON PAGE 25

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

GOby FIGURE! Linda Thistle

SUDOKU TIME

The idea of Go Figure is to arrive at the figures given at the bottom and right-hand columns of the diagram by following the arithmetic signs in the order they are given (that is, from left to right and top to bottom). Use only the numbers below the diagram to complete its blank squares and use each of the nine numbers only once.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.

King Crossword ACROSS 1 Snapshot 6 America’s uncle 9 Go back 12 Dawn 13 Pirouette pivot 14 “7 Faces of Dr. --” 15 Foolish 16 Current 18 Use mouthwash 20 Stirred 21 Service charge 23 Exist 24 Nervous 25 Screws up 27 Point of view 29 Horseradish cousin 31 Medal earners 35 Mottled mount 37 Break suddenly 38 Went on all fours 41 Kreskin’s claim 43 Have a go at 44 In the pink

45 Daughter of Muhammad 47 Oppressive 49 Danger 52 [Uncorrected] 53 Work with 54 Skip a sound 55 Superlative ending 56 Roulette bet 57 Rose

17 Deed holders 19 Wheat or rye 21 A handful 22 Geological period 24 Brewery product 26 Demolitions specialist 28 Specter 30 Morsel 32 Easternmost Great Lake 33 Corn spike 34 Agent DOWN 36 Ribbed 1 Tire pressure stat 38 Opted for 2 Barbarian 39 Indian royals 3 Asian wild asses 40 Vote in 4 With 46-Down, cheese- 42 They’re calling topped sandwich Danny Boy 5 Phantom’s bailiwick 45 Blend together 6 “Hot” 46 See 4-Down 7 Top-rated 48 “-- American Cousin” 8 “Family Guy” daughter 50 Altar affirmative 9 “Cats” inspirer 51 Started 10 Money lenders 11 One over par

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK H

H Moderate HH Challenging HHH HOO BOY!

EVEN EXCHANGE

by Donna Pettman

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK H

H Moderate HH Challenging HHH HOO BOY!

Each numbered row contains two clues and two answers. The two answers differ from each other by only one letter, which has already been inserted. For example, if you exchange the A from MASTER for an I, you get MISTER. Do not change the order of the letters.

SCRAMBLERS Unscramble the letters within each rectangle to form four ordinary words.

Then rearrange the boxed letters to form the mystery word, which will complete the gag!


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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

Youth of Today WestValleyView.com

For more youth visit westvalleyview.com

/WestValleyView

ATI Foundation empowers impaired local Arizona child BY ANDREA ESTRADA

West Valley View Staff Writer

When Goodyear resident Charles Fleming was searching for an adaptive bicycle for his 8-year-old son, Sebastian — who was diagnosed with Kleefstra syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by lack of the ninth chromosome and marked by intellectual disabilities, nonverbalness and a spectrum of complex physical and clinical features — he reached out to the ATI Foundation and found the support he needed. In late April, the ATI Foundation, whose mission is to provide resources and funding to children with physical impairments to enhance and sustain a better quality of life, held its Inaugural Arizona Golf Outing at Stonecreek Golf Club, where Sebastian was presented an adaptive bicycle customized to meet his specific needs. In addition to honoring Sebastian, as well as another local child, the goal of the golf event was to raise funds for future beneficiary families who are currently on ATI Foundation’s Arizona waiting list, said Terry Williams, vice president and executive director of the ATI Foundation. “When we have these regional events across the nation, we keep the money within that region. We raised over $16,000 at the Arizona outing and we have eight kids on the (waiting) list. That will go a long way in helping at least half of those kids,” Williams said. The ATI Foundation worked with a longstanding partner — Preston’s March for Energy, an organization that provides children access to freedom, fun and exercise — to build Sebastian’s bicycle, Williams added. “Our foundation pays for the bike and their foundation works with therapists to get the right measurements to get the right adaptations. They even work with families to get the color choice of the child,” Williams said. “It’s a great partnership. Fleming said he enjoyed seeing partners and the community come together to raise awareness for children with physical impairments. “The event was great. It was very welcoming — from the golfers that attended the golf tournament (to) the people that were hosting. It was just

open arms and smiles everywhere, understanding and supporting Sebastian and his disabilities,” he said. Because Sebastian has balance and leg-strength complications, it is difficult for him to ride traditional bicycles. But with his customized adaptive bicycle, Fleming said Sebastian can now play and participate in activities with other kids. “Now, he can go ride bikes with his nieces and nephews.” Making impacts in the lives of children like Sebastian, who at one point in his life was not expected to walk but now rides a bicycle, fulfills ATI Foundation’s goal, Williams said. “When we help a child and a family, it’s making an immediate day-to-day impact. That’s what we’re most proud of,” he said. “We know we’ve made that immediate impact on Sebastian, and we wish him lots of fun on the bike.”

O B S T E T R I C S • G Y N E C O L O G Y

Sebastian Fleming has Kleefstra syndrome. The ATI Foundation gave him an adaptive bicycle that would meet his needs. (Photo courtesy The ATI Foundation)

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YOUTH

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

Credit Union West awards five students scholarships BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

MAY 6:30 PM 27 MONDAY

MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY

The strength of a community depends on the quality of its leaders. So, to support the development of future leaders in Maricopa and Yavapai counties, Credit Union West has awarded five graduating high school seniors $1,000 scholarships to use toward college costs. The 2019 Credit Union West Scholarship recipients are Andrea Giacini, Sandra Day O’Conner High School; Samantha Latto, Centennial High School; Sierra McConnell, BASIS Prescott Charter School; Taylor Kluge, Sunrise Mountain High School; and Zackary Zertuche, Prescott High School. The scholarships were awarded based on academic achievement, community service and overall character. Applicants were required to submit an essay on the role personal finance plays in meeting career goals. Two of the selected recipients — Latto and Zertuche — are Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) students. “The cost of higher education is ris-

ing, and we want to help local high school graduates take this important step in their personal career and economic development,” said Karen Roch, president and CEO of Credit Union West. The credit union is working to be part of the solution to rising education costs. Across the United States, the average cost of tuition and fees for the 2018-19 school year was $9,716 for state residents at public college and $35,676 at private colleges, up from the 2017-18 averages, according to data in an annual survey by U.S. News. Roch added, “There were so many impressive candidates this year that I’m confident our future is in capable hands.” This is the sixth year the credit union has offered scholarships to Maricopa and Yavapai county high school graduates. In a pursuit to help more local graduates continue their education, Credit Union West has provided $22,000 in scholarships since the inception of the program.

