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Issue 33 Winter 2016

New Chair of Governors appointed Centre for Animal Welfare launched Leverhulme grant for human evolution research

venta For alumni and friends of the University of Winchester

University wins important national award Winchester the best place to live in Britain Graduation ceremonies


How's life after Winchester?

Every year the University of Winchester surveys its graduates as part of the nationwide Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey. If you graduated during 2015/16, our Careers Service will shortly be in touch with you by email and telephone. Regardless of what you are up to we’d still like to encourage you to respond to the survey. The University is extremely proud of its graduates and loves hearing from you. All the data collected is done so in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998 and no one is able to identify respondents from published material. If you need a bit of extra help planning your career or want to find out more about the 100s of career paths available to you, please contact Careers. Our Careers Service is able to help recent graduates for up to one year after graduation – so please get in touch by emailing careers@winchester.ac.uk or by telephoning 01962 827310.

We look forward to hearing from you.


VENTA Autumn / Issue 33 2016 / Winter 2016 Venta

Welcome Contents

Dear Friends, We are pleased to bring to you the latest issue of Venta, our magazine for alumni, partners and friends around the world. Graduation was, as always, a wonderful occasion this autumn. I take real delight in witnessing our students transform into graduates, alongside their family, friends and University staff who have supported them in their journey. This year was the second graduation led by our Chancellor Alan Titchmarsh MBE VMH DL, who once again executed his role with grace, humour and wisdom. Graduation also served as the perfect opportunity to make our recent graduates aware that they are now lifelong members of The Winton Club. They share a bond with us as they progress throughout their lives and careers. We are always incredibly proud of the difference to the world that our graduates make. Our graduation setting of Winchester Cathedral is always inspiring – we treasure the strong links we have with our local Winchester community. Winchester’s status as a truly special place was cemented this year when it was declared ‘Best place to live in Britain’ according to The Sunday Times Best Places to Live Guide 2016. As a University we are always aspiring to continuously improve all that we do across our organisation and we were thrilled to win the British Quality Foundation’s Excellence Award 2016. This is described as the highest accolade that any organisation in the UK can receive. Out acheivement recognises the hard work by our staff and students across the University who strive to make the University of Winchester a special place.

In this issue we showcase just a few examples of our academics' research. Our Archaeology Department has been helping to discover the medieval past of the New Forest, and we are very pleased that a project led by Dr Keith Wilkinson to explore the history of early humans in Eurasia has received a prestigious Leverhulme Grant. We are also honoured to be involved in valuable research into the progression of children from military backgrounds into higher education, funded by the Ministry of Defence. Alumni are an important part of our continuing achievements. We share in your successes and we thank you for your partnership with us as we continue to deliver excellent values-driven higher education. Please do keep in touch with us – we love to stay connected with you. I would like to take this opportunity to personally wish you and your family the warmest season's greetings and all the very best for a healthy and happy 2017.

University wins Excellence Award..... page 2 Winchester the best place to live...... page 3 Royal Blood trail................................... page 3 Every picture tells a story.................... page 4 New Chair of Governors ..................... page 6 Alumni Governor report...................... page 7 Writing for Children alumni succes... page 8 Graduation 2016.................................. page 12 Winton Teacher Association............... page 14 New Forest archaeology..................... page 15 What’s on?............................................. page 15 Leverhulme Trust grant........................ page 16 Centre for Animal Welfare.................. page 17 Alumnae success a reality................... page 18 Winton Club Reunions......................... page 20 Winton Weekend 25th birthday........ page 21 Alumnus 100th birthday..................... page 22 In memory of alumni and staff.......... page 23 Front Cover: Festive fun on the Winchester Cathedral Ice Rink

Stay in touch alumni@winchester.ac.uk 01962 827532 www.winchester.ac.uk/alumni universityofwinchesteralumniassociation

Professor Joy Carter DL, Vice-Chancellor

winchalum Write to us: Alumni Office, University of Winchester, Winchester, Hampshire SO22 4NR We would like to keep you updated about our work at the University of Winchester. This may include news, invitations to attend events, or to take part in fundraising campaigns or related activities. If you do not wish to receive further communications or wish to be removed from our database please email alumni@winchester.ac.uk or call 01962 827532.

Venta is published by the Marketing Department of the University of Winchester. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. Whilst every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of editorial content, no responsibility can be taken for any errors and/or omissions. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of the University of Winchester. All rights reserved. © University of Winchester 2016

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Winchester scoops British Quality Foundation UK Excellence Award 2016 These include its sector-leading low-carbon estate, its partnership with Winchester Action on Climate Change (WinACC), which works to cut the carbon footprint of the Winchester district and an inaugural Campus Blackout event in February 2016, which achieved a 16 per cent reduction in energy use overall in those buildings taking part. The University has also recently achieved additional sustainability success through the National Union of Students Green Impact scheme. This scheme brings together staff and students nationwide to promote and empower them to make meaningful change on sustainability issues. Six teams from the University completed a variety of initiatives, taking actions to become more eco-friendly, ethical and environmentally aware. L-R: Baroness Karren Brady CBE, Winchester SU President Harry Sampson, Jane Avery and Clair Lorrain from the University’s Continuous Improvement Unit, Chair of Governors Alan Lovell DL, Bathstore CEO Gary Favell (sponsor), VC Joy Carter, DVC Neil Marriott

The University of Winchester won two awards for excellence and was named one of the most exceptional organisations in the country at a prestigious awards ceremony in London.

Professor Joy Carter DL, was presented with the UK Excellence Award by Baroness Karren Brady CBE, businesswoman, author, columnist and one of the stars of BBC One's The Apprentice, at the ceremony at The InterContinental on Park Lane.

The British Quality Foundation (BQF) UK Excellence Award 2016 recognises the University for excellence across all areas of its operations.

Professor Carter commented: "This is a huge honour to be recognised for the excellent work of our staff and students in making this such an outstanding institution. Everything we do, built on our fantastic partnership with students and staff and our unrelenting commitment to our values, is about developing well-rounded, global citizens and world-class research that make a real difference in the world."

The University was the only higher education institution of the seven entrants shortlisted and overcame competition from national corporate companies including ABM Finance, Arriva Trains Wales, Merseyrail Electrics (2002) Limited, Rejuvo JPCS, and Safe Move - Yorkshire Water. Another shortlisted entrant in this category, Cross Country Trains, also won this Award. Entrants to the Awards are assessed against the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model, which helps organisations to evaluate and understand their key strengths and continuously improve their operations. The University also won the BQF Sustainable Future Achievement Award for outstanding environmental or social contribution to achieving a more sustainable world. 2

Chair of the University of Winchester Board of Governors, Alan Lovell DL, who was also at the awards ceremony, said: "Winning the prestigious BQF UK Excellence Award demonstrates the University's strengths and excellence as an organisation. We are all very proud." The University of Winchester is one of the best universities in the country for sustainability, with its low-carbon estate leading the way. The BQF Sustainable Futures Award recognises a raft of University initiatives aimed at tackling the challenge of reducing its environmental impact and mitigating the risks of climate change in its operations.

All six teams won gold, silver and bronze awards for their achievements. In addition, the Bookworms team from the University Library was recognised for going above and beyond the recommendations, receiving the Green Impact National Special Award for Innovation for Engagement. The Library Bookworms team utilised social media, particularly Twitter and Pinterest, to engage a wider audience to share sustainability good practice.

Have you received Queen’s Honours? We’d love to hear from you if you’ve received a Companion of Honour, Knighthood, Damehood, CBE, OBE, MBE, BEM, Overseas Territories Police and Fire Service Medal, RVO, George Cross, George Medal, Queen’s Gallantry Medal, Queen’s Commendation for Bravery or Queen’s Commendation for Bravery in the Air. Get in touch with alumni@winchester.ac.uk or write to tell us all about your Honours.


VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Winchester the best place to live in Britain We are proud to be located in the British city that has been deemed the best place to live in Britain named by The Sunday Times Best Places to Live Guide 2016. ‘Practically perfect’ was how the Guide viewed Winchester, highlighting its ‘irresistible mix of food, festivals and feel-good factor’. From independent stores to period architecture to plenty of unique restaurants, Winchester’s attributes helped it to top this annual guide. The Sunday Times Best Places to Live Guide combines data on house prices, school performance, and crime rates. This year Winchester was also ranked in the top three universities in England and Wales for low crime by TheCompleteUniversityGuide.co.uk (CUG). Campus Crime Data 2016, compiled by CUG from official police data, places the University of Winchester third out of almost 130 universities and other higher education institutions ranked for the most common criminal offences affecting students. Winchester Cathedral

Talking King Alf and Royal Blood trail mark Winchester’s regal past A new royal history trail has been created by the University of Winchester in partnership with Winchester City Council’s Visit Winchester team. ‘Talking King Alfred’ will personally welcome visitors to Winchester before they embark on the trail. The new Royal Blood trail was officially launched after students at the University researched the stories of royal births, deaths and visits to the Winchester district. As part of the Hampshire Cultural Trust’s Royal Blood campaign, which also sees reenactments in the city and exhibitions across the county, it is hoped that the trail will engage new audiences with the rich historical narrative of Hampshire. Dr Ellie Woodacre, Senior Lecturer in Early Modern History at the University of

Winchester, who worked with colleagues from the Archaeology and History departments to create the content for the trail leaflet, said: “The Royal Blood trail is the second partnership project the University has undertaken with the Visit Winchester team following the creation of a successful Medieval Jewish Trail last Spring.

Royal Blood trail and would like to thank our colleagues at the University and their team of hard-working students for their efforts. During the development the Visit Winchester team were exploring ways to attract the attention of new audiences to engage visitors with Winchester’s fascinating past."

"It has been a rewarding exercise and I would like to thank colleagues in the departments of History and Archaeology, Dr Katherine Weikert, Dr Simon Roffey and Dr Ryan Lavelle and students Luke Barnes, Jessica Watson, Ashleigh Bridgeman and Jemma Harbot for all their hard work. “The trail has been illustrated by local artist Wendy Bramall to bring some of the more gripping scenes, such as the escape by Edward I from the burning castle apartments, to life." Cllr Steve Miller, Winchester City Council’s Portfolio Holder for Estates, Economy and Tourism, explained: “We’re delighted with the

Dr Ellie Woodacre and Cllr Steve Miller with 'Talking King Alf' at the Winchester Tourist Information Centre

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Every picture tells a story In some cases, several stories. After we printed this beautiful black and white photo under the caption ‘Is this you?’ in last Venta – Issue 32, Spring 2016 – messages and photos poured into the Alumni Office as the picture sparked memories for those who studied here in the mid-1960s. Janet Benge (nee Wall), Cert Ed 1964-1967, has confirmed she is on the far right. We have received suggestions for the names of the other three but we are awaiting self-identification. Stephen Baldwin, Cert Ed 1963-1966 and Winton Club Year Secretary for 1966 leavers, has conducted a very helpful collective response from his enthusiastic peer group. What we hadn’t noticed was that the girls are wearing matching footwear – clogs – long before their popularity in the 1970s. This was swiftly pointed out to us and the stories behind the photo and the clogs began to unfurl. They revolve around a 1965 production by the drama society, The Irving Club, titled Serjeant Musgrave’s Dance, An Un-historical Parable, by John Arden. This was a brave and controversial choice. Arden was an ‘Angry Young Man’ and his play received unfavourable critical reviews and poor revenue in its first run in 1959 at The Royal Court. The play is set in Northern England in 1879 and many of the characters are required to wear clogs. John Hartley, Cert Ed 1963-1966, knew someone in his hometown of Nelson, an old mill town in Lancashire, who still made them. John arranged a supply for the play, followed by repeat orders as the fashion was taken up across the College. The press picked up the clogs story and took photos around the College of small groups of women showing off their prized wooden footwear. The article quickly spread nationally and even internationally. A reader from Texas arrived at the College, complete with Stetson, with his Inuit wife in full traditional costume, to buy two pairs, and orders also arrived from New Zealand! For the production of Serjeant Musgrave’s Dance, Roger Coates, Cert Ed 1964-1967, was selected by head of drama Brian Watkins to play the lead role of Musgrave. Jan Wall (now Benge) – pictured right in the photo that sparked so many memories – played the female lead. Roger recalls that it had a four-night run in front of a public audience paying for their 4

tickets and that he had “a million lines to learn, so no pressure there then”. Other alumni memories were shared at The Winton Club Reunion in July and circulated in friendship group emails. Roger relays that Brian Watkins rehearsed the cast in small scenes in between – and often instead of – lectures. At the nearby Royal Green Jackets barracks, a Regimental Sergeant Major put the military cast through their paces in a humiliating lesson in how to march. The full cast only rehearsed together just before the dress rehearsal. Of reconnecting over this production, Roger says: “As we shared memories, sometimes of

small details, it became clear that what we assumed was just a personal thing was the same for all of us. Much water under the bridge in the last fifty years but we all agreed it was a very special thing that happened to us that year.”


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Share your Winchester memories with us! Dee Sayers (1974-1978) recently sent us this great photo from the Hampshire Chronicle archives. We know it was taken during the bonfire celebrations during RAG Week in 1974 but who built it and what is the story behind it? Get in touch via alumni@winchester.ac.uk We are looking for photographs and anecdotes from your time at Winchester. Your memories could be happy, funny or bittersweet, long or short, all that matters is that it happened while you were studying with us! We welcome stories from alumni of all ages, including King Alfred’s College and Winchester University College. • D  id you meet your significant other or best friend while at Winchester? • W  hat Winchester day will you always remember? • D  id you play an instrumental part in the life of the institution or Winchester City? • D  o you have a funny student story that just needs to be told? • D  oes one particular lecture or lecturer stick out in your mind? • D  o you have fond memories of a building or place on campus? You can share your stories with us by using the hashtag #WinchMemories on Twitter (@_UoW) or post them on the University of Winchester Alumni Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ universityofwinchesteralumniassociation You can also send your stories to alumni@winchester.ac.uk and via post to the normal address. If you would like to send photos, please only send copies and not the original photograph. Those memories are yours to keep. Selected stories sent to us will be featured in the next edition of Venta. We will be offering a University scarf for the best story we receive.

Do you remember this Womble?

See page 22 for the best story we received to feature in this edition. Roger Hailwood (1961-1964) – a scarf is on its way to you!

Photograph courtesy of the Hampshire Chronicle.

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

University appoints new Chair of Governors The University of Winchester has appointed Alan Lovell DL as the new Chair of the Board of Governors. Alan Lovell was educated at Winchester and Oxford. He qualified as a Chartered Accountant and has spent most of his career in industry, including spells as Chief Executive of Costain, Dunlop Slazenger and Jarvis. More recently, he was involved in renewable energy, including waste-to-energy, tidal and a carbon capture and storage project. He is now Chair of the Consumer Council for Water. He is also the Chair of the Association of Lloyd's Members and was on the Council of Lloyd's of London from 2007-2016. Alan was High Sheriff of Hampshire 2010/11. He has been a trustee of the Mary Rose since 2007 and having led the appeal for the new museum, was elected Chair of the Trust in 2015. He is also a Trustee of Winchester

Cathedral, Chair of the Blue Lamp Trust, and Chair of Hampshire Cultural Trust. Professor Joy Carter DL, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Winchester, said: “We congratulate the outgoing Chair, Richard Wilkinson, for his huge and important contribution to the success of this University. He joins with me in welcoming Alan to his new position as Chair of the Board of Governors.

April 2008 and Chair since July 2011. Alan added: “I am honoured to follow in Richard’s footsteps as Chair, and look forward to building on his good work with the Board and the Senior Management Team to realise the vision of the University of Winchester.”

