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PRINT JOURNALISM: BECAUSE IT STILL MATTERS. FEBRUARY 10, 2020 VOL. 56, No. 6

westfaironline.com

The coronavirus outbreak has sickened thousands in China.

INSIDE PAGE

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WELLNESS THERAPY

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EXECUTIVES OUSTED

THE WRIGHT STUFF

AtmosAir Solutions VP: Coronavirus ‘hysteria is at such a fever pitch’ BY PHIL HALL phall@westfairinc.com

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fter news reports of a new strain of coronavirus began to filter out in December from Wuhan, the capital city of China’s Hubei province, AtmosAir Solutions has been receiving higher-than-normal sales inquiries.

DANBURY MOTHER-SON DUO UP THE LUXURY-GIFTING ANTE WITH BLKBOX BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN

The company’s Fairfield headquarters has been fielding telephone calls and emails from airport authorities and commercial property managers around the country to learn more about its air purification technology, while its office in Shanghai has been flooded with requests for immediate product deliveries. “The dealers are saying to our Shanghai division,

‘Tell the U.S. to send everything,’ ” said Tony Abate, the company’s vice president and chief technological officer. “They want to get every piece of equipment we have because the hysteria is at such a fever pitch.” AtmosAir’s bipolar ionization technology has its roots in conversations from the early 1900s between Swiss mathematician Conrad Habicht and a drinking buddy who worked in a patent office named Albert Einstein. “Einstein had a sister that succumbed to tuberculosis,” Abate noted. “There was no cure in the early 1900s, so the recommendation was to have her go » ATMOSAIR

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kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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walk along a Martha’s Vineyard beach has doubtless resulted in any number of ideas. But while presumably few of those have had to do with starting a business, it turned out to be the ideal place to brainstorm a luxury-gifting service. The Vineyard was the site of a family vacation for Eric and Karen Wright and their son, Justin. Karen had spent much of her career in the education field, including serving as director of development at Western Connecticut State University in Danbury and

New York University. She also ran gift service Fancy Baskets for 16 years. Justin had focused on sales and business development primarily in the food and beverage sector. “I have a hanging on my refrigerator that says, ‘Build your own dream, or someone else will hire you to build theirs,’ ” Karen recalled. “What Justin and I decided was to do both, together.” The result is BlkBox, curated gift presentations designed to, in her words, tell a story, connect people and build relationships. “Anybody can go to a store, pick up a few things and put them in a gift box,” Karen, co-founder and » BLKBOX

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Jason Ayala rubs people the right way BY PHIL HALL MAIN OFFICE TELEPHONE 914-694-3600 OFFICE FAX 914-694-3699 EDITORIAL EMAIL bobr@westfairinc.com WRITE TO 701 Westchester Avenue, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604

phall@westfairinc.com

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ason Ayala used to work in retail management and he would offer hand massages to co-workers whose fingers and palms ached from long hours at the store. Earlier in his youth, he gave massage assistance to his father, whom he recalled as “always having body aches.” After years of therapeutic altruism, Ayala believed he could find professional success with his cathartic hands. “I wanted to pursue a career in helping people relieve pain,” said Ayala. “It was a big leap of faith to drop everything and stop being the regular 9-to-5 person.” Ayala received certification from Westport’s Connecticut Center for Massage Therapy in 2016 and opted to pursue an entrepreneurial career in his field. Today, the 26-year-old Ayala is running It Is Wellness Massage Therapy, a one-man practice operating out of a pair of Bridgeport locations: Preventive Health Care Solutions in the city’s downtown and Gravity Bodywork in the trendy Black Rock community. “I have clients ranging from businesspeople to single mothers,” he said. “One of my clients had a traumatic brain injury and I have been working at rehabbing him to regain his movements and strength in his body.” Ayala begins a client relationship with a slate of questions to determine the best course of action, which could range from hot stone massage that uses heated stones to relax sore muscles to assisted stretch therapy for limbering up joints. “I will run through a health entry form with a client so I can determine their specific needs and history, and we can work together to create a plan,” he said. Ayala charges $85 per one-hour session, adding that he came to that figure “because I didn’t want to make it overly expensive.” He also offers a monthly wellness plan at $60 per month consisting of “one session per month that can include upgrades like incorporating CBD (cannabidiol) into your massage, cupping therapy and sugar foot scrubs.” Ayala advocates the use of CBD in his work, noting that “the body absorbs CBD very well and it helps relieve a lot of pain — more than a lot of other topical creams.”

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Publisher Dee DelBello Managing Editor/Print Glenn J. Kalinoski Managing Editor/Digital Bob Rozycki Associate Publisher Anne Jordan Group Associate Publisher Dan Viteri NEWS Bureau Chief • Kevin Zimmerman Senior Enterprise Editor • Phil Hall Copy and Video Editor • Peter Katz Senior Reporter • Bill Heltzel, Reporters • Georgette Gouveia, Mary Shustack Research Coordinator • Luis Flores ART & PRODUCTION Creative Director Dan Viteri Art Directors Sebastián Flores, Kelsie Mania

Jason Ayala at his studio in Gravity Bodywork in the Black Rock section of Bridgeport. Photo by Phil Hall

Everybody could use a massage. In doing that, you see an increase in employee performance – they are more efficient when they are working. And employees know they are being treated well by their employers.

As an independent massage therapist, Ayala has relied on social media and word-of-mouth marketing to find new clients. He has also made himself a ubiquitous presence at business networking events in the Bridgeport market and up Route 8 into the Naugatuck Valley. These events have helped him branch into another business pursuit of offering chair massages in offices and workplaces as part of a corporate wellness program. “Everybody could use a massage,” he explained. “In doing that, you see an increase in employee performance — they are more efficient when they are working. And employees know they are being treated well by their employers.” Ayala will also make house calls for clients who are unable to travel to his locations, noting that this service “makes it a lot easier for people who don’t have the ability to get out of their homes or are coming in from a long commute from New York and want to be able to relax in the comfort of their homes.”

But whether he is working in his massage studio, a residence or a workplace, he is always consistent. “My biggest goal is to see the improvement in people,” he stated. “They experience healing when they are getting the work done. I’ve had people who came in with bad headaches and left headache-free, and others who came in with excruciating back pain and were amazed to be able to move. You want people to leave the table changed and not leave the same way they came in.” Ayala is also looking for change in his life. He is pursuing chiropractic studies that he believed “would go hand in hand with massage.” He also envisions partnering with trainers and physical therapists in a new wellness-focused venture. Ayala added that some of his peers have viewed his entrepreneurial spirit as an inspiration. “A lot of my friends in massage therapy were nervous about going into business on their own,” he said.

ADVERTISING SALES Manager • Anne Jordan Metro Sales & Custom Publishing Director Barbara Hanlon Account Managers Beth Emerich, Marcia Pflug Events Sales & Development • Marcia Pflug Marketing & Events Director • Fatime Muriqi Research and Events Coordinator Olivia D’Amelio AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT & CIRCULATION Circulation Manager • Sylvia Sikoutris Telemarketing Director • Brianne Smith ADMINISTRATION Contracted CFO Services Adornetto & Company L.L.C. Human Resources & Payroll Services APS PAYROLL Administrative Manager • Robin Costello

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Dems ready to vote on tolls; Fasano slams ‘lack of transparency’ BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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onnecticut’s Democrat leaders say they expect to hold a vote on the trucks-only tolls bill this week, having called off plans to vote on it before the General Assembly’s regular session that began on Feb. 5. Gov. Ned Lamont and fellow Democrats had hoped to hold the vote during a special session following a Jan. 31 public hearing on the matter, but canceled those plans. One of the sticking points was reportedly whether the Senate or House would vote on the bill first. The public hearing went on as scheduled with proponents and opponents on hand. “This is an important issue and there is no better investment the state can make than in our infrastructure,” Lamont said after the hearing. “Senate and House Democrats are showing leadership in this critical area and I look forward to achieving the goal of passing a comprehensive infrastructure funding package during the week of Feb. 10.” The bill, An Act Concerning the Stability of Connecticut’s Transportation Infrastructure, would allow the state to charge tolls on tractor-trailers at 12 highway bridges. Supporters of the bill say that at least half of the $150 million to $175 million per year expected to be collected would be from out-of-state truckers. Connecticut Republicans, who have opposed tolls of any kind, questioned the speed with which the Democrats are working to pass the bill, maintaining among other things that a complete fiscal study of the matter has yet to be published. “If Democrats are so confident in their tolls plan, why do they continue to withhold the numbers from the public? Even their supporters can’t get information,” Senate Minority Leader Len Fasano said. The Republican leader cited a published

report quoting Connecticut Construction Industries Association President Don Shubert, who has expressed support for tolls in the past, wondering about whether the pro-tolls contingent’s numbers really add up. “We may have a bill,” Fasano said, “but we have no details on what the numbers are, what projects will be funded and how any of the projections were calculated. Even toll supporters recognize that infor-

Len Fasano, left, and Gov. Ned Lamont

mation is not being made available, which doesn’t give the public a full picture of what this plan actually does. “The lack of transparency here is alarming,” he said. “The whole process has been about avoiding sunlight and rushing the bill through before people actually know what it does or doesn’t do.” Democrats have solid majorities of 22-14 in the Senate and 91-60 in the House.

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SUITE TALK Wilton’s Possibilities Farm offers serenity, peace – and horses

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arrie Brady is assisted in running her Wilton-based retreat center Possibilities Farm with a four-member team who work to bring a sense of serenity and inner peace to those seeking out the facility’s services. However, they are not licensed therapists, nor are they licensed in any wellness-related practice. And if they were licensed, it would be a first: Brady’s team consists of horses. But don’t expect to saddle up and ride off on adventures. The horses at Possibilities Farm mingle with the two-legged visitors on a combination of body-mindspirit exercises. Yoga and dance sessions are held in the horses’ presence, and creative artists are invited to work next to the horses to finish their writing or paintings. With the horse duo of Sweet Potato and Mere plus the miniature horses Moon and Paddington — the latter makes trips around the region to health care facilities and schools — Brady is dedicated to exploring the cathartic possibilities that equines bring to human wellness. In this edition of Suite Talk, Business Journal Senior Enterprise Editor Phil Hall speaks with Brady about her distinctive business. When did Possibilities Farm begin and why did it begin? “Officially, the horses moved in September 2016, but I say it began a very long time ago when I was a little girl in Michigan. I fell in love with everything about horses. I did not have a horse. When I was growing up, I had the opportunity to work in a barn and anytime I was there I felt better. I knew when I was around horses I felt at peace and calm and relaxed. “I always said when I was very little that I was going to do something with horses when I grew up, but I couldn’t find a profession that made any sense to me. So, my parents got me this ‘Careers with Horses’ book and it had things like jockey, horse trainer, veterinarian. I didn’t want to be a trainer and I obviously could not be a jockey. I

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Carrie Brady at Possibilities Farm in Wilton. Photo by Phil Hall.

decided that I would always have horses as part of my life — and as soon as I got old enough, I would buy a horse. “So, I grew up and I had a job that had nothing to do with horses, I was working in health care as a consultant around patient-centric care. I learned around 10 years ago that Stanford University was using horses to teach doctors bedside manner. And I thought this was cool. I looked into that and found an entire field of equine-facilitated learning had developed. I found there were certification centers for this. I got certified and built the barn.” What is the connection between horses and wellness? “People become self-reflective because the horses are completely in the moment with you. When you change your attitudes, they change their thoughts immediately — humans aren’t that quick to do that.” What are people looking for and expecting when they come to Possibilities Farm? “We offer drum circles here and meditation. People come here and have an experience with the horses. People say they come here and relax and are in the moment. I called it Possibilities Farm because the possibilities are there.”

How do you incorporate horses in drum circles or meditation? “At this time of year, we do it in the barn where it is warmer. We set up chairs in a summit circle. I open the stall doors and have a little chain between the people and the horses. People can put their chairs as close to the horses as they want. Some people are comfortable being right up to the horses and some people would rather hang back. The silent meditation is about a half-hour. “When we are outside, the group is smaller and there is enough room for the horses to come between every single one of us. We usually have two or three horses out there. They’ll come up and put their heads on people’s shoulders, heads or knees, or just stand there. And amazing stories get told after that. One woman has the horse’s head on her knee, and she told me after that she had huge knee issues and having its head on her knee was very relaxing to her. The horses can tune into us.” Would the noise from the drumming upset the horses? “No, but horses have jobs in the herd and Sweet Potato’s job is the security for the herd. He doesn’t like to be right next to the drum circle because he can’t hear what’s going on all around. There are predators around here — there

was a mountain lion here once — so he wants to keep scanning what’s going on.” From my own experience, I feel very relaxed when my little Bichon Frise is curled up at my feet when I am working or watching television — there is a sense of serenity in having him next to me. Isn’t it extraordinary to take that feeling you have with a small dog and magnify it a hundredfold with a horse next to you? “It’s amazing. People tell me all the time how powerful it is. And I’d say that maybe 30% of the people who come to the farm are afraid of horses. And they tell me that about having bad experiences. But by the end, people are so relaxed.” Do the horses relieve themselves when they are among people? “Fortunately, no. And I did not train them to do this. They will walk away from the group to do that if they are outside. If they are inside, they will make in their stalls. They are not splattering it on you, but you can smell it. “When Paddington goes to hospitals, nursing homes or schools, he has never made manure when we are with clients. He will walk away back to the van and do it.”

