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UCD College of Engineering, Mathematical and Physical Sciences

A WORLD OF

ENGINEERING


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Photo courtesy of ESA

Engineering at UCD

The dawn of a new era at UCD If you see your future in energy, the environment, business, healthcare, manufacturing, clean technologies, communications or construction and sustainable living, then an engineering degree from UCD may be just the right step for you. An exceptionally broad range of programme pathways will be available to students entering UCD Engineering (DN150) from 2011. After successfully completing a common first year, you will be offered unrestricted choice from a huge range of specialisations at undergraduate level. In addition to the long established Bachelor of Engineering (BE) programmes in Biosystems, Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, students will now have the option to specialise in Energy Systems Engineering or Biomedical Engineering. Also, to facilitate more advanced study (to a level consistent with modern European standards), students will have the option to progress through to taught Masters programmes in the areas of Biomedical Engineering, Biosystems Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Energy Systems Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Engineering with Business.

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Students also have the option of specialising in many different research areas at both Master and PhD level. The Structural Engineering with Architecture Programme (DN140) is based only on the five-year education model and is accessed via a separate direct entry route. This will suit those students who have a love of design and the built environment, and a passion for architecture. Lectures will be led by academics, many of whom hold world renown for their research and knowledge breakthroughs in engineering aspects of the environment, energy, healthcare, communications, power systems and even space travel. From your first day in UCD you will be exposed to innovative research in all of these areas. Through self-directed learning and research gained from both class and group projects, you will develop and increase your knowledge of engineering principles. This will prove to be enjoyable, perhaps beyond what you thought an engineering education would be. For instance, had you previously thought that as part of your education you’d be teaching a boat to sail autonomously across the Atlantic, measuring the effects man has had on the environment en route or, indeed, designing and building a robot to play rugby?


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Programme Structure

Studying Engineering at UCD DN140 STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING WITH ARCHITECTURE

DN150 ENGINEERING

Biosystems

Year 1 – Engage with the principles (Common Curriculum)

Year 1

Years 2 & 3 – Choose your pathway

Years 2 & 3

Chemical & Bioprocess

Electronic/ Electrical

Civil

Mechanical

Energy Systems or Biomedical Engineering

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING WITH ARCHITECTURE

Year 4 – Bachelor Degree Options Biosystems

Energy Systems

Electrical Civil

Year 4

Mechanical

Chemical & Bioprocess

Electronic

Years 4 & 5 – Master Degree Options Biosystems

Chemical & Bioprocess

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING WITH ARCHITECTURE

Biomedical

Year 5 – Master Degree

Mechanical

Energy Systems

Engineering with Business

Biomedical

Civil Biopharmaceutical

Electronic & Computer

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING WITH ARCHITECTURE

Professional careers in engineering and other areas CAREERS IN ENERGY

CAREERS IN HEALTHCARE

CAREERS IN COMMUNICATION

CAREERS IN BUSINESS

CAREERS IN RESEARCH AND ACADEMIA

Designing renewable energy devices Energy technology transfer Power systems engineering

Tissue engineering Developing medical equipment Developing and producing pharmaceuticals

Developing entertainment and media devices Developing satellite communications Developing telecommunications systems

Management and project management Financial services Risk assessment and analysis

Teaching Research Developing new technologies

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Engineering at UCD

Welcome The aim of this brochure is to give you some insight into what life might be like if you choose to study engineering at UCD, with a view to becoming a professional engineer or to using your acquired skills in another arena. In essence, we aim to enable you to develop your capacity for independent and creative thought, so that you will be equipped to provide sound leadership in an uncertain future world. At UCD, we aim to provide a first-class education in a very wide range of engineering disciplines, some of which may be familiar and others less so. Whatever the specialisation, we place strong emphasis on mastery of analytical skills and the use of quantitative methods. Study is based on solid mathematical, scientific and engineering principles that do not change even though implementation through technology changes rapidly. Also, we make significant efforts to ensure that all students develop good communication skills and study some aspects of accountancy, business, finance and law. We are not content with just understanding mathematics and the sciences. We wish to use this understanding to solve problems, to design and implement new processes and products. Ultimately, engineers aim to provide solutions to a huge array of problems faced by mankind, now and in the future. For example, it is now very clear that an ever increasing population on earth is hoping to emulate the living standard enjoyed at present by a lucky minority. Enormous challenges face us in providing sufficient energy, water, food and healthcare for all. Perhaps you would like to contribute, whilst at the same time enjoying a very satisfying and well-paid career? Achieving something really worthwhile is rarely easy and engineering students need to work consistently and learn to be efficient with use of their time. The contact hours are slightly longer than in some other programmes but our students invariably have a really enjoyable and satisfying experience. Many life-long friendships are formed through team-work, often in the context of laboratory experiments and design projects. Our programmes are fully accredited and the qualifications enjoy wide international recognition. UCD-educated engineering graduates have excelled internationally in technical and managerial leadership roles. We are delighted to introduce two new BE programmes this year to our suite of programmes under CAO code DN150 Engineering, Biomedical and Energy Systems Engineering; these are exciting and challenging additions to the engineering educational programme at UCD, delivered by world-renowned experts in the fields. It is important to note the change in CAO codes: this year when you fill out your CAO form note that Engineering is now DN150 and Structural Engineering with Architecture is DN140. In the case of DN150 Engineering, students entering under this CAO code will not be required to specialise until after the first year, at which point they are offered unrestricted choice from our extensive list of engineering specialisations. Students will have the opportunity to complete an Honours Bachelor of Engineering (BE) degree after four years or, alternatively, to complete both BSc (Engineering Science) and Master of Engineering (ME) degrees after a total of five years of study. In the latter case they will satisfy the future Engineers Ireland educational requirements to become Chartered Engineers.

Dr David Timoney, Chartered Engineer Dean of Engineering, UCD College of Engineering, Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

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Engineering at UCD

Contents BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING (Honours) Engineering

6

Biomedical Engineering

8

Biosystems Engineering

10

Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering

12

Civil Engineering

14

Electrical Engineering

16

Electronic Engineering

16

Energy Systems Engineering

18

Mechanical Engineering

20

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AND MASTER OF ENGINEERING Structural Engineering with Architecture

22

MASTER OF ENGINEERING Taught Masters in Engineering ME Biomedical Engineering

24

ME Biosystems Engineering

24

ME Civil Engineering

24

ME Electronic and Computer Engineering 25 ME Energy Systems Engineering

25

ME Engineering with Business

25

ME Mechanical Engineering

25

Life as an engineering student in UCD

26

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Engineering at UCD

UCD Engineering

Engineering

BE(Hons) Direct Entry CAO Code: Length of Programme: Minimum CAO Points 2010:

Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)

DN150 4 Years 425

Entry Requirements

DN150 BE (Hons) (NFQ Level 8) or BSc (Engineering Science) (NFQ Level 8) leading to ME (NFQ Level 9)

Contact details UCD Engineering & Architecture Programme Office UCD Engineering and Materials Science Centre Belfield, Dublin 4 Tel: +353 1 716 1868 Email: eng.arch@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/engineer

Irish; English; Mathematics (minimum grade C3 LC Higher Level); one laboratory science subject – Physics and/or Chemistry is recommended (minimum grade D3 LC Higher Level); and, two other recognised subjects. A-Level/GCSE Passes (GCSE Grade C or above) in six recognised subjects including those above, of which two must be minimum Grade C or above at A-Level. (Note: ALevels are normally exempt from the Irish language requirement.) Guideline Equivalent Average A-Level Grades: AAAC (A-Level) or equivalent combination. Guideline Equivalent Minimum A-Level Grades: A*AC (A-Level) and B (AS) or equivalent combination.

What is UCD Engineering?

What makes a good UCD Engineer?

UCD DN150 Engineering is the entry point to the majority of the Engineering programmes at UCD. The diversity and possibilities open to you as an Engineering student in UCD are second to none. This year two new programmes – Biomedical Engineering and Energy Systems Engineering – have been added to our suite of programmes, increasing the myriad of possibilities open to you as a UCD Engineering student. At undergraduate level after a common first year you will have unrestricted choice of specialisation in any of the following areas; Biomedical, Biosystems, Chemical and Bioprocess, Civil, Electrical or Electronic, Energy Systems and Mechanical Engineering. During the first year of the Engineering (Common Entry) degree at UCD, all students will enjoy a year of rigorous training in the fundamentals of engineering, which UCD is renowned for. This year will focus on maths and physics to develop your problem-solving and decision-making skills, which will hold you in good stead throughout your engineering education, your career and your life.

The engineers that have passed through the doors of UCD all hold one very special attribute in common – creativity! UCD engineers have inquisitive minds and love to solve problems – and it is their creativity that sustains them when times get tough. Sometimes the tried and trusted solutions won’t work and you’ll have to come up with a new way of solving a problem, be it a health issue, a structural design issue, an energy issue, or a business issue. You will be the person that people will look to for answers and a UCD engineer will try to find a creative way of arriving at a solution that meets the needs of all parties.

What can students expect to study following entry to Engineering at UCD? A world of opportunity awaits you. The first year will be spent intensively learning and discovering how to solve problems through physics, mathematics and some engineering subjects such as mechanics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and electronic/electrical engineering. You will be exposed to the various engineering disciplines, which will make your choice (at the end of the first year) a more informed one. You can then proceed into a specialised area of engineering such as biomedical, biosystems, chemical and bioprocess, civil, electrical, electronic, energy systems or mechanical engineering.

What are the career options for engineering graduates? From running a company to designing an industrial plant, from working in a multinational like Google to visiting Africa to work on

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Engineering (Common Entry)

Did you know?