Sundance honoring ‘our greatest generation’ BY WEST VALLEY VIEW STAFF

This month Sundance Elementary School will present its teaching museum. Students will transform classrooms into different aspects of the Great Depression and World War II. Each student group will give their presentations off nearby research boards and answer questions. The first session is from 8:30 to 11 a.m. A second session will follow from 12:15 to 3 p.m. The event is an open house-style walkthrough presentation. It is free to

attend and open to the public. The event is hosted by seventh and eighth graders who have been working toward this student-led walkthrough museum since the beginning of the year. The date of the event was selected to coincide with the nearby Armed Forces Day, which is Saturday, May 18. Last year’s event coincided with Veterans’ Day, and garnered 300 attendees. Sundance Elementary School is located at 23800 W. Hadley Street, Buckeye.

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OBITUARIES Dillon Troy Howe

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Dillon Troy Howe passed away on April 21st, 2019 in Buckeye, AZ at the age of 33. He loved his family, hunting, leather crafting, and the outdoors. Dillon is survived by his children Cheyenne and Clay, his parents Dave and Bonnie, and six siblings. Funeral services were held on Friday, April 26 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and laid to rest at the Louis B. Hazelton Memorial Cemetery In Buckeye. Dillon was deeply loved and will be greatly missed.

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Remembering Alvino E. Alvarado “Tio Haba” 05/02/1933 – 04/28/2019 of Buckeye He is survived by his sister Gloria and his many nephews & Nieces. Services were held on Friday May 10, 2019 at Universal South Mountain Mortuary 7007 S. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85042, followed by burial at Holy Cross Cemetery 9925 W Thomas Rd. Avondale, AZ 85392

John (Juan) Manuel Amabisca Sr John (Juan) Manuel Amabisca Sr. passed away on May 1st, 2019 from complications of surgery. He was an Arizona native, born in Buckeye. He attended Buckeye Elementary and High Schools. He worked for Maricopa County Parks and Recreation and then Glendale Elementary School District before retiring in April 2018. He was a "forever cowboy gentlemen" and loved roping with friends and his daughter. He loved his family and his God. He is survived by his wife, Denise Amabisca and his children, Andrea Cordova (Steve), Abigail J Amabisca, Nellie Amabisca, son John Amabisca Jr. (Chelsea), Stepchildren; Dahn F Ribeiro (Vinicius) and Topher Hernandez (Haylee). He has nine grandchildren and another on the way who will miss having their Tata around including Adrianna Cordova, Kylie McLenithan, Cooper Trailer, Ethan Ribeiro, Dellon Trailor, Christian Ribeiro, Lincoln Hernandez, Alice Amabisca, Knox Hernandez and Dean Amabisca coming soon. He is also survived by his sisters Irene Garcia (Richard) and Pauline Salas (Rudy) and Anna Amabisca. Also missing him in this life are his many nieces and nephews, aunts and uncles and many friends. His mother, father, brother, cousin, best friend, father-in-law and many other family and friends lost along the way have greeted him HOME. A funeral service was held May 10, 2019 at St. Henry Catholic Church, Buckeye.

Need help writing an obituary? We have articles that will help guide you through the process. Deadline for obituaries is Thursday at 5pm for Wednesday. All obituaries will be approved by our staff prior to being activated. Be aware there may be early deadlines around holidays. Call 623-535-8439 Mon-Fri 8:30-5 if you have questions. Visit: obituaries.WestValleyView.com

CLASSIFIEDS

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Charlene Lucille Lockitski

Charlene Lucille Lockitski, age 67 of Goodyear, died April 24, 2019 in Goodyear. She was born April 22, 1952 in Bucyrus, OH to Kenneth and Lucille Stewart. She is survived by her husband, Stan Lockitski, daughter Angela Masisak-Borer (James), brother, James Stewart, and two grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, Kenneth and Lucille Stewart, and her brother, Ronald Stewart. The family suggests that donations be made to Cancer Research Institute. To read an expanded obituary and leave condolences please visit www.Thompson FuneralChapel.com.

Betty Ann Morrow Betty A. Morrow, 77, passed away April 27th. She was born and raised in Buckeye. Parents were John (Henry) and Clara Fields. She will be welcomed home by both parents, her sister Margaret, and brother John. She is survived by daughter's, Sheryl Teare of Port Lucia, FL, Karen Ballanger of Centerville, IA, Elaine Hodge of Dana Point, CA, Jennifer Smiddy of Buckeye, Tammy Little of Goodyear, 10 grandchildren, and nine great grand children, her sister Velma Williamson of Phoenix, and brother James of Pryor, OK. Memorial will be held at Ganley's in Buckeye, May 26th at 11am. She touched a lot of hearts and will forever be missed.

David Michael Roach David Micheal Roach was born on May 8,1969. He took his last breath at 3:29 pm May 4, 2019 surrounded by family and friends. He enjoyed making everyone laugh and feel great about themselves. He was a father figure to his nephews and nieces and took pride in that. He was a son, brother, uncle and a father. He leaves behind his 2 sons Cody and Brandon Roach. His long time friend Melody Nordman. His mother Geri Roach, one brother Ronnie Roach and six sisters Lynda (Stanton) Horn, Millie Roach, Mary (Kelly) Jones, Elizabeth Roach, Jennifer Roach (Travis Martin) and Christy (Michael) Hershkowitz. He is preceded in death by his loving father John Roach. His favorite color was blue. In celebration of his life please wear blue. Services were held on Monday May 13, 2019 at Ganleys Funeral Home in Buckeye AZ, at 10:00 a.m. Celebration of life following services at the Elks Lodge in Buckeye AZ.

Holiday Deadlines: May 29th Edition Deadline May 22nd at 1pm 623-535-8439 class@timespublications.com


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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

OBITUARIES

John Tinsley Hoffman John T. Hoffman passed away at the age of 91 on April 1, 2019. Services were held at North Sacramento Funeral Home in Sacramento, CA on April 20, 2019. Contributions can be made to your favorite charity or hospice.