What does Paddington do when he is visiting those facilities? “He’s kind of like a therapy dog. When I adopted Paddington, I was looking for a horse that had the temperament needed for this — horses are herd animals and they like to have other horses around, so you are asking that horse to go into an environment where there are no other horses at all. “We’ve done mostly outside visits — you can take them inside, but you’d have to do baths and wash their hooves. When he was at the hospital, we have the patients come out under an awning and it worked out well. People pet him and laugh — it is so surprising to see a horse — and it reminds them they are capable of finding joy, even if they are in a rough situation.” Who are the Possibilities Farm visitors? “People from New York, the Hartford area, Long Island. I had a woman who I had worked with in health care come out here from Minnesota — she wanted a session with the horses because she didn’t know which way to go in her career. And she got some clarity.” What are your goals for your business? “After three-and-a-half years of experience here, I would like to have the ability for people to take the horses for walks in the woods. With the space limitations here, I don’t have the ability to put any covered facility here. I am thinking if it would make sense to expand it because people are enjoying it so much. “I’m excited about the opportunity to create a retreat center where we can expand the services we offer, such as by supporting therapeutic riding horses who may need a few weeks or months away from their programs for rest and recuperation. Just like the current Possibilities Farm, in our new home we will continue to celebrate every individual human and horse and support them in discovering their unique strengths and gifts and sharing them with the world.”


Westmed Medical Group forms WW partnership for Fairfield, Westchester and Putnam counties BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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estmed Medical Group has long been involved in not only the business of making people well, but also interacting with the communities it serves. But the company — headquartered in Purchase, with 12 other locations throughout Westchester and Fairfield counties — has taken the latter a step further with the publication of its first Social Impact Report, designed to not only highlight its activities in that area in 2019 but also to outline what it hopes to achieve moving forward. The report is focused on four key areas: community, people, environment and innovation. “The industry has gotten so much more complex that it’s no longer enough to focus solely on your delivery of care,” explained Westmed CEO Anthony Viceroy. “There was so much going on last year. We felt it was the right time to put all that information together — to talk about all of our business decisions.” The most recent of those decisions, announced Jan. 28, is the formation of a strategic partnership with WW, formerly Weight Watchers. Westmed will be the exclusive medical group partner of the WW program in Fairfield, Westchester and Putnam counties for six months, with Westmed patients aged 18 and older offered the WW Digital Program at a discounted rate. Westmed patients will have digital access to what WW is touting as its “most customized weight-loss plan ever,” myWW. Members take an evidence-based personal assessment that leverages details about food preferences and lifestyle and matches them to one of three comprehensive ways to follow the program. Viceroy noted that almost 21% of the Westchester County population is at risk for or diagnosed with obesity, while one in three people in the U.S. struggles with maintaining a healthy blood pressure. “The partnership is part of the robust strategy we are in the process of developing,” he continued. “We want to educate everyone about adopting healthy habits, and there are so many health problems that obesity can create. Oftentimes losing just 5% of your weight can make a big difference.” Also falling under the “education” banner is Westmed MEDTalks, a series of free monthly community presentations featuring Westmed doctors at various Westmed offices and public facilities. Viceroy said similar presentations have been made in the past, but added, “This is connecting the dots, putting more thought into it and organizing it better.” Topics can range from explaining

Medicare and various diets to torn-fromthe-headlines subjects like the coronavirus. “So many patients already get newsletters that they’re on overload,” Viceroy said. “This is a way of focusing in on and explaining a topic that people care about.” The group — which consists of more than 500 physicians and advanced practice providers and more than 1,500 employees, caring for over 350,000 patients in Westchester and Fairfield counties — has also launched the Westmed Foundation, a nonprofit that has applied for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. The Foundation’s remit, Viceroy said, is to benefit charitable organizations that support wellness initiatives for children and young adults in the commu-

nities it serves, particularly in the mental wellness and healthy eating categories, via annual donations. Input on how the Foundation should operate came from staff and patients alike, Viceroy said, “and several of our big vendors have expressed tremendous interest.” Monies will be received through individual donations and some in-house events, he said, adding that such an approach — rather than holding a big money-raising gala — will better assure that “every dollar raised goes directly to the children.” Viceroy said Westmed is also looking at enhancing its office specs to create better access, “so that patients can get in and see their physician in as timely a manner as they need.”

The group also initiated an “innovation task force” focused on the research and development of emerging technologies. Last year the team began focusing on Amazon Alexa Skill-Building, a tech platform that will use voice assistant skills to help patients use the My Westmed portal to complete tasks like checking wait times, booking an appointment or getting daily health tips. The portal itself, along with its mobile app, underwent significant upgrades last year, Viceroy said. More than 175,000 patients are listed as active users. The group also relies on its Westmed Patient Advisory Panel, composed of past and present patients along with staff and executives, to discuss various challenges and concerns.

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BlkBox — From page 1

CEO, said. “We want to take that to the next level, to help people really connect.” “Corporate gift-giving is a $120 billion industry,” Justin, co-founder and COO, added. “We did our research and found that there are not two people like us doing things like this — a black-owned business run by a mother-and-son team.” The third member of the Danbury-based organization, sales and marketing director Ben Simpkins, is a longtime friend and former Rollins College roommate of Justin’s. “He was in it from day one,” Justin said. The longtime equestrian, breeder and designer “helped come up with the name and spelling as well as our logo, which is similar to what Rolls-Royce has.” The boxes come in two varieties: one with pre-selected items around a particular theme and the other personally curated by the Wrights. The first category ranges from the $80 “Luxuriously Lemon” — containing shea butter hand and body lotion, scented room spray, a soy wax candle, triple-milled hand soap and a card with the sender’s personal message — to the $200 “Gentleman’s Edition,” featuring a cedar-lined cigar case, cutter, cigar, bottle of Johnnie Walker Blue Label Scotch, a whiskey-themed card deck, gourmet nuts and a personal-message card. That the cigar is a John Starks

BlkBox co-founders Justin and Karen Wright.

#3 Signature Series Maduro is no coincidence. The one-time New York Knicks star (who wore No. 3 on his basketball uniform) invited the Wrights to officially open their operation at an Oct. 6, 2019, pop-up event. “We thought, ‘It’s now or never,’ ” Karen laughed. “The opportunity to showcase what we were doing to NBA (National Basketball Association) allstars and business professionals was too good to pass up.” BlkBox’s personally curated option involves sending an email query, after which one of the Wrights responds to determine the recipient’s age, interests and general tastes. “What do they like when it comes to food, travel, music?” Justin said. “We try to find out as much as we can, like we’re putting it together for one of our own best friends.” Turnaround time can range from “a few days to a few weeks, depending on the size of the gift,” he continued. “It all depends on what we’re looking for and what goes into procuring it.” Business has been strong — the holiday shopping season was “amazing, beyond our goals,” Karen said — and has relied on word-of-mouth, social media and some email marketing. Connections like Starks and Bethel-born jazz flautist Sherry Winston help as well. The latter has developed a cookbook that includes one of her CDs that the Wrights expect to make a centerpiece of one of their future boxes.

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IN BRIEF Tuition rising at Connecticut’s state universities

The statement further noted that federal law requires the facility to provide 60 days’ notice to workers prior to its closing. In addition, Chaim Stern, the nursing home’s former operator, has pleaded guilty in federal court to embezzlement and tax offenses. Stern was also chief financial officer of Bridgeport Manor, an affiliate of the health care center, which closed in 2018 after it was revealed that he had diverted $4 million from Bridgeport Manor employees’ retirement plans to himself and a religious charity he controlled.

BRADLEY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TO KEEP ITS NAME

Western Connecticut State University.

Students at the 12 community colleges operating under the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities (CSCU) banner can expect no increase in tuition and fees next fall — while those attending its four state universities are looking at a 3% to 4% increase. Students at the four state universities — including Western Connecticut State in Danbury — would pay $6,162 for full-time, in-state tuition, up from the current $5,924. University fees would rise from $918 to $946, while individual university general fees, which vary from school to school, would also rise. For out-of-state students, tuition would go from $17,726 to $18,436 with additional fee increases. Tuition would remain the same at the 12 community colleges, which include Norwalk Community College and Housatonic Community College in Bridgeport. Full-time students pay $2,238 per semester, or $4,476 per year, while part-time students are charged $166 per credit, plus fees. Tuition at the online Charter Oak State College would also remain the same, with fees decreasing by $224.

Beginning this fall, full-time, first-time, in-state students will pay no tuition at the community colleges.

FTC SUES TO BLOCK SHELTON’S EDGEWELL FROM ACQUIRING COMPETITOR HARRY’S INC.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is suing to block Sheltonheadquartered Edgewell Personal Care Co. from moving forward with its proposed $1.37 billion acquisition of Harry’s Inc. The FTC stated that the acquisition would “eliminate one of the most important competitive forces in the shaving industry,” adding that Harry’s is “a critical disruptive rival that has driven down prices and spurred innovation in an industry that was previously dominated by two main suppliers, one of whom is the acquirer.” “The Harry’s and Flamingo brands represent a significant and growing competitive threat to the two firms that have dominated the wet-shaving market for decades,” said Daniel Francis, deputy director of the FTC’s Bureau of Competition. “Edgewell’s effort to short-circuit competition by buying up its newer rival promises serious

harm to consumers.” Harry’s began as a direct-to-consumer wet-shave brand in 2013 that sold its products exclusively online. In 2016, Harry’s expanded its sales into brick-and-mortar retail stores. The FTC claimed Procter & Gamble and Edgewell were forced to reduce prices and developed previously unavailable value-priced products as a result of this third entity in the market. The FTC voted unanimously to issue the administrative complaint and to authorize staff to seek a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction. An administrative trial is scheduled to begin on June 30.

One year after the Connecticut Airport Authority raised the possibility of changing the name of Bradley International Airport, the agency decided to keep the name. The facility was named in honor of Lt. Eugene M. Bradley of Antlers, Oklahoma, a 24-year-old who was killed in August 1941 when his aircraft crashed during a dogfight training drill at what was then known as the Windsor Locks Army Air Base. The military base became a commercial airport in 1947, carrying Bradley’s surname. The airport agency conducted a study of the benefits and challenges in changing the name and concluded that airports that are renamed do not see significant increases in passenger traffic based on a renaming. The agency also acknowledged that local veterans

groups expressed displeasure over the possible erasure of Bradley’s name from the facility.

CERC REBRANDS AS ADVANCECT; HIRES VP OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

The Connecticut Economic Resource Center Inc. (CERC) — the nonprofit corporation that seeks to advance business formation, retention, recruitment and growth in Connecticut — has rebranded as AdvanceCT. The rebranding effort represents a strategic transition stemming from Gov. Ned Lamont’s plans for the organization to collaborate more closely with the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) to drive business recruitment and retention. AdvanceCT also announced the hiring of David Campbell as vice president of business development. Campbell will lead recruitment efforts by growing relationships with national and international business clients and engaging with strategic partners across the state. Formerly with the New Jersey Economic Development Authority and the U.S. Department of Commerce, Campbell has 17 years of economic development, international business and policy experience, including expertise in attracting foreign direct investment, entrepreneurs and innovative technologies.

BRIDGEPORT HEALTH CARE CENTER CLOSING

Bridgeport Health Care Center, the financially troubled nursing home at 600 Bond St., is closing after efforts to sell it failed. According to a state Department of Labor document, the judge in the health care center’s bankruptcy case ruled that “inattention to the physical plant infrastructure over decades made operation of the facility, without heavy state subsidies, impossible.”

Bradley International Airport.

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S D R E E N N U IN T Y W A ST THE R O F

2020

REGISTER TO ATTEND at westfaironline.com/csuite2020/ AWARDS EVENT:

Thursday, March 12 • 5:30 p.m.

Serafina at the Italian Center • 1620 Newfield Ave, Stamford, CT

KEYNOTE SPEAKER:

JOHN MURPHY CEO OF NUVANCE

2019 Westfair's Businessperson of the year "Helped create a powerhouse in health care"

HONORING OUTSTANDING LEADERSHIP IN WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTIES WestfairOnline PRESENTED BY:

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For event information, contact: Olivia D'Amelio at odamelio@westfairinc.com. For sponsorship inquiries, contact: Marcia Pflug at mpflug@wfpromote.com or 203-733-4545. SPONSORS & SUPPORTERS:

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BENEFITING SPONSOR:


IN BRIEF Odyssey Logistics acquires California firm RPM Consolidated

XFL owner Vince McMahon.

Poll: 41% of football fans think XFL will succeed BY PHIL HALL phall@westfairinc.com

Odyssey Logistics & Technology Corp. has acquired RPM Consolidated Services for an undisclosed amount. Based in Danbury, Odyssey specializes in global logistics and transportation services, including intermodal, trucking, bulk container, global forwarding and transportation management services. RPM, headquartered in Fullerton, California, is a logistics and warehousing provider specializing in Jones Act markets, offering door-to-door ocean, ground and air freight forwarding services to Hawaii and Puerto Rico with extended services to Alaska, Guam and the Caribbean. The Jones Act requires that all goods shipped between U.S. ports to be carried by U.S. vessels and operated primarily by Americans. RPM will join Odyssey’s Multimodal Global Solutions Division, led by division president Keith Hancock.