Life as an Engineering student

Ronan McGovern Entrance Scholar and Irish Language Scholar

Engineering graduates have a better chance than graduates of any other discipline of becoming the chief executive of a Fortune 500 company. UCD engineering graduates have gone on to do weird and wonderful things. Being part of the UCD engineering alumni can lead you down a range of paths: from being managing director of a multi-national company, to working in the Kennedy Space Centre, and from developing new biomedical devices, to tackling the energy and environmental challenges facing mankind. Whatever path of engineering at UCD you decide to take, you can be certain that, if you apply yourself, it can give you opportunities you never would have thought possible.

irrigation systems, the opportunities that will be available to you as an engineering graduate from UCD are as wide as they are varied. Whether your career path is to make a million by the time you are 25 or help save the world, you won’t go too far wrong with engineering! It is not only a profession, it is a discipline, which will equip you with a mindset and skill set that will make you an asset on every career path you decide to take, and to any company that employs you.

What are the graduate study options for engineering at UCD? The options for UCD engineering graduates are numerous. In UCD there are professional taught Masters programmes including Biomedical, Biosystems, Civil, Energy Systems, Electronic with Computer, Engineering with Business and Mechanical Engineering currently available. There are also research Masters and PhD opportunities. The world is really at your feet and the postgraduate opportunities are fantastic!

I was interested in both chemical and mechanical engineering and didn’t know which one to choose. The Engineering (Common Entry) degree from UCD meant I could delay the choice until I was more familiar with the area. I chose UCD because of its strong reputation. The greatest challenge by far about college life is time management; any one thing is achievable but when you want to do many things within a certain time-frame, organisation and forward planning become essential. Between going to lectures, getting study and assignments finished, playing sport, playing music, being involved in clubs and societies, spending time with friends and family and relaxing, it’s a challenge to balance everything. Every day you make new mistakes (hopefully different ones); then you learn from them and feel that you’re improving and making progress. The advantage of this degree is that it gives students the opportunity to study abroad on one of various exchange programmes, known in Europe as "Erasmus Exchange Programmes". The experience of an Erasmus exchange is invaluable and life changing, both in terms of progression and discovery as an engineer, but also in terms of personal development. I'd give three reasons why, as a European engineer, this is the case: experience, language and contacts. Learning and integrating into another engineering school are the only ways to determine where you stand in the pecking order of international engineering students. Your ability to learn fast and effectively makes you stand out as an engineer. Your ability to adapt to new systems provides you with the motivation to succeed and the impetus to learn an incredible amount in a short space of time. A year studying and discovering abroad will inspire you to travel further and provide you with the relevant contacts to progress with your career and life. In my case, studying at EPFL in Switzerland and making contacts earned me a job as a research engineer on a detector project for a future linear collider at CERN. The hurdles to success as an engineer are innumerable but not insurmountable. If you’re courageous and dedicated, you will progress fast and make your own luck. So, what's engineering about? Advanced communication, rapid learning and effective problem solving. The sky's the limit! Since graduating from UCD, Ronan McGovern has been awarded the Fulbright International Science & Technology Award. With the Award, Ronan, who scored 900 points in the Leaving Certificate (9 A1s), has enrolled on a fully funded PhD in Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Engineering at UCD

UCD Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical Engineering

BE(Hons) Direct Entry CAO Code: Length of Programme: Minimum CAO Points 2010:

Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)

DN150

Entry Requirements

BE (Hons) (NFQ Level 8) or BSc (Engineering Science) (NFQ Level 8) leading to ME (NFQ Level 9)

Contact details UCD Engineering & Architecture Programme Office UCD Engineering and Materials Science Centre Belfield, Dublin 4 Tel: +353 1 716 1868 Email: eng.arch@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/engineer

What is Biomedical Engineering? Biomedical Engineering involves applying traditional engineering methods and techniques to solve problems in biology and medicine, and advance healthcare. Biomedical Engineers are interested in complex living systems, particularly the systems of the human body. They are employed in a wide range of areas. These include working in industry researching and designing new medical technologies, for regulatory agencies establishing safety standards for healthcare devices, as a clinical engineer in a hospital, or in a research institution working on developing new medical technologies, therapies or diagnostic methods. This work often involves working closely with other researchers and professionals with such backgrounds as medicine, physiology and nursing. Biomedical Engineering is a relatively new and exciting area that is changing rapidly.

What makes a good UCD Biomedical Engineer? A good Biomedical Engineer will have an interest in how the human body works and how technology can be used to advance our understanding of living systems and improve healthcare. As with all engineering courses, Biomedical Engineering requires a strong aptitude for maths and problem solving.

DN150 4 Years 425

Irish; English; Mathematics (minimum grade C3 LC Higher Level); one laboratory science subject – Physics and/or Chemistry is recommended (minimum grade D3 LC Higher Level) and, two other recognised subjects A-Level/GCSE: Passes (GCSE Grade C or above) in six recognised subjects including those above, of which two must be minimum Grade C or above at A-Level. (Note: ALevels are normally exempt from the Irish language requirement.) Guideline Equivalent Average A-Level Grades AAAC (A-Level) or equivalent combination. Guideline Equivalent Minimum A-Level Grades A*AC (A-Level) and B (AS) or equivalent combination.

A good Biomedical Engineer will also have good communication skills as they may be expected to work as part of a diverse interdisciplinary team with people from many different backgrounds. A strong interest in the health of people and the future of healthcare is also a key attribute of a good UCD Biomedical Engineer.

To see if Biomedical Engineering at UCD is for you, ask yourself the following questions… n Do you want to apply engineering to understand how the systems of the human body work? n Do you want to create new technology that has an impact on the world of medicine? n Do you want to develop innovative solutions to today’s medical problems? n Do you want to graduate with an internationally recognised and professionally accredited degree?

What can students expect to study in Biomedical Engineering at UCD? As with all engineering courses in UCD, Biomedical Engineering involves a common first year, with the fundamentals of engineering, maths, physics and science forming the core elements. Over the next two years students will develop a strong basis in core engineering skills, focusing on developing their competencies in electrical, electronic and mechanical engineering. Biomedical Engineering students will also have the opportunity to study modules in physiology and biology to gain an understanding of the systems involved. Towards the end of third year and during the fourth year of the

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Biomedical Engineering

Did you know? The human eye is in constant motion, some under our conscious control but much of it completely unconsciously. Knowing how the eye moves involuntarily can tell us a great deal about the health of the individual and of the nervous system, even allowing us to measure brain activity or death. The only way to measure very small eye movements until now was to Prof. John Sheridan place a needle in contact with the eye – this is very uncomfortable for the patient. We have built a system for use by collaborators in St James’s Hospital, which allows movement to be measured using laser light. This is not only easier for the patients, it is more accurate and safer.

degree specific Biomedical Engineering subjects will be introduced. These include biomechanics, neural engineering, biomaterials, medical device design and rehabilitation engineering. The reason for this can be described in simple terms: the brain and the nervous system can be thought of as one large processor which co-ordinates and transmits signals around the body and the organs and limbs as pieces of machinery that operate when receiving signals from the brain.

What are the career options for a UCD Biomedical Engineering graduate? Biomedical Engineering is an extremely diverse area. You could find yourself working in many different fields including some of the specialist areas in which UCD academics are involved. These include orthopaedic biomechanics, where engineering methods are used to understand joints and bones and in the design of artificial joints; cardiovascular device design, involving the development of materials for use in artificial organs and design of implants such as artificial heart valves or cardiovascular stents; and neural engineering, which applies engineering to understand and interact with the human nervous system, for example in neuromodulation devices which electrically stimulate nerves within the body to restore lost function.

What are the graduate study options for Biomedical engineers? Once you have your primary degree, you may decide to do a taught or research Masters in Biomedical Engineering. You can also embark on a PhD and work with some of the world’s leading researchers and conduct ground-breaking research in an area that excites you.

What have Biomedical Engineers gone on to do……?

Peadar Grant PhD student

I chose to study Engineering in UCD because of the fact that the courses had an excellent reputation, which was important for considering future career options. UCD also had excellent extra-curricular facilities such as sports facilities and clubs and societies. My favourite subjects at school maths, physics, applied maths, economics and Irish. The Engineering degree at UCD gives you a solid grounding in the fundamentals which makes it easier to pick up new technical and theoretical skills later on. The academics in UCD are active in Biomedical research and familiar with current trends and developments. I am currently in the final stages of full-time postgraduate study in Biomedical Engineering. My project involves building computer models to better understand how to treat Parkinson’s disease using implanted electrodes in the brain. Because of the high number of contact hours the class tends to get to know one another very well. We had a great mix of people from all over the country, people from Dublin and a few foreign students from all over the world. Most of the engineering disciplines are based in one building so there is a real collegiate atmosphere and there are plenty of opportunities to get to know other engineering students. UCD Engineering has an incredibly fun and vibrant social scene. I made friends with a number of people from my year and I catch up with them regularly. The UCD Engineering Society organises many parties and get togethers which are terrific for getting to know classmates. Studying Engineering at UCD prepares you for travel, career and further graduate study. The UCD Engineering Degree is recognised all over the world, as it is fully accredited by Engineers Ireland and the IEEE. Many of the lecturers have studied, researched or worked abroad in other institutions and companies and are keen to share their experiences with you. Employers also know that the UCD degree is of a high standard and thus its graduates will make a great hire. I did a summer internship with one of the lecturers from my department at the end of third year and it gave me great insight into how Biomedical research is conducted and the challenges and opportunities involved.

