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Walpole High School Student and Alumni Musicians

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Chromebooks

Walpole High School commences 1:1 Chromebook Program with Class of 2021 Photo/Caroline Pitman

Freshman Jenna Keaney uses her own Chromebook during study hall to complete some of her homework. “They’re nice because I don’t have to carry textbooks around everywhere,” said Keaney.

By Emily Ball News Editor The Class of 2021 received new chromebooks from Walpole Public Schools at the end of August. This initiative is the first step in Walpole Public School’s 1:1 Chromebook Program. “We could not fund a full nine to twelve roll-out all at once. This is a new project that will be done in at least two phases,” Walpole Public School’s Director of Technology Integration Ann Arpin said. “With enough funding to provide students in just one grade with

a new Chromebook, starting with freshmen, and having them keep them over their four years at the high school would be the best choice to build and sustain a logical and cost-effective roll-out.” Freshmen students received their Chromebooks during orientation on Aug. 29 as long as they submitted $40 and a signed loaned agreement on the first day of school. The Chromebooks were purchased with funds from Walpole High School’s budget. “For the high school’s Phase one of this initiative, last spring Mr. Imbusch collaborated with Depart-

ment Chairs to identify funds from their remaining budgets, and identified other accounts from which he could allocate funds,” Arpin said. The Chromebooks have allowed students to adapt to 21st century technological advances by replacing textbooks. “One positive to having chromebooks is the amount of free space in my bag,” freshman Benjamin Skypeck said. “Textbooks would have taken up a lot of space but the chromebook is my textbook now.” Although only the Class of 2021 has personal Chromebooks right now, the technology staff plans to expand the program to upperclassmen in the upcoming year. “Next year, the plan is to allocate the funding for the next incoming Freshmen Class, and take the existing stock of Chromebooks in carts at the high school and distribute those to juniors and seniors,” Arpin said. Not only do the Chromebooks change the learning environment for students in school, they also offer students, as well as families, another form of technology for outside of the classroom. “A number of parents said that this would relieve the burden at home of sharing their available computers with multiple children and adults in the family,” Arpin said. “Also, the recognition that digital learning and ubiquitous

access to a device will best prepare students for success in high school, as well as for college and careers.” Arpin spearheaded this project with a goal of making learning through technology more accessible for students. “With the growth and use of digital resources, teachers were having difficulty scheduling Chromebooks from the carts into their classrooms,” Arpin said. “It was becoming clear that access to digital resources was no longer something that could reasonably be ‘scheduled.’ Students should have access as needed throughout the day.” The only issue freshmen students have identified with this new program is the fact that they must charge their Chromebooks before coming into school. “The only negative to having chromebooks could be remembering to charge them at home and not being able to use them during class if they are not charged” Freshman Alison Fair said. Although this technological initiative is brand new, it has already allowed Walpole students and staff to take a step towards complete dissemination of educational information online. “Having access to digital resources 24/7 enables students to collaborate, communicate, create and publish their work in a 21st century learning environment,” Arpin said.

Community organizes drives for hurricane victims

Courtney Nottebart and students help those affected by recent record holding storms in Texas and Puerto Rico By Dana DeMartino Staff Writer Walpole High School students are holding donation drives to help hurricane victims in Puerto Rico and Texas. Special educator Courtney Nottebart placed donation bins for Puerto Rican victims in the main lobby and in front of her classroom, room 1136. To support Houston families, senior Ellen Irmiter placed a bin for diapers in the main lobby. Irmiter will package and send diapers to Texas throughout October. “There are so many parents who have been displaced and have nothing, but they have young children who really need diapers. I was particularly motivated by a story of a woman who drowned, but her child survived by clinging to her,” Irmiter said. Nottebart will send the first donation package to the organization United for Puerto Rico on Oct. 7. Donatable items include toiletries, hygiene products, cleaning supplies, toothbrushes/ toothpaste, towels, diapers, wipes, pet food, canned food and water.