ECCO RESTAURANT COMING TO TRUMBULL’S LONG HILL GREEN

Ecco, an Italian restaurant that is part of a group that operates several other eateries in the area, is coming to Trumbull’s Long Hill Green. The dining spot will be at the redeveloped plaza at 6540 Main

St., the former site of Marisa’s Restaurant, which has been demolished. The group behind Ecco also operates Pizzeria Molto in Fairfield, Spiga Wine Bar & Salumeria in New Canaan, Lugano Salumeria & Wine Bar in Old Greenwich and Racanelli’s Pizza & Brew in Greenburgh, New York. Ecco hopes to open this year. Construction of Long Hill Green could stretch into 2021.

GOV. LAMONT UNVEILS JOB INCENTIVE PROGRAMS

Gov. Ned Lamont has announced a pair of job incentive programs, the first proposals he submitted to the Connecticut General Assembly during the 2020 legislative session. Jobs CT is a performance-based incentive program for businesses to expand or relocate jobs to Connecticut while Small Business Express 2.0 is a new version of the state’s program that helps small businesses. Jobs CT takes an earn-as-yougrow approach in which businesses creating 25 or more full-time jobs can retain (or be rebated) 25% of the withholding taxes from the new employment for up to seven years. Employers in one of Connecticut’s

opportunity zones or distressed municipalities are eligible to retain 50% of the withholding taxes over the same period. To earn those benefits, the salaries must be 85% of the median household income in the municipality where the jobs will be located and the jobs must be in one of the following designated sectors: • Aerospace/defense. • Clean energy/renewables. • Corporate headquarters. • Distribution and logistics. • Entertainment and digital media. • Financial services. • Information technology. • Life sciences. • Manufacturing. • R&D facilities. Small Business Express 2.0, named and partly patterned after a program launched in 2011 by then-Gov. Dannel Malloy and administered by the Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD), will focus on partnering with banks, helping to guarantee their loans and spur more private investment in small businesses. Small Business Express 2.0 will launch through a new, two-pronged model, First, DECD will leverage the existing Capital Access for Business (CAB) loan guarantee program, sim-

Football fans have plenty to say about Vince McMahon’s rebooted XFL, according to a survey conducted by the market research firm Piplsay. In a nationwide poll of 32,677 conducted last month, 60% of respondents said they were aware of the XFL and 45% said they were excited about the league’s arrival, with 34% expressing no enthusiasm and 21% stating they were not sure. Millennials were the most excited to see the XFL games (60%), followed by Generation Z (55%). When it came to awareness of the new XFL teams, 40% of respondents said they were “somewhat aware” and 18% said they were “quite aware,” but 42% said they were unaware of the XFL’s teams. The league, owned by McMahon’s Stamford-based Alpha Entertainment, launched on Feb. 8, nearly a week after the NFL’s Super Bowl LIV. Half of the poll’s respondents did not believe the XFL would pose a challenge to the NFL, citing the dominant league’s size and presence, although 20% of respondents said it could pose a challenge “to some extent” and 18% said the challenge would be “to a big extent.” More than 40% of Generation Z and millennial respondents believed the XFL would pose a threat to the NFL, compared with 29% of Generation X respondents. The XFL’s previous incarnation in 2001 failed to take root. The survey found 41% of respondents believing the second edition will be successful, with 27% believing it will be another failure and 32% being unsure what the future will hold. ilar to what is done in Rhode Island and Massachusetts. Private lenders will have the ability to opt into a small business lending program where the state of Connecticut shares a portion of the credit risk alongside the lender. Second, DECD will work with community development financial institutions (CDFIs) to provide investment in their revolving loan fund programs to build capacity and ensure sustainable capital for higher-risk credit profiles. This is also similar to what is done in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Lamont said there are several

benefits to making the adjustments to the program, including: • The state will partner with the private sector to increase capacity rather than compete. • Moving an existing program into a new phase will leverage expertise and lower the cost of starting a new program. • State resources will become better aligned for greater efficiency with a customer-centric approach. • There is no new fiscal impact, while risks to the state are significantly lowered. • Targeted investments can be made to fill market gaps.

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IN BRIEF ACCESS HEALTH WARNS OF DATA BREACH IMPACTING 1,100 CUSTOMERS

A security breach at Access Health CT (AHCT) put the personal information and Social Security numbers of some 1,100 AHCT customers at risk last fall, according to the state health insurance exchange. Those customers will receive an orange envelope in the mail notifying them of the compromising of their information, as well as instructions on how to enroll in credit mon-

itoring or enact a credit freeze. AHCT will be contacting affected consumers in a multilayer outreach effort including phone calls and emails to alert them to look for the orange envelopes in the mail.

support practice in Shelton. Before starting his firm in 1981, Kosowsky was a principal with Ernst & Young.

J. ALLEN KOSOWSKY MERGES CPA FIRM WITH CIRONEFRIEDBERG

Pier 1 Imports is closing two of its Fairfield County stores and five of its Westchester-Hudson Valley locations. The financially troubled home furnishings retailer announced plans to close up to 450 of its 942

J. Allen Kosowsky is merging his CPA firm with CironeFriedberg and will serve as a partner in its forensic, valuation and litigation

27th Annual

PIER 1 IMPORTS CLOSING SEVEN REGIONAL STORES

stores nationwide. The Fort Worth company recorded sales declines across the last nine fiscal quarters, with CEO Robert Riesbeck stating, “Fiscal third-quarter sales and margins remained under pressure.” In Fairfield County, the Pier 1 locations at 1 Sugar Hollow Road in Danbury and 777 Connecticut Ave. in Norwalk will be shut. A third store, in Fairfield, will remain open. A total of six Connecticutbased stores are closing.

In New York, Pier 1 is closing its stores at 792 Bedford Road in Bedford Hills, 3125 E. Main St. in Mohegan Lake, 1329 W. Boston Post Road in Larchmont, 499 Tarrytown Road in White Plains and 427 Boston Post Road in Port Chester. Stores in Middletown, Newburgh, Spring Valley and Yonkers will remain open. Pier 1 is closing 21 stores in New York state. — Kevin Zimmerman and Phil Hall

Executives ousted as WWE faces ratings, earnings challenges

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George Barrios and Michelle Wilson.

BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com Longtime WWE executives George Barrios and Michelle Wilson have been bounced from their positions as co-presidents and from the company’s board of directors, as the Stamford firm grapples with declining earnings and ratings. The president role was created in 2018 when Barrios and Wilson were given the titles. He had been chief strategy and financial officer and she was chief revenue and marketing officer. Frank Riddick, a board member for more than 11 years, has been named interim chief financial officer as WWE searches for both a permanent chief financial officer and chief revenue officer — an indication that the president title may be a thing of the past. WWE has seen its stock price significantly drop over the past year. It ended Jan. 31, 2019, at $82.34 and sat at $62.31 before Jan. 30’s announcement, after which it plummeted to $47.50 during extended trading hours. Declining ratings for its flagship TV shows, increased competition from rival wrestling organizations like All Elite Wrestling on TNT, and negative headlines about lawsuits filed against it involving instances of concussions and chronic traumatic encephalopathy among its wrestlers have all been cited as factors in WWE’s downward turn. A 10-year deal signed in 2018 to produce events in Saudi Arabia, while lucrative, has also been controversial. Female wrestlers were originally barred from participating due to limited women’s rights in that nation, and various other personalities, including John Cena, have refused to appear due to Saudi Arabia’s human rights record and the 2018 assassination of Jamal Khashoggi. Meanwhile, Terry “Hulk Hogan” Bollea, a longtime familiar face to wrestling fans, is planning a comeback this year.


Report: Purdue Pharma involved in $1M kickback investigation Purdue Pharma is also trying to settle through its Chapter 11 bankruptcy case approximately 2,700 civil lawsuits that allege the company fueled the national opioid crisis through deceptive OxyContin marketing. The company has denied those complaints’ allegations, but it has offered a settlement plan that it values at more than $10 billion. Connecticut and other states have rejected that proposal because they say it does not do enough to tackle the opioid epidemic. The judge overseeing Purdue Pharma’s bankruptcy approved a controversial $1.3 million bonus for CEO Craig Landau. Paul Schott is a staff reporter with Hearst Connecticut Media. He can be reached at pschott@stamfordadvocate.com or 203-9642236.

BY PAUL SCHOTT

O

xyContin maker Purdue Pharma is reportedly the company that federal prosecutors say made a $1 million kickback to a health IT firm that agreed to a nine-figure payout to settle investigations of software fraud. San Francisco-based Practice Fusion will pay $145 million to resolve criminal and civil probes of its electronic health records, the U.S. attorney’s office in Vermont announced. As part of the agreement — which contains the largest criminal fine in Vermont’s history — Practice Fusion admitted that it solicited and received payments from a “major opioid company” in exchange for using its software to influence physicians who prescribed opioids. That unnamed company is Stamford-based Purdue Pharma, according to unnamed sources cited by Reuters. Purdue Pharma was not criminally charged in the case. “Practice Fusion’s conduct is abhorrent,” Vermont’s U.S. Attorney Christina Nolan said in a statement. “During the height of the opioid crisis, the company took a million-dollar kickback to allow an opioid company to inject itself in the sacred doctor-patient relationship so that it could peddle even more of its highly addictive and dangerous opioids.” A message left for the Vermont USA, asking whether Purdue Pharma was the pharmaceutical company in question, was not immediately returned. In a statement, Purdue Pharma neither confirmed nor denied that it was the implicated pharmaceutical firm, but it said it was “cooperating with investigative demands by various components of the U.S. Department of Justice in connection with criminal and civil investigations of the company.” Starting around the fall of 2013, Practice Fusion solicited remuneration from “Pharma Co. X” in exchange for creating and embedding a “clinical decision support” alert in its electronic health records, according to case documents. The initiative led to doctors increasing prescriptions of Pharma Co. X’s extended-release opioids. OxyContin is an extended-release treatment, but the publicly available case records do not mention the drug. Among its features, Practice Fusion’s alert suggested treatments, including opioids, “without regard to the medical appropriateness of each option,” prosecutors said. “The companies illegally conspired to allow the drug company to have its thumb on the scale at precisely the moment a doctor was making incredibly intimate, personal and important decisions about a patient’s medical care, including the need for pain medication and prescription amounts,” Nolan said. Purdue Pharma has faced federal scrutiny for years. In the past year, negotiations between Purdue Pharma and prosecutors have reportedly focused on civil and criminal probes examining the company’s possible failure to report doctors who were illegally prescribing opioids and the firm’s order-monitoring systems.

Photo by Matthew Brown / Hearst Connecticut Media

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ewly proposed legislation would enable the expansion of gaming operations conducted by the Mohegan and Mashantucket Pequot tribes, including the creation of a tribal casino in Bridgeport. The legislation is authored by Democrat state Sen. Cathy Osten, whose district includes both the Mohegan Sun and Foxwoods casinos. Similar to legislation she introduced last year — which died in the last legislative session — Osten’s new bill would direct Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont to begin talks with the tribes concerning brickand-mortar and digital gaming operations. Among the goals proposed in the bill are the creation of a tribal casino in Bridgeport, the opening of “entertainment zones” in Hartford, New Haven and other to-be-determined localities that would offer sports wagering and providing the tribes with the exclusive right to offer Connecticut-based online gaming and sports wagering on computers and mobile devices. The bill would also enable the tribes to begin offering sports wagering at all tribal-owned locations, including the proposed East Windsor casino that has been stalled following a lawsuit filed by MGM Resorts International. It would further give the Connecticut Lottery the ability to offer online and app-based lottery ticket sales and to offer iKeno. Osten forecast her bill would generate approximately $90 million a year in additional revenue for Connecticut by updating the 1993 state law that only requires the tribes to pay the state 25% of their slot machine revenue. The bill sets an Oct. 1 deadline for Lamont to conclude negotiations with the tribes. Osten’s bill effectively pro-

Rendering of a proposed MGM casino in Bridgeport.

hibits nontribal entities from participating in casino and sports wagering operations in the state. MGM Resorts, which operates casinos in Yonkers, New York, and Springfield, Massachusetts, vowed to fight for a stake in Connecticut’s gaming industry. The company said in a statement, “If Connecticut is to maximize the economic impact of a commercial casino license, a transparent, competitive process is in the state’s best interest. That is equally true for sports betting and the most direct path to bring the greatest results for Connecticut taxpayers, economic growth and state revenue. MGM will also continue to pursue all legal options, including litigation, to defend our right to compete in Connecticut.” Osten’s legislation comes at a time when the state’s gaming industry is showing signs of fraying. Mohegan Sun reported net revenues for fiscal year 2019 of $992 million, down from the nearly $1.1 billion it took in during the previous fiscal year, while net revenues at Foxwoods were $787.8 million, from $828.9 million generated in fiscal year 2018. Competition from neighboring states has been blamed for the tribes’ recently declining casino revenues. In Massachusetts, Encore Boston Harbor ended December with $54

million in gaming revenue for the month, its best monthly performance since its June opening. The slots-only Plainridge Park Casino took in $10.2 million and MGM Springfield brought in less than $19 million. The Springfield casino has gotten off to a particularly rough start. It marked its first anniversary in business last August with $252.8 million in gambling revenue, far below the $412 million that the company projected for its first year in Springfield. In Westchester County, MGM Resorts acquired Empire City Casino last year for approximately $850 million, but has yet to get a license from the state’s gaming commission to expand its offerings beyond slot machines and electronic table games. Jim Murren, chairman and CEO of MGM Resorts International, told The Business Council of Westchester’s annual dinner in October that the delay was unsatisfactory. “I don’t want to be in the commodity business,” Murren said at that event. “Anyone can run a slot machine house or manage somebody else’s property. We feel like what we do very well is develop an entertainment environment. And, if we don’t feel that we can make that differentiating edge, we don’t need to be in every gaming market. And, we’re not in all of them.”