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Engineering at UCD

UCD Biosystems Engineering

Biosystems Engineering

BE(Hons) Direct Entry CAO Code: Length of Programme: Minimum CAO Points 2010:

Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)

DN150

Entry Requirements

BE (Hons) (NFQ Level 8) or BSc (Engineering Science) (NFQ Level 8) leading to ME (NFQ Level 9)

Contact details UCD Engineering & Architecture Programme Office UCD Engineering and Materials Science Centre Belfield, Dublin 4 Tel: +353 1 716 1868 Email: eng.arch@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/engineer

What is Biosystems Engineering? Our growing world population requires more food, water, and energy but limited resources demand we do more with less, without degrading our natural environment. Biosystems Engineers work on global and local issues of safe foods, clean air and water, sustainable bioresource utilisation, safe and healthy environments, reduced waste, sustainable energy and green technology.

What makes a good UCD Biosystems Engineer? Biosystems Engineers must have good creative skills and a love of maths, combined with a a strong interest in working with living systems and biological products. Due to their variability, biological systems and products present many challenges to an

DN150 4 Years 425

Irish; English; Mathematics (minimum grade C3 LC Higher Level); one laboratory science subject – Physics and/or Chemistry is recommended (minimum grade D3 LC Higher Level); and, two other recognised subjects. A-Level/GCSE: Passes (GCSE Grade C or above) in six recognised subjects including those above, of which two must be minimum Grade C or above at A-Level. (Note: ALevels are normally exempt from the Irish language requirement.) Guideline Equivalent Average A-Level Grades AAAC (A-Level) or equivalent combination. Guideline Equivalent Minimum A-Level Grades A*AC (A-Level) and B (AS) or equivalent combination.

engineer. For example, the processing of biological materials such as food requires a much different solution compared to the handling of other materials such as metal or plastic. Another example is the mass cultivation of marine algae for biofuel production; such systems must be designed to optimise growth rates for particular algal strains, which are living organisms. In working with these products and systems, Biosystems Engineers must be able to incorporate biological variability into a successful engineering design.

To see if Biosystems Engineering at UCD is for you, ask yourself the following questions ‌ n Do you want to study in an institution that is the only one to offer such a course at honours degree level in the country? n Do you want to study on a programme that will give you the option of studying abroad as part of your course?

What can students expect to study when taking Biosystems Engineering in UCD? Biosystems Engineering is founded on basic sciences (biology, physics and chemistry), mathematics and engineering design. It then builds with engineering sciences and biology, culminating in engineering studies chosen from food, bioprocess, environment, mechanisation, bioenergy and sustainable energy. Undergraduate students have the opportunity to focus on Biosystems Engineering design projects of special interest while being mentored by research active staff.

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Biosystems Engineering

Did you know?

What have Biosystems Engineers gone on to do…?

Nicola Greene UCD Biosystems Engineering graduate

Increasingly, employers are asking for graduate engineers with international experience. We are pleased to have several programmes that allow our undergraduates to gain this valuable exposure to the global workplace. Our third-year students have the unique opportunity to study at Virginia Tech (one of America’s top 25 engineering universities) or the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (the number 1 Biological Systems programme in the USA).

What are the career options for a UCD Biosystems Engineering graduate? Graduates in Biosystems Engineering have a variety of employment options open to them, as well as the option of further education and research. Traditionally, our graduates have been employed in bioprocess and food companies, consulting engineering companies, and similar organisations. There are also numerous opportunities in environmental protection agencies, equipment and systems design, manufacturing companies, information technology groups, and research and development organisations.

My physics and maths were very strong at school, but I always felt more drawn towards biology. I looked hard to find a degree in which I could combine these subjects. Biosystems Engineering suited all three and provides a unique chance to integrate biology with engineering. With increasing talk about pollution and global warming, Biosystems Engineering seems sure to become more popular, leading to many jobs in the area. It also gives you an opportunity to study abroad, which I highly recommend. On graduating, I wanted to use the skills I’d learned to help others, before working in a consultancy and travelling from site to site helping to design and construct water quality systems. I was involved with the UCD Softball Club and I took part in the Virginia Tech–UCD Exchange Programme for two semesters. Now that I have graduated, I have gone on to study a Masters in Sustainable Management of Water Resources as my professional interests are in the area of sustainable research management.

What are the graduate study options for Biosystems Engineers? Once you have your primary degree you may decide to do a taught or a research Masters degree or a PhD in an array of disciplines. Food, bioprocess, environment, mechanisation, bioenergy and sustainable energy are the key research areas of our academic staff. Within these broad groupings, however, there is great diversity among projects and you will be the architect and driver of your own research.

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Engineering at UCD

Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering

UCD Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering

Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)

BE(Hons) Direct Entry CAO Code: Length of Programme: Minimum CAO Points 2010:

DN150

Entry Requirements

BE (Hons) (NFQ Level 8) or BSc (Engineering Science) (NFQ Level 8) leading to ME (NFQ Level 9)

Contact details UCD Engineering & Architecture Programme Office UCD Engineering and Materials Science Centre Belfield, Dublin 4 Tel: +353 1 716 1868 Email: eng.arch@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/engineer

What is Chemical/Bioprocess Engineering? The breakthroughs that have been made by Chemical and Bioprocess Engineers are evident in everyday life. From petrochemicals to lifesaving drugs, all owe their development and production to Chemical or Bioprocess Engineers. These engineers are involved in every pillar that sustains and supports life, including health, water, energy and the environment. Chemical Engineers combine the fundamental principles of science and mathematics with engineering practice, to generate products such as pharmaceuticals, and services such as clean water. Bioprocess Engineers also utilise these fundamentals, applying them to biological systems, such as mammalian cells, to produce biochemicals and medicines. Today, the field of Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering is a broad and expanding one, encompassing areas as diverse as biotechnology, nanotechnology and mineral processing.

What makes a good Chemical/Bioprocess Engineer? Chemical or Bioprocess Engineering, like all of the other engineering courses in UCD, requires hard work and commitment. To succeed as a Chemical or Bioprocess Engineer requires an aptitude for maths and science, as well as an inquisitive mind and an interest in dealing with real and often complex problems. Coupled to this is their ability to work with and manage large, diverse teams towards common project deadlines and goals. These attributes are essential for graduates who will be charged with finding practical solutions to health, environmental, and energy issues, by applying the scientific and engineering fundamentals central to the UCD programme. A Chemical or Bioprocess Engineer needs to be committed, creative and clever.

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DN150 4 Years 425

Irish; English; Mathematics (minimum grade C3 LC Higher Level); one laboratory science subject – Physics and/or Chemistry is recommended (minimum grade D3 LC Higher Level); and, two other recognised subjects. A-Level/GCSE: Passes (GCSE Grade C or above) in six recognised subjects including those above, of which two must be minimum Grade C or above at A-Level. (Note: ALevels are normally exempt from the Irish language requirement.) Guideline Equivalent Average A-Level Grades AAAC (A-Level) or equivalent combination. Guideline Equivalent Minimum A-Level Grades A*AC (A-Level) and B (AS) or equivalent combination.

To see if Chemical/Bioprocess Engineering at UCD is for you, ask yourself the following questions... n Do you want to study at a university that has been running a Chemical/Bioprocess Engineering degree for over 50 years, longer than any other Irish institution? n Do you want to study in a degree programme, the graduates of which are sought after by the world’s biggest pharmaceutical companies? n Do you want to invent/design processes (equipment integrated and controlled to meet a specific design purpose) that harness chemical and other reactions effectively and safely? n Do you ever wish you could be involved in the development and production of a drug to treat one of today’s prevailing illnesses? n Do you want to join a School of Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering that is the most research active in its field, not just in Ireland, but also in Europe? n Do you want to graduate with a professionally accredited and internationally recognised engineering degree?

What can students expect to study when taking Chemical/Bioprocess Engineering at UCD? As a first year Engineering student, you will receive vigorous training in the fundamentals of Engineering. After deciding to specialise in Chemical or Bioprocess Engineering the subsequent years will see you taking subjects such as chemical reactor and control system design; process economics and safety; and engineering science subjects, including heat transfer, mass transfer and fluid mechanics. At the end of second year, you will have the opportunity to choose to pursue one of the two closely related disciplines of Chemical or Bioprocess


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Chemical/Bioprocess Engineering

Did you know? Prof. Mohamed Al-Rubeai, Professor of Biochemical Engineering at UCD, is currently investigating how best to grow cartilage cells in the laboratory, in a bid to help people with degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis of the knee, a condition that affects over 30 million people worldwide, causes erosion of the natural cushion of cartilage which covers the bones and joints. Cartilage in the body has a limited ability to heal and the healing capacity decreases with age. In his work, Prof. Al-Rubeai aims to create optimal growth conditions for cartilage cells in the laboratory; if surgeons then return the new cartilage to the knee, the pain experienced by sufferers would be reduced.

Engineering. Project work is a key component of the final years of the programme, with students undertaking an experimental research project, as well as participating in a group design project. Students are strongly encouraged to seek industrial employment during the summer at the end of third year; the School, which maintains very close links with industry, supports them in this undertaking.

What are the career options for a UCD Chemical/Bioprocess Engineering graduate? Chemical/Bioprocess Engineers are consistently the highest paid engineering graduates, exemplifying the demand for such highly skilled individuals. You will leave UCD, ready for immediate employment as a Chemical or Bioprocess Engineer, with an internationally recognised degree, accredited by Engineers Ireland and at Master’s level by the UK-based Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE). You might choose to apply your skills and qualifications in the strong Irish sector. Or you might work as a consulting engineer, involved in the design of research and production facilities. However, there is a multitude of options for graduates of this programme and not all of them are immediately obvious. You could find yourself in the increasingly important energy or environmental sectors, or even in the corporate world of finance and banking.