"Alan’s experience and expertise are an asset to the University, particularly considering the planned development for West Downs which will continue to grow our role as a cultural and knowledge centre for the City. “Alan has already demonstrated great commitment to the University and I look forward to working with him over the coming years.” Alan succeeds former British Diplomat Richard Wilkinson CVO, who has been a governor since

Alan Lovell DL, Chair of the Board of Governors

Enrol on a Masters programme at Winchester and receive a 20 per cent discount. For those with first class honours the discount increases to 50 per cent. All our former students who completed an undergraduate degree, postgraduate degree or research degree at the University of Winchester are eligible. This scheme cannot be used in conjunction with any other sponsorship awarded by the University of Winchester. Students supported by their employer for professional development programmes, students intending to pursue a PGCE and students applying for a top-up course are also ineligible. To check your eligibility please email alumnischolarships@winchester.ac.uk

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We offer you a postgraduate experience with • Integrated career-focused learning • Access to leading research • A dynamic and supportive environment For a full course listing please visit www.winchester.ac.uk/courses For any queries please contact the Alumni Office T: 01962 827532 E: alumni@winchester.ac.uk


VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Alumni Governor report John McKenna, DipHE Social and Environmental Problems 1986-1988

other opportunities which can benefit current and future students, as well as the University.

The first semester of the academic year in Winchester is an exciting time as Freshers, returning students and staff look forward to a new year in the life of the University. It is also when Graduation takes place; its importance reflected in the solemnity and pageantry of the ceremony and all the celebrations which follow.

By building an effective network of graduates, we can seek resources and support from people across a wide range of disciplines and businesses. Former students who choose not to make a financial contribution to the University may instead be encouraged to volunteer their support in the form of, mentorships, internships and employment opportunities for our students and graduates. As a consequence, the profile of the University will be raised nationally and globally as our networks develop.

We have the opportunity to reflect on the support we can offer graduates as they begin their onward journey and subsequently how they can help those students who follow in their footsteps. The University recognises the importance of having a focused Alumni Strategy and as a result has invested in the new role of Student and Alumni Communications Officer. We are very happy that Savannah King, last year’s Student Union President, has been appointed to this post. A strong alumni association is a hugely valuable resource as it can provide not only financial support but also a wealth of

form of social events, discounts and services, but might also include extended access to the Careers Service. In order for our vision to succeed we need your participation and I would be very happy to represent your thoughts and ideas. You can contact me by email at: John.McKenna@winchester.ac.uk

A larger alumni network will also provide us with important information about students’ experiences, not just in the recent glow of graduation, but later as they pursue their careers. The information can be used to inform the planning and marketing of high-quality, value for money courses in the future. In order for an alumni association to flourish, there must be obvious benefits for the members. These will continue to be in the

John McKenna, Alumni Governor

Winchester Writers' Festival Award-winning author gets fierce at University of Winchester Writers’ Festival Hundreds of emerging authors were encouraged to seek their own unique voice during the 36th University of Winchester Writers’ Festival.

How I Live Now, won The Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize, the Branford Boase and the Michael L Printz Award and was made into a major film starring Saoirse Ronan. Meg has gone on to win several other prizes for her work.

with around 65 industry professionals to gain their advice and expertise. There was also the opportunity to take part in 17 themed all-day workshops, 28 talks and hundreds of one-to-one appointments.

Over the course of the three-day Festival, aspiring writers had the opportunity to network

Next year’s University of Winchester Writers’ Festival takes place on 16-18 June 2017.

Multi-award winning author Meg Rosoff detailed the importance of achieving resonance with readers in her keynote address titled, What it means to have a voice and how to get one. “Meg’s keynote was extraordinary – it was the highlight of the whole weekend,” said Judith Heneghan, Festival Director and Programme Leader for MA Writing for Children at the University of Winchester. “She spoke with great passion and humour about the idea of ‘throughness’ or greater connection with the unconscious mind when writing, and in life generally. She urged us all to write fiercely.” American-born Meg Rosoff worked in advertising for fifteen years before embarking on her writing career. Her first novel in 2004,

Meg Rosoff addresses attendees at the Winchester Writers' Festival

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Masters of Writing for Children Gunpowder, treason and plotting As this issue of Venta goes to press, Winchester alumna and children's author Alison Smith (MA Writing for Children 2009-2011), who writes under the pen-name Ally Sherrick, is getting ready to light the blue touchpaper for the publicity tour of her debut novel, Black Powder published by Chicken House Books. Alison credits her time on the course at Winchester with encouraging her to take her writing more seriously. "I had spent over 20 years in PR and marketing roles where I was always writing for other people. Although I did a bit of creative scribbling in my spare time, I never really gave myself the permission to properly focus on it." The opportunity to do things differently came along when Alison’s role as Head of Communications for a local council was made redundant. "I decided to use some of my redundancy money to pay for a creative writing course. I was attracted to the one at Winchester because of the specialism in children’s literature, which I thought sounded like fun. It did so many things for me, unlocking my

creativity, getting me to work at my craft and introducing me to a whole host of supportive networks for writers. Plus I made some lovely friends – both fellow students and tutors – along the way."

You can find out more about her and her writing at www.allysherrick.com and follow her on Twitter @ally_sherrick

During her first term at Winchester, Alison also wrote the opening chapters of an early version of the story that became Black Powder, though it’s gone through a lot of rewrites since then. The novel tells the story of 12-year-old Tom Garnett, whose father is arrested and thrown into prison for sheltering a Catholic priest. Tom sets out to try and save him and meets up with a mysterious stranger – the Falcon – who promises to help in exchange for his service. But on the long journey to London, Tom discovers the Falcon’s true mission – and a plot to blow up Parliament with barrels of black powder. Tom is then faced with a terrible decision: secure his father’s release, or stop the assassination of the king… Besides promoting Black Powder, Alison is now hard at work on her second book for Chicken House. This time her historical novel is set during World War II, but with, as she puts it, "an Anglo-Saxon ghostly twist."

E R T A E H T N LONDO

Alison Smith with her novel Black Powder

ster ing for Winche c ri p t e k c ti e iv Exclus unted tickets o c is d e s a h rc u alumni. To p End musicals t s e W n o rs e ff lo and get specia : and plays go to b/winchester lu /c m o .c e tr a e westendth

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

We're really proud of the success that many of our graduates of our MA Writing for Children course have in the literary world. We caught up with two alumni who have been making publication waves recently.

From a life-ruining jam doughnut to a chicken nugget ambush Mark Lowery (MA Writing for Children 20052007) author of four novels for children and twice shortlisted for the Roald Dahl Funny Prize fills us in on how his time at Winchester helped launch an exciting career. How did the MA Writing for Children help you to become a successfully published writer? The MA at Winchester was absolutely vital in enabling me to get my work published. In 2005 I was working as a teacher in Leeds when I came to a bit of a crossroads in my life, and decided to apply (something I'd been toying with ever since I saw the MA advertised back when I was a Fresher in 1998!). It turned out to be one of the best decisions I've ever made. From the word go it was obvious that the MA would reward anyone who was prepared to work hard and challenge themselves. It gave me all of the time, space, support and advice that I needed to develop my writing. So what is it that you write about? I write (hopefully) funny books for children. It's great fun because I get to sit in my shed all day and think up silly things, like shaving a prize-winning guinea pig, or getting a cow to

bounce on a trampoline. My fourth book – The Chicken Nugget Ambush – was published earlier this year. It's part of a series about a poor unfortunate little chap called Roman, whose life keeps on getting ruined by seemingly insignificant things. It's the follow-up to The Jam Doughnut That Ruined My Life. Book three in the series – Attack of the Woolly Jumper – will be out next year, and I'm currently working on the fourth. I've also got a slightly-less silly book coming out in 2018 called 421 Miles, which is all about two brothers running away from home to recapture the spirit of a memorable family holiday. What other projects are you involved in? I try to get involved with different projects whenever I can. This year I wrote a bedtime story for Derian House Children's Hospice in Lancashire, which was read by Steve Pemberton from The League of Gentlemen. I was also very fortunate to be invited to take part in a book bench project for the Big Read in Coventry. I went to visit a load of schools, and they held a competition for the pupils to design a bench based on The Jam Doughnut That Ruined My Life. The design was then put

on an actual bench by art and graphic design students from Coventry University, and put on display in the city's central library. Sitting on it was pretty awesome, I've got to say! This autumn I'm going to be judging a short story competition for an Irish cultural magazine called The Caterpillar, which is really exciting, and I also judge a kids' story contest in Ely, Cambridgeshire. Earlier this year I set up a mini literary festival for local schools around where I teach, and I'm hoping to expand that next year as well. You can find out more about Mark and his writing at www.marklowery.co.uk and follow him on Twitter @HelloMarkLowery

Mark Lowery in Coventry Central Library sitting on the bench inspired by his book The Jam Doughnut That Ruined My Life

Paul Chamberlain remembered The University has recently honoured much-loved former staff member, Paul Chamberlain, at a naming ceremony in a building now bearing his name. The Paul Chamberlain Building was formerly known as the Performing Arts Studios.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Elizabeth Stuart and former Head of Performing Arts, Professor Steve Hawes. Performances included a reading from A Midsummer Night’s Dream by Professor Hawes and an interactive musical piece led by Steve Solloway, capturing the spirit of Paul’s encouragement to take creative risks.