Christina Valencia Ferguson Christina Valencia Ferguson was born in Cashion, Arizona on July 24, 1945. She entered Heaven's gates on May 7, 2019. She is survived by her husband Robert and her five children: Anna Martinez, Dianna Arias, Gilbert Macias Jr., Daniel Macias, Malinda Garcia; three step-children Betty Ann Buchanan, Bob Dale Ferguson, and Bonnie Sue Sandstrom. She was preceded in death by her brother David and survived by siblings: Carlotta, Connie, Emily, and Leuterio. Christina was a loving grandmother to her 18 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren.

Kenneth Ray Price

Kennith Ray Price, 78 years, passed on May 7th, 2019. Native Phoenician. Born July 17, 1940 to Ray and Leona Price, of Phoenix. Preceded in death by sons, Kenny Jr. and Aaron Andrew Price. Survived by wife, Carol Beloat Price and sister, Kay (Wayne) Johnson, Daughters Peggy (John) Hager and Penny Price; step-children, Lara (Bill) Sparks, David (Shay) Henry and Gina Henry. He had many grandchildren. Kenny worked in commercial and residential construction for 47 years in AZ and CA before retiring in 2003. He enjoyed his family as well as hunting and fishing in Arizona for many years. He will be missed greatly by his family and extended family and friends. Viewing will be held at Ganley's Funeral Home in Buckeye on Thursday May 16, from 5:00 - 7:00 pm. Graveside services will be held Friday May 17, 9:00 am at Louis B Hazelton Memorial Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Faith Hospice, faithofAZ.com or Home Instead Senior Care, Homeinstead.com/831

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Armando Reyna Vega "OG" Beloved Father, Brother, Uncle and Grandfather passed away May 1, 2019 surrounded by his family. He is survived by Three Daughters Angela, Florinda and Alyssa, Two Sons Gabriel and Armando Jr. Services Monday 05/13/19 from 5 PM to 7 PM Palabra Viva Centro Christian Church 17541 W Yuma Rd. Goodyear (Reception to follow)

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FREE

CUTE & CUDDLY KITTENS TO A GOOD HOME! 602-882-2249 CARE GIVERS

Erineo Luera Botello Erineo was born on March 3, 1949 to Benicio and Bertha (Luera) Botello in Gonzales Texas. He married Maria Consuelo Vergara on April 7, 1972 in Phoenix Az. He made his home in Snyder Tx on August 17, 1977 with his wife and family. They then moved their family back to Avondale on August 17, 1992. Erineo worked as a laborer, but was best known as the neighborhood mechanic. He had many friends and was always a happy go lucky kind of man with a big heart. His main hobby was buying old project cars and fixing them up, his favorite being a 77 Monte Carlo. Erineo is survived by his loving wife of 47 years Maria (Connie) Botello. Six children, Rosario Carreon, Angel Carreon and wife Sandra, Jesus Carreon, Rafael Botello and wife Blanca, Reynaldo Botello and wife Jaci and daughter Ernestina (Tina) Virgil and husband Samuel. Brother Benicio Botello and wife Beatrice of Seguin Tx. 28 grandkids, 54 great grandkids and three great great grandkids. Numerous aunts, uncles and cousins in Texas and Mexico. He is predeceased by his parents Benicio Botello and Bertha Lopez, sister Carmen Guzman, two other sisters and a brother who passed as infants, son Rafael Campos Botello and two granddaughters Marissa Botello and IsaMari German. A funeral service will be held from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM on 2019-05-13 at Avenidas Funeral Chapel, 522 East Western Avenue, Avondale, AZ, USA./Graveside services at Greenwood Memorial Cemetery.

Care Giver Needed. Womans group home in Goodyear is looking staff for all shifts. MUST be able to pass a FBI backround check. Please call 623-882-4236 for more information.

EMPLOYMENT LOOKING for experienced compassionate CNA's. Certified Caregivers. Part time/ full time. 623-547-7521

CAREGIVERS & DRIVERS Needed immediately. Positions start at $11-12.00 hour. Higher pay based on experience. 14423 McDowell Road Ste G104, Goodyear. 623-547-4839 WINGFIELD LIVESTOCK TRANSPORTATION

Looking for several DRIVERS

with 2 yrs OTR Exp. Please Call 623-694-9063 Trucking Company looking to hire Mechanics and Lube Tech Full-time. Pay based on experience Please Call 623-386-4454 or Email wingfield04@hotmail.com

CHILD CARE DAYCARE in my home. Snacks, meals, some weekends, some evenings. Esther 602-361-1607 CLEANING SERVICES HOUSECLEANING. We provide excellent and professional service. More than 12 years of experience. We will keep your place up and presentable. FREE estimates Ana 602-326-2780

Are you energized by being in the action, you'll be on your feet 8-10 hours a day, walking, bending, lifting up to 50 pounds that keeps your body in constant motion. Are you incredibly reliable & responsible. You must have excellent attendance and consistently meet goals and metrics. Have high school diploma or equivalent, need to be at least 18 years old. Starting wage is $13.46. You may apply on line at www.stitchfix.com/careers

YOUR NEIGHBORS, YOUR FUNERAL HOME. THE NAME YOU CAN TRUST. • Locally Owned & Operated • Offering World Class Service With Quality & Sensitivity • Full Concierge Service To All Families • We Accept All Neptune Policies • We Honor The Catholic Final Expense Funeral Program

“LIFE ONLY DEMANDS FROM YOU STRENGTH YOU POSSESS.”

926 S. Litchf ield Road, Goodyea r, A Z

- DAG HAMMARKJÖLD

w w w.t hompsonf unera lchapel.com


CLASSIFIEDS

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

Classifieds

27

West Valley View

250 N. Litchfield, #130, Goodyear, AZ 85338

623.535.VIEW (8439) Deadlines

Classifieds: Friday 1pm for Wednesday

The Place “To Find” Everything You Need EMPLOYMENT WANTED

CDL Drivers day and night shift needed. Mechanics and helpers needed. Accounting Personal needed. Yard Labor needed. Please come in and see Tony. 25376 W. Tonopah, Salome Highway, Buckeye, AZ 85396. GPS takes you to far google maps will get you here.