What are the graduate study options for a Chemical/Bioprocess Engineer? The solid foundations of an engineering degree certainly won’t restrict your choices after graduation. UCD offers a wide array of opportunities, leading to taught Masters, research Masters and PhD degrees, while our graduates are also sought as research students by leading universities worldwide.

What have Chemical/Bioprocess Engineers gone on to do…?

Dr Mark Barrett Chemical Engineering graduate, UCD 2005

I chose Chemical Engineering as I really enjoyed both chemistry and maths for the Leaving Cert. I also was aware that Chemical Engineering offered excellent job opportunities, in Ireland and abroad. And I think that Chemical Engineering at UCD is a very well-rounded degree, offering real flexibility in terms of career path choices. A great aspect of Chemical Engineering at UCD is the class size. There were just 33 students in my class, which meant that I got to know everyone on a one-to-one basis. The final year undergraduate design project is also really enjoyable as you work as a member of a team, with four or five of your classmates, designing a chemical or biopharmaceutical plant. Through the School, I obtained an industrial placement during the summer of third year, working in a pharmaceutical company in Ireland. This was a wonderful opportunity for me to apply engineering theory, which I’d learned in lecture and laboratory courses, to real life applications in a production facility. After I graduated in 2005, I was offered a place on the FÁS Science Challenge Programme, which involved a summer studying at NASA and working with the Florida Space Authority (FSA). This was an amazing experience for me, being mentored by and working directly with NASA-based scientists and astronauts. I returned to Dublin determined to continue with Chemical Engineering research and in 2008 I graduated from UCD with a PhD in Chemical Engineering. From a career perspective, the PhD programme at UCD opened so many doors for me: I travelled throughout the world, attending and presenting at conferences, where I got to meet with leading international scientists, as well as potential employers. After spending some time in industry, I’ve now returned to UCD, as a Senior Research & Development Engineer with the Crystallisation Research Group. This group is part of a national research effort, the SSPC (Solid-State Pharmaceutical Cluster) and my role is to work closely with our industrial partners from the pharmaceutical sector on collaborative research and training projects. But it’s not all work! The social scene in UCD is great and life on campus offers everything a student could need! My strongest memories of UCD would have to be of the great friends I’ve made. And those friends, coupled with a Chemical Engineering degree and doctorate, have made my time in UCD extremely enjoyable and satisfying.

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Engineering at UCD

UCD Civil Engineering

Civil Engineering

BE(Hons) Direct Entry CAO Code: Length of Programme: Minimum CAO Points 2010:

Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)

DN150

Entry Requirements

BE (Hons) (NFQ Level 8) or BSc (Engineering Science) (NFQ Level 8) leading to ME (NFQ Level 9)

Contact details UCD Engineering & Architecture Programme Office UCD Engineering and Materials Science Centre Belfield, Dublin 4 Tel: +353 1 716 1868 Email: eng.arch@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/engineer

What is Civil Engineering? The first thing you need to know about Civil Engineering is that it is not just about hard hats and building sites. The work of Civil Engineers is on view on a daily basis in the critical infrastructure required for a functioning society. Civil Engineers are required for the roads you drive on, the bridges that get you from A to B, the power stations that provide your electricity and the fact that when you turn on your tap you have fresh drinking water. Civil Engineers also take an active role in protecting our environment and have responsibility for a range of activities, including water pollutant reduction and waste management.

What makes a good UCD Civil Engineer? Like all of the engineering disciplines, good creative and problem solving skills are crucial. In particular, and because mathematics underpins design, numeracy skills are important. As the modern infrastructure of society impacts on the environment, Civil Engineers have the task of finding solutions that enable society to function, while at the same time minimising effects on the environment. So, to sum up, the ideal UCD Civil Engineer would be a bright, intelligent person, who has great enthusiasm and flair for the challenge of solving problems, coupled with a desire to see society develop in a way that “Big Dig” Boston, USA, where keeps environmental concerns and UCD Civil Engineering students have undertaken work placements. issues to the fore.

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DN150 4 Years 425

Irish; English; Mathematics (minimum grade C3 LC Higher Level); one laboratory science subject – Physics and/or Chemistry is recommended (minimum grade D3 LC Higher Level); and, two other recognised subjects. A-Level/GCSE: Passes (GCSE Grade C or above) in six recognised subjects including those above, of which two must be minimum Grade C or above at A-Level. (Note: ALevels are normally exempt from the Irish language requirement.) Guideline Equivalent Average A-Level Grades AAAC (A-Level) or equivalent combination. Guideline Equivalent Minimum A-Level Grades A*AC (A-Level) and (AS) or equivalent combination.

To see if Civil Engineering at UCD is for you, ask yourself the following questions… n Do you want to solve problems and address society’s infrastructural and environmental needs? n Do you want to study a degree programme that, following graduation, will enable you to work in water and environmental engineering, structural engineering, geotechnical engineering and transport engineering? n Would you like the opportunity to take advantage of a work placement in a top engineering organisation in Ireland or abroad as part of your degree programme? n Do you want to study a discipline that has solid career prospects in the public and private sectors? n Do you want to study for an engineering degree that is internationally recognised and qualifies you to work anywhere in the world?

What can students expect to study when taking Civil Engineering at UCD? Civil Engineering can be said to comprise four key areas: structures, geotechnics, water and environmental, and transportation engineering. The subjects that you will study for a degree in Civil Engineering at UCD are varied. Like all of the other UCD engineering disciplines, the first year will be spent on developing the fundamentals of engineering. A rigorous study of mathematics and physics will ensure that regardless of how technology changes, you will always have solid fundamental problem-solving skills. This makes UCD engineers extremely employable in professions outside of engineering. The subsequent years are spent developing specific skills in subjects that involve Civil Engineering design, analysis and construction. A great emphasis in these years is spent on the built


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Civil Engineering

Did you know? The Centre for Water Resources Research (CWRR) under the directorship of Professor Michael Bruen in UCD Civil Engineering is currently involved in a number of projects to enable both engineering practitioners and the public at large to design for and deal with the impacts of floods. Climate change impacts in the future are likely to result in an increased frequency of floods, particularly in urbanised areas. The CWRR is actively engaged in projects to develop improved methods of flood estimation and is also involved in work to improve flood forecasting and public responses to flood warnings. Projects focusing on sustainable development that are assessing the re-use of both excess rainwater and ‘greywater’ are also being undertaken. The research is not only focused on water quantity, but extends to developing environmentally sensitive methods for improving the quality of contaminated waters.

environment and natural environments and includes subjects related specifically to the design of structures, water resources management and transportation systems. The third year of the programme offers students an opportunity to undertake a four-month work placement in an Irish or international civil engineering organisation.

What are the career options for a UCD Civil Engineering graduate? Civil Engineering is comprised of many inter-related specialties such as: structural engineering, geotechnical engineering, environmental engineering, traffic and transportation engineering, and water resource and hydraulic engineering. As a result, the opportunities available upon graduation are extremely varied. Some of our graduates have gone on to work in the public sector or have secured positions in consulting and contracting organisations. Increasingly, the career path of a Civil Engineer involves interdisciplinary work with engineers from other sectors, and work on projects dealing with areas such as sustainable energy. Studying engineering at UCD has provided our graduates with highly transferable skills and many of our graduates have secured positions in banking and business organisations.

What are the graduate study options for Civil Engineers? Postgraduate study is an increasingly popular route for engineers. At UCD we offer a taught Masters programme in Civil Engineering. We also offer a range of research Masters and PhD opportunities that cater for all interests. This presents students with the opportunity to build on the work of, and further develop relationships with research groups to which you will have been exposed in your undergraduate programme.

What have Civil Engineers gone on to do…?

Christian Nea UCD Civil Engineering graduate

It is sometimes difficult for someone who has just finished their Leaving Certificate to be certain of which career path to follow. The benefit of studying Civil Engineering at UCD is that you learn problem-solving skills that are transferable to, and well recognised in, other fields and industries. A significant number of students in my year subsequently developed careers in other areas such as banking and management. A degree in Civil Engineering from UCD is a good solid degree. I put UCD top of my list because it has one of, if not the best, reputations for Civil Engineering in Ireland. My interest in the environmental aspects of Civil Engineering was initiated and developed while studying Civil Engineering at UCD. As a result I have been working as an environmental engineer at the National Roads Authority (NRA) for the last four years. I work in the Environmental Unit, where my work involves developing and communicating the NRA’s environmental policy. These policy documents provide guidance on dealing with a number of environmental impacts which can occur during the planning and construction of national road schemes such as: air quality; noise and vibration; ecological (e.g., impacts on bats, otters, badgers, watercourse, trees and hedgerows), landscape, architectural and archeological heritage; and, hydrological, hydrogeological and geological impacts. A significant portion of my time is spent advising those involved in the project management of individual schemes on environmental issues. I also advise on environmental law issues. This has led me to study law with a view to developing my knowledge in environmental law, which is why I recently completed an LL.B. I have great memories from my time at UCD. The Civil Engineering programme was quite intensive. Generally, there were lectures in the morning and lab work in the afternoon. Working in the various laboratories was very interesting and there was always a great camaraderie between students. The lab sessions were great craic, which made attending labs or lectures good fun. Engineering has always had a reputation for having an excellent social scene. I would recommend Civil Engineering at UCD to any prospective student. It certainly is an ideal starting point for a career in Civil Engineering, and it is also looked very favourably upon in other industries.