Paul worked at the University from 1984 to 2010 and played a key role in the development of Performing Arts programmes before becoming Director of Regional Academic Partnerships.

Paul had directed a memorable production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. A quote, "We will meet an there we may rehearse most obsceneley and courageously", from the play is featured on the brass plaque unveiled by Paul’s family.

Current and former staff, alumni, Paul’s friends and members of his family came together to appreciate Paul’s rich contributions to the University and to the local community. The ceremony began with tributes from Vice-Chancellor Professor Joy Carter, First

We will continue to remember Paul with great fondness as generations of Performing Arts students rehearse and perform in the building bearing his name. Paul Chamberlain

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Winchester University Press launches new Theodore Dreiser Edition in London Winchester University Press (WUP) held a literary showcase at the British Library to mark the launch of a new scholarly edition of The Titan by Theodore Dreiser. In a literary coup, academic editions of the renowned twentieth century American novelist’s works are now being published by WUP at the University of Winchester. The Titan is the first in the Theodore Dreiser Edition to be produced in the UK, after many years of being published by the University of Illinois Press. The launch event, Theodore Dreiser: from Transatlantic Censorship to Scholarly Editions, took place at the British Library in May, with speakers discussing the controversy around the book’s first publication in 1914 and how it has been the subject of censorship and reinterpretation during the past century. “It is unusual for a UK press to produce scholarly editions of an American author,” explained Jude Davies, Professor of American Literature and Culture at the University of Winchester and General Editor of the Theodore Dreiser Edition. “Dreiser's first novel Sister Carrie is widely read in American

high schools and universities; it captures the rush of modernity in the American cities of Chicago and New York in the early twentieth century. “The Titan – and the trilogy of which it is a part – focuses on the development of the American financial system in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. It’s experienced renewed interest after the financial crash of 2008.”

Next to be published are an edition of Dreiser's Literary Criticism, and his autobiography Dawn – a frank account of his childhood and youth in poverty in the Midwest of the USA.

At the launch event, Professor Davies explored how the historical censorship of Dreiser’s novels affects contemporary readers and how fresh research has affected recent scholarly editions of his works. Contributions also came from Professor Roark Mulligan of Christopher Newport University, Virginia, who reveals new research around the first publication of The Titan. “I first encountered Theodore Dreiser's work while I was an undergraduate in the 1980s,” added Professor Davies. “I went on to do doctoral research on Dreiser, and my involvement in the Dreiser Edition began when I was asked by the then General Editor, Thomas P. Riggio, to edit Dreiser's Political Writings. The resulting volume has opened up

Why not come back for a Winchester break? Our alumni can get discounted rates for on-campus accommodation. Our 2016 prices per night for alumni are: Single £29.63 per night Single occupancy in a double room £34.13 per night Double occupancy £41.25 per night Family room £56.25 per night You must have your alumni membership number (available from alumni@winchester.ac.uk) upon booking accommodation to be eligible for the discounted rate. Alumni cannot block book rooms under one alumni membership number, each room must be allocated to individuals with a valid membership number. Other accommodation may be available on request, please enquire with the Conference Office on conferences@winchester.ac.uk

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a previously neglected area of Dreiser's life, and helped scholars rethink their approach to his fiction.”

A page from the original manuscript of The Titan by Theodore Dreiser


VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

University and alumni support is springboard for recent alumni Thanks to support from the University’s enterprise Try It Award and the alumni-funded Winton Benevolent Fund, two recent alumni have been able to have international experiences and recognition.

Kathryn Williams (BSc Psychology 2013-2016) The Winton Benevolent Fund helped Kathryn to travel to South Africa as a leader on a county Girlguiding trip. While there, Kathryn was able to attend meetings with different groups of Teddies (Rainbows) and Guides to play games, share songs, badges and bracelets, and learn first-hand about South African Guiding traditions. She also helped to sell Girlguiding cookies in order to help keep Guiding going within the Cape Province. As a part of the same trip, Kathryn and her fellow Guides visited a township suffering with sanitation and safety issues post-apartheid.

This inspired them to collect clothes and bedding which they will send back to the local Guide Leader for distribution in the area they visited. While in South Africa, Kathryn experienced the natural landscapes of the country by going on a hot air balloon over game reserves, and on a safari in Mkuze to see wildlife in their environments. Kathryn remarked that: "this trip allowed me to push my own boundaries in what I thought I would be able to do. Thank you very much to the Winton Benevolent Fund for the support that was given to me".

Kathryn Williams with South African Teddies

Gemma Dunning (BSc Sports Coaching and Development 2013-2016) Congratulations to Gemma Dunning who was recognised by the International Cricket Council. She won their Women’s Cricket ‘Behind the Scenes’ award for her work as founder of Crick-Fit, a creative initiative to inspire more girls to get involved in sports through the vehicle of cricket. During her time as a Development Officer at the Jersey Cricket Board, Gemma was saddened that many girls and women found cricket boring, and she wanted to break down

the barriers to participation in order to change this perception. Thanks to funding from the University’s enterprise Try It Award Gemma started Crick-Fit and now runs events for primary school girls from Jersey. "I am delighted to be recognised by the highest echelons of cricket’ said Gemma. ‘It has given me an increased belief and motivation to apply myself to the company to drive it further".

Crick-Fit’s popularity is now spreading, and Gemma is looking to implement her enterprise across Hampshire and the South. "It’s not just about cricket," added Gemma. "It’s about attracting girls and women to participate in sport and to educate them on a healthy and active lifestyle".

Gemma Dunning (right) running a Crick-Fit session at Eastern Illinois University, USA

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Autumn 2016

Graduation 2016 More than 2,300 students graduated during eight ceremonies held in Winchester Cathedral (18-21 October). Alongside our newest alumni, we presented Honorary Doctorates to individuals with national and international distinction and Honorary Fellowships to individuals whose work is in line with the aim and mission of the University.

Honorary Doctorates Mark Kermode Awarded an Honorary Doctorate for services to broadcasting Dr Mark Kermode is film critic for The Observer newspaper and the BBC. He co-presents the Sony Award-winning Kermode and Mayo’s Film Review on BBC Radio 5Live, and The Film Review on the BBC News Channel. He is the author of several books on films and film criticism, including The Good, The Bad & The Multiplex and Hatchet Job. He has also written monographs for the British Film Institute on The Exorcist, The Shawshank Redemption, and Silent Running.

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Bill Bryson Awarded an Honorary Doctorate for services to literature Bill Bryson is a best-selling author whose books have sold more than 15 million copies and been translated into more than 30 languages. His science book A Short History of Nearly Everything won the 2004 Aventis Prize of the Royal Society and the Descartes Prize, the European Union’s highest literary award. His other books include A Walk in the Woods, The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid, At Home: A Short History of Private Life, and the biography William Shakespeare: The World as Stage. His latest book (published February 2016), The Road to Little Dribbling, examines his longstanding affection for Great Britain. In the autumn of 2015, A Walk in the Woods was released as a movie starring Robert Redford and Nick Nolte.