“My best friend has family in Puerto Rico and seeing his desperation at not being able to do much was really upsetting,” Nottebart said. “He works for the Boston Fire Department and mentioned that supplies were much needed and that he would be organizing a drive to ship them down to the island. After talking with Carlos, we decided that we could try and do something here at Walpole since a number of students have family who are impacted.” Senior Carlos Vega and junior Ernesto Maldonado planned the donation drive Nottebart to assist Hurricane Maria victims. Vega and Maldonado’s grandparents live in different areas of Puerto Rico and the students wanted to help their families on the island. “I traveled there to visit my family in the summer of 2016,” said Vega. “The island is beautiful and special to me, and I wanted to do something to help the people and my family still there.” Walpole students and faculty publicized the aid efforts by word of mouth. Nottebart also reached out to nurse Rachel Jackson and started

Photo/ Dana DeMartino

Senior Carlos Vega and junior Ernesto Maldonado collect items with Courtney Nottebart for their donation drive. “It’s been pretty amazing to see the response of the high school and Walpole community,” Nottebart said.

to spread the word on social media. “It’s been pretty amazing to see the response of the high school and Walpole community,” Nottebart said. Students who wish to help with the diaper drive can donate diapers, reach out to National Honor Society members, or email Irmiter at irmitere18@wpsma. org for specific directions. Students

who wish to help with Nottebart’s drive can place donation items into either of the bins, or speak to her in room 1136. “No amount of goodness is too small,” said Nottebart. “I want my students to know they can always help each other in times of need. We have to be in this life together, I think there is a lot of value in learning that.”

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October 2017


News

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October 2017

Faculty encouraged to ask students for preferred pronouns Gay Straight Alliance Advisor proposes new ways to be more inclusive of students By Caitlin Kahaly Staff Writer On the first day of the school year, teachers typically choose to get to know their students through classic name-sharing games such as human bingo and icebreaker activities. In addition to these first day traditions, several Walpole High School teachers gave students the opportunity to share their preferred pronouns to be more inclusive of the entire student body. Teachers collected this information from students in class through either an online survey, written on an index card or shared out loud, depending on each teacher’s preference. Last year, Principal Stephen Imbusch attended one of the Gay Straight Alliance meetings to make the students feel more accepted. “Within public schools, the laws are very clear that we have to be very inclusive of everybody, and I wouldn’t want it to be any differ-

ent,” Imbusch said. “I wanted to show support by going to the club. I was pleasantly surprised at how relaxed everybody was with my presence there.” Before the start of the 2017-2018 school year, Walpole High School Gay Straight Alliance Advisor Ashley Prickel spoke to faculty regarding inclusivity. She reminded teachers that they can implement this first day activity as a way to make all of their students feel comfortable in the classroom. “Asking the students was not mandatory, completely by choice. The whole thing was an invitation to embrace change and embrace our students,” Prickel said. The group who supported this

change included several Gay Straight Alliance members at the high school. The GSA is a club not just for LGBTQ students, but for students who want to support their peers and help create a welcoming environment for all. “Being asked was really nice and refreshing to see more awareness in my classes. S o m e k i d s m a d e f u n Graphic/ Danielle Borelli of it; you could see it made them uncomfortable, but this was very important to do,” sophomore GSA member Emily Tomasetti said. Last spring, a speaker from the

Safe Schools program spoke to all faculty regarding the inclusivity of LGBTQ, which initiated the discussion of pronoun sharing. The Safe Schools program is a special commision for LGBTQ students and is run by the Massachusetts Department of Education. After the Walpole High faculty attended this presentation, Prickel began brainstorming different ways to include students who may not choose to identify with their biological gender. “Teachers are just like the kids: it’s new and it’s different, and they are open to change, but you have to let people change how they want to and feel like they can,” Prickel said. As a result of the Safe Schools meeting, teachers gained more knowledge regarding the importance of inclusivity in the classroom. “It was very educational for us because we may have students who use these pronouns,” math teacher Zach Okolowitcz said. “It will make them feel more welcomed overall.”