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Engineering at UCD

Electrical/Electronic Engineering Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)

DN150

UCD Electrical/Electronic Engineering BE(Hons) Direct Entry CAO Code: Length of Programme: Minimum CAO Points 2010:

DN150 4 Years 425

Entry Requirements

BE (Hons) (NFQ Level 8) or BSc (Engineering Science) (NFQ Level 8) leading to ME (NFQ Level 9)

Contact details UCD Engineering & Architecture Programme Office UCD Engineering and Materials Science Centre Belfield, Dublin 4 Tel: +353 1 716 1868 Email: eng.arch@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/engineer

Irish; English; Mathematics (minimum grade C3 LC Higher Level); one laboratory science subject – Physics and/or Chemistry is recommended (minimum grade D3 LC Higher Level); and, two other recognised subjects. A-Level/GCSE: Passes (GCSE Grade C or above) in six recognised subjects including those above, of which two must be minimum Grade C or above at A-Level. (Note: ALevels are normally exempt from the Irish language requirement.) Guideline Equivalent Average A-Level Grades AAAC (A-Level) or equivalent combination. Guideline Equivalent Minimum A-Level Grades A*AC (A-Level) and B (AS) or equivalent combination.

UCD Electrical Engineering graduate, David Burke, at work in Google.

What is Electrical/Electronic Engineering?

know how to generate renewable or wind energy? Do you want to be one of the first people to come up with a new source of energy?

Everywhere you go you are surrounded by the work of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, from the music you listen to, to the device you listen to it on, the internet where you download the music, and the energy that powers it all. All of these are designed and developed by Electrical and Electronic Engineers. However, there is more to it than that. As you will see from the research carried out by the academics in UCD, the work of Electrical and Electronic Engineers involves developing new ways to solve the world’s energy problems through harnessing renewable energy sources like wind and tidal power. Their work also extends to communications, health and the medical professions. From researching brain activity to developing artificial limbs; this is all part of a day’s work for an Electrical and Electronic Engineer. There is a difference between Electrical and Electronic Engineers; simply put, Electronic Engineering is concerned with transmitting and processing information while Electrical Engineering focuses on generating, transmitting and using the electricity that powers our world. They combine scientific principles, mathematical understanding and creative thinking to produce the technology that shapes our world.

To see if Electrical/Electronic Engineering at UCD is for you, ask yourself the following questions…

What makes a good UCD Electrical/Electronic Engineer? To determine if you are interested in Electrical or Electronic Engineering, ask yourself the following questions… Do you like using maths and physics to solve problems in the world around you? Are you interested in technology? Are you interested in communications? Do you want to know more about how information is transmitted around the world? Do you want to understand how technology is used in medicine? Do you want to

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n Do you want to study in an environment where the people teaching you are involved in ground-breaking research in the areas of energy, communications and health? n Do you want to study at an institution which offers the only Electrical Engineering degree programme in Ireland? n Do you want to study in a university with a long established, recognised degree programme in Electrical and Electronic Engineering? n Do you want to study in an institute that has close contact with Irish and multinational companies? n Do you want to study in a university whose solid fundamentals are recognised by the world’s leading businesses like Intel, Siemens, and Google? If you said yes to any of these – then UCD is the place for you!

What can students expect to study when taking Electrical/Electronic Engineering at UCD? In Electrical and Electronic Engineering we educate you not just for your first job, but for your entire career. We do this by emphasising the fundamentals of the field. With this background, you won’t be left behind as technology advances, but will be among those driving and developing the technology of the future. Like all other


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Electrical/Electronic Engineering

Did you know?

What have Electrical/Electronic Engineers gone on to do…?

David Burke Dr. Madeleine Lowery, a lecturer at UCD, studied Electronic Engineering followed by a PhD in Biomedical Engineering in UCD. After finishing her PhD, Dr. Lowery took up a research position in the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago where she worked in the Neural Engineering Center for Artificial Limbs. Dr. Lowery was involved in research into developing new means of controlling artificial arms by connecting nerves from amputated limbs to remaining muscles and recording the electrical signals generated by these new nerve-muscle systems. These electrical signals, known as EMG signals, are then used to control a multifunction prosthetic arm, allowing it to move with many more degrees of freedom than conventional artificial arms.

engineering courses in UCD, the first year is common throughout, with the fundamentals of engineering, maths, physics and science forming the core elements. The second year will see you delving in more depth into subjects such as circuit theory, computer engineering, electromagnetics, communication systems and digital electronics. In third year you will then embark on a specialised path of study between Electrical or Electronic Engineering. You will develop your skills further and study new subjects like signals and systems, wireless systems, power engineering and renewable energy systems.

What are the career options for a UCD Electrical/Electronic Engineering graduate? There is a multitude of career options to choose from upon graduating from UCD – you can work on projects that will really make a difference to the world and society that we live in such as discovering new sources of energy. You may work on finding new means of communication and embark on a career developing the next generation of multimedia devices or you may work studying the human brain and body, working with electrical impulses around the body.

What are the graduate study options for Electrical/Electronic Engineers? Once you have your primary degree you may decide to do a taught Masters in an array of disciplines. You can also conduct groundbreaking research in an area that excites you and work with some of the world’s leading researchers by embarking on a research Masters or a PhD degree.

UCD Electrical Engineering graduate

At Google’s London headquarters, amongst the primary coloured exercise balls and a giant projection of a spinning globe – highlighting all of the google searches happening in real time all over the world works Dave Burke, a graduate of Electrical Engineering (EE) at UCD. “I decided to study engineering as I wanted to understand the fundamentals of all the cool technologies and gadgets I saw around me and have the skills and knowledge to one day invent my own. My favourite subjects in school were physics, maths, applied maths and economics. I saw and still do see EE as a great foundation to allow students to pursue a wide variety of directions ranging from cutting-edge electronics, to software development and biomedical engineering. I don’t think I could have selected a better course than the EE course in UCD. The EE course at UCD focuses on the fundamentals and not on technologies that quickly become dated. Moreover, the course equips you with the skills to analyse and think for yourself – you learn how to learn! After my undergraduate degree, I went on to do a Masters and then a PhD. My PhD involved studying the electrical activity in the brain and allowed me to get a good grounding in other areas outside of engineering such as mathematical neuroscience. EE gave me the tools and confidence to learn any subject. As a result, I was able to bring together different ideas from different fields and really be innovative at an advanced level. Later, I went on to found and manage a leading-edge software development company. Again, the skills I picked up doing EE were a real benefit here, notably being able to analyse a problem, propose solutions, and to think rationally, quantitatively, and objectively. I am currently an engineering manager at Google’s largest mobile development office, based in London. I direct a team of around 30 of the smartest engineers from all over the world working on mobile products ranging from Google Maps for Mobile to Picasa and You Tube. We invent new technologies and techniques that touch a huge amount of people every day. I found my time at UCD fantastic! I met lots of smart interesting people who have become life-long friends. The social scene at UCD was really good. Engineers know how to party!”

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Engineering at UCD

Energy Systems Engineering Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)

DN150 Contact details UCD Engineering & Architecture Programme Office UCD Engineering and Materials Science Centre Belfield, Dublin 4 Tel: +353 1 716 1868 Email: eng.arch@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/engineer

Energy Systems Engineers work on finding and implementing solutions to the world’s energy and climate change problems. The complex world that we live in presents many interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary challenges and a narrow focus on solution to one aspect of a problem is often inappropriate if the ultimate need is to meet the needs of an ever-increasing global population for a good standard of living. The latter requires that adequate supplies of clean water and food be available to all. It also requires clean air, comfortable housing, good quality transportation, stable climatic conditions, efficient communications systems, etc. Many of these are ultimately dependent on human ability to exploit natural resources in ways that are sustainable and do not leave permanent damage. Economic development and progress over the past few generations has been remarkable but built on unsustainable foundations and a reliance on finite natural resources, the rate of consumption of which has begun to threaten the planet we live on. Finding and implementing alternatives here is urgent but really challenging. Harnessing sustainable energy sources linked to wind, ocean, solar or biomass is clearly desirable but must be implemented under severe economic constraints and in competition with existing unsustainable alternatives. Education in Energy Systems Engineering is aimed at enabling you to become a contributor in this important area. UCD offers students the opportunity to complete their education to either Bachelor Degree (BE) or Master Degree (ME) level in Energy Systems, after four or five years, respectively. Each builds on the essential core principles of mechanical, chemical and electrical engineering, developed during the earlier years. The programme focuses on engineering applications in the energy arena. In particular it focuses on the interdependence between the

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BE(Hons) Direct Entry CAO Code: Length of Programme: Minimum CAO Points 2010:

DN150 4 Years 425

Entry Requirements

BE (Hons) (NFQ Level 8) or BSc (Engineering Science) (NFQ Level 8) leading to ME (NFQ Level 9)

What is Energy Systems Engineering?

UCD Energy Systems Engineering

Irish; English; Mathematics (minimum grade C3 LC Higher Level); one laboratory science subject – Physics and/or Chemistry is recommended (minimum grade D3 LC Higher Level); and, two other recognised subjects. A-Level/GCSE: Passes (GCSE Grade C or above) in six recognised subjects including those above, of which two must be minimum Grade C or above at A-Level. (Note: ALevels are normally exempt from the Irish language requirement.) Guideline Equivalent Average A-Level Grades AAAC (A-Level) or equivalent combination. Guideline Equivalent Minimum A-Level Grades A*AC (A-Level) and B (AS) or equivalent combination.

electricity system, building energy systems, the industrial production system, the food supply chain and the transport system, as well as taking account of security of supply and climate impact/CO2 emissions. For example, road transportation has traditionally depended almost exclusively on combustion of fossils in internal combustion engines. In the future, it seems likely that electric vehicles powered ultimately by renewable energy will gradually become commonplace. An important consequence will be strong interdependence between electrical and mechanical systems that were previously unconnected. Also, the need to manage and control an electrical generation system that is influenced by minute-to-minute changes in wind characteristics presents exciting but very formidable challenges. Solutions to these very real challenges do not respect traditional boundaries between engineering disciplines. The UCD Energy Systems Engineering degree programme aims to provide you with an education that will help you to participate in finding the necessary solutions – for the benefit of mankind and to enable you to have a satisfying and prosperous career.