Roy Lancaster – Awarded an Honorary Doctorate for services to the environment and the media The Very Reverend James Atwell – Awarded an Honorary Doctorate for services to the public Richard Wilkinson – Awarded an Honorary Doctorate for services to the public Gregory Valerio – Awarded an Honorary Doctorate for services to social justice Kate Prince – Awarded an Honorary Doctorate for services to performing arts

Honorary Fellowships Rebecca Murray – Awarded an Honorary Fellowship for services to social justice

Other honorary doctorates awarded:

Allen Parton – Awarded an Honorary Fellowship for services to the public

Sarah House – Awarded an Honorary Doctorate for services to social justice

Gloria Vessey – Awarded an Honorary Fellowship for services to social justice


VENTA / Issue 33 / Autumn 2016

Alumnus of the Year Mark Kermode, Honorary Doctor

Graduation also provided the opportunity to celebrate and formally recognise the achievements of some of our alumni who have made outstanding contributions to society, through the Alumnus of the Year Award. Alan Dudeney

Bill Bryson, Honorary Doctor

Certificate of Education (Music) 1952-1954 As Headmaster of St Richard’s with St Andrew’s Church of England Primary School, Ham, Kingston-on-Thames, Alan formed a choir that went on to have notable success performing on television mainly at Christmas for 13 years in a row. Particular highlights include two appearances in Cliff Richard’s Christmas TV Programme, three BBC Radio 2 Christmas programmes, numerous recordings made in the Broadcasting House Concert Hall heard by millions of people worldwide, leading to Radio 4’s description of them as ‘the most broadcast choir in Britain’. On being recognised in this way, Alan said: "I wish to share this award with the pupils, former pupils and adults in the choir, without whose extremely hard work no such award would have been achieved." John Stanley Stoker in memory

Sarah House, Honorary Doctor

Certification of Education (Physical Education) 1962-1965 Stan was an accomplished sportsman, as well as an inspirational teacher and Deputy Headteacher. He played cricket and rugby for Dorset before taking up a PE teaching post

in Newcastle and playing rugby for Gosforth and cricket for Sunderland and Durham City. Alongside sport, Stan excelled as a teacher, Head of Lower School and later Deputy Head of Spennymoor Grammar School. He was known for forming strong and lasting relationships with many of his pupils as well as being a good listener and able to point ways forward in difficult situations. Sadie Rance in memory BA (Hons) Childhood, Youth and Community Studies 2009-2012 As a student, Sadie was enthusiastically involved in University sports teams and was Welfare Officer of Winchester Student Union. After graduation she was diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer and given a year to live. She battled against the disease for two years and spent every day celebrating life and seizing every opportunity, including marrying fellow Winchester alumnus Jason. Sadie, her family and friends not only raised awareness of cancer, but significant amounts of money for various cancer charities whilst always bringing people together, maintaining a positive attitude a formidable Team Winchester spirit. Other University celebrations included the University of Winchester and Hampshire Chronicle Community Star Award and staff awards including the Chancellor’s Award, Vice-Chancellor’s Leadership Award, Vice-Chancellor’s Community Engagement Award and the Values Award.

Alan Dudeney, Alumnus of the Year

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Military matters

Despite a similar achievement level to their non-service peers up to GCSE level, it appears that fewer service children go onwards to study at university. Additionally, children’s intent on going to university was found to be unaffected by their housing status, parents’ education and the number of schools they have attended. The challenges and opportunities for supporting the educational progression of children from military service backgrounds was explored at The Educational Progression of Children from Military Families conference at the University of Winchester earlier this year. The event saw the launch of free resources available to schools, colleges and universities to help improve their practice and outcomes, in the hope of building a better support network for service children. These findings come from a year-long research project by Dr Judith McCullouch, Senior Lecturer in Education, and Michael Hall, Widening Participation Outreach and Evaluation Officer. They gathered data from

service children and their parents, analysed literature and large national data sets, listened to feedback from military service children about what they need from their teachers and schools, and interviewed undergraduate students from military service families. “The experiences of military service children give them unique strengths, including the independence and resilience needed to flourish at university,” explained Dr McCullouch. “We must work together to ensure that these children are able to access the opportunities they need and want in order to progress through education. What is missing is a coherent, systematic approach to monitoring and supporting their educational progression. “Collectively, we could do more to recognise the responsibilities of, and pressures experienced by students from military service families. This would include ensuring that they have the right support and opportunities to make the most of their strengths in moving to and through higher education.”

Consequently, the University of Winchester is keen to create an alliance of organisations with the aim of supporting service children to translate their experiences and assets into top qualifications and successful careers, including access to higher education. Alongside this, the University will continue to work with the Ministry of Defence to further its research into where these children go after school, and why. The University is also taking part in the Heritage for Heroes initiative which aims to help former service personnel develop new skills as they recover from injuries and illnesses and transition from the military into civilian careers. A small group of former service personnel have just enrolled at the University to study on undergraduate degree courses in archaeology. This builds on the success of a Ministry of Defence initiative developed by the archaeological team in the Defence Infrastructure Organisation and the Defence Archaeology Group.

Philip Dent, Visiting Research and Development Fellow at the University of Winchester who has been leading the project, added: “At the heart of the research is the message that universities and colleges have an essential role in working with schools, local authorities and the military to find out where these children are and to support them to see higher education as a viable option and a fantastic opportunity.”

Winton Teacher Association We are launching our Winton Teacher Association for University of Winchester alumni teaching professionals. The Winton Teacher Association will seek to foster employability, networking, support and sustained engagement with the University for the community of alumni of all ages who teach or have taught. We are developing a mentoring scheme, as well as opportunities for professional development and interactions with fellow Winchester teachers. If you are interested in being involved with the Winton Teacher Association please do get in touch via alumni@winchester.ac.uk

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Crown Copyright 2011

Recently, the University of Winchester has been highly involved in initiatives and research around the military services. Around four out of ten military service children who have the ability to progress into Higher Education were unlikely to do so, according to new research undertaken by the University of Winchester and funded by the Ministry of Defence.


VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

University of Winchester leads archaeological excavations to uncover the New Forest’s past An archaeological project in the New Forest has enabled a team from the University of Winchester to shed light on the medieval landscape of the National Park. The excavations in Denny Inclosure – directed by Dr Paul Everill from the University’s Department of Archaeology in collaboration with the New Forest National Park Authority – focused on the remains of a medieval forester's lodge. A number of hunting lodges were constructed in the New Forest by order of King Edward III in the mid-fourteenth century. The site at Denny – a Scheduled Ancient Monument protected by law – shares a number of similarities with known royal sites and may indicate that they were initially foresters’ lodges before being converted to accommodate the king during his hunting trips. This project represented a new collaboration between archaeologists at the University of Winchester and the New Forest National Park Authority, to encompass a number of related sites over the next few years. It builds on the historic links between Winchester, as the ancient capital of England, and the New Forest. The New Forest National Park Authority supported the excavations with advice and volunteer time.

Dr Everill, Senior Lecturer in Applied Archaeological Techniques, said: “Working to help tell the story of the New Forest is such a fantastic local opportunity and provides a superb training experience for our students, especially for those targeting graduate employment in British archaeology. “This excavation is revealing more about the rich history of the New Forest, and the acidic, sandy soil at the site presents a number of challenges. Some archaeological materials do not survive well in this soil, but we have already defined the extent of the enclosing bank and ditch and now hope to retrieve evidence for the date of construction.

years ago. Modern scientific dating techniques and the ability to recover information about the site’s use can now provide us with a much better understanding and the potential for more accurate dating of the site. “We hope this will lead to similar work on other lodge sites as part of a much larger project that will expand our knowledge of potential royal hunting sites from the medieval period.” In addition to the research goals, the excavation provided an opportunity for a group of school children participating in the Jon Egging Trust’s Blue Skies Programme to gain experience of archaeology and to develop teamwork skills.