Pulitzer Prize winner talks to Walpole High students

Tracy K. Smith holds a video call with students from the Creative Writing Club By Jess Ferguson Assistant News Editor

The 2011 Pulitzer Prize winning poet and author, Tracy K. Smith, video chatted with Walpole High School’s Creative Writing Club on Sept. 7. During the conversation, she read poems from her upcoming book Wade in the Water, shared personal anecdotes and answered students’ and teachers’ questions. Wade in the Water comes out next April and focuses on various topics including history, compassion, strangers, eternity and the experiences people can gain by just looking up. Some of these poems were inspired by a research trip to Georgia, where she became influenced by African culture. Smith also took inspiration from different people’s rituals and history from her trip to China, “I first got inspired [to write] when I was very young. I read some poems in school, and I liked what they did to my ear and the way they taught me new things about the world and new ways to understand the familiar feelings that I had,” Smith said. Over time, poetry permeated itself into other aspects of Smith’s life, such as worldly views and interests. “As I got older, I found myself reading poems but also living with those lines in my head. I found myself looking at how a poet would describe something, and then suddenly my view of the world was permanently changed. I wanted to record and make better sense of the things that I saw and felt and experienced.” Junior Katie Hurwitz organized this video through her involvement with Girl Scouts. She is currently a Girl Scout Ambassador working towards her Gold Award. “I'm working on my Gold Award project for Girl Scouts, which means it has to be 80-100 hours of a take-action project that impacts the community, is sustainable and about something I'm passionate about,” Hurwitz said. “I wanted to have it be community writ-

Photo/ Catherine Hurwitz

Photo/ Catherine Hurwitz

“As I got older, I found myself reading poems but also living with those lines in my head,” Smith said.

ing, so I organized Tracy K. Smith to speak for the Creative Writing Club as a way for an experienced writer to spread information about what she loves to aspiring writers.” For Hurwitz, the video chat was both educational and inspirational: several students including herself were able to gain some knowl-

edge and insight about writing. “I think it was a successful turnout; we had twelve students and three teachers, and some students asked questions and received meaningful answers from Tracy Smith,” Hurwitz said. “I learned the value of being passionate about writing, following your dreams and taking

risks, and you will receive what you ask for.” This conversation appeared to be an informative experience for both teachers and students alike. Peter Salmans, head of the Creative Writing Club, assisted Hurwitz in organizing this event. “I thought it was a really engaging conversation and reading, and it was a great reminder of the purpose that poetry and fiction can serve in our lives, and the fact that it can help us empathize with people who have different perspectives and different experiences,” Salmans said. “It was also just inspirational; she's a really engaging speaker, and she's so excited and enthusiastic about what she does, and I think that excitement is contagious.”

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Editors-in-Chief Tara Gordon Lillian Hunter Lindsey Sullivan Social Media Director Julia Kane Business Manager Breanna Andreassi News Editor Emily Ball Assistant News Editor Jessica Ferguson Editorial Editor Molly O’Connell Entertainment Editor Catherine Hurwitz

Lifestyle Editor Grace Donovan Layout Editor Samantha Simons Lead Reporter Hope Jordan Photo Editors Ciara Healy Caroline Pitman Graphic Editor Danielle Borelli Staff Writers Giovanna Anello Megan Brigham Aidan Chariton Eva Clarke

Brianna Deasy Dana DeMartino Gabriella Donahue Caitlin Kahaly Ashley Kuropatkin Peter Lynch Allison Millette Brendan Moser Olivia O’Connell Bridget O’ Connor John O’Meara Kelly O’Meara Chloe Patel Deepika Pokala Alexis Rodia Callie Ross Jared Schmitt

Charlotte Schoenthaler Emily Smith Sarah St. George Rachel Stanton Sydney Weinacht Interested in placing an advertisement in our next edition? Contact Business Manager Breanna Andreassi at andreassib18@ wpsma.org


October 2017

EDITORIALS

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CPR training should be mandated at WHS

It’s never too late to introduce With the new 4-year gym requirement, CPR should be yourself worked into the physical education and health curriculum By Lindsey Sullivan Editor-In-Chief