NOW HIRING Landscape Construction Laborers Needed. Call 623-670-0080

EMPLOYMENT EXP'D LANDSCAPERS Wanted in Goodyear area. Starting pay $15/hr. PLEASE text M-F 7a-2p

623-399-0139

GARAGE SALES/ BAZAARS Church Thrift Shop Open Thurs, May 16, 8:30-12:30 300 N. Old Litchfield Road (across from Wigwam Spa) Clothes, jewelry, books, kitchen items, furniture, and more. The Thrift Shop will also be open Sat, May 18, 8:30-12:30. All items 1/2 off on Sat. Last sale before we close for the summer.

EMPLOYMENT RECREATION CENTERS OF SUN CITY WEST FACILITIES ASSISTANT–FT MON-FRI, 7AM-3PM with benefits- $11.00 p/h. Sweeping floors, showers, restroom, pool deck and other areas, emptying trashcans, maintaining/cleaning bathrooms and hall area, setting up tables/chairs for events. Must be able to work with cleaning chemicals. Previous custodial exp, knowledge of commercial vacuums, floor scrubbers, gas powered blowers preferred; varies locations/hours/days/weekends.

GARAGE SALES/ BAZAARS 3 FAMILY GARAGE SALE Saturday, May 18 7am - 4PM Art, Furniture, Clothes, Kids Items, Household Items Lots of Misc. 5 N 125th Ave. Van Buren Between Dysart and Avondale Household items for sale, furniture, men & women's clothing, decorations, patio furniture, much more May 24th & 25th, from 7:00 am - 2:00 pm, 16472 W. Monro St. Goodyear

HANDYMAN JOEL Cedillo- I do construction work! Concrete, Block, Stucco, Bobcat work, Haulaway, Demolition. Call for free estimates, 623-707-6072. *Not A Licensed Contractor

HANDYMAN - 37 years experience. Drywall, framing, plumbing, painting, electrical, roofing and more. Stan 602-434-6057

LANDSCAPING SERVICES

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

Yard Work clean ups, removal, sod installation, irrigation systems, hauling, rock spreading. Not a licensed contractor. Juan 623-242-4161 or 623-242-4159

AKC GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES FOR SALE 6 Solid Black Males, 1 Sable Male, 2 Sable Females Available. Parents on Site. 1st Shots, DeWorming & Pedigree Included. $750 Each Call / Text Dave 602-770-5213

O.N.B. Specializes in landscaping and trimming. Also Concrete: patios, driveways, sidewalks, additions and more. Free estimates. 623-249-0610 - Robert Residential/Commercial.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Sprays, Kits, Mattress Covers Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com DIATOMACEOUS EARTH-FOOD GRADE HARRIS DIATOMACEOUS EARTH FOOD GRADE 100% OMRI Listed-For Organic Use Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

EMPLOYMENT

LANDSCAPERS - $11.25 p/h - Manual labor. Previous landscape experience a plus. Must be able to work M-F, some OT and MUST have a valid AZ driver's license with a good driving record. TECH III – PLUMBER, F/T, $18.61 with benefits. Responsible for performing skilled/semiskilled labor in the Plumbing fields. Installs and repairs plumbing fixtures, valves and sewer systems. Must have current knowledge of plumbing codes and must possess a valid Arizona driver’s license and a good driving record. One year current plumbing experience. Perform preventative maintenance and work in other areas of the maintenance field. The above positions include golf when availability is open. All positions must be able to communicate in English. Apply M-F, 8-3, at 19803 R.H. Johnson Blvd, Sun City West, AZ 85375. Fax 623-544-6124 or apply online at hrsearch@rcscw.com For more info on open jobs visit www.suncitywest.com (Association) All positions are open until filled. EOE

Perishable Selector IV

Excellent opportunity to join McLane Company, the nation's largest wholesale convenience store supplier. We are searching for a self-motivated, energetic candidate. Ability to multitask in fast paced environment and work in cold temperatures. Perishable Selector IV is responsible for select designated product, securely loading it onto a cart and using power equipment to transport it to the designated dock area to fulfill customer orders We offer a competitive wage and excellent benefits package including profit sharing, medical, dental, vision and company paid life insurance. HS Diploma/GED Required If interested, go to www.mclaneco.com/careers Locate the job opening for Sunwest (Goodyear, AZ) and click to “Apply"

KILL ROACHESGUARANTEED! Buy Harris Roach Tablets, Sprays, & Concentrate Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com KILL SCORPIONS! Buy Harris Scorpion Spray/Kit Odorless, Non-Staining Effective Results Begin After Spray Dries Available: The Home Depot, homedepot.com, Hardware Stores Vaughan Bassett Four post Canon Ball Cal-King, solid oak bed frame $600 602-622-2346

Wanted Freon R12. We pay CA$H R12, R500, R11. Convenient. Certified professionals. refrigerantfinders.com 312-291-9169

Washer-Dryer Electric Good condition $125.00 ea 702-354-0912

PETS/SERVICES HORSE Pellet Delivery 250# outdoor container SSS @ 623-556-7597

LAND FOR SALE 1 to 18 acres, starting $10,000, various locations, payments, owner/agent, Call Ken, 602-510-8900

HOMES FOR SALE PUBLISHER's Notice: All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preference limitation or discrimination." We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

ROOMS/ ROOMMATES Room for rent, utilities included for more information please call 602-717-5064

WANTED TO BUY $100-$500+ Cash for Junk Cars all "as is" autos! Good condition more $$$$. Best Prices! Fast, free pickup. 623-329-2043

MANUFACTURED HOMES SALE/RENT

MANUFACTURED HOME WITH LAND FINANCING

1978 OR NEWER SINGLE OR DOUBLE WIDE, SECOND MOVES OK COMPRE SU RANCHITA CON RON TRINKA REALTY

RON TRINKA REALTY 623-853-2525 MNLS # 1707061, 1462431 - Ronald Trinka


28

CLASSIFIEDS

623.535.VIEW AIR CONDITIONING

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

WEST VALLEY BUSINESS ACCOUNTING Desert Valley Palms, llc Cynthia (Benson) Traugott, EA