“We have been fortunate to work closely with our colleagues in the National Park throughout this process, and are grateful for the specialist support and advice we have received.” Frank Green, New Forest National Park Authority Archaeologist, said: “Working closely with our archaeological colleagues from the University of Winchester is an exciting opportunity to further our knowledge of this part of the New Forest’s past. “The excavation on the site at Denny Wait provides a rare opportunity to find new evidence on lodges as the last archaeological excavation on this type of site was a hundred

The excavation in Denny Inclosure

What's on? December 2016

January 2017

March 2017

7 December 12.30-1.30pm Abbey House Talk - Climate Change

10 January 5.30pm Big Data: Who’s in Control? 25 January 6pm Centre for Responsible Management: Film The True Cost- Fairness, Environmental Sustainability and Human Welfare in the Fashion Industry

8 March 5.30pm Centre for Gender Studies: Crusading Masculinities in the Middle Ages

7 December 11.30am-1.30pm Opportunities for Collaborative Health and Wellbeing Research 7 December 6pm Was Jack the Ripper a Slaughterman? Unexpected Journeys in Animal Welfare 13 December 6.15pm University Chapel Christmas Lessons and Carols 14 December 12.15pm University Chapel Christmas Lessons and Carols

29 March 6pm Centre for Responsible Management: Jonathon Porritt – Hope and Despair in the Foothills of the Anthropocene

February 2017 15 February 6pm Centre for Responsible Management: Talk by Carolyn Fairbairn, Director General of the Confederation of British Industry

For more information about public events and others, please visit www.winchester.ac.uk/events

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Lessons from the past: the early history of veterinary medicine Research carried out by Professor Louise Hill Curth – an historian specialising in Early Modern English human and non-human medicine, and Head of the University of Winchester's Centre for Medical History – suggests that there was a very sophisticated system of animal health care in this country which dates back to the late Middle Ages. "This included a major focus on providing animals with a healthy lifestyle to help them build strong bodies which might prevent disease," said Professor Hill Curth. "When illness would inevitably occur, there were also a range of remedial treatments that could be employed, based on a combination of ancient Greek and astrological principles." These ideas were the theme of For Man and beast: animal healthcare in Early Modern England – a public lecture at the University of Winchester on 27 October in which Professor Hill Curth argued that there are valuable lessons to be learned from these beliefs and practices.

Leverhulme grant supports new PAGES being turned in the human evolutionary story A team of archaeologists and geologists led by Dr Keith Wilkinson are examining the history of early humans in Eurasia after being awarded funding to further its research.

of central and northern Armenia during 2016 and 2017, while the samples collected will be analysed in laboratories in Winchester, Royal Holloway and the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre at the University of Glasgow.

The grant of almost £400,000 for the Pleistocene Archaeology, Geochronology and Environments of the Southern Caucasus (PAGES) project comes from the Leverhulme Trust – the value of the award recognises the considerable scientific potential of the research.

“The Debed and Hrazdan were chosen for study as we have previously found wellpreserved Palaeolithic sites associated with former floodplains of these rivers,” explained Dr Wilkinson. “Furthermore we can accurately date the solidified lavas and volcanic ash that sandwich the river sediments and thereby provide the first precise regional chronology for early human occupation of this key part of Eurasia.”

Dr Wilkinson, Reader in Environmental Archaeology at the University of Winchester, states: “The Southern Caucasus was selected for study as it is the region where the earliest human fossils have been found outside Africa, as well as having the earliest evidence for advanced stone tool-making behaviours. PAGES therefore seeks to understand when and why humans expanded from Africa into Europe and Asia. “This study will enable Old Stone Age (Palaeolithic) archaeological sites to be correlated across the region, existing theories of population expansion during the Pleistocene geological epoch (2.5 million to 11.5 thousand year ago) to be explored further and a greater understanding of how early humans adapted to ecological changes and developed new technologies along the way.”

The PAGES project commenced in mid-July, the publication of initial results will follow in 2017. For more information on the project, visit www.winchester.ac.uk/PalaeoArmenia The Leverhulme Trust awards £80m in grants each year. The Trust aims to support original research that advances world knowledge in the fields of the arts, humanities, sciences and social sciences.

The project team comprises scientists from Royal Holloway, University of London; Armenian Academy of Sciences; the Universities of Connecticut, Glasgow, North Carolina (Greensboro); and the Senckenberg research institute. Members of the team will carry out fieldwork in the valleys of the Hrazdan and Debed rivers Professor Louise Hill Curth

University of Winchester blog From the psychology of winning Olympic gold, to networks of wellbeing as the Holy Grail for the NHS. Read the Univeristy of Winchester’s blog for articles and insight from Winchester’s academics: www.winchester.ac.uk/blog 16

Dr Keith Wilkinson in the Hrazdan Valley


VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Heather Mills and Peter Egan launch Winchester’s Centre for Animal Welfare Animal welfare campaigners Heather Mills and Peter Egan helped launch the University of Winchester’s new interdisciplinary Centre for Animal Welfare. The Centre aims to positively contribute to the advancement of animal welfare – from research, education and associated animal welfare qualifications, to actively engaging in important social debates. “We are very proud to launch this groundbreaking new Centre for Animal Welfare, which will embody the values of compassion and social justice which are at the heart of the University,” said Professor Knight, Director of the Centre for Animal Welfare, and Professor of Animal Welfare and Ethics at the University of Winchester. “Animals are the individuals most consistently denied justice within society. Through the Centre’s seminars, expertise and media commentaries, we hope to encourage the evolution of social consciousness and public policy relating to animals, thereby helping to bring about a better world.” The launch event saw philanthropist, international business entrepreneur and long-standing animal advocate Heather Mills and well-known TV actor and animal cruelty activist Peter Egan sharing their inspiring stories about campaigning for animal welfare.

L-R: First Deputy Vice-Chancellor Elizabeth Stuart, Professor Andrew Knight, Director of the Centre for Animal Wefare, and Vice-Chancellor Joy Carter DL

Heather has won a number of awards for her contribution to animal welfare including being a key figure in creating the first EU law to ban dog and cat fur use throughout Europe for which she received The Humane Society Genesis Award. She won PETA’s Humanitarian Award in 2005 for her campaign to end the use of dog and cat fur by American clothing company J.Crew across the USA, and supports charities such as Retreat Animal Rescue, Farm Sanctuary and VIVA. Peter is Patron of Chaldon

Animal Sanctuary and an active ambassador for organisations such as All Dogs Matter and the Animals Asia Foundation. The University of Winchester has just announced its partnership with the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) to create a new generation of animal welfare experts and ensure that animal welfare is recognised and respected as an expert discipline in its own right.

Book a break for less All Winton Club members can receive 10% Discount with cottages.com Discover rural cottages, rustic farmhouses and modern apartments in the UK and beautiful villas and gites overseas. With over 15,000 properties to choose from you are sure to find your dream holiday. Choose to stay for a short break of 2, 3 or 4 nights or stay 7 nights or longer. Also thousands of properties are pet friendly so all the family can enjoy a holiday! All properties are annually inspected and graded by regional managers and graded to a scheme supported by Visit England and their Gold Awards. To search and book securely online visit www.chooseacottage.co.uk/uow Alternatively, call the sales team on 0345 268 0980 quoting ALUM10 to receive your 10% discount.

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Success is a (virtual) reality for Winchester alumna "I still have to pinch myself sometimes" says Samantha Kingston (BA Journalism and Media Studies, 2009-2012) referring to her recent win of the national Venus Award for New Business. Samantha is co-founder and Client Director of Virtual Umbrella, a virtual reality (VR) marketing specialist company based in Southampton and London. The Venus Awards recognise, reward and celebrate working women in business, and the New Business category is for a business less than two years old. Samantha started Virtual Umbrella in March 2015. Previously she discovered a love of virtual reality through a virtual reality gaming job she was recruited to, an industry that she had never previously considered. Now her company is working with a range of clients such as Nokia, and alongside the National Venus Award Samantha herself is one of the Rising Stars of 2016 in the British Interactive Media Association’s 100 list.

variety of hats. Sometimes I am the Client Director, or the accountant, the planner or a campaign creator. You have to be prepared to do things you might not realise you had to do. That’s the great thing about it, I am learning skills I would have never imagined I would ever have needed." Looking forward, Samantha wants to continue to grow her business and offer opportunities to others to join the company. Virtual Umbrella has offered internships and work experiences to many students over the past two years, and Samantha’s focus remains on wanting to "build a fun, honest and hardworking company that I can be proud of."