Four years of English, three years of math, two non-core electives—in order to graduate from Walpole High School, each student must fulfill these and other academic requirements. However, Walpole High does not mandate students to learn a skill that equips individuals with the ability to save lives: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, commonly referred to as CPR. According to the American Heart Association, more than 326,000 people will have an unexpected episode of cardiac arrest during daily life each year—and nine out of ten will not survive. However, the chance of survival doubles (or even triples) if a passerby performs CPR. If every high school student graduated with the knowledge of how to correctly perform CPR, these annual statistics would look quite different. “Required CPR and AED training for all students would dramatically increase the number of first responders in the school and community,” Ankoor Shah, a member on the D.C. board for the American Academy of Pediatrics, said. “Thousands and thousands of citizens will be armed with how to save a life.” As it stands today, 33 states have laws requiring CPR training as a graduation requirement, and three states have introduced a bill to work towards similar prerequisites. Massachusetts, however,

does not fall among these states. In 2014, rather than passing the bill that would require training for students, the Massachusetts legislature opted to correct the original proposal by only requiring CPR training for coaches. Although an important safety measure, the correction attempted to end discussion in the state over CPR in schools. In Walpole High School, adding CPR training and certification to our current gym and health program

of time to incorporate CPR training. As for the training itself, acquiring materials is simple and fairly inexpensive. The American Heart Association sells a comprehensive CPR training kit that trains up to 20 students at a time for $649. With a typical gym class hosting around 30 students, two kits would suffice and provide extra materials in case of lost or damaged items. The cost of the kit should not be seen as another fruitless expense, yet an investment in creating both a safer community and world. Furthermore, in order to fund the CPR program, the school could apply for a grant through the Will Committee to cover the cost. Through the Will Commitee, teachers can apply to the John Ahern Memorial Fund Grant for financial assistance to further their curriculum. The implementation of CPR training would fulfill the guidelines for this grant as a “creative unit of study or experimental project.” Finally, all of our gym teachers are CPR certified, but would have to take courses to instruct training. The American Red Cross, the American Heart Association and the National Safety Council all offer courses that are not time-consuming and can be taken online. Walpole High School has begun a renewed commitment lli e r o to health education with the new gym le B aniel D / c requirement. With this, Walpole High hi Grap would not School has the ability to set an exb e an impossible task. Now that ample for the rest of Massachusetts— Walpole High School is implement- a state that falls behind the rest of the ing a new four-year gym requirement, country in terms of mandatory CPR beginning with this year’s freshman, training. 70% of Americans do not the new curriculum presents plenty know CPR. Let’s change that statistic.

Removal of “in the presence” rule is a step in the right direction

Walpole’s School Committee’s new Chemical Health Policy is a change for the better By Molly O’Connell Editorial Editor

The Walpole School Committee held a public meeting on Aug. 31 to decide the fate of Walpole High’s School Chemical Health Policy. The recent removal of the “in the presence” phrase indicates that the committee’s primary concern appropriately is student safety, not unfair consequences. As defined in the Walpole High School handbook, a chemical health violation is explained that “possession means being ‘in the presence of’ and shall include being or remaining at a site, or in a building, residence, or vehicle in which a controlled substance or alcohol is being used, consumed, or possessed.” Previously mentioned in an article entitled “Walpole High’s strict chemical health policy could be the cause of high violations” by Wicked Local Walpole in 2015, “more than 50 student-athletes were found to be in violation of the Walpole High School Chemical Health Policy [in 2014-2015].” These raw numbers sound alarming, “especially when a number of fellow Bay State Conference schools were in the single digits.” Because of Walpole’s more stringent policy, “it’s likely for a school that uses

a stricter version of the rule to have more violators than a school that chooses to use the MIAA version, resulting in an apples-to-oranges comparison.” Therefore, this current alteration is a step in the right direction, especially for the students who were simply in the presence of, but not consuming, alcohol, yet were forced to deal with the same consequences—such as sitting out of sports and/or extracurriculars—as those who were actually consuming it. These consequences should not have been applicable to people affected by guilt by association if they were not taking part in illegal behavior and were staying sober. The new Chemical Health Policy states that “students shall not, regardless of quantity, use or consume, possess or buy/sell or give away” any controlled substance or alcohol. This change will truly benefit students, as they can now follow the MIAA guidelines, and they are not held to a stricter standard than other towns. The zero-tolerance policy hindered students from attending practically any large social event. Finding students at a party will not be enough to punish them anymore, for the new policy is indicative of student safety being preeminent, and it does not

