Page 1

Vol. 1.

APRIL 7. 1905.

No. 11.

REMEMBER THAT TIME IS THE ESSENCE OF MOST THINGS, AND IS NOT INCONSISTENT WITH , THOROUGHNESS. '

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WALTRH C. KERR.


BIL.L.1ARD

and POOL. PARLOR

T H E B E S T OF E V E R Y T H I N G

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"IF WE MADE IT, IT'S RIGHT"

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JOHN

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Washington St.

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Soulier's Lyric Theatre,

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GEISMAR'S

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FINE CLOTHES FOR MEN".:,


T H E STUTE Some Requirements. There came to the authorities of the Institute not long ago an application, in letter form, for a recommended list of engineers who stood ready to fulfill the requirements set forth in the letter. The letter was from a very large firm developed along broad engineering lines and, a new department being contemplated, they were searching the country for able men, as managers, engineers, superintendent of construction and so on. The requirements ran like this : General Manager-' ' The man to properly fill this position should primarily be a shrewd, capable, energetic business man, with a civil engineering education and experience in carrying out large engineering works." He should have abundant initiative and ambition, should be diplomatic, and should possess great executive ability. Chief EngineerÑ T h e chief engineer should be a man of high standing in his profession, etc."-" H e should be of good appearance and address, diplomatic, energetic, possessing some h i ness judgment and abundant initiative Manager of Contractiny Department~TheManager of the Contracting Department should be a well educated Civil Engineer, who has had an extended experience in contracting work ___ - I ! " He should'be a man of great energy, keen perception, good business judgment, and one who would be able to estimate accurately the costs of work on which tenders are to be submitted, and who can direct the carrying out of such work in a manner that will be substantially and thoroughly satisfactory to those for whom the work is being done, and who can at the same time keep the' cost of such work within the estimates. T h e essential qualifications of the position are undoubted integrity, great eçerg and initiative, sound business judgment and u ~ ~ j - u d executive ability. " Now heave a long breath and then if you ever thought in your life think of what it means. I t means that if you ever wish to become a really successful engineer you must develope qualitives which mark successful men. If you even want to become a $15,000 man you'll have to get the qualities of a $15,000 man; The quality of a man is a thing within his own power for better I I Qr for worse. If you began making quality ' ' in your cradle, by kicking the covers higher in the air, it would not be too soon. Whatever you do bepin now. Do you know, some fellows go along in smooth calm life in a smooth calm way, until some tide of existance. If nothing day Something happens to ruff the .eke ever disturbed you into c quality activity" the fact'that -.'I

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you're in college ought to. You think that a queer statement, YOU came to give up four years from the very heart of your life in order to acquire the foundation for the ability required by this very firmquoted. The results are not in the books, they are in Self, with a big S, and if you didn't think the whole thing out before you determined to chop four years from life you ougtit to do it now. A thousand dollar fellow with a ten thousand dollar education is over-capitalized. Turn the present circumstance of your career to good account and remember that with you lies a large part of your own fate.

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A. Executive Meeting.

By action of, the Executive Board, Thursday, March 30, S, B. B. C. was adopted as the monogram to be worn upon the base-ball suits. At a previous meeting H. A. Pratt '04 was elected as the Alumni delegate to the I. C,I,. A.

Calendar.

REmA~sAiflSÑOrchestraevery Monday at 4 P. M. in Auditorium. Mandolin Club, Mondays and Thursdays at 4.10 P. M . in Prof. Denton's room. LACROSSB PRACTICBÑEV day ~ ~at the Cricket grounds. - , . .I BASE-BAU,P ~ A c T ~ c ~ - ~ v day e r y at the Castle Point grounds. t r PSIDAY, April 7-Cheer rehearsal at 12.45 in ~uditorium. All , out, Meeting of the Engineering Society in Webb's room. Foundry Practice '' by Lynd '05. I . . SATURDAY, April 8-Lacrosse game with Crescent A. C . , at Bay ' Ridge. '<{ Base-ball game with St. Francis Xavier, at Hoboken. WEDNESDAY, April 12-Lacrosse game with City College, N. Y. <:.-, , at Hoboken. -id FRIDAY,April 14ÑTh next meeting of the Stevens Club of . Newark. The Club meets on the second Friday of each. month at I,. Achtell Stetter's,"Broad St., Newark. SATURDAY,,April 15-lacrosse game with Columbia - B ~ - b a lgws l with Pratt Institute at Brooklyn.