Samantha credits the University of Winchester for influencing her ability to have success. "I have definitely taken skills I developed at Winchester that have helped my professional skills. My lecturer really taught me how to manage my time, be organised and work hard for what I am passionate about. Winchester will always be a big part of my personal and working life." Find out more about Virtual Umbrella here www.virtualumbrella.marketing

"The best part of my job is being able to show virtual reality to people for the first time," comments Samantha. "VR can be incredibly powerful, it can make people laugh or even cry and it’s great to be able to experience this with people." Starting and running a business is not without challenges, as Samantha explains: "I wear a

Samantha Kingston trying out a virtual reality game.

Would you like to start your own Social Enterprise? A new project to help budding entrepreneurs in the M3 corridor has been launched thanks to a significant grant secured from the Big Lottery Fund and European Social Fund (ESF). The University is one of the partners in ‘Inspiring Enterprise’ the new project within the Building Better Opportunities programme. Led and managed by WSX Enterprise, other partners include Action Hampshire and Surrey Community Action for this project which will support entrepreneurs from Southampton to the M25, including Winchester, Andover, 18

Alton, Farnham, Basingstoke, Farnborough, Camberley, Woking, and Bracknell. Working with unemployed and economically inactive people the programme aims to help those interested in creating and running their own social enterprise. It will include a web portal full of information, tools and resources, ‘is it for me?’ taster sessions, workshops, and dedicated mentors. Starting in the New Year, the University will be holding events for unemployed or economically inactive graduates who would like to find out

more about starting their own enterprise, followed by a range of workshops, advice and mentoring for those wishing to develop their ideas. To find out more email Trish.Kernan@winchester.ac.uk


VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Francesca Duggan: Gimme Five Recent graduate Francesca Duggan (BA Fashion: Media and Marketing 2013-2016) gives us the numbers behind landing her new job at Shortlist Media as their Creative Coordinator, where she supports the Content Solutions team in charge of advertising across all platforms, print and digital.

Alumni Gifts

Crystal flute

Crystal tumbler

Card case

175th anniversary cup

University scarf

Silk tie

Crystal goblet

Glass tankard

Compact mirror

Cuddly sheep

5 weeks of interviews for this role 4 rounds of interviews for this job, including a presentation and meeting the directors

3 specific areas – journalism, marketing and

entrepreneurship – are the elements of my course that I draw on regularly in my role

2 m  agazines, Stylist and ShortList are owned by the company that I work for, where I put together pitches and presentations in responses to the briefs of our clients, who are big brands wanting to run advertising campaigns on our channels

1 city – London! I knew I wanted to work

in the capital, so I joined an employment agency that specialised in media jobs who secured me the interview with ShortList.

To purchase please visit our online store at www.winchester.ac.uk/store Francesca Duggan

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Stephen and Barbara Baldwin (1963-1966) with their friends from the ’50 years on’ group

Winton Club Reunions This year’s Winton Club Reunion took place on the weekend of 22-24 July, ending a year of celebrations to mark the University’s 175th anniversary. The weekend began, for those staying at the University in the newest accommodation at Burma Road Student Village, with checking into rooms and greeting friends. The evening supper events included a special gathering of 1966 leavers who shared memories and enjoyed a slideshow of photos from their student years in Winchester at King Alfred’s College (KAC). The lunch on Saturday 23 July brought together 180 alumni, University staff and invited guests. We were fortunate to be joined by the Bishop of Winchester, The Rt Revd Tim Dakin and the University Chancellor, Alan Titchmarsh MBE VMH DL. The Bishop had delivered a warmly received sermon at Reunion Service earlier that morning. Following lunch the Honorary Secretary of the Winton Club, Howard Horstead (19531955) called out the names and study years of Club members present. The list included 13 celebrating their 60th anniversary (1954-1956) and 30 celebrating their 50th anniversary (19631966), many accompanied by their partners. Congratulations to John Debenham and Stephen Baldwin respectively for their wonderful work as long-serving Year Secretaries for these groups, proving that friendships made as students here in Winchester are indeed lifelong! 20

The Chancellor delivered an engaging speech, concluding with a toast to the University and the Winton Club to which Vice-Chancellor Professor Joy Carter DL and Councillor Jill Hubbard (1973-1977) gave respective and well-received responses. The sunshine and warm temperature continued long into the evening, allowing friends to enjoy picnics on the lawns and terraces around campus. As darkness fell, many gathered in the Student Union to dance to live music from the 1960s and 1970s, performed with great enthusiasm by Te Deum, a band formed at KAC circa 1970. On Sunday 24 July, former staff from the past five decades joined alumni for a Reunion Brunch. It was a great pleasure to welcome back to the University former KAC Principal, Martial Rose (1965-1984) and this special event proved to be a fitting conclusion to the institution’s 175th anniversary celebrations. Please note the dates for Reunion 2017 will be Friday 23 to Sunday 25 June. If you have any suggestions for events we can help you plan for the weekend, please contact me by email to Corinne.Mackenzie@winchester.ac.uk Corinne Mackenzie Alumni Relations Manager

Alumni Recognition Award Do you know a graduate from the University of Winchester, or one of its predecessor institutions, who has made an outstanding contribution to society through: • Considerable community/voluntary dedication • Career success in any area with a number of notable achievements • Exceptional courage in the face of adversity • Heroism or dedication to others? If you do, please consider nominating them for the award. Download the nomination form and find out more at www.winchester.ac.uk/alumni


VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

25 years of Winchester Student Union's Winton Weekend Next year sees the 25th anniversary of Winchester Student Union’s Winton Weekend which takes place on Saturday 25-Sunday 26 February 2017.

Ever since 1992 Winton Weekend has become bigger and bigger. 25 years on, over 700 alumni and current students play a range of sports, watch matches, and celebrate at the Saturday night party in the Vault.

Winton is an annual event where alumni return for a weekend of sports fixtures against current students. This is then celebrated on the Saturday night with the Winton Party and awards!

All alumni are warmly welcome to come back to play sport or spectate. Keep an eye on Winchester Student Union’s social media channels, @winchestersu on Twitter and Winchester Student Union on Facebook.

This year, to celebrate the 25th anniversary, all alumni and current students are invited to an opening ceremony on the morning of Saturday 25 February in order to sign the Winton banner, and officially kick of a wonderful weekend of sport, memories and friendship.

Email: suactivities@winchester.ac.uk We look forward to seeing you there!

Winton Weekend was started by the King Alfred’s Men’s Rugby Team in 1992 in memory of their teammate Steve Tomlinson who sadly passed away from a cancer-related illness. The Rugby Team decided to play an annual rugby match where rugby graduates would return to play the current rugby team, and the concept for Winton Weekend was born.

Half price Student Union venue hire

Welcome to the team

Winchester Student Union is now offering all alumni half price venue hire.

Please join us in welcoming Savannah King, Student and Alumni Communications Officer, to the team!

With three venues to choose from there is plenty of choice when it comes to organising a party, awards evening, reunion and much more. Rates start from just £25 per hour and the bar prices are sure to be the best available in Winchester. To enquire or book please contact suevents@winchester.ac.uk or call 01962 827418 – you will need to quote your alumni number when booking at a discounted rate. If you are unsure of this then please contact the Alumni Office on alumni@winchester.ac.uk or call 01962 827403.