FOCUS ON

REAL ESTATE FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL

BOMA panelist: ‘It’s a tenant’s market’ BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

T

he real estate market being tilted in favor of tenants, the continued strength of Stamford and the obstacle to development that is the state of Connecticut’s transportation system were the main themes of The Southern Connecticut Building Owners and Managers Association’s (BOMA) annual “State of the Market” panel discussion held Jan. 30 at The Waters Edge at Giovanni’s in Darien. Moderated by James Ritman, executive vice president, managing director at Newmark Knight Frank in Stamford, the well-attended event featured BLT

Co-president Ted Ferrarone, Stamford Director of Economic Development Thomas Madden and CBRE Executive Vice President Tom Pajolek assessing the area landscape. Noting that Fairfield County’s office market had just over 2 million square feet in leasing activity last year — with WWE’s 16½-year lease for the 415,000-square-foot, three-building complex at 677 Washington Blvd. in Stamford accounting for much of that — Pajolek said that figure was still about 20% less than five years ago. Nevertheless, he said, the fact that Stamford’s Central Business District (CBD), which includes Washington Boulevard,

Panel moderator James Ritman, executive vice president, managing director at Newmark Knight Frank in Stamford.

accounted for half of the region’s total leasing “speaks very well of the attractiveness” of that area: “More people are coming in to Stamford than go out every morning.” Pajolek also said the availability rate in Greenwich’s CBD finished 2019 at 16%, compared to what he called an all-time low of 8% just a couple of years ago. “There’s a whole bunch of space available around their train station,” he said. Countywide, the availability rate remained essentially flat quarter over quarter at 23.6%. “It’s a tenant’s market,” Pajolek said. Ferrarone noted that WWE and Charter Communications — in the

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midst of constructing a new two-building headquarters on Washington Boulevard — are reflective of how employers are catering to a new breed of employees who don’t want a long commute and prefer retail, dining and other amenities near where they live. Pajolek took up the subject, listing numerous projects that are getting, or have recently received, a “face-lift,” largely to attract young workers, including: 45 Glover Ave. and Merritt 7 in Norwalk; as well as Washington Boulevard and Stamford Plaza. Pajolek also cited the renovations going on at The Summit at Danbury, formerly the Matrix Corporate Center, » BOMA

FEBRUARY 10, 2020

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FOCUS ON REAL ESTATE

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NEWLY RENOVATED BUILDING LOCATED ALONG BUSY BOSTON POST ROAD FOR SALE | 1137 Boston Post Road | Mamaroneck | Listed by Bryan Lanza | KL Team | $3,349,000

From left: Stamford Director of Economic Development Thomas Madden, BLT Co-president Ted Ferrarone and CBRE Executive Vice President Tom Pajolek at the 2020 BOMA event in Darien.

BOMA — From page 13

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as a positive sign. “We’re all upping our games because of what tenants are demanding,” he said. Madden said Stamford is focusing on five key industries, including digital media, financial services/ real estate, government services, food and beverage and especially biotech. He added that the city continues to benefit from luring New York City firms to Stamford, including ITV America and Cholula Hot Sauce, as well as Canidae Pet Food, which is relocating its headquarters from Norco, California. The talk then turned to Norwalk’s SoNo Collection mall, and the near-simultaneous announcement that the Stamford Town Center is being put up for sale. “I’m very, very relieved that that site (SoNo) was put to good use,” Pajolek said. “I have some concern about surrounding retail, but overall it should invigorate the marketplace.” Repeating that Stamford Town Center will not

be occupied by UConn, Madden noted that selling the 853,000-square-foot mall at 100 Greyrock Place requires signoffs from five parties: Macy’s, which owns its pod site; Reckson, which also owns part of the site; the Stamford Urban Redevelopment Commission, which owns Center Drive, the mall’s ramps and helix structure; mall owner Taubman Centers; and the city of Stamford, which owns the land under the site’s parking structure. Madden said the city “is pretty much ready for a new owner to come in and present.” He expressed confidence that Stamford’s Zoning and Planning boards will “do what it takes” to push the sale through, provided the right terms are involved. The mall had an 83% occupancy as of mid-January, he continued, compared with more than 94% in the downtown. Looking to this year, the panelists said repurposing long-vacant properties — especially those not located in CBDs — was high on their agendas. “There’s a lot of office

space that should probably not be office anymore,” Ferrarone said. Returning to the subject of UConn, Madden said the university’s Stamford dorms are already 100% occupied and expressed hope that further expansion could be in the cards. “Why go to Storrs (where UConn is based) when all the jobs are down here?” he asked. Agreeing that Connecticut’s roads and rail system are in desperate need of improvement, the panelists said that, should it succeed, Gov. Ned Lamont’s “30-30-30” plan — a goal of 30-minute travel times by rail between Hartford and New Haven; New Haven and Stamford; and Stamford and New York City — would be a godsend. “Stamford could become the sixth borough of (New York City),” Ferrarone said, adding that “nothing would be more transformative” to the area than improved train service and the presence of a major public university. Pajolek said better train service would relieve some of the notorious traffic congestion on I-95.


FOCUS ON REAL ESTATE CONNECTICUT MEDIAN SINGLE-FAMILY HOME PRICE AT 11-YEAR HIGH

The median sale price for single-family homes in Connecticut reached an 11-year high in 2019 while the median sale price for condominiums hit a five-year high, according to data from The Warren Group, a publisher of regional real estate data. Connecticut recorded 2,634 December single-family home sales, up from December 2018 when there were 2,501 transactions. The median single-family home sale price hit $258,500, a 4.2% year-over-year increase. There were 33,146 single-family home sales in 2019, down 2.1% from 2018. However, the year-to-date median sale price reached $260,000, a 0.4% uptick from the previous year. Fairfield County recorded 8,237 single-family home sales last year with a median sale price of $440,000 that marked a 2.7% decrease from 2018. On the condominium side of the housing market, there were 776 transactions in December, an 11.7% increase from the 695 sales recorded one year earlier. The median sale price of $175,000 was up from the $162,000 price in December 2018. There were 9,109 condo sales in 2019, a 0.2% dip from 2018, with a median sale price of $167,000 that was a 1.2% increase. Fairfield County recorded the most condominium sales in the state last year with 2,858 transactions, although the median sale price of $255,000 was a 1.2% drop from 2018.

CBRE: FAIRFIELD COUNTY LEASING ACTIVITY 20% BELOW THE FIVE-YEAR AVERAGE

Fairfield County’s office market closed 2019 with just over 2 million square feet in leasing activity, according to data from CBRE, which added that last year’s leasing activity was 20% below the five-year average. The Stamford Central Business District (CBD) accounted for half of the region’s total leasing during 2019, due in large part to WWE’s first-quarter lease of 415,000 square feet at the former UBS complex at 677 Washington Blvd. The second-largest lease transaction for 2019 was Synchrony Financial’s renewal of its 267,000-square-foot space at 777 Long Ridge Road in Stamford. The second-largest original lease behind the WWE deal was ASML’s third-quarter transaction involving 98,907 square feet at 50 Danbury Road in Wilton. CBRE also reported that the Greenwich CBD submarket saw 166,000 square feet of negative absorption last year, raising the availability rate from 7% to 16.6%. That marked the first time since 2016 that the submarket recorded negative absorption, which was attributed to a large quantity of highend sublease space coming available from AQR Capital Management and AMG Funds. In contrast, the Greenwich NCBD saw 91,000 square feet of positive absorption last year, totaling 17.9% of availability.

IN BRIEF

CBRE noted asking rents were down 7% year over year throughout the county, with an average asking rent of $34.50 per square foot.

AMAZON BUYS TRUMBULL WAREHOUSE FOR DISTRIBUTION CENTER

Amazon is expanding its Fairfield County footprint with the $7.5 million purchase of a 114,000-square-foot warehouse in Trumbull that will become its latest distribution center. The 10-acre property at 7120 Main St. was originally a warehouse for the now-defunct Read’s Department Store and has been vacant for more than a decade. The company estimates that 150 jobs will be based at the site and is now running online advertise-

ments to fill the newly created positions. In November, the Seattle-headquartered company signed a seven-year lease for two Stratford properties — the 78,000-square-foot 500 Long Beach Blvd. and the 117,000-squarefoot 600 Long Beach Blvd. — for use as a distribution facility. Elsewhere in Connecticut, the company operates distribution centers in Wallingford, Newington and Bristol and fulfillment centers in Windsor and North Haven.

FORUM GROUP SIGNS LEASE FOR WEST AVENUE SPACE IN NORWALK

The Forum Group has signed a lease to establish a new 1,357-square-foot office at 1-3 West Ave. in Norwalk.

Choyce Peterson Vice President Adam Cognetta and Associate Casey McKnight represented The Forum Group in the transaction. The Forum Group provides human capital, process management and financial consulting services. It operates eight recruitment divisions specializing in permanent staffing on both a contingency and retained search basis, as well as providing contract/temporary placement across a variety of disciplines. The landlord was represented by Read Auerbach, senior vice president of Colonial Realty. — Kevin Zimmerman and Phil Hall

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Tony Abate at AtmosAir Solutions’ headquarters in Fairfield. Photo by Phil Hall.

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to a hospital that was very high up in the mountains. She recovered, but Einstein didn’t just accept the fact that she recovered. He wondered why she would recover there and not somewhere else. Habicht believed it could be possible to replicate that natural conductivity with a man-made device.” The device in question was an ion generator that was developed after World War II. For many years, the technology was more prevalent in Europe that in the U.S. “Our technology provides air purification,” Abate continued. “It produces bipolar air ions — they’re a natural element. High in the Swiss Alps, they are very plentiful. But pollution and emissions have depleted that natural supply.” AtmosAir Solution’s product mitigates the corruption of clean air by increasing the volume of bipolar air ions within interior spaces. “Ions fight contaminants,” Abate added. “Think of them as little Pac Men that go out into the air and interact with the dust, particles and spores.” The company was founded in 2004 with Abate handling its first installation at Darien’s Board of Education. Abate pointed out that the technology does not require a massive reconfiguration of existing HVAC systems.

“The beauty is that it’s really simple to install,” he said. “Our product adapts to the air system. We designed ionization tubes that look like little missiles. We size the product and the quantity of ionization tubes to the flow of air and the size of the space. So, an installation like Los Angeles International Airport would have 10 or 12 of our units, or we may get small installations like a commercial office that would only need one or two. Our system uses the air conditioning system like a great big fan. The air blows across the tube, the tube produces the ionization, it blows it back into the space and saturates the space with these ions that really go to work in attacking contaminants.” The tubes need to be replaced every two years, Abate noted, although they can be cleaned out during use in spaces where the air quality can quickly become problematic, most notably animal shelters with a surplus amount of canine dander and casinos where smoking is allowed. Abate, who is also chairman of the American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers’ committee related to standards for gas-phase air cleaning equipment, pointed out that bipolar ionization has been tested in Asia against earlier strains of the coronavirus since the beginning of this century and was shown to be effective against it.

The company’s technology was tested against the MS2 Bacteriophage, a surrogate of the norovirus, and was shown to produce better than a 99% reduction capability. The company has more than 7,000 installations, ranging from large stadiums to small offices. The coronavirus outbreak has brought in more sales inquiries from West Coast airports and Abate held a meeting with Facebook executives at their Manhattan complex to discuss air quality improvement strategies. With the current coronavirus epidemic, Abate explained, the bipolar air ions “attack the virus on the surface and break it down, and not allow it to infect when it enters your body.” He warned that the outbreak “has a relatively short incubation period — about 14 days in the body.” But while news reports on the coronavirus focus on a rising death toll in China and more confirmed cases on this side of the Pacific, Abate warned that situation needs to be put in perspective. “When you are in public places, lots of people come through and carry different types of illnesses,” he said. “We’re hearing about coronavirus, but influenza is extremely common and that has killed many more people than coronavirus. It’s Mother Nature’s way of telling us the air is not clean.”


Fairfield County

NOMINATE TODAY

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: APRIL 30 Visit westfaironline.com/events/

AWARDS EVENT: Early June 2020 WestfairOnline

NOMINATE A CANDIDATE (PERHAPS YOURSELF) WHO IS: • Over 25 and under 40 years of age

• A dynamic industry leader who’s part of the county’s business growth • Working in Fairfield County and has not previously won this competition

For more information or sponsorship inquiries, contact Barbara Hanlon at bhanlon@westfairinc.com or 914-358-0766. For event information, contact Olivia D’Amelio at odamelio@westfairinc.com. CHAMBER PARTNERS: Darien Chamber of Commerce | Fairfield Chamber of Commerce | The Business Council of Fairfield County | Wilton Chamber of Commerce | Greater Norwalk Chamber of Commerce | Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce | Ridgefield Chamber of Commerce | Westport-Weston Chamber of Commerce | Greater Danbury Chamber of Commerce | Greenwich Chamber of Commerce | Bridgeport Regional Business Council | Stamford Chamber of Commerce

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FEBRUARY 10, 2020

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GOOD THINGS R.D. SCINTO GIVES TO HCC FOUNDATION The Housatonic Community College Foundation (HCCF) got an early gift to support its participation in Fairfield County’s Giving Day campaign this year. Connecticut commercial real estate firm R.D. Scinto Inc. has agreed to fund a $5,000 challenge grant to support students in need. Hosted by Fairfield County’s Community Foundation, with champion sponsor Bank of America, Giving Day inspires and empowers the region to raise as much money as possible for local nonprofit organizations in just 24 hours through online donations. The HCCF will participate in the oneday campaign on Feb. 27. Funds raised from Giving Day will allow the foundation to continue providing financial assistance, such as tuition and textbooks, to motivated, financially struggling students.