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Alumni Dinner. On Monday, March 27, the annual banquet of the Stevens Alumni was held a t the Hotel Astor. There were more than two hundred present and great enthusiasm was shown throughout. After enjoying an elaborate dinner, the Alumni settled back in their seats for the important part of the evening's program, namely the speeches, and these proved to be more important than had been expected. President Humphreys was the first one introduced by the toastmaster. I n his speech he made frequent references to the plans of the Institute property, a copy of which was at each plate, and which showed the Morton laboratory and also the new athletic field and track, which are to be built on the Castle Point grounds. The field will be situated about 100 ft. back from Hudson St., between 7th and 8th Streets, and will have a base-ball diamond, football and lacrosse field, quarter mile track and a grand stand. The property on which it will be laid out is to be given in exchange for a part of the Castle Point grounds now controlled by the Institute, by Mr. R. L. Stevens at a sacrifice in valuation of $15,000. Directly behind the Morton Laboratory a small field has also been arranged for, and the tennis courts will be placed on the ground at the North East corner of the block bounded by River St., 6th St., Hudson St. and the extension of 7th St. President Humphreys also announced that at last the $100,000 mark had been reached from the subscriptions for the Morton Laboratory. H e stated that if each Alumnus would pay $7 for every year he had been out of college, the proceeds would reach the grand total of about $400,000. The percentages of the classes from the subscriptions paid by each, based on this assumption, were also read, showing that only a very few had attained loo%, and that the class of 1881 headed the list. Perhaps the most important announcement was that in which the President stated the willingness of Mr. Carnegie to add $50,000 to the Carnegie Laboratory Endowment Fund and his own willingness to give $50,000 for a student's club-house, both conditioned upon $100,000 being raised by Alumni or other friends of the Institute. Mr. Andrew Carnegie was then introduced and spoke on technical education. H e pointed out that the work of the engineer was higher work than that of the mere money-grabber and said that he would have given his son-had he had one-an education at one of the technical schools of which Stevens Institute was in the foremost rank. H e congratulated the Alumni upon the support they were giving the Institute and President Humphreys. The other speakers were Mr. Edmund Whetmore of H a n a r d , Prof. Kroeh, Mr. John Lieb, President of the American Institute , of Electrical Engineers, and Prof. Chandler of Columbia, the well-known chemist. During the dinner a number of songs were well rendered by a double quartette from the Stevens Glee Club.


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The Publicity Bureau. The Publicity Bureau has begun its work and is doing finely, The co-operation of Mr. Smith, of the President's office, ha: been secured and lines have already been laid for disseminating the news of the Institute, reports of the various games, etc., in the quickest and most economical manner. One or two of the big dailies have asked the Bureau to find for them reliable men who would act as their regular correspondents here at the Institute. If such a proposition interests you, communicate with Walker '06. Volunteers in the work now are Schaaf '05 Walker '06, Klein '07. Willis '07, Demarest '07. The target competition was held on the morning of Saturday March 25, at the North German Lloyd Pier. Although the attendance was not large, great interest was shown by the men present. The following men qualified for prizes : Butler '08, Erlenkotter '05, Shope '08, Mervine '07, Hamilton '07, Buist '05. Cruthers '05 and Scheel '05 acted as judges.