OFFERING FULL ACCOUNTING & TAX SERVICES

AIR CONDITIONING AC & HEATING SERVICES

Repair • Replacment • Maintenance

• Bookkeeping/QuickBooks • Individual & Business Tax Returns • Payroll

*FREE SECOND OPINIONS *EMERGENCY SERVICE *ALL MAKES & MODELS **FREE QUOTES ON NEW EQUIPMENT** “FINANCING AVAILABLE” FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED WESTSIDE BUSINESS LICENSED ROC#313262-BONDED-INSURED “World Class Service - Hometown Feel”

www.airNOWac.com

623-932-1674 A+ REPAIR-SERVICE-UPGRADE

602-601-6002

www.desertvalleypalmsllc.com desertvalleypalmsllc@gmail.com

AIR CONDITIONING

480-633-7867

HIGH PERFORMANCE EXPERTS • 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed • FREE Second Quotes • Financing Options • 40+ yrs total industry experience

WE CARE ABOUT OUR COMMUNITY & YOU

EpicHVAC.biz

May 29th Edition Deadline May 22nd at 1pm 623-535-8439 class@timespublications.com REMODELING

WWW.YOURSONCONTRACTING.COM

(6 2 3) 5 8 2 - 4 4 7 7 LUXURY HOME REMODELS

KITCHEN & BATHS FLOORING ADDITIONS AGING IN PLACE ROOFING

Visit Our Design Studio 11203 W Nevada Ave. Youngtown, AZ LICENSED - BONDED - INSURED - ROC#223524

Family Locally Owned & Operated • 20 Years Experience

623-299-7111 www.ampmhomeservices.com Insured

*Not a Licensed Contractor

AIR CONDITIONING

Holiday Deadlines:

Plumbing Experts

FREE ESTIMATES

Licensed, Bonded, Insured ROC 318574

FREE ESTIMATES! FREE DIAGNOSIS!

One Call Can Fix It All! Water Heaters • Faucets • Toilets • Filtration & R.O. Drywall Painting/Texture • Electrical • Fans • Lighting Pool Repairs • Drain Cleaning • Sewer Cameras Bathroom Remodel/Update • Plus Much More!

• Ask about Special Pricing for Veterans, Military Members & First Responders • Women Owned Business

AC-HEAT-PLUMBING

HANDYMAN

(623) 244-6447 AIR CONDITIONING

CARPET CLEANING/ REPAIR

Appliance Repair Now

COOPER’S CARPET .. CLEANING Tile AND GROUT 623-872-8552

If It’s Broken, We Can Fix It!

ROC #156315, ROC #285317

OPEN 24/7/265

APPLIANCE SERVICES

• Same Day Service • On-Site Repairs • Servicing All Major Brands • Quality Guaranteed

25 OFF $

We Also Buy, Sell & Trade Used Appliances Working or Not

A/C Repair!

480-659-1400

COUPON REQUIRED

★ Emergency Service ★ ALL Makes & Models ★ FREE Quotes for New Units ★ Financing Available ★ Local Family Owned Business ★ Friendly Service Every Time!

623.537.4830 LICENSED ROC#166569 BONDED & INSURED

www.acexpertek.com

HANDYMAN

Licensed & Insured

AUTO SERVICES

100- $500 + ABANDONED CARS All “As Is” Autos!

CLEANING

$

Carpet, Tile-Grout, & Air Duct Cleaning

Commercial & Residential Housecleaning

FREE ESTIMATES

www.pnponecarecleaning.com

Call Today/Clean Today

602.550.7732

Licensed/Bonded/Insured

CONTRACTORS GET AN ESTIMATE TODAY!

Honey Do List Too Long? Check out the Handyman Section!

30 Years Experience Owner – Operator

Good Condition = More $$$ Best Prices! Fast, free pickup!

623-329-2043

✔ Concrete Removal ✔ Pool Removal ✔ Demo Jobs ✔ Driveway Removal

WE DIG OUT ANYTHING!

Fully insured. We carry work insurance on all employees.

602-428-8733


CLASSIFIEDS

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

& SERVICE DIRECTORY

AS LOW AS $45 PER ISSUE ASK US HOW!

GARAGE DOOR/ SERVICES

HANDYMAN

LANDSCAPING

SUPERCHARGED

Avondale Garage Doors Inc.

Professional Handyman

Lawn Care

ELECTRIC

Showroom & Parts Store

FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL

Indoor/Outdoor Lighting Spa Circuits Panel Replacement/ Upgrade

Ceiling Fans Troubleshooting/ Inspection Repairs Remodels/Additions

Fix & Replace Garage Doors & Openers

LOW PRICES!

623-546-7714

Bonded • Insured • Licensed AvondaleGarageDoors.com

Family - Owned and Operated LICENSED ROC#181530 BONDED • INSURED www.superchargedelectric.com

ROC#198687

GARAGE DOOR/ SERVICES

623.466.3712

GARAGE DOOR/ SERVICES

Licensed • Bonded • Insured

Broken Springs Replaced

New Doors & Openers Sales/Service/Installations/Repairs

Over 25 Years Construction Experience

• Service & Installation • Door Off Track • Routine Maintenance • Licensed, Bonded & Insured • Valley Wide Service 24/7 • Hablo Español ROC# 319202

BROKEN SPRINGS

• Tree Trimming

• Weed Removal/Spray • One-Time Cleanup

WHY PAY MORE? Mike 714-742-4527 Not a licensed contractor

Specializing in LARGE TREE TRIMMING Antonio or Laura 623.206.3403

HANDYMAN

LANDSCAPING

HANDYMAN I AM HOME REPAIR L.L.C.

Minnesota Ethics in an Arizona Economy

•No Job Too Small • Free Estimates

Licensed, Bonded, Insured • ROC 209166

623-225-1930

ROC# 299652

www.azbestgaragedoors.com

602-931-0904

GARAGE DOOR/ SERVICES

GLASS SERVICES

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

623-512-6194

HandymanIam@cox.net

Don’t let your broken panes... Break your bank!!! Mention this ad: Buy One Window Replacement Get the Second -1/2 OFF*

Garage Doors

Repair • Service • Installation

Residential • Commercial

Family Owned & Operated

Family Owned & Operated In Arizona Since 1977 www.demersglass.com

623.556.8378

(623) 878-1180

Same Day Service & Free Estimates Licensed, Bonded & Insured ROC #289066

ROC# CR65 090690D

*Equal or lesser value of materials ONLY

PLUMBING

Honest Locally Integrity & Veteran Value Owned

FREE SERVICE CALL

SENIOR DISCOUNTS •MILITARY DISCOUNTS

30 OFF

49.95

Service

Water Heater Flush

100 OFF New Water Heater

Call for details. Some restrictions may apply. Exp 5/31/19

Call for details. Some restrictions may apply. Exp 5/31/19

Call for details. Some restrictions may apply. Exp 5/31/19

$

Check us out on Angie’s List, Manta, Porch and Yelp Business Listings.