TWO WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS CLAIM TOP DOG STATUS IN CANINE SERVICES

NEW BRUCE CAMPAIGN COMPLETES $1M MATCH

John Toscano

PARTNER APPOINTED AT BLUMSHAPIRO

GBBA 2020 OFFICERS The Greater Bridgeport Bar Association (GBBA) elected its 2020 slate of officers at its recent annual dinner. The 139th class of officers are: Matthew C. Reale, president; Frank Bailey, president-elect; Steve Levy, vice president; Etan Hirsch, secretary; and Charleen Merced Agosto, treasurer.

Knowledge is Power

The newly renovated main gallery with the expanded science gallery.

Shannon Powell, left, and Jasmin Cruz.

Shannon Powell’s A Muddy Paw Grooming Salon of New Milford will offer a full menu of grooming services at Unleashed and Furry Friends, a pet daycare and boarding facility in New Milford and Danbury, said Jasmin Cruz, COO of the daycare and boarding centers. Full-service grooming will be offered at both daycare and boarding facilities. Two groomers will be available at both locations. Appointments can be made online or by phone at unleasheddaycare.com or 860-799-7979 or 203-798-1759.

Leaders of the Campaign for the New Bruce are pleased to announce continuing widespread community support for the $45 million renovation and expansion project that will transform the Greenwich museum of art and science. In July 2019, two friends of the Bruce Museum agreed to match all new gifts of $10,000 or more and to bring the next $1 million raised to $2 million. The challenge was met by close to 20 donors, completing the match in early 2020 and bringing the campaign to 85% of its fundraising goal for the renovation and construction project. The $1 million challenge was launched by Rebecca Gillan, a member of the Bruce Museum Board of Trustees, and by a second campaign leader who wishes to remain anonymous.

NEW MILFORD ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT WELCOMES NEW BOARD MEMBERS

Be part of our comprehensive database of contacts. Visit westfaironline.com or scan below

Blumshapiro, the largest regional business advisory firm based in New England, with offices in Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, has announced the appointment of a new partner, John Toscano, CPA. Toscano will be participating in the leadership of blum’s education practice.  He has more than 28 years of experience, primarily focused on serving educational institutions of all types and providing specific expertise on endowment-related matters. Toscano’s years of experience include providing accounting, auditing, tax and advisory services to clients in various industries, comprising education, not-for-profit, construction and manufacturing. 

PITNEY BOWES FOUNDATION SUPPORTS STAMFORD PUBLIC EDUCATION The Stamford Public Education Foundation (SPEF) received a grant from the Pitney Bowes Foundation in support of its Stamford Mentoring Program, which serves students in grades 3 to 12. Celebrating its 10th anniversary of delivering student mentoring programs, SPEF has been serving the community since 1996. The mentoring program runs through June and provides students with the resources and guidance necessary to be successful during elementary, middle school, high school and beyond. More than 500 volunteers from colleges, corporations and the greater Stamford community were instrumental in making the 2018 to 2019 program a success.

From left: Adele Lynn Connor, Kristen Gizzi and Kerry Parker.

The Corporation for New Milford Economic Development, a nonprofit organization founded to expand and develop new business opportunities in the town, has elected four new members to its

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board of directors. They include: Kristen Gizzi, executive director of Litchfield Crossings and director of real estate for ECCO Development; Kerry Parker, superintendent of

New Milford Public Schools; Adele Lynn Conno r, senior director of development of Nuvance Health, New Milford Hospital; and Dean Barile (not pictured), CEO of Amore4wine.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.


TWO AI INDUSTRY EXPERTS ARE A MATCH FOR ONE LIFE-SAVING MEDICAL MISSION

The Connecticut Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA Connecticut), in coordination with the Connecticut Society of Certified Public Accountants (CTCPA), Hartford County Bar Association, CFA Society of Hartford, Connecticut, Young Insurance Professionals and the Connecticut Bar Association announces the launch of a Connecticut Professionals’ Leadership Academy. The six-month program brings together 42 professionals to help develop and improve their professions, their professional association groups, their companies and their personal career growth. AIA Connecticut serves as a resource to architects and the public. Its membership of more than 1,500 is comprised of architects, associates working toward licensure, students, and professionals in affiliated fields.

Matthew E. Hummel

KEYBANK APPOINTS COMMERCIAL BANKING TEAM LEADER KeyBank announced that Matthew E. Hummel has joined the bank in the newly created position of commercial banking team leader, reporting to Market President James Barger. Hummel will lead and expand the team of commercial bankers serving middle-market clients in Connecticut and western Massachusetts and his leadership will be instrumental in driving KeyBank’s commercial business growth throughout the market. He brings more than 30 years of commercial banking experience to KeyBank, primarily from Bank of America’s Global Commercial Banking group.

CONNECTICUT PROFESSIONALS LAUNCH LEADERSHIP ACADEMY

According to the American Transplant Foundation, there are 114,000 people in need of organ transplants in the U.S., and only 30% will receive their life-saving surgery this year. And 20 people will die each day as their time passes by. This is not from a lack

of available donated organs, but mainly from cumbersome and complex transportation systems.   Aquiline Drones, a Connecticut-based drone enterprise that provides sophisticated solutions in drone manufacturing, au-

tonomous operations and cloud services, is partnering with VyrtX, an advanced logistics-technology firm, to create a life-saving medical delivery service for human organs and tissues using unmanned aerial vehicles/ drones.

CPA SOCIETY HONORS SEVEN IN FIRST-EVER CTCPA WOMEN’S AWARDS PROGRAM

BRANCH MANAGER ADDED TO OPPENHEIMER David Roth has joined the Stamford branch of Oppenheimer as branch manager and senior investment advisor. Roth will be responsible for overseeing all branch activities, including growth and expansion and providing strategic counsel for clients in the region. Additionally, he will provide support and guidance for the firm’s financial advisors in Stamford.

PROMOTION AT HUB Formerly serving as assistant vice president, Jason Provenzano has been promoted to vice president of commercial lines with HUB International Northeast, a leading North American insurance brokerage that provides a variety of employee benefits and business and personal insurance products. Based out of the company’s Fairfield office, Provenzano is responsible for the negotiation and procurement of insurance programs for some of the larger and more complex real estate and financial sector clients within HUB Northeast. His specialties include analysis of risk, program design, negotiation of terms and conditions as well as coordinating client services.

CONNECT WITH westfair communications From left: Vanessa Rossitto, Ilona Gooley, Mary Santella Connolly, Katherine Donovan, Marcia L. Marien, Mary R. Gilhuly and Susan A. Martinelli.

WHITBY SCHOOL HEAD APPOINTED Dr. Jack Creeden has been appointed head of school by the Whitby School Board of Trustees. Creeden joined the Greenwich-based school last summer with more than three decades of experience in independent school leadership, teaching, governance and strategic planning.

The Connecticut Society of Certified Public Accountants (CTCPA) honored four female CPAs for distinguished service and three female CPAs as women to watch when the organization held its first-ever CTCPA Women’s Awards Breakfast in late January at the TPC River Highlands in Cromwell, Connecticut. They included: Vanessa Rossitto (distinguished service), partner - Industry Leader Government Services Group at Blumshapiro in West

Hartford. Rossitto resides in East Haddam. Ilona Gooley (women to watch), senior manager at Andersen in Hartford. Gooley resides in West Hartford. Mary Santella Connolly (women to watch), audit and assurance, senior manager at Deloitte & Touche LLP in Stamford. Connolly resides in Fairfield. Katherine Donovan (women to watch), assurance manager at Whittlesey in Hartford. Donovan resides in Bloomfield. Marcia L. Marien (distinguished ser-

vice), finance director/controller for the town of Brookfield, Connecticut. Marien resides in Middletown. Mary R. Gilhuly (distinguished service), executive vice oresident and chief financial officer at Community Mental Health Affiliates, Inc. in New Britain. Gilhuly resides in North Haven. Susan A. Martinelli (distinguished service), office leader — New Haven and Assurance Partner at RSM US LLP. Martinelli resides in Southington.

westfaironline.com wagmag.com

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FEBRUARY 10, 2020

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Facts & Figures BUILDING PERMITS Commercial 1937 Main Office LLC, Stamford, contractor for 1937 Main Office LLC. Install temporary tent at 1937 W. Main St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $1,500. Filed Sept. 19. 72 Franklin LLC, Stamford, contractor for 72 Franklin LLC. Install temporary tent at 72 Franklin St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $850. Filed Sept. 17. Bennett, Jill, Stamford, contractor for Jill Bennett. Remodel and repair bathroom at 127 Greyrock Place, Stamford. Estimated cost: $10,800. Filed Sept. 13. City of Stamford, contractor for the city of Stamford. Prepare for a private party at 1040 Washington Blvd., Stamford. Estimated cost: $1,000. Filed Sept. 13. Comex Painting LLC, Stamford, contractor for BLT 333 Ludlow LLC. Renovate office space at 1 Start Point, Stamford. Estimated cost: $125,000. Filed Sept. 20. Complete Dismantling Services LLC, Stamford, contractor for Summer Street Property LLC. Demolish storage space at 777 Summer St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $222,500. Filed Sept. 19. CP Rankin, Stamford, contractor for Harbor Drive Acquisitions LLC. Replace roofs on two buildings at 208 Harbor Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $594,495. Filed Sept. 12. Empire Telecom USA LLC, Stamford, contractor for Harbor Drive Acquisitions LLC. Replace antennas at 208 Harbor Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $20,000. Filed Sept. 11. Greatview LLC, Stamford, contractor for Greatview LLC. Construct 6 condominiums at 22 Highland Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $2,817,180. Filed Sept. 11. Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to:

Haynes Construction Co., Stamford, contractor for Jonathan Rose Companies. Construct new single residence at 681 Atlantic St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $2,341,602. Filed Sept. 18.

Bailiwick roofing and Siding Inc., Stamford, contractor for Yim Elizabeth Yinling. Install new fiberglass at 45 Greenfield Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $8,500. Filed Sept. 18.

Monk, Edward, et al, Stamford, contractor for Edward Monk. Construct an addition to side of home at 139 Pond Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $400,000. Filed Sept. 18.

Sunrun Installation Services Inc, Stamford, contractor for Carlos Sanchez. Install roof-top solar panel at 36 Wilson St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $5,994. Filed Sept. 12.

New Look Painting Inc., Stamford, contractor for Rosemarie Abbazia. Strip and replace roofs at 85 Courtland Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $45,500. Filed Sept. 17.

CCI Group Inc. New York, Stamford, contractor for Louis N. Cohen. Extend exterior deck at 11 Barnes Road, Unit 10, Stamford. Estimated cost: $5,500. Filed Sept. 16.

Ocean North Pools LLC, Stamford, contractor for Nicole A. Raucher. Install accessible ramp at 127 Haviland Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $10,000. Filed Sept. 13.

Taipe, Marcelino, Stamford, contractor for 22-31 Stephen St. Remove basement at 22 Stephen St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $46,800. Filed Sept. 13.

Cooke, Douglas J., Stamford, contractor for Douglas J. Cooke. Install full-basement bathroom at 48 Twin Brook Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $18,810. Filed Sept. 19.

Pazmino, Laura, et al, Stamford, contractor for Laura Pazmino. Construct addition at 64 Betts Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $228,820. Filed Sept. 19.

RSN Interiors LLC, Stamford, contractor for 56-66 Viaduct Road LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 56-66 Viaduct Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $83,000. Filed Sept. 20. Signature Construction Group of Connecticut Inc., Stamford, contractor for 750 Washington Blvd LP. Alter interior at 750 Washington Blvd., Stamford. Estimated cost: $210,000. Filed Sept. 16.

DL Carpentry LLC, Stamford, contractor for Robert Neilsen. Renovate kitchen at 18 Birchwood Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $34,650. Filed Sept. 20.

Springdale Fire Company Inc., Stamford, contractor for Springdale Fire Company Inc. Construct storage at 19 Cushing St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $20,000. Filed Sept. 16.

Erie Construction Mid-West Inc., Stamford, contractor for Oleg Margolin. Remove existing layers before installing fiberglas roof at 281 Dundee Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $29,981. Filed Septt. 16.

Stamford Signs & Graphics, Stamford, contractor for 930 High Ridge LLC. Install storefront sign at 930 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $950. Filed Sept. 12.

Guiltec Development LLC, Stamford, contractor for Larchfield LLC. Install siding at 1766 Bedford St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed Sept. 12.

US Home Services LLC, Stamford, contractor for Stewart N. Jones. Alter bathroom at 127 Greyrock Place, Stamford. Estimated cost: $30,000. Filed Sept. 18.

Guiltec Development LLC, Stamford, contractor for 1786 Bedford Associates LLC. Install siding at 1786 Bedford St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $17,000. Filed Sept. 12.

Wedge Construction LLC, Stamford, contractor for Riverbend 5 LLC. Alter interior to create educational space at 5 Riverbend Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $265,000. Filed Sept. 17.

The Home Depot USA Inc., Stamford, contractor for Annamaria Csizmadia. Install vinyl panel at 4 Barnstable Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $513. Filed Sept. 10.

Residential

The Home Depot USA Inc., Stamford, contractor for Silverblatt Lindsay. Install vinyl replacement windows at 44 Glen Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $2,063. Filed Sept. 18.