aim to simply get students in trouble. Moreover, the policy now provides student safety to the entire student body, as they hopefully feel comfortable to call for a ride home from friends or family. Previously, students who were asked to help their friend or family member under the legal drinking age were faced with two options: having to tell their friend no or being pressured to drive there and possibly face the “in the presence of” consequences. In the case that they do tell their friend no, the potential drivers are somewhat responsible if their friend takes part in dangerous activities, such as driving themselves and others while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Preventing drunk driving—which is created through endless commercials, advertisements and seminars— is now appropriately being supported by the school community. The Chemical Health Policy should be more strictly enforced now, and hopefully it will set a harsher precedent that the use of drugs and alcohol will not be permitted among the students. However, things are looking up for Walpole High School students, as students can now feel ensured that they are appropriately cared for when faced in treacherous situations.

Lillie Hunter’s Kindergarten school photo.

By Lillie Hunter Editor-In- Chief In kindergarten, I knew everything about everyone—and by everyone I mean my entire class, and by everything I mean what snacks were in their cupboard (preferably Welch’s Fruit Snacks and Sunny-D). First grade came as a shock because the 15 kids from kindergarten were dispersed, and new people were now sitting next to me. I realized there were other classes with other students and other teachers at Old Post Road and I was only one of about 80 kids in my grade. Over the five years, although I knew all eighty names and faces of my grade, I mostly formed friend groups based on how one wore their Uggs (folded was clearly cooler). In middle school, my world changed again: in addition to my Ugg friends, we now worshipped Aeropostale and One Direction. The friends group message contained more important text than my history book as being informed about my classmates was essential. Learning second hand information about people became more common than getting to know someone through actual face to face interactions. As Boyden combined with Old Post Road at Bird Middle, there were more people to meet, befriend or talk about. I chose my friends based on who I sat with during French and who I hit with during tennis practice as they were the people who I spent my time with. It was nice to find people with similar interests as me, but the shmorgishborg of kids with all different interests in one class ended in middle school. Now into my senior year of high school, I am still friends with the people I found through these commonalities and we have more to talk about than other people. I participate in French Club, Art Club and Journalism; a wide range of clubs and activities with a wide range of people in these clubs. However, every day in the hallway I see someone that I swear is new; it shocks me that I could have gone to school with these people for at least three years and I am only noticing them now. The people I grew up with for the past 13 years, although they might be a familiar face, I know nothing more than what elementary school they went to. How have I become so stuck in interacting with the same people everyday? How have I become so comfortable with only really knowing such a small part of the school population? So this year, my last year, I will make it my mission to meet new people or reacquaint myself with those I last said “hi” to in kindergarten. This is my last chance to take all I can from the people that I have not met yet and to create new bonds with people that have managed to escape my friendship. Because really, it’s never too late to introduce yourself. So hi, I’m Lillie, and I can’t wait to meet you whether it be for the first or fiftieth time. The pleasure is all mine (especially if you have Welch’s or SunnyD in your cupboards).


The Rebellion

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October 2017

WALPOLE HIGH SCHOOL OF ROCK: Photo/ Rocco Frattasio

Rocco Frattasio Class of 2015 By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor Being passionate about music comes naturally to 2015 WHS graduate Rocco Frattasio. As a kid, his Uncle John taught him his first guitar riff of “Smoke on the Water.” He would write down original lyrics during the school day and his Uncle Fin bought him his first guitar— a black Mexican Fender Strat. Frattasio was a Renaissance child, in love with sports and all

different forms of art. However, as he grew older, his priorities narrowed down to music, as his singing and writing began to feel like his life’s calling. Observing musicians such as John Mayer, Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Bob Dylan and Jim Croce created a longing for him to become at the same level of his favorite artists. “I was simply chiseling away at myself, much like a sculptor does with a big piece of marble. I was a giant insecure piece of marble with no shape or defini-