The Lacrosse Came. The Lacrosse season opened on Saturday, April 1, with the New York Lacrosse Club game. This proved agreat disappointment to Stevens, as the team was expected to win easily. It is true that the visiting team was stronger than it was last year and outweighed ours almost twenty-five pounds to the man, but aftel the winter practice we had hoped to see the team make a bettel showing. The chief weakness seemed t o be in the defense, which was scattered and generally played too far out. The tean work of the attack men was good. By strengthening the defensc and improving the stick work we ought to turn out a strong team. The opposing centers faced off at 4:04 and for the first few minutes the ball travelled from one end of the field to the other. Deppeler, however, stopped all the shots and no score was made. Hamilton received the ball on a long throw from the New York's defense, and by passing t o Murray and Gayley it was carried steadily down the field, Davis scoring the first goal from a pass by McKinlay. Jacoby was substituted for Hicock and not 20 seconds after he got in the game he scored New f o r k ' s first goal. During the next few minutes our attack made repeated shots but did not score. Solo scored New York's second goal by rolling the ball in. After the face off, Roberts was cut on the head, and the game was stopped for a few minutes. The New DonoYork's attack played fast now and after repeated shots hue scored from a pass by Jacoby. This was followed by goals by Solo and Jacoby, making the score 5-1. Here Stack made a1 of the game from a pass from Davey. A

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minute later he scored again just before time was called. Score N, Y. I,.C . , 5-Stevens, 3. At the beginning of the second half the playing was fast and after Kegelman had scored for the New Yorks, the ball hardly once left our attack. An unfortunate incident occmed in the middle of this half. Turner checked E. Donohue and the latter resenting, swung at Turner and they clinched but were separated by the players. Referee Finlay put both men off the field for the remainder of the game. During the rest of the half our attack tried hard to score but succeeded only once. Stack shot the last goal. Score-N. Y. I,. C., 7-Stevens, 4 We can make no excuses, we were outplayed. The line-up was as follows : STEVENS.

N. Y. I,. C .

Inside Home Hicock-Jacoby Outside Home Solo 1st. Attack R. Donohue Stack 2nd Attack E. Donohue McKinlay Gayley-Demarest 3rd Attack Kegelman Center Ruge (Capt.) Murray 3rd Defense Foran Davey 2nd Defense White Hamilton 1st Defense Mclntyre Turner Cover Point Steinert-Newman Pinkney Point Campbell Rrlenkoetter Deppeler Goal Ganz Time of halves 25 minutes. Referee, W. S. Finlay, Cornell. Time keepers, N. Y. I,. C., Kaufm'an ; Stevens, Charavay.

Roberts Davis (Capt.)

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Cheer Rehearsals. During the past ten days we have had three cheer rehearsals in the Auditoriun, at which there was good attendance and which seemed to be the beginning of good spirit for the season upon which we have now entered. Some of the new S6ngS went well and if they can only be well learned by every man the results ought to show at future games. It is the plan of the Cheer leaders to get out in pamphlet form printed songs and cheers including all the songs we eyer tig and many which we have picked up rather recently. This pamphlet will be on hand within a very few days. Keep it yi yam pocket all the time so you. will have it to hum '' over. &t out to the " Choir Practices " every time we have one. If s yfitir show you h o w . " Aguinaldo ', is on the stage, the Gav~ ~ I OGeneral Y ' ' at &hepiano and " the hobo "-well he, must be the fdlow' who d o d t come at all: See calendar tor om schedule. . CHBSB. LBADKRS.


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^Coinmencement P I ".

On Thursday, March 30th, Prof. Ganz address for a few minutes, with reference t o plans for the mencement Week. The Professor submitted program for suggestions : Sunday, June 18, Baccalaureate Sermon. Monday, June 19, 8 P. M., Cremation of Calculus. Tuesday, June 20, 7 P. M., Alumni Class Re-union Banquets. Wednesday, June 21, A. M., Senior Class Day Exercises; 4 to 6 P. M., President Humphrey's Reception ; 8 P. M., Alumni Meeting. Thursday, June 22, 10:30 A. M., Commencement ; 3 P. M . , Base-ball Game between Faculty and Seniors ; 8 P . M., Farewell Reception by Junior Class to Graduating

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a t will be seen that the Cremation of Calculus comes a1 two weeks later than has heretofore been the custom. arrangement was made a t the suggestion of the Professor, the idea that all events incidental to Commencement should place as near together as possible.