To see if Energy Systems Engineering at UCD is for you, ask yourself the following questions… n Do you see yourself working on solutions to the world’s energy problems? n Do you want to create new clean and efficient energy technologies that will change the world we live in? n Do you want to study a discipline that offers solid career prospects both in the public and private sectors? n Do you want to learn how to harness the power of the sun, wind, waves or an atom to generate energy?


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Energy Systems Engineering

Did you know? Professor Chen-Ching Liu is an internationally distinguished leader in developing advanced computer methods to enhance the reliability and resilience of electric energy systems. In his role as Professor of Power Systems in UCD School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering he has developed an innovative project concerned with cyber security of the computer and communication Prof. Chen –Ching Liu systems that power grids rely upon for monitoring and control functions. As the power plants, distributed renewable sources, substations and control devices of the grid become more and more “wired”, new cyber security technologies are needed to protect the integrity of the complex and dynamic power grids. Professor Liu and his team are developing new methods for monitoring, anomaly detection and mitigation of cyber intrusions.

What can students expect to study in Energy Systems Engineering at UCD? Like other UCD engineering courses, the first year is common, with the fundamentals of engineering, maths, physics and science forming the core elements. Key components of the Energy Systems Engineering programme at UCD include modules on energy engineering, and electrical circuits. Core modules include: energy systems and climate change; fossil fuels, carbon capture and storage; chemical processes of sustainable and renewable energy; and, power systems operation.

What are the career options for a UCD Energy Systems Engineering graduate? Graduates of the Energy Systems BE will be equipped with the skill set and knowledge vital for crucial roles in research, design and development in the energy sector. Candidates who complete the optional electrical modules will be equipped to work as electrical engineers within the power industry with organisations such as ESB International, Airtricity, GE Energy and Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI).

What are the graduate study options for Energy Systems Engineers? Graduates can gain a more in-depth knowledge of Energy Systems Engineering through postgraduate study. There are many options available including taught masters or research work at master or PhD level. From day one you will be exposed to the high volume of research currently being conducted in the energy area at UCD. From this you can get a good grounding in the research activity and then chose your area of research specialisation accordingly.

What have Energy Systems Engineers gone on to do……?

David Kavanagh BE PhD candidate UCD

As a child I was always inquisitive about how and why things worked. I was always asking for Lego and Meccano for Christmas and birthday presents. My favourite subjects at second level were woodwork, physics and maths. I suppose this mindset followed me all the way through my life so it seemed a natural choice to study Engineering, and where better to do it than at the largest university in Ireland! As a UCD Engineering student, of any discipline, you’ll find that on any given day you could spend your time doing a wide range of activities, ranging from lectures and tutorials, to handling heavy duty electrical machinery in the labs. My favourite aspect was the hands-on approach in the labs; this more than anything else allowed me to get a grasp as to what was actually happening, and it gave me a better understanding of materials initially presented in the lectures. Studying Engineering at UCD has opened up so many doors for me that I never expected. As well as graduating with an internationally recognised degree, my postgraduate study in UCD has led to me travelling to various conferences and seminars around the world, and even to spending time on a work placement with a Scottish wave energy company called Aquamarine Power. I am currently studying for a PhD with the Electricity Research Centre in UCD under the supervision of Dr Damian Flynn. My work focuses on the integration of ocean energy devices with our power system, and figuring out the implications for the other energy sources we use to generate electricity. Harnessing the power of the oceans to generate electricity is a cutting edge area of research in both Ireland and around the world. The Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland estimates that the accessible ocean energy resources around Ireland would total approximately 90% of Ireland’s electrical energy demand in 2008. Studying an energy-related field at UCD will leave you well placed to be at the forefront of the industries that will be tasked with solving these challenges, and will give you a long and fulfilling career in an area that is becoming ever more relevant. My strongest memories of UCD are of the final few weeks of my undergraduate degree as the realisation arrived upon myself and my classmates that we wouldn’t see a lot of each other again. It was at that point that you realise quite how many friends you’ve made over the years, and how much you will have enjoyed your time at UCD.

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Engineering at UCD

UCD Mechnical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

BE(Hons) Direct Entry CAO Code: Length of Programme: Minimum CAO Points 2010:

Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)

DN150

Entry Requirements

Photo courtesy of ESA

BE (Hons) (NFQ Level 8) or BSc (Engineering Science) (NFQ Level 8) leading to ME (NFQ Level 9)

What is Mechanical Engineering? Mechanical Engineering is concerned with the design and production of virtually every device used by mankind. If it moves in any way, Mechanical Engineers are involved. From biros to satellites, from design to manufacture, Mechanical Engineers have been involved every step of the way.

What makes a good UCD mechanical engineer? It has been said of great men and women that they dare to dream; we might add that great Mechanical Engineers dare to wake up afterwards! The best Mechanical Engineers possess more than a vision of the way the world should be; they combine it with the desire and skills to make their dreams come true. They lead change, drive innovation and open doors to a new and exciting reality. They share a common thought: the world isn’t perfect, it could be better – let’s make it happen!

DN150 4 Years 425

Contact details UCD Engineering & Architecture Programme Office UCD Engineering and Materials Science Centre Belfield, Dublin 4 Tel: +353 1 716 1868 Email: eng.arch@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/engineer

Irish; English; Mathematics (minimum grade C3 LC Higher Level); one laboratory science subject – Physics and/or Chemistry is recommended (minimum grade D3 LC Higher Level); and, two other recognised subjects. A-Level/GCSE: Passes (GCSE Grade C or above) in six recognised subjects including those above, of which two must be minimum Grade C or above at A-Level. (Note: ALevels are normally exempt from the Irish language requirement.) Guideline Equivalent Average A-Level Grades AAAC (A-Level) or equivalent combination. Guideline Equivalent Minimum A-Level Grades A*AC (A-Level) and B (AS) or equivalent combination.

To see if Mechanical Engineering at UCD is for you, ask yourself the following questions… n Do you want to help overcome the great global challenges that now confront us? n Do you want to apply science, logic and mathematics to identify what changes we need to make? n Do you want to develop the technologies that will make these changes possible? If your answer to these questions is a resounding ‘Yes!’; if you want to learn from people doing ground-breaking research in energy, materials science, bioengineering, and technology management; if you want to help direct the currents of change, rather than be swept along by them; then Mechanical Engineering at UCD is the place for you.

What can students expect to study in Mechanical Engineering at UCD? All UCD Engineering students share a common first-year course, in which the emphasis is placed on engineering fundamentals, maths, and science. In years 2 and 3, the focus shifts towards Mechanical Engineering, with subjects such as fluid mechanics, applied dynamics, manufacturing, design, and control to be explored. The theoretical material delivered in lectures and tutorials is closely linked to, and reinforced by, experimental work in all important aspects of the course, and students will find themselves working in well-equipped workshops and laboratories. Considerable attention is also devoted to developing effective oral and written communication skills, with each student required to deliver both written reports and oral presentations.

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Mechanical Engineering

Did you know? A research group in UCD Mechanical Engineering, under the supervision of Professor Gerry Byrne, is helping to develop the next generation of green power generation systems. The group is focused on the development of tidal turbines, which use the periodic tidal flows induced by lunar and solar gravitation, to generate electricity. Working with Irish renewable energy company OpenHydro, they aim to develop farms of tidal turbines mounted on the seabed where no part of the structure is visible from the surface and which is deep enough not to interfere with shipping. This method of installation realises the company’s vision of silent, invisible, predictable, renewable energy. In May 2008 OpenHydro became the first company in the UK and Ireland to complete the connection of a tidal turbine and commence electricity generation onto the UK national grid. This testing and grid generation is ongoing. The trials at EMEC have been supported by both Sustainable Energy Ireland and the Scottish Government.

At the end of years 2 and 3, students are encouraged to participate in the optional vacation employment scheme; this is considered to be an important part of the engineering education. These voluntary placements are arranged with carefully selected participating companies, offering invaluable experience in design, manufacturing and software projects in a broad spectrum of engineering industries, both in Ireland and abroad. In year 4, further specialisation is possible: students have access to a wide range of advanced modules in areas as diverse as energy, biomedicine, materials, mechanics, and economics. Students also undertake a major project in an area of interest. The project provides an opportunity for students to integrate the knowledge and understanding acquired in previous stages, and to develop and test their analytical and research skills.

What are the career options for a UCD Mechanical Engineering graduate? In Ireland, there is significant demand for Mechanical Engineering graduates in the energy, biomedical, manufacturing and IT sectors, at both engineering and management levels. There is a wide range of career options, in all areas. Or you may decide to go into further academic study …

What are the graduate study options for Mechanical Engineers?

What have Mechanical Engineers gone on to do…?