Photo/Halle Losordo

Photo/ Halle Losordo

Halle Losordo Class of 2019

Halle Losordo Class of 2019

By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor Halle Losordo, a junior at Walpole High School, started loving music at a young age. With influences such as Amy Winehouse and Sam Cooke, Losordo admires the powerhouse and soulful singers. Ever since elementary school, she enjoyed going to music class and singing whenever she had the chance. In the sixth grade, Losordo sang in her first recital, and learned that she loves performing. “[It] was definitely a standout moment since when I was younger I would be really shy and refused to sing in front of anyone, so during my recital it was the first time anyone in my family

tion,” Frattasio said. “I think everyone goes through that in their own way, you have to. Nobody is born ready-made.” Aside from being influenced by musicians, Frattasio’s art is impacted by writers like Dylan Thomas, Charles Bukowski and S.E. Hinton, along with films such as The Loser, The Delicate Delinquent and The Apartment. “My music puts a heavy importance on feel and lyrics. The feel is spacious, atmospheric, mellow, and bluesy. The lyrics tend to be philosophical in an existential sense, but can also be very simple and used to compliment the feel,” Frattasio said. “I am a firm believer that sadness is the key to happiness and authenticity, and sadness plays a big role in my music.” Frattasio’s music can be found on his album “Life, And Other Dreams,” which is on Spotify and YouTube. Two more albums are in the works, including “Love Is For Real People,” which will be released in October. He regularly performs at an outdoor bar called “The Slab” in Estes Park, Colorado; he hopes to fly back to Walpole for an event and explore the states for more opportunities. “Fight for yourself. Fight for that inner feeling and voice that’s telling you it wants something more than the usual,” Frattasio said. “Fight for it, because no one else will. By far the most important thing: Dream.”

had heard me sing,” Losordo said. Today, she participates in the high school musical productions, but most of her experience singing is out of school. In sixth grade, Losordo began taking lessons with Joanna Gaughan, but currently is instructed by Richard Travers in Westwood. “Singing lessons over the years have taught me how to control [my] voice through breathing techniques, and the placement of my voice,” Losordo said. “The most important thing my teacher told me was probably the time he said to make my voice my own, basically meaning to be different than everyone else because nobody wants to hear something they’ve al-

ready heard from another person.” Losordo has learned how to become a musician by recording music in a studio. Her music can be found on YouTube and at different local events. Her channel has two videos: a cover of Adele’s “All I Ask” and her rendition of James Arthur’s “Say You Won’t Let Go.” When looking into her plans for the future, Losordo will consider either a career in music or film. Her dad is her number-one fan, so she knows that she will have support with going into art. “One thing that I have learned is to never let the fear of putting yourself out there get to you and just be confident because you’ll get good results in the end instead of holding yourself back,” Losordo said.

Photo/ Griffin Wilkins

Griffin Wilkins Class of 2019

By Tara Gordon Editor-In-Chief A typical Walpole High school musician may be required to stay after school one day each week for Orchestra or Jazz Choir; however, for Griffin Wilkins, he is singing and dancing from 3:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. practically every day. Walpole High School junior Griffin Wilkins spends six days a week at the Franklin School For the Performing Arts (FSPA) in Franklin, Massachusetts, where he is constantly practicing and performing with other local musicians. Wilkins is not in the average performing group; in fact, he has actually spent summers in Europe, singing in front of audiences around the world. “I think a standout moment in my musical career was of course touring Europe and performing in front of foreign crowds,” Wilkins said. By Tara Gordon Editor-in-Chief For Walpole High alumni Noah Millette and Zach Ganshirt, music has always been a large aspect of their everyday life. Now, music plays an even bigger role in their life, as they are two out of three members in Transitions, an alternative band that consists of Millette, Ganshirt, and friend Haley Senft. “Music isn’t just a hobby or enjoyment for me, it’s a way to heal and express myself. I find playing and listening to music very therapeutic and I’ve always used it to sort through my emotions as long as I can remember,”said Millette. Millette, WHS class of 2015, first began writing music in his early teenage years. In 2015, he joined his first band and began recording and releasing original music. Meanwhile, Ganshirt was part of a small band when he was only 13, but he credits his first legitimate experience in music to a band called Do No Harm, which he joined when he was 18. Transitions’ music culminates the musical tastes and styles of all three members. “Paramore is definitely one of my biggest influences on whole. They’re one of the first bands I got into and I still love them. Balance and Composure, PVRIS and A Loss For Words have definitely been very big influences for me,”said Millette. “My musical taste is pretty