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Class Notes. 1905.

George Ross is assistant on a new railroad that is being constructed between Fort Worth and Indianapolis. His address is Tipton, Ind. Dudley Polhemus has left the Institute to accept a posit as chemist in the Oil Works at Edge Water, N. J. The Calculus Cremation Committee has decided to held the cremation on Monday evening, June 19. This date w s selected so as to have the celebration in commencement week, and it will no doubt prove to be one of the principal busy and happy time.


T H E STUTE

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Base-Ball. A great deal of interest has been taken in base-ball and judging from the large number of candidates who have reported for practice the prospects for a good fast team are very good. The men take very well to the game, going at it as if they meant business,-in fact during practice some very snappy and phenomenal plays have been executed, At present the Castle Point grounds are not in the best of condition owing to the breaking of ground for the new Chemical Laboratory, but the building and grounds committee has promised to fix up the place as soon as possible. So it is hoped that in a very short time the grounds will again be in good condition. A very strong- schedule has been arranged. To have a winning team, everyone must play his best, so Capt. Beckman requests that everyone who knows anything at all about baseball will come out for practice and aid him in every possible way. Our first game is with St. Francis Xavier at the St. George Cricket Grounds on Saturday, April 8th, at' 3 P. M. and we should like to have every man in college there, to help us win, by his cheering and presence. Herewith is a copy of the schedule : St. Francis Xavier-at Hoboken Pratt Institute-at Brooklyn Peddie-at Hightstown , N. J. C. C . of N. Y.-at New York Forest H i l l - a t Newark Brooklyn Poly .-at Hoboken St. Francis Xavier-at New York Hoboken C. C. of N. Y.-at Seton Hall-at South Orange Pratt-at Hoboken N. Y. University~atNew York Momistown F. C.-at Morristown Oleo F. C.-at Asbury Park H. A. EVERTZ.

Tennis.

At a meeting of the Tennis Club held on Monday, March 27, the question of a tournament was thoroughly discussed. The opinion-of the meeting was that an inter-class tournament should be held in the near future. A committee consisting of Delafield $05,. Walker ' 0 6 , Demarest '07, Stewart '08, and Hazeltine ex-officio, was appointed to make all arrangements. One court is now in L! -, ~l%ing,condition and another will soon be ready.

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Hoboken's ' Fiftieth Anniversary. , On Tuesday, March twenty-eighth, two rare phenomena were observed in this section of the country. Hoboken celebrated her fiftieth birthady and we enjoyed a holiday. The city was decked from river t o swamp with flags and bunting, and from early morning till the day after" it's streets were filled with a happy holiday crowd. I t was in the evening however, that the big event, the parade, took place. At six o'clock the fellows began gathering at the Institute and sliortly after seven, canes and flags were distributed and the first start was made. A brightly illuminated float led the way, behind which marched a group of upper-class men in gray shirts with red ties. The lacrosse men in jerseys, carrying their sticks came next, followed by the rest of the students. Another float brought up the rear. For the leading float the model of the ferry boat "Ham' was removed from the library and mounted on a large ectric truck. A mass of electric lights arranged about the ~ o d emade l the float one of the handsomest in the line. Above the boat, on each side, spreading out from the front in a V shape was the word STEVENS. The large raised gray letters thickly dotted with electric light bulbs, were set on a red background. On the second float, two forges and two anvils were placed and a group of freshmen exhibited the long-to-be-remembered work r black-smith shop. The front of the truck carried two S. I. T . monograms, also lighted up with electric lights. Both floats were well gotten up and to Mr. I,ieb '80, of the New York Edison Co. and to the Faculty Committee in charge, great credit must be given for planning and arranging them at such short notice. Mr. Lieb has since very kindly. presented the above signs to the Institute. Our first march brought us to our assigned starting point on Willow Ave. After over an hour's delay, we began to go forward again at 8.30 o'clock and soon became a real part of the parade. The line of march led up Washington Street from Ferry to Fourteenth Streets then back through several different streets to First and thence past the reviewing stand in the park opposite the Institute. There was some verygood marching and some very poor, but none so varied as that of Stevens. We marched along for two solid hours, sometimes in regular order, sometimes in sinusoidal curves, singing and yelling till hoarse. The bands played and the crowds of spectators kept waving their flags and shouting their applause. The Freshmen on the float kept time with their heavy sledges and the sparks flew. Everybody was out for a good time and everybody had it. When the reviewing stand came in sight, the lines straightened out and took their distance apart, all held their heads up, looked straight ahead and marched by-like engineers. Later a picture was taken of the Stevens sectiaa sad the crowd broke up for some more fun.