Dr David Browne Senior lecturer, UCD School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering

At school I always liked physics and maths, and had two great teachers at Templeogue College in Dublin who were inspirational – Mick O’Hara in physics and Ray Kennedy in maths. As engineering represents the appliance of science and mathematics, I was more attracted to a career as an engineer than one as a pure scientist. Mechanical Engineering became the obvious choice for me as a young school leaver in Dublin. The work I am involved with at present involves both Mechanical Engineering and space. People often wonder how these tie together. A pretty good start would be to note that the first man on the moon, Neil Armstrong, was an aerospace engineer (closely related to mechanical engineering). In fact, the new engineering building at Purdue University (his Alma Mater) in the USA was recently completed and named the Armstrong Building in his honour. Getting any space vehicle off the ground and into orbit requires a huge team of engineers, and the design of the spacecraft structure, its propulsion, and the materials used in its construction, are all figured out by mechanical/aerospace engineers. I became involved in the European Space Agency via my research at Oxford, where I did my masters and then doctoral studies under the supervision of Prof. John Hunt. The only place that one can do long-duration experiments in near-zero gravity is in space; hence the ESA’s involvement. They can provide access to the international space station, in particular to the new European Columbus lab, and to other space microgravity platforms. A lot of the students I have lectured have become involved in research, starting with undergraduate projects, right up through Masters, PhD and postdoctoral level, and many UCD engineering students have worked on my projects. Many of these now have successful careers in industry and business, whereas others have taken my path and have themselves started their own research teams in other universities. I hope some day that a UCD engineering graduate will become an astronaut, and continue the work of engineering predecessors like Neil Armstrong. Indeed, the ESA has recently been recruiting for new astronaut trainees, and young professional engineers will feature among the chosen few.

Once you have your primary degree, you may decide to do a taught or research Masters in Mechanical Engineering, energy systems or bioengineering. You can also embark on a PhD and work with some of the world’s leading researchers and conduct ground-breaking research in an area that excites you.

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Engineering at UCD

Structural Engineering with Architecture Bachelor of Science and Master of Engineering

Contact details UCD Engineering & Architecture Programme Office UCD Engineering and Materials Science Centre Belfield, Dublin 4 Tel: +353 1 716 1868 Email: eng.arch@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/engineer

The Structural Engineering with Architecture degree at UCD is a twopart degree leading to a Masters qualification. It is often said that the architect is a creator and the engineer is an inventor. Architects and Structural Engineers work closely together as members of the design team, developing designs from the earliest stages, bringing them from concept to reality. This programme is designed to give engineers a full understanding and appreciation of the architectural profession, coupled with the solid fundamentals of the engineering degree.

What makes a good UCD Structural Engineer? A strong creative flair, great problem-solving skills, and a love of Architecture and buildings are the attributes that a good Structural Engineer requires. These skills are nurtured and developed through the Structural Engineering with Architecture programme at UCD.

To see if Structural Engineering with Architecture at UCD is for you, ask yourself the following questions‌ n Do you have you an interest in problem solving? n Do you have an appreciation for the beauty of structural design and architecture? n Do you want to study Structural Engineering with Architecture? n Would you like the opportunity to take advantage of work placement in the top engineering consultancy firms either in Ireland or abroad as part of your degree programme? Do you want to enhance your employment prospects through focused study in Structural Engineering to a postgraduate level?

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BSc (Hons) and ME Direct Entry CAO Code Length of Programme: 3 years (BSc) + 2 years (ME) Minimum CAO Points 2010:

DN140 440

Entry requirements

DN140

What is Structural Engineering with Architecture?

UCD Structural Engineering With Architecture

Irish; English; Mathematics (minimum grade C3 LC Higher Level); one laboratory science subject – Physics and/or Chemistry is recommended (minimum grade D3 LC Higher Level); and, two other recognised subjects. A-Level/GCSE: Passes (GCSE Grade C or above) in six recognised subjects including those above, of which two must be minimum Grade C or above at A-Level. Guideline Equivalent Average A-Level Grades AAAC (A-Level) or equivalent combination. Guideline Equivalent Minimum A-Level Grades A*AC (A-Level) amd B (AS) or equivalent combination.

What can students expect to study in Structural Engineering with Architecture at UCD? You will study a multitude of interesting and diverse subjects while studying Structural Engineering with Architecture. In your first year you will find yourself studying the fundamentals of engineering, maths, physics and science subjects with the rigour that UCD is renowned for. Along with a solid grounding in these subjects, you will also study thermodynamics, which is the study of heat, energy and movement, and fluid mechanics. This will be married to the study of theory and design of structures, and the history and theory of the designed environment. By the end of your first year you will understand the fundamentals of engineering and have an appreciation of architecture. In your second year the foundations of structural design are studied, including construction materials, building construction, mechanics of solids and mechanics of fluids. Design studio work includes model making and 3D computeraided design (CAD). In third year, the design and skills from the previous two years are taken to a more advanced level. Third year also sees students undertaking a major project involving experimentation, analysis or design, the results of which are presented in a formal report. At the end of third year, successful students are awarded a BSc (Hons) Structural Engineering with Architecture. After this, students have the opportunity to study for a Master of Engineering degree in this area. It is important to note that, as the second part is considered to be graduate study, students must obtain an honours BSc degree for admission to the Master of Engineering (ME) programme, and postgraduate fees will apply. In the first year of the ME programme, design and


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Structural Engineering with Architecture

What have engineers gone on to do……?

Dr Amanda Gibney Vice Principal - Teaching and Learning

analysis skills are enhanced through lectures, laboratory practical sessions and project work. In addition, a professional studies module is taken. During the second semester a work placement option, either in Ireland or abroad, is available. Our students have undertaken placements in top firms in Dublin, London, Paris, Dubai, New York and Prince Edward Island, experiencing the excitement of being part of creative design teams. The second year provides you with advanced modules in structural design and analysis and soil mechanics. The modules relating to planning methodology, professional engineering and construction management further prepare you for professional life. A major research project is undertaken, and the results are presented in a final thesis.

What are the career options for a UCD Structural Engineering graduate? Graduates of this programme can go on to have successful careers working with innovative and creative design teams, bringing what was believed to be the impossible alive through feats of engineering. The sky’s the limit, or is it?

I was interested in both maths and science subjects in secondary school. I felt that a qualification in either engineering or science would allow me to pursue a career that used my interests and abilities. The career opportunities available to an engineering graduate in the areas of design and research appealed to me. I had not decided which branch of engineering I wanted to study when I started my engineering degree at UCD. I quickly became drawn to the discipline of civil engineering, with the challenges of design and construction of buildings, bridges and highways most particularly attracting me. When I graduated from UCD I went to work with Arup in London, where I was very fortunate to work with the famous Irish engineer, Peter Rice. I worked on a variety of lightweight structures, steel and glass structures and tall buildings with architects such as Sir Michael Hopkins, Ian Ritchie and Richard Rodgers. During this time, I also undertook a part-time MSc at City University, further developing my design capabilities and research skills. Following this I worked with Skidmore Owings and Merrill in London, a Chicago-based architecture and engineering firm. I returned to Dublin after six years and worked with Techrete and, subsequently, Muir Associates, before returning to UCD as a lecturer and researcher. UCD has a strong tradition in both research and teaching. Research activity at UCD informs the teaching, creating a culture of enquiry and innovation. This ethos facilitated my design and development of the Structural Engineering with Architecture Programme, which integrates the development of key skills across the curriculum, preparing students for both the workforce and for further postgraduate study. A degree in Structural Engineering with Architecture or indeed Civil Engineering at UCD can open up many opportunities for an exciting career.

What are the graduate study options for a Structural Engineer? Upon successful completion of the five-year programme, you will obtain the award of Master of Engineering (ME). However, your education need not stop there – a multitude of taught or research graduate opportunities are available to you.

RFR, Paris

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Engineering at UCD

Taught Masters in Engineering Master of Engineering

ME Biomedical Engineering Biomedical Engineering involves the application of engineering principles to healthcare and medicine. It is an interdisciplinary field, requiring knowledge of both living systems and engineering. The ME Biomedical Engineering at UCD provides students with a broad background in Biomedical Engineering, taking the fundamentals of electrical, electronic and mechanical engineering developed at undergraduate level and complementing these with modern biomedical engineering techniques. As part of the ME you will study Biomedical Engineering subjects such as rehabilitation engineering, neural engineering, biomechanics and medical device design. You will also have the opportunity to choose from a range of modules in physiology and anatomy alongside advanced engineering topics including advanced signal processing, nanomaterials and dynamics. There will be an emphasis on independent learning and research, with the opportunity to participate in a work placement either in the medical technologies industry, a clinical environment or with a research group in UCD. You will work with staff and researchers at UCD who have extensive experience in ground-breaking Biomedical Engineering research. You will also develop a knowledge of how the medical device industry is regulated and how new products are introduced to the market, drawing from experience within UCD which includes pioneering companies such as BiancaMed. Upon graduation from the Biomedical Engineering Masters degree at UCD you will have the knowledge and experience to position you to follow a career in the medical devices and technologies industry or to pursue PhD research in Biomedical Engineering.

ME Biosystems Engineering Our growing world population requires more food, water, and energy but limited resources demand we do more with less, without degrading our natural environment. Biosystems Engineering involves the

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The Taught Masters in Engineering at UCD are the next step in your engineering education. Upon completion of your undergraduate engineering degree (BE), you will have the option of being involved in some of the most advanced and ground-breaking research in the areas of technology, healthcare, energy, communications and the environment.

application of engineering science and design to biological materials and systems, especially in food production, sustainable energy and environmental protection. The ME Biosystems Engineering at UCD provides students with a broad background in Biosystems Engineering, complementing the engineering fundamentals with state-of-the-art knowledge from research-active staff. As part of the ME you will study modules such as engineering design for food quality, advanced power and machinery systems, and advanced environmental engineering. There will be an emphasis on independent learning and research, with the opportunity to participate in a work placement either in a related industry or with a biosystems engineering research group in UCD. You will work with staff and researchers at UCD who have extensive experience in the most advanced Biosystems Engineering research. Upon graduation from the Biosystems Engineering Masters degree at UCD you will have the knowledge and experience to develop a career in bioprocess and food, consulting, environmental protection, sustainable energy and green technology industries. There will also be opportunities to pursue PhD research in Biosystems Engineering.