Savannah joins Corinne Mackenzie, Alumni Relations Manager, to continue enhancing and delivering our alumni relations services. An alumna herself, Savannah studied BA (Hons) English (2012-2015) and held the position of Winchester Student Union President in the academic year 2015/16. You can get in touch with Savannah at alumni@winchester.ac.uk

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

John Shannon’s 100th birthday On 1 October, the University’s oldest alumnus, John Shannon (1935-37) reached the milestone of his 100th birthday.

To mark this occasion his family staged a splendid celebration event attended by friends from across many years and four generations of his family, including a great-grandson already studying at university. The family

were kind enough to extend an invitation to the University of Winchester and Barbara and Stephen Baldwin (1963-66) attended on our behalf. It was a wonderful day and a fitting tribute to the man – who was in excellent form.

John Shannon (centre) with KAC friends, Stephen and Barbara Baldwin, Annette Kulik, daughter of Rowan Hackman (1935-37) and Julian Steed, son of Frederick Alfred Steed (1935-37)

Alumni memories: Alwyn Hall ‘Minty Board’ Story from Roger Hailwood (Cert.Ed 1961-64) Alwyn Hall was the largest of the student hostels and was quite an imposing building, with three storeys arranged as two wings, with a central entrance. At the end of the two wings was a warden’s accommodation. Dennis Pass occupied the one on the left, while the Minty family occupied the one on the right. Initially there seemed to be an attempt to emulate the Oxford colleges which locked doors at night, and it had been decided that Alwyn Hall, like St Grimbald’s, the women’s hostel, should have its main door locked at 10pm, and all who wished to enter after that time would be let in by one of the wardens. In order to check who was in and who was out, Mr Minty devised a system which became known as the ‘Minty Board’. This was a board hung just inside the central entrance to the hostel, which had rows of numbered hooks, one for each of the rooms.

On each hook was hung a small steel washer which was painted white on one side. When a student was in the hostel the white face was exposed and as he left, he turned the washer over – if he remembered – and on return he reversed the washer again. The idea was a simple one but open to much abuse, especially after an evening in one of the Winchester pubs, and the washers were frequently scattered on the floor. It was also a way of expressing resentment at the constraints of being locked in at 10pm. Some of the older students had come from National Service and were enjoying the freedom from military and discipline. They were not happy about having to conform to what they considered to be petty restrictions. Soon the Minty Board disappeared and the task of the warden was not that of ensuring that male students were corralled for the night, but rather that there were no female visitors still on the premises after 10pm. Alwyn Hall

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VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Trying to find It’s not easy to maintain the large number of friendships established during your Winchester days. ‘Trying to find’ is a service available to all alumni, whereby the Alumni Office helps to reunite old friends. If you are trying to get back in touch with old friends from your days at Winchester, please contact the Alumni Office by email at alumni@winchester.ac.uk We have recently been asked to help with the following requests. • P eter Keen (1967-1970) is trying to find Malcolm Best, Steven Lord and Derek Hocking, all 1967-1970 students. • H  elen Scott (BA Drama, Theatre and Television 1988-1991) is trying to find Arthur Brooks (possibly Brookes) who was on the teaching staff of the course. • L ouise Ashby, nee Hanner (1993-1996) is trying to find Winifred Martins (BA English and Drama 1993-1996). John Shannon blowing out the candles on 100 cupcakes

Winchester Wordsearch Enjoy a quick wordsearch as you're catching up on our news…

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ASSOCIATION BOP

TITCHMARSH UNIVERSITY

23


VENTA / Issue 33 / Winter 2016

Obituaries Dr Chris Grover (Cert Ed 1974, PhD History 2009), Senior Lecturer in Global Issues and Management

Donald Colin Cartridge (Cert Ed, 1954-1956) Don was one of the top club cricketers in Southampton and played for Hampshire three times before training as a teacher at King Alfred’s College. On leaving here, he joined the staff at Millbrook School and was a hugely respected maths and PE teacher there for over three decades. He died in September 2015 at the age of 81. Edward Macintyre (Cert Ed, 1949-1951)

Chris first started working at King Alfred’s College in 1987 and was still working here part-time on a phased retirement when she died. However Chris’s roots in this institution in fact go further back than that. She was a student here, transferring from Christchurch College in Kent when her husband, Richard, got a job at Portsmouth. Such transfers were not really permitted in those days and it was only by a circuitous route involving her father and Principal Martial Rose’s book editor that Martial was persuaded to take her here. Chris incurred the wrath of the Christchurch Principal and lost her registration for the London B.Ed so she graduated from here with a Cert Ed. She then taught Maths in schools and colleges, devising a Maths course especially for naval wives and then she came here in the era when there was still a swimming pool by the library in which her children swam. All three of those children have worked here at some point. Chris taught Maths. She survived the major restructuring which took place in the 1990s, and became a lecturer in Business, doing a stint as Acting Head of Business when it went through its QAA subject review with flying colours. She, with a small group of colleagues, developed Management Studies which was to become the foundation of the business school. Having gained a degree from the Open University in 1978 and various postgraduate qualifications, Chris gained her PhD in 2008. Her 2012 book on the Winchester district of Hyde is a fascinating study of the history of that area. Chris was a popular lecturer and much-loved and respected colleague. 24

After National Service in the Navy as a radio operator at Portsmouth, Edward (Mac) studied at King Alfred’s College. Mac’s first teaching post was as PE master at Caterham school where he spent 10 very enjoyable years. It was here that he married Ismay, the school nursing sister, and where their children Jane and Alistair were born. In the early 1960s Mac moved to the Royal Philanthropic Society’s School in Earlswood, followed by Banstead Hall approved school and St Nicholas’ School for children with special needs, where he became headmaster. Mac was well respected by staff and students alike at each school. Mac was a keen player and follower of sport. In his early years he was a county champion athlete. He played hockey for Spencer in the London league and represented several counties. He was perhaps most proud of representing the Anglo Scots. Philip Ray (1926-2016)

We have received the sad news of the death of Philip Ray, a member of the academic staff for well over twenty years. Philip was a graduate of Birmingham University. After gaining extensive experience as a school teacher he joined the academic staff of King Alfred’s College in 1964 as a lecturer in the Education Department. He subsequently took on the role of Co-ordinator of Teaching Practice, a key position in what was then a college devoted almost exclusively to teacher training as this involved liaising with

schools across Hampshire and personal contact with virtually all of the College’s students. He played an important part in the development of the In-service B.Ed degree course and was then appointed Academic Registrar. In this capacity he acted as secretary to the Academic Board and organised the institution’s degree ceremonies. After Philip’s retirement in 1987 he and his wife Betty lived in King’s Somborne and Winchester, maintaining a keen interest in the institution as it evolved into a university and often attending The Winton Club’s annual reunion lunch. More recently, in declining health, Philip and Betty moved to Hitchin in Hertfordshire to be closer to members of their family. It was there that he passed away peacefully on Thursday, 8 September 2016. Always a vibrant and friendly presence in the community, Philip will be remembered with gratitude by generations of former students and with great affection by his former colleagues. Contributed by Professor Brian Tippett

In memory of We have recently been notified of the death of the following people from the University of Winchester and Winton Club community. We send our condolences to their families.

Former students Mr Denis Janda Mr Ernest W Clarke Mr Edward Macintyre Mr Elliot Lancaster Mr Donald C Cartridge Mr Michael G Latham Mr David J Dee Mr George Douglas Mr John Edwin Hilsum Mrs Audrey Walker (Daines) Mr Chris Simpson Mr Philip Smith Mr Ephson Ngadya Ms Nola Kinna Mr Damien Bates Mr Stephen Piper Ms Kerry Elliott

Former staff Ms Hazel Crook Mrs Helen Gray Mr Geoffrey Hughes Mr Michael Martyn Dr Philip Ray Ms Anthea Rothery Mr Colin Whittall Dr Chris Grover

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The Winchester Alumni Association You’re a lifelong member of The Winton Club, our alumni network established in 1874. Keep in touch: alumni@winchester.ac.uk Universityofwinchesteralumniassociation winchalum www.winchester.ac.uk/alumni

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Venta 33  
Venta 33  

Winchester University Alumni Magazine