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Correspondence Corner. To the Editor of The StUte. DEAR SIR:-There seems to be a growing tendency here, for men to neglect duties which they have taken upon themselves. You will see them skurrying around trying to get somebody to do the work on a committee or board of editors, or whatever it may be, which of right they themselves should $IAs an excuse they invariably offer some such reason as this : I am very busy, you see I am president of this, and chairman of that, member of this committee and delegate to that conference, t have time to look after this little matter, etc., etc." Surely this state of affairs is dl or carries with it certain responsibilities and is done until he has executed these responsibilit of his ability. If a man is already so busy'that o do his full duty in connection with a new allow himself to be appointed to i t ? No as a right to acdept an office in the hope that some kind 11 do the work for him. 'Tis true, a long string of man's name in Link does look well and the tempbut does it not partake of the nature of fraud lf he office has been performed by someone jdy? his Alma Mater if his work in connection with s anything short of his best? I s he fair to the have not had a chance to show what they can do1l f i e some friends want him to have it, he gobbles up ch, for any reason he cannot properly fill? finally Is o himself in assuming greater responsibilities than he

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has either the time or the ability to fill ? Wouldn't it be better for him to say, No, my hands are full," and thus give the man with. more time at his disposal an opportunity. This stand would in some cases require a considerable sacrifice, but in fairness to himself and in justice to the office it should be made. X. Y, 2. Yours truly,

The Engineering Society.

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At the last regular meeting of the Society held March 24, Mr. Scheel delivered a very interesting talk on ' T h e Telephone and Telephone Practice." He outlined the developement of the receiver and transmitter, and of the central station switchboard and explained, the operation of the various appliances used in telephone work. Mr. Scheel went through the various motion's ' of a complete connection and mentioned some of the difficulties met in the service. Mr. Fendrich supplemented Mr. Scheel's remarks and showed some samples of switchboard apparatus. At the meeting this afternoon, Mr. Lynd will talk on t Foundry Practice." The meeting will be called at 4 o'clock in Prof. Webb's room. The next meeting will be held on April 14, and it will be in. charge of the men of the Junior Closs. Mr. 33. H. Palmer will talk on the " D'Auria Pump," and other Juniors will speak. f

Faculty Notes. Doc. Stillman has been dispossessed from his office and laboratory on the top floor of the west wing of the Institute and the room has now been converted into an up-to-date classroom, seating a hundred. I t is to be officially known as Prof. Knapp's room. I t is light and commodious and has considerable black-board room. Col. Chas. W. Lamed (Professor of Drawing), Lieat.-CoL Chas, P. Echols (Professor of ~athematics)and Capt. I?. W. Coe of the Artillery Corps, all of the faculty of the U. S. Military Academy at West Point have been visiting the Institute to investigate the methods used here in teaching Descriptive Geometry and Technical Graphics.