$

623-688-5243 www.theplumberguy.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured ROC 185143, 192987

• • • • • •

Tree Trimming •Mowing & Edging Sprinkler Systems - Install & Repair Landscape Renovations General Clean Up • Weed Control Lighting • Concrete • Pavers Plant & Tree Installation

Serving the West Valley Since 1990

References Available

Not a licensed contractor

Weekly Year Round Service! No job too big or too small

Mike (623) 764-1294

LANDSCAPING

• Regular Maintenance • • Bi-Weekly & Monthly Service • • One Time Clean-Ups • • Plant & Tree Renovation • • Tree Trimming & Removal • • Irrigation Repairs & Installs • • Weed Control & Removal • • Next-Day Service in Most Cases •

Gardeningpluslandscapes@gmail.com

Ben - 623-764-1364

LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

Not a licensed contractor

Custom Landscaping and Hardscaping Same Owners, formerly Flatiron Landscape Same Great Service! Pavers. Artificial Grass. Putting Greens Same Owners, Same Service! Custom Landscaping andGreat Hardscaping Concrete. Retaining Walls. Pavers. Artificial Grass. Putting Greens Fireplaces. Outdoor Kitchens. Curbing. Custom Landscaping and Hardscaping Concrete. Walls. Irrigation and Repairs Pavers • ArtifiInstallation cial Retaining Grass • Putting Greens Fireplaces. Outdoor Curbing. Tree• and PlantKitchens. Installation Concrete Retaining Walls Fireplaces Irrigation Installation and• Repairs Outdoor • Cubring E FRE Tree andKitchens Plant Installation ST E Licensed-Bonded-Insured Irrigation Installation and Repairs IMATES ROC#202397. ROC#219652 TreeLicensed-Bonded-Insured and Plant Installation ROC#202397. ROC#219652 D:(623)670-0080 D:(623)670-0080 stonecreek-az.com stonecreek-az.com D:(623)670-0080 O:(623)536-8275 O:(623)536-8275 stonecreek-az.com

O:(623)536-8275 Licensed - Bonded - Insured • ROC#202397 ROC#219652

LANDSCAPING

AZ MAD Heating & Cooling

(Call/Text)

All Makes & Models Free 2nd Opinions • Free Equipment Quotes

45.00

MEDICAL SERVICES

vistadelsollandscape@q.com vistadelsollandscape@q.com

Uriel 623-297-0114 623-297-0114 Uriel

PAINTING

“A Passion for Caring” The most experienced and compassionate home care service in the West! • In-Home care service for your loved ones • On Call 24/7 Customized Care • Experienced Staff • RN Supervised • Serving the Greater Phoenix West

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING

VALLEYWIDE!

– Licensed and Bonded –

CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES

623.547.7521

www.acompassionatehomecare.com

602-434-7050

PLUMBING If Your Water Won’t Flow or Your Air Won’t Blow...Call...

623.910.0742

* Irrigation system and repairs (Valves, drip, timers, & sprinklers) * Pavers * Artificial grass * Malibu lights * Maintenance, general clean-ups & hauling * House painting, interior & exterior AND MUCH MORE. CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE.

Weekly, Biweekly, Monthly & Quarterly Residential & Commercial, Big Properties Not a licensed contractor

MEDICAL SERVICES

www.fastflowplumbingandair.com Water Heater • Water Treatments • Faucets/Toilets • Leak locating Drain Cleaning • Heating • Air Conditioning • Air Purification Gas Pipe Repairs & Installation

24 hour e! Servic ra $) Senior & Military Discounts

DEL DEL

Irrigation Install & Repairs Irrigation Install Pavers& Repairs Pavers Outdoor Lighting Outdoor Lighting Arbor Care/Cleanups Arbor Care/Cleanups

ROC#212627

Landscape Maintenance Services

Insured & Bonded Insured & Bonded ROC#230926 ROC#230926

SOL SOL LANDSCAPE LANDSCAPE

Phoenix Metro Area

Family Owned & Operated Not afraid to work weekends Get out of the crowd and join the family!

(No Ext

VISTA VISTA

Same Day Service

24 HR. EMERGENCY SERVICE

Landscape

602.301.3429

NO EXTRA $$$ FOR AFTER RS, WEEKENDHSOU HOLIDAYS!OR

623-535-8000 $

Not a licensed contractor

714-380-9826

Same Owners, Same Great Service!

Water Heaters • Drain Cleaning • Faucets/Sinks • Slab Leaks Water Softeners • Toilets • Garbage Disposals

$

HANDYMAN & HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

Mike’s Lawn Service LLC

AIR CONDITIONING

Inc.

ELECTRICAL

432 N. Litchfield Rd. Unit 300

29

Charles Residential Care LLC. • Offers long-term residential care for seniors • RN Owner/operated • Serene, Secure & comfortable environment • Trains caregivers for NCIA Board certification and Heart Saver CPR/1st Aid • Beds available in Goodyear and Glendale

Contact us at 309-269-0798 or 309-314-7790

6500

$

Drain Cleaning with Guarantee

75 OFF

$

Any NEW Water Heater Install

Sewer Camera Inspections

FREE ESTIMATES

Family Locally Owned & Operated • 20 Years Experience

Complimentary Plumbing Inspection with Any Repair

623-299-7111

Licensed • Bonded • Insured • 234804 & 234805


CLASSIFIEDS

30

WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY PAINTING

PAINTING

BRANDENBURG PAINTING

Saunders Painting

Interior & Exterior Bonded & Insured ROC #123818

MIKE MORAN PLUMBING LLC

Residential, Commercial & Industrial Customers

Interior & Exterior

623-972-9150 623-695-3390

Bob

PAINTING

ERIC SAUNDERS

BRUSH STROKE PAINTING FREE ESTIMATES

POWER WASH • WINDOW CLEANING • CABINETS DRYWALL REPAIR • ACOUSTIC CEILINGS BRUSH/ROLL/SPRAY • INTERIOR/EXTERIOR brushstrokepaintingllc@gmail.com

602-722-7696

Drywall Repair/Texture Matching Acoustic Ceiling Removal Cabinets’ & Power Washing

PLUMBING

Your West Valley Plumber

For All Your Plumbing Needs

FREE ESTIMATES

Free Estimates

MOBILE:

PEST CONTROL

Licensed, Bonded & Insured

ROC Lic. #170982

Jeff R. Saunders

602-826-3969

Serving Arizona Since 1976 • Locally Owned & Operated

Credit Cards Accepted ROC Lic. #143502 & Bonded

800-284-2392 602-275-4888 www.biochemexterminating.com

PEST CONTROL

PEST CONTROL

Mobile

WINTER BROS PESTS, inc.