250 Ludlow Street LLC, Stamford, contractor for 250 Ludlow Street LLC. Renovate two-family dwelling at 250 Ludlow St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $100,845. Filed Sept. 18. Al Hariri, Omar, et al, Stamford, contractor for Omar Al Hariri. Alter interior at 94 Akbar Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $9,000. Filed Sept. 12. Anderes, Johanna, Stamford, contractor for Johanna Anderes. Remove old stairs and install new stairs at 36 Ringwood Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $40,000. Filed Sept. 10.

Bob Rozycki c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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Integrated Building Management Inc., Stamford, contractor for the Housing Authority of the city of Stamford. Perform replacement alterations at 0 Ursula Place, Stamford. Estimated cost: $29,832. Filed Sept. 13. Kuczo, Christopher M., Stamford, contractor for Morck Steven. Build addition for garage at 51 Prudence Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $63,360. Filed Sept. 20. Mayen-Mayen, Manuel de Jesus, Stamford, contractor for Manuel de Jesus Mayen-Mayen. Finish basement at 79 Lenox Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $31,625. Filed Sept. 12.

Preference Construction LLC, Stamford, contractor for Marie M. Gelin. Remove and re-roof at 47 Chatfield St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,000. Filed Sept. 18. Pro Custom Solar LLC, Stamford, contractor for Paula A. Bejarano. Remove and re-roof at 24 Corn Cake Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,219. Filed Sept. 18.

Tuller, Alexander, Stamford, contractor for Alexander Tuller. Build a tall fence at 28 Pinnacle Rock Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $7,000. Filed Sept. 12. Villena Novavida N., et al, Stamford, contractor for Novavida N.Villena. Install sink in garage and wood-burning stove at 1929 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $33,280. Filed Sept. 13. Vincenzo, Iannone, Stamford, contractor for Jason Jaworoski. Install pool patio at Lot A1, Old Orchard Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $65,000. Filed Sept. 19.

Rebuilding Together Hartford Inc., Stamford, contractor for Strongwater Marc. Repair siding in front and sides of home at 56 Stone St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $500. Filed Sept. 19.

Vinylume Inc., Stamford, contractor for Craig E. Goldstein. Install vinyl siding at 169 Butternut Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $31,500. Filed Sept. 10.

Rebuilding Together Hartford Inc., Stamford, contractor for Johnnie Edwards. Install storm door at 15 Woodland Place, Stamford. Estimated cost: $500. Filed Sept. 19.

Vivint Solar Developer LLC, Stamford, contractor for Brian Gregg Demetros. Install roof-mounted panels at 611 Hope St., Unit 621, Stamford. Estimated cost: $3,880. Filed Sept. 10.

Rebuilding Together Hartford Inc., Stamford, contractor for Marlene G. Rhome. Repair basement floor at 8 Elmcroft Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $200. Filed Sept. 19.

Westview Electric LLC, Stamford, contractor for Susan A. Santagata. Remodel bathroom at 78 W. Hill Circle, Stamford. Estimated cost: $14,000. Filed Sept. 18.

Santagata, Susan A., Stamford, contractor for Susan A. Santagata. Fix swimming pool at 78 West Hill Circle, Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,000. Filed Sept. 13.

Westview Electric LLC, Stamford, contractor for Ankur Mathur. Renovate kitchen at 43 Bennington Court, Stamford. Estimated cost: $24,000. Filed Sept. 18.

Skyline Solar LLC, Stamford, contractor for Carmen Sena. Install PV solar system at 479 Fairfield Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $12,000. Filed Sept. 19. Sloyer, Elliot, et al, Stamford, contractor for Elliot Sloyer. Remove and re-roof at 35 Toilsome Brook Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $5,000. Filed Sept. 13. Stamford Building Company LLC, Stamford, contractor for Sean Downling. Repair water damage at 97 Sagamore Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $19,600. Filed Sept. 17.

COURT CASES Bridgeport Superior Court Adams, Akeem et al, New Haven. Filed by Mary Rucker, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Miller Rosnick D’Amico August & Butler PC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-196092579-S. Filed Dec. 17.

Aguilar-cornejal, Antonio, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Donato Dejesus, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Cooper Sevillano LLC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-196092399-S. Filed Dec. 12. Levy, Julia C., Monroe. Filed by Carl Zinn III, Monroe. Plaintiff’s attorney: McEnery Price Messey & Sullivan LLC, Milford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBTCV-19-6092192-S. Filed Dec. 5. Lourenco, Marisa M., Bridgeport. Filed by Diego Perez, Norwalk. Plaintiff’s attorney: Appleton & Appleton LLC, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBTCV-20-6092506-S. Filed Dec. 16. Shelton IV Hotel Equity LLC, et al, Shelton. Filed by Derek Ruiz and Marie Ruiz, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: John J Luckart Jr., Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiffs were using the pool facilities at the defendants’ premises when Mr. Ruiz cut his head on a protruding sharp object in the waterslide sustaining injuries. The plaintiffs seek monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBTCV-19-6092357-S. Filed Dec. 11.

Danbury Superior Court Chajon-Jimenez, Gerber Estuardo, Danbury. Filed by Luz Victoria Chillogalli-Gallegos, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura Law, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-206034858-S. Filed Dec. 31.


Facts & Figures Dardis, Richard, Norwalk. Filed by Cazenovia Creek Funding I, LLC, Charlotte, North Carolina. Plaintiff’s attorney: Marcus Law Firm, North Branford. Action: The plaintiff is the current owner of the lien and the defendant is the owner of the real property on which the unpaid property taxes were assessed. As a result, the plaintiff was assigned the owner and holder of lien. The plaintiff claims foreclosure of lien, monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-196034327-S. Filed Nov. 12. Faulknor, David, et al, Redding. Filed by Cornerstone Home Improvement LLC, Bantam. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ouellette Deganis Gallagher & Grippe LLC, Cheshire. Action: The plaintiff furnished materials and rendered services and labor in the renovation of the defendants’ real property. In order to secure payment, plaintiff filed a ‘ mechanic’s lien. The sum due to the plaintiff remains unpaid and the defendants breached the contract by failing to pay the balance due. The plaintiff claims foreclosure of the lien, possession of the premises, monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-196034503-S. Filed Nov. 6. Krueger, Judy T., Ridgefield. Filed by Angela Tropeano, Ridgefield. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura Law, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief as the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-206034638-S. Filed Dec. 6. Lesserevil LLC, Danbury. Filed by Jermic Battle, Broofield. Plaintiff’s attorney: Cicchiello & Cicchiello LLP, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff filed a charge of discrimination and unjustified termination of his job against the defendant, who is his former employer, in which he was discriminated for his race. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages is less than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-19-6034513-S. Filed Nov. 26.

Stamford Superior Court Angelov, Kostadin, Stamford. Filed by Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia. Plaintiff’s attorney: London & London, Newington. Action: The plaintiff is a banking association. The defendant used a credit account issued by plaintiff and agreed to make payments for goods and services. The defendant failed to make payments. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages and is less than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs. Case no. FST-CV19-6044704-S. Filed Dec. 2. Garcia-Gonzalez, Teylor A. Stamford. Filed by Hollingworth O. Boyke, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Wocl Leydon LLC, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedlycaused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FSTCV-19-6044387-S. Filed Nov. 7. Hecht, Levi, et al, Stamford. Filed by Fairfield House Condominium Association of Greenwich Inc., Harrison, New York. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ackerly & Ward, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff provides assessment of common charges for the condominium. The defendants have failed to make payments. The plaintiff claims foreclosure of the lien, possession of the premises, monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs. Case no. FST-CV-196044546-S. Filed Nov. 19. Shilling, Lynn. et al, Norwalk. Filed by Salvatore Mattera, Norwalk. Plaintiff’s attorney: Harris Harris & Schmid, Norwalk. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief as the court deems appropriate. Case no. FSTCV-19-6044433-S. Filed Nov. 12. Town of Greenwich. Filed by Angelo Perrone, Cos Cob. Plaintiff’s attorney: Carmody Torrance Sandak & Hennessey LLP, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff was a pedestrian, when he fell and injured himself due to a broken and loose storm-drain cover that caused a gap to exist between the pedestrian sidewalk and the top of the storm drain. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-196044715-S. Filed Dec. 2

DEEDS Commercial 46 Orchard Place LLC, Greenwich. Seller: Jaime Aldama and Kosanna Poon, Greenwich. Property: 39 Orchard Place, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Nov. 4. ABC Real Estate Investors LLC, Fairfield. Seller: Deutsche Bank National, Coppell, Texas. Property: 13 Hill St., Norwalk. Amount: $382,200. Filed Sept. 6. Alston, Jennifer Marie and Maxwell George, Norwalk. Seller: Martha Ava Nails, Norwalk. Property: 6 Observatory Place, Unit 9, Norwalk. Amount: $298,000. Filed Sept. 6. Chmielewski, Piotr, Norwalk. Seller: Nationstar Mortgage LLC, Coppell, Texas. Property: 30 Richmond Hill Road, Norwalk. Amount: $299,250. Filed Sept. 6. Galeano, Mirza, Norwalk. Seller: John F. Barna Palm Desert, California. Property: 4 Highmeadow, Unit 4, Norwalk. Amount: $715,000. Filed Sept. 3. Gilhooly, Richard, Norwalk. Seller: Wilmington Savings Fund Society, Anaheim, California. Property: 3 Branford St., Norwalk. Amount: $305,000. Filed Sept. 9. Hurlingham Green LLC, Greenwich. Seller: Hurlingham Drive LLC, New York, New York. Property: 22 Hurlingham Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Nov. 4. Jimenez, Felix and Brenda Lopez, Bronx, New York. Seller: Compliant Solutions LLC, Norwalk. Property: 2 Eagle Road, Norwalk. Amount: $359,000. Filed Sept. 3. Keating, Riley J. and David S. Keating Riverside. Seller: 899 LLC, Greenwich. Property: 15 Spring St., Riverside. Amount: $1,800,000. Filed Nov. 1. PJS Holdings LLC, Ridgefield. Seller: FM Investments LLC, Norwalk. Property: 9 Mott Ave., Unit 1-7 Norwalk. Amount: $190,000. Filed Sept. 6. Trujillo, Maria, Norwalk. Seller: CDVK Properties LLC, Norwalk. Property: 46 Glenrock, Norwalk. Amount: $282,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Residential Aldama, Jaime and Kosanna Poon, Greenwich. Seller: Michael Alan Bressler and Rachel Hope Bressler, Greenwich. Property: 46 Orchard Place, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Nov. 1. Bakshi, Loren A., Old Greenwich. Seller: Karen Trayer, Old Greenwich. Property: 1465 E. Putnam Ave., Unit 119, Old Greenwich. Amount: $420,000. Filed Nov. 1. Black, Lyn M., et al, Greenwich. Seller: Tom S. Ward Jr., Greenwich. Property: 5 Stanwich Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Nov. 5. Brainard, Sarah, Norwalk. Seller: Betsy Conti, Norwalk. Property: 342 Sunrise Hill Road, Norwalk. Amount: $295,000. Filed Sept. 9. Cooper, Joseph and Gina Cooper, Old Greenwich. Seller: Michael Ettinger, Old Greenwich. Property: 59 Park Ave., Old Greenwich. Amount: $2,100,000. Filed Nov. 1. Croft, Jamie and Karka Croft, Norwalk. Seller: David D. Rich and Doreen Rich, Norwalk. Property: 227 New Canaan Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $577,500. Filed Sept. 10.

Greco Jr., John J., Norwalk. Seller: Donna L. Macri and Donald V. Nielsen, Norwalk. Property: 40 First St., Norwalk. Amount: $320,000. Filed Sept. 5. Hu, Jiping and Min Huang, Bridgewater, New Jerey. Seller: Martha Correa, et al, Wilton. Property: 1 Walter Ave., Unit 39 Norwalk. Amount: $145,000. Filed Sept. 5. Jackson Girimonte, Dorothy and Erica Girimonte, Mount Holly, New Jersey. Seller: Mark E. Smith and Maria Cristina Smith, Norwalk. Property: 5 Rampart Road, Norwalk. Amount: $475,000. Filed Sept. 3. Jefferis, Matthew, Cheshire, Seller: Sarah Brainard, Norwalk. Property: 27 W. Main St., Unit 8, Norwalk. Amount: $180,250. Filed Sept. 9. Krupa, Slawomir, New York, New York. Seller: Eric W. Sacks and Jacqueline S. Sacks, Norwalk. Property: 17 Rocky Point Road, Norwalk. Amount: $2,645,750. Filed Sept. 9. Kudrnac, Jan and Drahoslava Kudrnac, Greenwich. Seller: Robert A. Bria, et al, Fairfield. Property: 5 Grange St., Greenwich. Amount: $730,000. Filed Nov. 4.

Curioli, Paul A., Norwalk. Seller: Nicholas J. Curioli, Towson, Maryland. Property: 17 Tanglewood Lane, Norwalk. Amount: $240,000. Filed Sept. 4.

Kuelzow, Elizabeth and Robert J. Kuelzow, Burnt Hills, New York. Seller: J. Tracy Armstrong, Norwalk. Property: 119 Gregory Blvd., Unit 31, Norwalk. Amount: $845,930. Filed Sept. 3.

Fisher Plotner, Susan, Stamford. Seller: Kenneth F. DiBella, Danvers, Massachusetts. Property: 8 Cudlipp St., Norwalk. Amount: $0. Filed Sept. 5.