The J. B. Colt Co. of N. Y, has presented the Institute with a 75-liglit Model N acetylene gas generator and a one-horse power gas engine direct-connected to a piston pump. The outfit will be tested by Messrs. Hausmann, Kaltwasser and Lexow during the thesis term and will afterward be mounted permanently on the second floor of the Carnegie laboratory for the use of the students. T o Mr. Hausmaan is due the credit of having secured

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The second meeting of the Sophomore Engineering Society Wednesday morning March 29. A number of riauers

was 'held

manipulation and tests of the new electric locomotives of the N, Y. C. & H . R. R. R., that were made by the General Electric Company for local traffic. Mr. Brandes then spoke on electrical units and the measurement of electrical power. Mr McBurney gave an interesting talk on some of the oddities and peculiarities of bridge construfction. His paper was very interesting and instructive. Mr. Beyer discussed the construction and manipulation of torpedoes as specified by the United States Government, for use in our navies. 1 Some new types of Acetylene Gas Generators'' was the subject selected by Mr. Matzen. He spoke very instructively on this important industry. The Peter Cooper Hewitt Mercury Vapor Lamp was touched upon by Mr. I,um in a very interesting manner. Mr. Blake presented the last paper on "The East River Tunnel. " He showed many sketches showing the progress of the work at various periods. The men are taking a meat deal of interest in these discussions, and it will no doubt prove to be of future value to them. t

s. w. s.

The Hobohen Concert. The Annual Hoboken 6oncm-t of the "Mnsical Clubs " was held Friday evening, March 31. in the Auditorium, The room was well filled with an appreciative audience who received the following program with approbation :

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ORCHESTRA, GLKBCLUE, M A ~ o I CLUB, , ~ QUARTSTTB, PIANO MONOLOGTO,

lections from " WoodIan Honey, I Want You No

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, 1, ORCHS~TM, 2. G u s ~CLOT. 3. MANDOLINWE,

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Hungarian Dance"

Dont YQU Cry Ma Honey" - - ' Moonlight ' '

- ' Cradle Song " a Mechanical Engineer " 5. GLBBCWB, All the numbers were well rendered, each being applauded heartily by the audience. The encores were well up to the high standard, which the clubs have set for 'themselves this season. The hit of the evening was the Quartette, which responded to three or four encores to both. numbers. After the entertainment dancing was enjoyed in the Carnegie laboratory. The floor was comfortably filled and those dancing said it was one of the most enjoyable evenings. The music was furnished by Mueller and was of the usual high order. Among the many patronesses, several of whom were present were: Mrs. Alexander C. Htimphtcys, Mrs. Chas. I?. Kroeh, Mrs. Thomas 3,Stilhnan, Mrs. Wm. E, Geyer, Mrs. Jas. E. Dentoo, Mrs. Adam Riesenberger, Mrs.' David S. Jacobos, Mrs. Albert F. Ganz, Mrs. Win. H. Bristol, Mrs. F. 1,. Sevenoak, Mrs. Franklin DeR. Furman, Mrs. Wm. J. Moore, Mrs. , Chas. 0. Gunther, Mrs. F. J. Pond, Mrs. Louis A. Martin. 4,

QUARTETTE,

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This and That. DONE YER HEAR ? Can't yer hear the birds a calling When yer on your homeward trip, Dont yer hear the water saying Wont yer come in f e r a dip ? " Dont yer see yer sail boat waiting Per to try her new cut sail, An$ yer little dory's saying Plug around that leaky nail ? ' ' Yer bark canoe is ready Per to take yer on a spin, And yer fishing- tackle's itching Per to pull some suckers in. And yer tent with all its canvas Greets yer from the garret floor, Why yer rifle and yer shot guns I,ook as though they wanted war ! But yer got to come to Stevens, And yer got ter learn in hoofer, f

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C.0TRELL & LEONARD, ALBANY,

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F R E S H M E N AND SOPHOMORES IN MATHEMATICS A N D

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we cater to Stevens Students, Keep Sfevens Nofe Paper and Flags; Athletic Goods h season, Lawn Tends Racquets and Bags ; Laczosse Sticks and Balk the bfficial line, The selection of Easter Cards is fine.

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[The Stute] April 7, 1905 (Issue 11, Volume I)  
[The Stute] April 7, 1905 (Issue 11, Volume I)  
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