“Another highlight would be performing and taking master classes in Disney World in Downtown Disney, where we do a medley of songs under a certain theme.” Wilkins is continuing to expand his musical career, hoping to join new regional performing troupes. “I actually recently auditioned again for the European touring group, Electric Youth, which has shows throughout the year. Also, I am in the musical Spamalot at the Franklin Performing Arts Company, as well as the the Nutcracker in December with the same company,” said Wilkins. When preparing for a performance, Wilkins is practicing at FSPA. “For music, I take voice classes for two days a week and a lot of the time I have a rehearsal for a show at night,” said Wilkins. When Wilkins is not performing around Europe, he has also been involved in variPhoto/ Transitions

ous activities in Walpole High. “I was in pep band and band class for two years, as well as marching band for a year, so that really helped me learn rhythm and tempo and a good amount of technical work in music, which I am so thankful for,” said Wilkins. “Also, being in film really helped me with my acting skills which help in musicals.” In his music career thus far, Wilkins has enjoyed all his performances and learning experiences. “My favorite part of the musical experience has been meeting all the amazing people that are within the musical community. There is something different about them,” said Wilkins. “Everyone I meet in this industry is either so friendly or has an amazing story or has something so incredible to say. And I get to call some of them my best friends, which is amazing.”

Current and former Walpole students transform musical hobbies into potential professions

By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor Caleb Cofsky, a 2013 Walpole High School graduate, has a musical style influenced by The Beatles, The Grateful Dead, The Who, and Neil Young. His first big step in his musical journey was playing in downtown Walpole. “It gives you confidence when you can entertain a crowd of people, the confidence necessary to keep pursuing music,” Cofsky said. Currently, he has a YouTube channel focused on acoustic music. He has videos of covers, as well as original songs. His most popular video is a cover of Gregg Allman’s “Come and Go Blues.” Cofsky is currently releasing YouTube videos weekly. Additionally, he released a 13-track album and a few singles and is working on a second album. He will play in the city of Colorado Springs in the fall. His personal style in his band Tommy The Animal is called Tommy Rock, which is his unique take on a mix between the styles of himself and his influences. “Any time I have trouble writing a new song, I think ‘what would John Lennon do in this situation? And it usually helps me,” Cofsky said. Cofsky feels that with the more practice he has writing songs and playing shows, he is always improving as an artist.

Caleb Cofsky Class of 2013

The moment Cofsky knew that he wanted to be a musician was when watching “The Kids are Alright,” a documentary on The Who. He especially looked up to the rhythm guitarist, Pete Townshend, for his captivating stage presence and songwriting ability. From a young age, Cofsky obtained a passion for the classics from his supportive parents, who he sees as rock stars. His dad would play cassette tapes of his favorite artists, and his mom enjoyed the Talking Heads and Billy Joel.

Noah Millette Class of 2015 Zach Ganshirt Class of 2015

tions, the band is hoping to release more music and continue to play together as a band. “We have a show in October and we’re hoping to release a music video and some more music by the end of this year,” said Millette. As aspiring musicians, both Millette and Ganshirt support all growing musicians. “Do your own thing. Don’t be anyone but yourself,” said Ganshirt. “Music is all about self expression, and the more genuine you are, the better your music will be. Also, be as diverse as possible with the music you listen to. There’s so much out there!”