ME Civil Engineering The ME in Civil Engineering from UCD is a Masters degree specialising in structures and water and environmental engineering. Alternatively you can decide to specialise exclusively in one of these areas. At present, environmental issues are of major concern to the international community at large, resulting in an increasing demand for graduates with an understanding of the natural environment. This UCD Masters degree will develop and deepen your knowledge of Civil and Environmental Engineering and will allow you to apply this knowledge in a manner that is environmentally sustainable and contributes to overcoming the challenges that currently face us. The UCD staff involved in this programme have a long standing reputation for research in this area and enjoy collaborative links both


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Taught Masters in Engineering

with internationally recognised academic institutions and with industry. Students of this course will work with the academic staff and be actively engaged in research projects. Engineering design is an integral part of this course and students will complete real-world case studies within a problem-based learning course and a major design project under the guidance of UCD staff and experts from industry. While this is a taught Masters, a considerable amount of independent learning and research is involved. Students will undertake research in one of the School’s many laboratories, computer suites or in the field, in areas ranging from geotechnical engineering to hydrology. In addition to the well-recognised Civil Engineering subjects, the course structure allows students to elect to follow a range of complementary areas such as engineering law, business and planning.

ME Electronic and Computer Engineering The ME in Electronic and Computer Engineering is offered by the UCD School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering. This course is designed to give students the knowledge and the tools to solve complex problems in communications engineering, chip design and software engineering. Students will work alongside staff in the School, which boasts five academics who have received the award of Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, indicative of the high standard of research in a broad range of areas conducted at UCD. Through the learning and understanding of subjects including advanced communication theory; photonic engineering; performance of computer systems; and, introduction to coding and cryptology, graduates will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of fundamental and advanced, theoretical and practical issues in Electronic and Computer Engineering with the ability to quickly analyse issues in a variety of professional situations and be able to make judgments as to the nature and scale of viable solutions. We believe graduates of this programme will be in a position to take leadership positions within the fields of Electronic and Computer Engineering and beyond.

ME Energy Systems Engineering If you want to contribute to the creation of new clean and efficient energy technologies that will change the world we live in, then the ME in Energy Systems Engineering offered by UCD may be the right choice for you. This Masters degree programme builds upon skills developed at undergraduate level through the study of mathematics, physics, chemistry and a range of engineering subjects such as thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, applied dynamics, measurement and instrumentation, electrical circuits and electrical engineering. The ME programme prepares engineers for work in designing and developing future energy systems and aims to deepen understanding of the interactions between these systems and the environment and energy policy, taking account of economic factors. The scope of the programme includes analysis of global energy systems, use of finite natural resources and the impact on climate. It focuses on renewable and other energy sources such as wind, wave, nuclear and solar power and on the conversion, storage and

transmission by electrical and other means. The programme will also address the efficient use of energy in buildings, transport and industrial processes, together with the study of other topics such as carbon sequestration. The UCD academic and research staff involved in the programme are recognised as international experts in their specialist subjects and are currently leading research efforts backed by substantial funding from government and industry sources, aimed at finding practical solutions to the energy challenges facing mankind.

ME Engineering with Business The ME in Engineering with Business offers a unique opportunity to deepen the knowledge of engineering students in the business and management areas. Increasingly the skills set and problem-solving skills of engineers are required in today’s corporate world. This programme utilises the existing strengths and resources of the engineering schools within UCD and the UCD Graduate School of Business. The ME in Engineering with Business allows graduates to continue to deepen their engineering education within a given discipline such as civil, mechanical, electrical engineering, etc., while also gaining grounding in business and management subjects. Students will learn to apply their knowledge and understanding of engineering in an industrial and public service business context, through the use of case studies and a research-based master’s thesis. In addition to the application of engineering principles, new subjects will be introduced encompassing topics such as entrepreneurship, marketing, organisational behaviour and strategy. Students will apply both engineering and business knowledge in the design, implementation and management of complex engineering systems, developing their judgment both in the analysis of problems and in the implementation of solutions. Learning on the course involves both individual and team-based assignments combining lectures, case work and projects.

ME Mechanical Engineering This two-year professional engineering masters programme aims to provide students with an opportunity to gain advanced theoretical, conceptual and practical knowledge in the application of Mechanical Engineering. The course comprises core and optional taught modules, a research project and a professional work experience opportunity. Advanced modules are available in core areas such as thermodynamics, mechanics of fluids, energy systems and climate change, mechanics of solids, continuum mechanics and control theory and also in subjects focused on materials science and engineering, including nanomaterials, technical ceramics, metals processing, composites and polymers. Module choices permit the student to tailor the programme to personal interests. Emphasis is placed on the skills required to generate new knowledge through research. This is achieved through independent and project-based learning while working with UCD academics and researchers on contemporary research projects. Graduates from this programme will be fully qualified as professional engineers, capable of working anywhere in the world at an advanced technical level or as a professional engineering manager.

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Engineering at UCD

Life as an engineering student in UCD An essential part of being an engineering student in UCD is taking part in a fantastic social scene. Engineering students in UCD are renowned for their work hard, play hard ethic. As studying engineering in UCD involves long hours and a lot of group study on projects, engineering students tend to create extremely strong bonds with one another, and this is reflected in their social life.

Engineering Society – EngSoc Most of the engineers’ social activity is arranged by the Engineering Society, known in UCD as EngSoc. EngSoc is a student-run group catering mainly for the needs of engineering undergraduates on campus. Perhaps one of the most colourful student weeks across the Belfield campus is Engineering Week. Social and charitable events are organised by EngSoc to bring like-minded people together in projects that are both worthwhile and a lot of fun. The week culminates in ‘Eng. Day’, where students take part in a range of activities from 24-hour busking, to a fancy dress stretcher race, to engaging in human Tetris. Along with this, evening lectures are run to help students become more involved in their course and discipline by showing them the more interesting side to engineering. Guest lecturers talk about some of the most ambitious engineering projects out there, and bring the

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importance of enjoying the course home to students. The highlight of the EngSoc social calendar is the Engineering Ball, when students and staff come together to celebrate the successes of the year. The awards ceremony focuses on educational and social achievements, and it is always a night to remember.

RoboRugby An essential first-year project that is extremely popular among the engineering students in UCD is RoboRugby. The Siemens RoboRugby Challenge was created by staff and students within the College of Engineering, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, including: lecturers Dr Scott Rickard, Brian Mulkeen and Dr Paul Curran; technicians Gerry Hughes, Frank Hoye, Declan Lehane, Liam Carroll, and Luke Dalton; and, students Maurice Fallon, Liza Kierans, John Healy, Vincent Grace


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Life as an engineering student at UCD

The last word

I hope you have enjoyed reading our brochure, and that you are better informed about the opportunities that studying engineering at UCD will open up for you. Engineering in UCD is an integral part of the UCD College of Engineering, Mathematical and Physical Sciences. The College includes seven Schools:

Sports at UCD Engineering students who love sports, or even just want to engage in a little exercise, will find that the sports facilities at UCD are among the best in the country. They include over 50 sports clubs, 23 outdoor pitches, nine tennis courts, synthetic grass floodlit pitches, and a rifle range, as well as a large indoor sports centre with squash courts, a weights room, handball/ racquet alley, and a state-of-theart climbing wall.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Architecture, Landscape and Civil Engineering; Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering; Computer Science and Informatics; Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering; Geological Sciences; Mathematical Sciences; and, The School of Physics, comprising one of Ireland's largest groupings of research and teaching expertise.

The College promotes interdisciplinary research and teaching, both between schools and colleges at UCD, and with other institutions within Ireland and abroad. As an engineering student in UCD you are introduced from day one to the concept of working collaboratively with other disciplines and you will see how these disciplines influence and complement each other – just by virtue of being a student of the College. Our College produces high-quality leading edge research with an international profile, most of this in collaboration with industry. We offer you the chance to get involved from day one. We will give you a first class academic experience at UCD. We aim to help you unleash your potential so you can take full advantage of the plethora of opportunities that engineering at UCD can offer.

and Peadar Grant. RoboRugby was inspired by MIT’s 6.270 Competition and was created with support from a 2004 UCD President’s Teaching Award and the (then) Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering at UCD. It was envisaged that the event would spark the interest of prospective technical and engineering students, as well as fanning the flames of enthusiasm of the students already enrolled in the relevant courses. And it certainly did: in 2010 in a packed auditorium – complete with camera crews to capture the event – students pitted their design and intellectual skills against one another. The weeks of hard work for the teams of first-year engineering and computer science students finally come to fruition each year around April or May. This year saw 21 robots compete in 41 matches to decide the overall winner. With TV crews coming along to film the action, it is envisaged that next year, RoboRugby will be even bigger and better!

Prof. Nick Quirke College Principal College of Engineering, Mathematical and Physical Sciences

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Printed September 2010. ThinkMedia.ie

UCD Engineering and Architecture Programme Office Room 122, (first floor) UCD Engineering and Materials Science Centre University College Dublin Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland Tel: +353 1 716 1868 Fax: +353 1 716 1155 Email: eng.arch@ucd.ie www.ucd.ie/engineer

BiomedicalEngineeringBiosystemsEngineeringChemicalandBioprocess EngineeringCivilEngineeringElectrical/ElectronicEngineeringEnergySystems EngineeringMechanicalEngineeringStructuralEngineeringwithArchitecture


UCD World of Engineering August 2010