Lamb, Susan, Norwalk. Seller: Leah McFarland, Norwalk. Property: 10 Wildwood Lane, Norwalk. Amount: $209,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Fowler, Nathaniel and Alissa Fowler, Norwalk. Seller: Louis M. Killeffer and Catherine R. Killeffer, Norwalk. Property: 6 Bittersweet Trail, Norwalk. Amount: $1,417,500. Filed Sept. 10.

Landsdale, Zachary A. and Margareth M. Landsdale, Stamford. Seller: Vincent E. Martino and Luz J. Martino, Norwalk. Property: 4 Filbert Road, Norwalk. Amount: $489,000. Filed Sept. 4.

Gellman, David and Sheri Gellman, Greenwich. Seller: Allen S. Root and Karen E. Root, Greenwich. Property: 350 Riversville Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2,075,000. Filed Nov. 1.

Leboza, Benjamin W., Norwalk. Seller: Eileen L. Rizvi, Norwalk. Property: 1 Rowayton Court, Norwalk. Amount: $585,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Gojcaj, Katelini, White Plains, New York. Seller: Timothy M. Lobdell, Old Greenwich. Property: 1465 E Putnam Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $390,000. Filed Nov. 1.

McCalla, Winston and Shanda Samas, Norwalk. Seller: Evadne McKensie and Lynford McKensie, Norwalk. Property: 2 Saint Mary’s Lane, Norwalk. Amount: $320,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Gonzalez, Emely S., et al, Stamford. Seller: Andrew Malewicz and Elizabeth Swedock, Norwalk. Property: 300 Flax Hill Road, Unit 5C, Norwalk. Amount: $399,000. Filed Sept. 3.

McDonnell, Charles E. and Jennifer C. McDonnell, Norwalk. Seller: Stephen Young and Rena Young, Greenwich. Property: 553 North St., Greenwich. Amount: $2,895,000. Filed Nov. 1.

FCBJ

Naulaguari, Ana C., Port Chester, New York. Seller: Alison A. Perno, North Branford. Property: 8 Elmcrest Terrace, Unit 203, Norwalk. Amount: $174,900. Filed Sept. 3. Pagano, Evan and Alan Pagano, Darien. Seller: Robert J. Smith, Norwalk. Property: 9 Park Hill Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $510,500. Filed Sept. 5. Perez Aliaga, Cesar A., Bridgeport. Seller: Gisela Lamour, Trumbull. Property: 664 Main Ave., Unit B302, Norwalk. Amount: $210,000. Filed Sept. 4. Power, Heather and Ian Power, Norwalk. Seller: Eric R. Smith and Jill D. Smith, Norwalk. Property: 172 North Taylor Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $490,000. Filed Sept. 5. Rajput, Babar and Yasmeen Kousar, Norwalk. Seller: Oleksandr Levus and Halyna Levus, Norwalk. Property: 208 Flax Hill Road, Unit 15, Norwalk. Amount: $220,000. Filed Sept. 9. Russell, Elaine L. and Kevin B. Russell, Norwalk. Seller: Cynthia C. Campbell, Norwalk. Property: Lot 30, Map 864, Norwalk. Amount: $485,000. Filed Sept. 6. Schapiro, Gina Michelle, Norwalk. Seller: Jesse Folsom and Jordan Folsom, Norwalk. Property: 5 Riverview Drive, Norwalk. Amount: $700,000. Filed Sept. 3. Serrano, Michael Ruben and Sandy Lin, Norwalk. Seller: Ashley Lutz, et al, Southport. Property: 1 Glenrock, Unit 1, Norwalk. Amount: $227,000. Filed Sept. 4. Simon-Bayraktaroglu, Suzanne, Norwalk. Seller: Rosemarie P. Berglund, Norwalk. Property: 200 Gregory Blvd., Norwalk. Amount: $600,000. Filed Sept. 10. Sledge, Anesha, Stamford. Seller: Olaf A. Halvorssen, Norwalk. Property: 4 Lowe St., Unit 402, Norwalk. Amount: $280,000. Filed Sept. 11. Trayer, Karen, Greenwich. Seller: Thomas John Brown, Greenwich. Property: 33 Halsey Drive, Old Greenwich. Amount: $0. Filed Nov. 1. Vahora, Vikar and Almas Vahora, Norwalk. Seller: Sarah Kay Boll, Norwalk. Property: 1 Margareth St., Norwalk. Amount: $330,000. Filed Sept. 5. Viegas, Ysabel, Norwalk. Seller: Katheleen O’Malley, et al, Trumbull. Property: 273 Fillow St, Norwalk. Amount: $158,670. Filed Sept. 5.

FEBRUARY 10, 2020

21


Facts & Figures Viwatthanasorn, Wiwatsorn and Weerawan Kamonvatthana, Norwalk. Seller: Geoffroy Allimant, Norwalk. Property: 5 Driftwood Lane, Norwalk. Amount: $405,000. Filed Sept. 6.

Tesauro, Glen, et al. Creditor: Ditech Financial LLC, Houston, Texas. Property: 59 Bartlett Ave., Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Jan. 27.

Kennedy, Diana, Bridgeport. $3,624, in favor of Midland Funding LLC, San Diego, California, by London & London, Newington. Property: 169 Laurel Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16.

Zandsberg, Jonathan and Emma Jones, Norwalk. Seller: John Manuli, Norwalk. Property: Lot 2, Map 3828, Norwalk. Amount: $580,000. Filed Sept. 3.

JUDGMENTS

Mejia, Jammell Y., Bridgeport. $2,881, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 111 Bancroft Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16.

Zannino, Joseph and Paige Pedersen, New York, New York. Seller: Isabelle K. Vanneck and Cynthia G. Vanneck, Greenwich. Property: 2 Glen Court, Greenwich. Amount: $2,075,000. Filed Nov. 1.

FORECLOSURES Cooney, Dana L., et al. Creditor: The Bank of New York Mellon, Coral Gables, Florida. Property: 176 Perry Ave., Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Dec. 23. Geronimos, Emmanuel, et al. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank National Association, Jacksonville, Florida. Property: 180 Round Hill Road, Greenwich. Mortgage default. Filed Oct. 21. Harianto, Regina H., et al. Creditor: Citimortgage Inc., Highlands Ranch, Colorado. Property: 26 Strawberry Hill Ave., Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Dec. 2. Helbling, Mandy, et al. Creditor: US Bank Trust National Association, Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Property: Allen Road, Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 19. Kotz, Richard, et al. Creditor: US Bank Trust NA. Property: 215 Bedford Road, Greenwich. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 12. Massey, Mary E., et al. Creditor: Carrington Mortgage Services LLC, Anaheim, California. Property: 100 San Vincenzo Place, Unit 46, Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 26. Rodriguez, Jose R., et al. Creditor: US Bank Trust National Association, Eureka, California. Property: 27 Slocum St., Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Dec. 24. Sabia Sr., Anthony A., et al. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank National Association. Property: 201 Ponus Ave. Extension, Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 25. St. Denis, Thomas, et al. Creditor: Capital One NA, Irvine, California. Property: 44 Yarmouth Road, Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Jan. 27.

22

FEBRUARY 10, 2020

Bendolph, Jermaine J., Bridgeport. $2,855, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 125 Terry Place, Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Burnett-Snipes, Thelma, Bridgeport. $3,258, in favor of Midland Funding LLC, San Diego, California, by London & London, Newington. Property: 159 Hazelwood Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Carmichael, Brenda D., Bridgeport. $2,973, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 960 Sylvan Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Collazo, Wesley, Bridgeport. $3,386, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 516 Indian Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Davis, Katrina, Bridgeport. $3,262, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 2209 North Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Diaz, Wanda, Bridgeport. $4,730, in favor of Midland Funding LLC, San Diego, California, by London & London, Newington. Property: 176 Edwards St., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Fleming, Scotty, Bridgeport. $3,195, in favor of Midland Funding LLC, San Diego, California, by London & London, Newington. Property: 45 Staples St., Unit 47, Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Gordon, Andre R., Bridgeport. $3,284, in favor of Midland Funding LLC, San Diego, California, by London & London, Newington. Property: 1348 Chopsey Hill Road, Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Hellebrandt, Alexandre, Bridgeport. $4,098, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 42 Broadbridge Road, Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Horvath, Helene M., Bridgeport. $4,029, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 170 Greenwood St., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16.

FCBJ

Morris, White, Bridgeport. $2,821, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 267 Garfield Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Quezada Maria, Bridgeport. $2,900, in favor of Midland Funding LLC, San Diego, California, by London & London, Newington. Property: 135 Beechwood Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Reid, Beverley A., Bridgeport. $2,882, in favor of Midland Funding LLC, San Diego, California, by London & London, Newington. Property: 837 Beechwood Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Rhodes, Antoinette, Bridgeport. $3,090, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 2445 Park Ave., Unit 35, Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Spencer, Nadege, Bridgeport. $2,647, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 342 Indian Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Vital, Ricardo, Bridgeport. $2,683, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 913 Capitol Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Wallace, Neisha S., Bridgeport. $2,957, in favor of Midland Funding LLC, San Diego, California, by London & London, Newington. Property: 1605 Park Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16. Yakubik, Sharon Lee, Bridgeport. $4,482, in favor of Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia, by London & London, Newington. Property: 1673 Capitol Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Jan. 16.

LIENS Federal Tax Liens Filed 3 Singhs LLC, 285 Madison Ave., Bridgeport. $1,171, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14.

Amazing Grace Church Inc., 4 Worth St., Bridgeport. $504, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14.

Rankine, Sylvan, 456 Pequonnock St., Bridgeport. $97, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14.

Blake, Audrey, 732 Grad St., Bridgeport. $642, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14.

Roberts, Sylvia, 158 Frank St., Bridgeport. $725, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14.

Bromfield, Lloyd M., 295 Madison Ave., Bridgeport. $389, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14.

Sakakini, Johnny, 326 Catherine St., Bridgeport. $282, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14.

Cacho, Maria and Victor Cacho, 783 Gran St., Bridgeport. $136, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14.

Soto, Wilson, 407 Madison Ave., Bridgeport. $71, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14.

Castillo, Adalberto, 834 Grand St., Bridgeport. $130, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Colonial Gardens Condo Association, 49 Chestnut St., Bridgeport. $2,983, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Fountain of Youth Cathedral, 320 Madison Ave., Bridgeport. $35, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Gordillo, Saul, 1507 North Ave., Bridgeport. $234, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Henry, Charles, 508 Pequonnock South, Bridgeport. $409, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Kelly, Frances and Michael Kelly, 1235 North Ave., Bridgeport. $43, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Lopez, Maria L. and Hector J. Lopez, 1512 Park Ave., Bridgeport. $452, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Mandu, Denis, 660 Grand St., Bridgeport. $488, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Manuel A. Bataguas Realty LLC, 1097 North Ave., Bridgeport. $238, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Mosely, Michael, 160 Moffitt St., Bridgeport. $514, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Moura, Maria, 1921 Main St., Bridgeport. $1,718, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Pinnock, Neville, 169 Hurd Ave., Bridgeport. $321, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Portella, Irineu G., 36 Wallace St., Bridgeport. $225, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14.

Torres, Edna, 595 James St., Bridgeport. $150, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Trovarelli, Linda, and Rodney Trovarelli, 1313 North Ave., Bridgeport. $196, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Veillard, Sonya, 1985 Main St., Bridgeport. $172, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Wright, Helen and Linda Stanley, 430 Pequonnock St., Bridgeport. $820, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14. Wynter, Stephanie, 451 Lexington Ave., Bridgeport. $267, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 14.

LIS PENDENS 1148 William Street LLC, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Greene Law PC, Farmington, for the city of Bridgeport Water Pollution Control Authority. Property: 1148 William St., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 20. 600 Atlantic Street LLC, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Greene Law PC, Farmington, for the city of Bridgeport Water Pollution Control Authority. Property: 600-602 Atlantic St., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 20. Arce, Iris N., et al, Bridgeport. Filed by The Marcus Law Firm, North Branford, for the Water Pollution Control Authority for the city of Bridgeport. Property: 70 Hawthorne St., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 22. Ayala, Donald G., et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Halloran & Sage LLP, Hartford, for Newtown Savings Bank. Property: 57 Alanson Road, Unit 117, Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 20.

Bustos, Tania, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Bendett and McHugh PC, Farmington, for US Bank national Association. Property: 1911 North Ave., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 13. Connecticut Housing Finance Authority, Bridgeport. Filed by The Marcus Law Firm, North Branford, for the Water Pollution Control Authority for the city of Bridgeport. Property: 356 Charles St., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed Aug. 22. Figueroa, Jose A., et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Bendett and McHugh PC, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank NA. Property: 215 Edgemoor Road North, Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 13. Gage, Tami N., et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Bendett and McHugh PC, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank National Association. Property: 9 Cottage St., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 15. Hightower, Eugene, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Glass & Braus LLC, Fairfield, for US Bank National Association. Property: 43 Elmwood Ave., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 14. Hill, Jeffery, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by the Law Office of Juda J. Epstein, Bridgeport, for Benchmark Municipal Tax Services LTD. Property: 372 Wilmot Ave., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 16. Jones-Cooper, Carolyn, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Greene Law PC, Farmington, for the city of Bridgeport Water Pollution Control Authority. Property: 79-83 Highland Ave., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 20. McKay, Milton, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by the Law Office of Juda J. Epstein, Bridgeport, for Benchmark Municipal Tax Services LTD. Property: 455 Newfield Ave., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 23. McNeil, Margaret, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Bendett and McHugh PC, Farmington, for US Bank national Association. Property: 253 Prince St., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 13.