The Bug Stops Here

Termite - Pest - Pigeon Pro’s

• ALL PEST CONTROL • Fleas/ Ticks • Bed Bugs • Roaches • Weed control • All surfaces with 6 month guarantee • Residential / Commercial

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

FHA/VA Inspections

Bed Bugs, Bees, etc.

Basic Pest Service

FAMILY OWNED

49-75

$

Licensed • Bonded • Insured

Lic# 4147

Lic. / Est. 1981

Our Goal is not to be the Biggest – Just the best!

Mitch Stevens OWNER-OPERATOR A Referral Is The Best Compliment Bus

623 932 4168 Cell 623 810 6035

License #8555 mes123us@yahoo.com

No Contracts • Payment Plans

PLUMBING

PAINTING

A-CALL A-CALL PAINTING

We’W Wree’e’rereonon onlylyly a caaallca llll aw caaw awayay ay!

HOA REPAINT REPAINT SPECIALIST HOA SPECIALIST HOA REPAINT SPECIALIST ROC#302675 • Fully ROC#302675 • Fully Insured Insured jppaintpros445@gmail.com jppaintpros445@gmail.com

Free Estimates Jack Pacheco Jack Pacheco

602-422-3648 602-422-3648

623-293-7095 623-293-7095

U.S.A.F. Retired. 25+ Yrs. Exp.

Remodel • All Repairs Cleaning SVC “No Nonsense” www.triplerpool.com Licensed Contractor ROC C-37-120135 • ROC C-05-159059

“1 Call & We Do It All”

triplerpool@gmail.com

623-935-9221

Built Stronger to Last Longer

PLUMBING

ROOFING 602-622-2859 623-936-5775

Please recycle me.

55 DRAIN CLEANING

$

with Plumbing Inspection

Senior & Military Discounts

For All Plumbing Repairs

623-299-2637

9

▲▲

▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲ ▲ ▲▲ ▲

E

IN

Kitchen & Bathroom • Designer Showroom

8 CE 19

Your Custom Remodeling Specialist For All Your Home Improvement Needs!

623-933-4312 11126 W. Wisconsin Ave, #5 - Youngtown For Discount Coupons Visit www.AlbrechtandSon.com Licensed/Bonded/Insured Limited Liability Corp • ROC #155822 KB02

Listed HOA/PORA

★★C

▲ ▲▲ ▲

G ★▲▲▲▲▲▲

▲▲▲▲▲▲▲ ▲▲ ▲▲ ▲

N

▲ ▲

YEARS S

Painting, Remodeling and Construction

30

24 Hr. Service Plumbing Service & Repair Sewer & Drain Cleaning Free Estimates Free Plumbing Inspection

623-322-9100

PLUMBING

We raise the roof with our quality, service and value!

Re-Roofs New Roofs • Repairs

ROC Lic. #133241 • Bonded • Insured

“Licensed, bonded and insured” ROC #267604

35 Years Experience in the Valley

EstrellaCustomDesigns.com

FREE ESTIMATES

623-293-2648

ROOFING

Total Care Plumbing LLC Water Heaters from

585 Unclog Drains from $ 4400 $

includes labor

AZ’S

BEST ROOFING New Roofs, Repairs, Coatings, Flat Roof, Hot Mopping & Patching, & Total Rubber Roof Systems

FREE ESTIMATES

Remodels • Repairs Leaks • Toilets Water Softeners Gas • Sink/Faucets

SAME DAY SERVICE

Senior Citizen Discount

30 Years Experience References Available

FREE Estimates • Service/Repair

623-385-9580 ROC 233444 Licensed • Bonded • Insured

FREE

ESTIMATES!!!!!

Your leaks stop here!

602-329-2790

Painting & More

ROOFING

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PROJECTS

ALBRECHT AND SON

Kitchens Concrete Flooring

PLUMBING

Licensed • Bonded • Insured ROC Lic #138051

PLUMBING

Michael Kite

Additions Garages Patios

www.1buckeyeplumbing.com

RESIDENTIAL SPECIALISTS FOR ALL YOUR RESIDENTIAL FOR ALL YOUR INTERIOR SPECIALISTS & EXTERIOR PROJECTS

B R AT L E ▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲ I

New Roofs & Reroofs

Repairs, Coatings, Walk Decks Home New Build or Renovate

All Types of Roofing

Licensed • Bonded • Insured ROC#216918 • 216982

FREE ESTIMATES

ROC#273001 • 0 STRIKES • INSURED & BONDED

FREE ESTIMATES! 26 Years Experience in the Valley!

623-386-0710

Licensed • Bonded • Insured ROC 229722 • PORA & HOA Gold Member

Kite Plumbing

Estrella Custom Designs

All types of roofing!

• Water Treatment Specialists • Residential & Commercial • Water Heaters Sr & Military Discount • Slab Leaks

Plumbing & Drain Cleaning

Your newspaper. Your community. Your planet.

ROOFING

Almeida Roofing Inc.

Buckeye Plumbing

HAMILTON & HAMILTON

REMODELING

Quality Attention to Every Detail

TRIPLE WE DO IT ALL!