Facts & Figures Montalvo, Maria G., et al, Bridgeport. Filed by The Marcus Law Firm, North Branford, for the Water Pollution Control Authority for the city of Bridgeport. Property: 208 Brooks St., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 21.

Valencia Island LLC, Bridgeport. Filed by Zeldes, Needle & Cooper PC, Bridgeport, for Nob Hill Condominium Association Inc. Property: 29-D Nob Hill Circle, Unit 100, Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed Aug. 13.

Nielsen, Frederick J., et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Bendett and McHugh PC, Farmington, for MTGLQ Investors LP. Property: 43 Higgins Ave., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 13.

Vines, Gloria E., et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Bendett and McHugh PC, Farmington, for MTGLQ Investors LP. Property: 150 Harbor Ave., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 15.

Paramore, Otis D., et al, Bridgeport. Filed by the Law Office of Juda J. Epstein, Bridgeport, for Benchmark Municipal Tax Services LTD. Property: 908-912 Pearl Harbor St., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 16.

Watson, Sardia, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by The Marcus Law Firm, North Branford, for the Water Pollution Control Authority for the city of Bridgeport. Property: 200-206 Mountain Grove St., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 21.

Santiago, Jose, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Bendett & McHugh PC, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank NA. Property: 73 Boston Terrace, Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 22. Seton, Marie, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by The Marcus Law Firm, North Branford, for Tower Fund Services. Property: 25 Fourth Ave., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 21.

LEASES Barros Zuna, Diego, by Marylou Weeks. Landlord: Success Village Apartments Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 100 Court D, Building 79, Apt. 11, Bridgeport. Term: 34 years, commenced Jan. 17, 2020. Filed Jan. 21.

MORTGAGES

Gleason, Brad and Asmaa Safi, Stamford. by Benjamin McEachin. Lender: JG Wentworth Home Lending LLC, 3350 Commission Court, Woodbridge, Virginia. Property: 5 Howes Ave, Stamford. Amount: $466,231. Filed Aug. 22. Guevara, Suzette and Tony Guevara, Stamford. by Dina Thornhelm. Lender: US Bank National Association, 4801 Frederica St., Owensboro, Kentucky. Property: 55 Cook Road, Stamford. Amount: $932,000. Filed Aug. 21. Hourihan, Jeremiah M. and Tiffany M. Hourihan, Stamford. by Jennifer Brown. Lender: Bank of England, 5 Statehouse Plaza, No. 500, Little Rock, Arizona. Property: 235 Janes Lane Stamford. Amount: $588,000. Filed Aug. 28. Lucas, Jonathan A. and Donna Jo Lucas. Stamford. by Gerald M. Fox Jr. Lender: Bank of America NA, 101 South Tryon St., Charlotte, North Carolina. Property: 14 Crestwood Drive, Stamford. Amount: $463,200. Filed Aug. 26. Moran, Christine, Stamford. by Christopher Smith. Lender: United Wholesale Mortgage, 585 S. Boulevard East, Pontiac, Michigan. Property: 127 Greyrock Place, Unit1406, Stamford. Amount: $173,000. Filed Aug. 23.

Sheba Construction LLC, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Greene Law PC, Farmington, for the city of Bridgeport Water Pollution Control Authority. Property: 254-256 Pearl Harbor St., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 20.

Altamura, Michael, Stamford, by N/A. Lender: HomeBridge Financial Services Inc., 194 Wood Ave., South, Iselin, New Jersey. Property: 23 Knickerbocker Ave., Stamford. Amount: $318,750. Filed Aug. 9.

Stendbergh, Gunther, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Bendett and McHugh PC, Farmington, for US Bank National Association. Property: 476 Charles St., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 13.

Barahona, Arnulfo E. and Benjamin Barahona, Stamford, by Anita Khan. Lender: Bank of America NA, 100 North Tryon St., Charlotte, North Carolina. Property: 1 Dryden St., Stamford. Amount: $67,000. Filed Aug. 23.

Sagastume-Gonzalez, Mario N. and Roxana Sagastume, Stamford. by Robert E. Colapietro. Lender: Better Mortgage Corp., 250 Greenwich St., 36th floor, New York, New York. Property: 23 Aquila Road, Stamford. Amount: $361,738. Filed Aug. 27.

Temple, Darlene S., et al, Bridgeport. Filed by McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce LLC, Hartford, for Bank of America. Property: 2515 Old Town Road, Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 13.

Cabrera Guizar, Jose, Stamford. by Edwin P. Farron. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio, Property: 59 Courtland Ave., Unit 10 Stamford. Amount: $131,850. Filed Aug. 12.

Tandon, Ritu and Manoj Tandon, Stamford. by Michael J. McIntosh. Lender: Bank of America NA, 100 N. Tryon St., Charlotte, North Carolina. Property: 6 Coopers Pond Road, Stamford. Amount: $100,000. Filed Aug. 23.

Tumba, Beatrice, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by the Law Office of Juda J. Epstein, Bridgeport, for Benchmark Municipal Tax Services LTD. Property: 1929 North Ave., Bridgeport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 16.

Erickson, Kristen L., Stamford, by N/A. Lender: Guaranteed Rate Affinity LLC, 1800 W. Larchmont Ave., Chicago, Illinois. Property: 1 Shore Road, Unit 16, Stamford. Amount: $540,000. Filed Aug. 21. Franco, Rogerio H., Stamford. by Michael C. Jachimczyk. Lender: M&T Bank, 1 M&T Plaza, Buffalo, New York. Property: 552 Den Road, Stamford. Amount: $420,000. Filed Aug. 9.

Muslim, Amy and Salman Muslim, Stamford. by Andrew S. Gale. Lender: Guaranteed Rate Inc., 3940 N. Ravenswood, Chicago, Illinois. Property: 7 Carriage Drive South, Stamford. Amount: $580,000. Filed Aug. 30.

Tenca, William and Althea Tenca, Stamford. by Anita Khan. Lender: Bank of America NA, 100 N. Tryon St., Charlotte, North Carolina. Property: 72 W. Broad St., Stamford. Amount: $50,000. Filed Aug. 22. Valdovinos, Carlos and Ivon Valdovinos, Stamford. by Gabriel H. Cusanelli. Lender: Freedom Mortgage Corp., 907 Pleasant Valley Ave., Suite 3, Mount Laurel, New Jersey. Property: 640 Newfield Ave., Stamford. Amount: $490,943. Filed Aug. 20.

Violi, Antoinette, Stamford. by unreadable. Lender: The First Bank of Greenwich, Mortgage Branch, Cos Cob. Property: 360 Westover Road, Stamford. Amount: $1,120,000. Filed Aug. 9. Wugalter, Alexander, New Haven. by Daniel N. Hoffnung. Lender: Webster Bank NA, 145 Bank St., Waterbury. Property: 21 Janice Road, Stamford. Amount: $83,800. Filed Aug. 21.

NEW BUSINESSES S&K Realty, 906 E. Main St., Stamford 06902, c/o John Sotiropoulos. Filed Nov. 22. Accurate Acquisition LLC, 16 Leon Place, Stamford 06902, c/o Peter M. Ginz. Filed Nov. 25. Apartment Insurance Consultants, 6 Landmark Square, Fourth floor, Stamford 06901, c/o Foundation Risk Partners Corp. Filed Nov. 25. Aspen Leaf Travel, 69 Tupper Drive, Darien 06820, c/o Joseph Campbell. Filed Dec. 2. Auto Top Care, 15 Ryan St., Stamford 06907, c/o Jorge Pretel. Filed Dec. 3. Budget Roofing Co., 223 Seaside Ave., Stamford 06902, c/o Anthony Costello. Filed Dec. 4. CL Carpentry & Services, 5 Sixth St., Unit A, Stamford 06905, c/o Cristian A. Enriquez Garcia. Filed Dec. 3. Claudia Coppola Salon, 29 High Ridge Road, Suite 104, Stamford 06902, c/o Claudia Coppola. Filed Dec. 2. Ecabello’s, 17 Puritan Lane, Stamford 06906, c/o Elvis G. Cabello. Filed Dec. 5. Extrave Heating & Cooling 38 Hundley Court, Stamford 06902, c/o Daniel Kolaj/38. Filed Nov. 22. Fairfield & Westchester County General, 157 Lawn Ave., Stamford 06902, c/o Dindy Garcia-Diego. Filed Nov. 26. Hughes Marino, 1450 Front St., San Diego, California, 92101, c/o Hughes Connecticut LLC. Filed Nov. 25.

Kensual, 32 Greenwood Hill St., Stamford 06902, c/o Yimi A. Gomez Elvir. Filed Dec. 3. KV Construction LLC, 2440 High Ridge Road, Stamford 06903, c/o Konstantin Vitikov. Filed Nov. 25. LJJ Properties, 133 Tresser Blvd., Stamford 06902, c/o Richard Fajardo. Filed Nov. 22. Luxury Necessity Services, 17 Clinton Ave., Stamford 06902, c/o Jeff Joseph. Filed Dec. 2. Nielsen’s Florist LLP, 1 Hospital Plaza, Rowayton, 06853, c/o Sandra Nielsen-Baumann. Filed Nov. 25. One Nail & Spa, 21B High Ridge Road, Stamford 06905, c/o J&P Nails Inc. Filed Dec. 3. Premier Mortgage of Michigan LLC, 28588 Northwestern Highway, Suite 25, Southfield, Michigan, 48034, c/o Premier Mortgage LLC. Filed Nov. 27. Property Owners & Managers, 6 Landmark Square, Fourth floor, Stamford 06901, c/o Foundation Risk Partners Corp. Filed Nov. 25. Robs Creative, 3145 Steinway St., Stamford 06906, c/o Rob Bernstein. Filed Dec. 5. Tiernans Bar & Restaurant, 187 Main St., Stamford 06902, c/o Curragh LLC. Filed Nov. 25. Tikal Travel, 76 Stillwater Ave., Stamford 06902, c/o Gustavo Lopez. Filed Dec. 5. Total Dollar Insurance, 6 Landmark Square, Fourth floor, Stamford 06901, c/o Foundation Risk Partners Corp. Filed Nov. 25. Village Bagel, 301 Hope St., Stamford 06906, c/o DaSilva Village Bagel LLC. Filed Dec. 5.

PATENTS Aperture patterns and orientations for optimization of phasing plug performance in compression drivers. Patent no. 10,555,072 issued to Alexander Voishvillo, Simi Valley, California. Assigned to Harman, Stamford.

Approach for detecting alert signals in changing environments. Patent no. 10,555,069 issued to Ajay Iyer, Murray, Utah; Jeffrey Hutchings, Lehi, Utah; Richard Allen Kreifeldt, South Jordan, Utah. Assigned to Harman, Stamford. Concurrent noise cancelation systems with harmonic filtering. Patent no. 10,553,197 issued to Jonathan Christian, Milford, Michigan. Assigned to Harman, Stamford. Mailer for obtaining and transporting biological samples such as DNA. Patent no. 10,549,568 issued to Douglas K. Herrmann, Webster. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Method and apparatus for creating a watermark via thermal gradients in a dryer. Patent no. 10,549,552 issued to Linn C. Hoover, Webster; Chris Mieney, Rochester; Paul Michael Fromm, Rochester. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Method and system for extracting impression marks using a mobile application. Patent no. 10,552,708 issued to Srinivasarao Bindana, Andhra Pradesh, India; Mahesh Ramasamy, Ariyalur, India; Baskaran Sathishkannah, Pondicherry, India; Liya Stanley, Kerala, India. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Method for ablating openings in unsupported layers. Patent no. 10,549,386 issued to Raunder Cardenas, Wilsonville, Oregeon; John R. Andrews, Fairport. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Systems and methods for interleaving material in printed rolled substrate materials to prevent offset. Patent no. 10,549,474 issued to Steven Robert Moore, Pittsford; Alexander J. Fioravanti, Penfield; Xin Yang, Webster. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Systems, apparatuses and methods for dual-line inbound detection on a data communication bus. Patent no. 10,552,361 issued to Nik Ilijic, Glen Alpine, Australia; Andrew Rhydian Jones, North Turramarra, Australia. Assigned to Hubbell Inc., Shelton. Wire-stripping die for crimping tool. Patent no. 10,554,006 issued to Logan Trombley, Manchester, New Hampshire. Assigned to Hubbell Inc., Shelton.

JDK Catering, 926 Newfield Ave., Trumbull 06611, c/o Jack Dellicarpini. Filed Dec. 2.

FCBJ

FEBRUARY 10, 2020

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More than 14,000 votes are tallied as of today. Make sure you enter your vote for the best companies. Visit Fairfield’s best companies supplement at westfaironline.com and vote your choices for the best of the best. Join the celebration of the winners after your votes have been tallied.

Tuesday, April 28 • 5 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza • 2701 Summer St., Stamford Business organizations partnering with the Fairfield County Business Journal are: Bridgeport Regional Business Council, The Business Council of Fairfield County, Darien Chamber of Commerce, Fairfield Chamber of Commerce, Greater Danbury Chamber of Commerce, Greater Norwalk Chamber of Commerce, Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce, Stamford Chamber of Commerce, Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce For information, contact: Olivia D’Amelio at odamelio@westfairinc.com. For sponsorships, contact: Barbara Hanlon at bhanlon@westfairinc.com or 914-358-0766.

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