License #ROC209589

L&M

PEST & LANDSCAPING LLC

— 623-869-7378 —

Senior Citizen Discount 20 Years Experience

POOL SERVICES

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

MEDICATION ASSISTED DRUG & ALCOHOL DEPENDENCY TREATMENT

Suboxone Vivitrol Counseling 7331 E. Osborn, Suite 410, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 • (480) 550-7842 www.truesolutionshealth.com

CALL (480) 550.7842 FOR A CONFIDENTIAL CONSULTATION

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WEST VALLEY VIEW NEWS | MAY 15, 2019

BE$T PEOPLE - BE$T PRICES LOWE$T TA X RATE

PRE-MEMORIAL DAY PRE-OWNED SPECIAL AT THE JONES FORD MEGA SUPER STORE! 2009 VW TOUAREG 2 VR6

$

#P8413A Low Miles! Absolute Excell Cond!

8,817

2014 JEEP WRANGLER UNL. SAHARA

#P8455 Nicest Jeep on our lot!

$

29,417

2018 SUBARU FORESTER PREMIUM

#P8319A 4x4, Ready to Work! ........................................

3,917

$

2001 FORD F-150 KING RANCH

#T8383A 4WD, 1 Owner, Loaded!

#P8431 #X8411

1 Owner! Excellent Cond! ......................... $12,517

2016 FORD FUSION SE

#19114A Sporty! Warranty Incl! ............................... $13,417

2015 FORD FLEX SE

#P8396A Very Nice! 3rd Row, Rear AC! ................... $13,617

Low Miles! Like New! ................................. $16,417

2016 HONDA CR-V LX

#T8441

20171 HONDA CR-V EX

#19069A 1 Owner! Only 14K Miles!......................... $22,817

CHRYSLER, DODGE, JEEP, RAM #P8260B Leather, DVD, Much More! .......................

14,417

$

#19043A Sharp! Only 29K Miles! .............................. #P8423

Like New! Well Equipped! ........................

2016 FORD F-150 XL

2018 RAM 1500 SLT

#X8425

#P8438

#P8451

1 Owner! Priced to Sell! ............................

26,517

$

4x4, Crew Cab, Like New! .........................

18,717

$

20,817

$

24,817

$

2016 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT #T8414

Like New! Only 11K Miles! .......................

28,717

$

Hard to Find Hybrid! ................................... $14,917

2014 INFINITI Q50 HYBRID SPORT

Classy! Sharp Ride! Low Miles! ............... $19,617

2014 BMW 428i

#18622A Sporty! Loaded w/ Equip! ........................ $20,717

2019 ACURA MDX

#18556A Like New! Only 7K Miles! .......................... $39,917

CHEVEROLET, GMC

2015 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING

2018 CHRYSLER 300 LIMITED

2019 FORD FLEX LIMITED

37,217

2014 LEXUS CT 200h HYBRID

Leather, DVD & More! ................................ $19,917

2013 HONDA ODYSSEY EX-L

2012 FORD F-150 XL

Crew Cab, Must See! Like New!.............. $25,917

$

#19260A Sporty! Low Miles! ...........................................$7,417 #T8415

2016 DODGE JOURNEY CROSSROAD +

#19147A Crew Cab, Low Miles! ................................. $18,617

#19132A Sweet Ride! Picture says it all!

16,817

Priced to Sell! Warranty Incl!...................

$

2016 FORD MUSTANG V6

#19054B Like New! only 32K Miles! ........................ $17,717

2018 TOYOTA 4RUNNER LIMITED

2009 MERCEDES-BENZ C300 3.0L SPORT

#T8399

Sharp! Like New! ......................................... $11,317

2011 FORD RANGER XLT

25,917

2016 HONDA ACCORD SEDAN SPORT

#P8454

2018 FORD FIESTA SE

30,617

$

PREMIUM IMPORTS

5,517

#18269A 4x4, Crew Cab!...................................................

$

#T8343A Off Road Fun! Only 46K Miles!

HONDA

#T8384

$

22,917

2016 DODGE CHALLENGER 392 HEMI

FORD 1999 FORD F-150

$

#T8404 1 Owner! AWD! Well Equip!

2015 JEEP WRANGLER UNL. SAHARA

2011 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 LS

#19196A Crew Cab, Warranty Incl! .......................... $16,517

2015 GMC SIERRA 1500 SLE #T8418

Like New! Only 24K Miles! ....................... $24,917

2018 CHEVY COLORADO 4WD LT #P8434

Crew Cab, Like New!...................................

25,917

$

2015 GMC YUKON XL DENALI

2013 CHEVY BLACK DIAMOND AVALANCHE

#19297A Like New! 4WD, 1 Owner!

#P8429 Sharp! Like New! DRW!

#T8409

24600 W. YUMA ROAD, BUCKEYE JUST SOUTH OF I-10 BETWEEN MILLER AND WATSON ROADS

623.386.4429 | JONESFORDBUCKEYE.COM Prices subject to change. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Prices do not include sales tax, license, $379.00 dealer doc fee and any dealer add-ons. Prices valid through 05/21/2019. Sales vehicles may have scratches, dents or dings. See dealer for details.

Sporty Sedan! Warranty Incl!.................. $11,217

2016 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 S #P8972

Low Miles! Very Nice!.................................. $11,917

2016 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER SPORT

#P8361A Sharp & Sporty! 1 Owner SUV!............... $14,117

2014 TOYOTA RAV4 LE

#T8400A Priced Below Market! Nice Cond! .......... $14,517

2018 NISSAN FRONTIER PRO-4X #P8430

Crew Cab, 4x4, Off Road Beast!............... $24,617

HYUNDAI, KIA 2015 KIA SPORTAGE LX #T8393

Fun SUV! .......................................................... $11,917

2017 HYUNDAI SONATA 2.4L #T8362

Low Low Miles! Must See! ........................ $13,917

2018 KIA SOUL BASE

#T8388

Loaded w/ Equip, Like New!....................

47,317

2016 MAZDA MAZDA3 i SPORT

38,817

#T8440

$

MITSUBISHI, MAZDA, NISSAN, TOYOTA

#P8446

$

27,617

2018 FORD SUPER DUTY F-350 XLT

#18523A Loaded w/ Options! Must Have! ............ $37,817

2018 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT

$

Like New! Cute! ............................................. $14,817

2017 HYUNDAI SANTA FE SPORT 2.4L Sporty, Fun SUV!........................................... $14,917

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West Valley View: West 05 - 15 - 2019  

West Valley View: West 05 - 15 - 2019  

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