Photo/ Caleb Cofsky

In addition to having multiple ideas for new music, he has an innate ability to write songs. He values the friendship that comes along with playing music. One of his fondest memories is when he and his band rode bicycles around the stage during a two minute drum solo in one of his outdoor shows. “[My parents] listened to so much music that I actually turned into a guitar,” Cofsky said. “They had to bring me to the hospital to get me back into human form.” Photo/ Claire Sully

Claire Sullivan Class of 2018

By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor eclectic. The band I’m in now doesn’t necessarily reflect what I listen to, but it makes things more interesting,”said Ganshirt. I mainly listen to genres within the metal and hardcore sound, but I’m also into emo, punk, post-hardcore, pop, and old school rap.” So far, Transitions has released their first EP, p.u.p., and have played several shows around the area. “Recording our EP was the most pivotal moment for us in our career and as people, we learned so much and made so many incredible memories and friends during that week,” said Millette. For the future of Transi-

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The Rebellion

Senior Claire Sullivan has dreamed of being a music star ever since she began to sing. She moved from Vermont, Italy to a small town in the United States, and observed the amount of success that other singers—Miley Cyrus, Dolly Parton, and Britney Spears—had from small towns. At her first show in Burlington, Vermont at the age of 13, Sullivan was exposed to the world of performing. Recently, she had a show at Adam’s Farm, and she will be in many performances in October, including having a lot at the Boston Arts Festival on Oct. 9th. Sullivan has been approached by different labels to sign, but she

declined the offers in order to continue her high school experience. In the meantime, she develops her artistry at Bristol Studios in Boston, and she has trained with a producer who worked with Lady Gaga, Rihanna, and Justin Bieber. She also participates in Walpole High School music, like the choir, drama club, the musical, and piano lab. Practicing one to four hours a day every day each week is part of her routine that focuses on perfecting her skills. She has worked with people to write original songs, but has focused mostly on covers. Being a musician is innate in the Sullivan family: her mother is a pianist and singer, and her father’s side of the family is very musical. Her family, especially her sis-

ter Ana, is her biggest supporter throughout her musical endeavor. Her musical style is a mix between an individual take and the features of her idols. “It’s pop and a flare of country,” Sullivan said. In her future, Sullivan dreams of moving to Los Angeles, California or Nashville, Tennessee. She has reached out to labels, artists, and music producers in Los Angeles to get a head start. Sullivan’s steps to her career are not partial to herself: she loves to see others pursuing a career in art like her. “Never give up. I always say life’s a climb,” Sullivan said. “It’s all about those steps: the littlest steps that will take you to where you want to be.”


The Rebellion

Page 4

October 2017

WALPOLE HIGH SCHOOL OF ROCK: Photo/ Rocco Frattasio

Rocco Frattasio Class of 2015 By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor Being passionate about music comes naturally to 2015 WHS graduate Rocco Frattasio. As a kid, his Uncle John taught him his first guitar riff of “Smoke on the Water.” He would write down original lyrics during the school day and his Uncle Fin bought him his first guitar— a black Mexican Fender Strat. Frattasio was a Renaissance child, in love with sports and all

different forms of art. However, as he grew older, his priorities narrowed down to music, as his singing and writing began to feel like his life’s calling. Observing musicians such as John Mayer, Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Bob Dylan and Jim Croce created a longing for him to become at the same level of his favorite artists. “I was simply chiseling away at myself, much like a sculptor does with a big piece of marble. I was a giant insecure piece of marble with no shape or defini-

Photo/Halle Losordo

Photo/ Halle Losordo

Halle Losordo Class of 2019

Halle Losordo Class of 2019

By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor Halle Losordo, a junior at Walpole High School, started loving music at a young age. With influences such as Amy Winehouse and Sam Cooke, Losordo admires the powerhouse and soulful singers. Ever since elementary school, she enjoyed going to music class and singing whenever she had the chance. In the sixth grade, Losordo sang in her first recital, and learned that she loves performing. “[It] was definitely a standout moment since when I was younger I would be really shy and refused to sing in front of anyone, so during my recital it was the first time anyone in my family

tion,” Frattasio said. “I think everyone goes through that in their own way, you have to. Nobody is born ready-made.” Aside from being influenced by musicians, Frattasio’s art is impacted by writers like Dylan Thomas, Charles Bukowski and S.E. Hinton, along with films such as The Loser, The Delicate Delinquent and The Apartment. “My music puts a heavy importance on feel and lyrics. The feel is spacious, atmospheric, mellow, and bluesy. The lyrics tend to be philosophical in an existential sense, but can also be very simple and used to compliment the feel,” Frattasio said. “I am a firm believer that sadness is the key to happiness and authenticity, and sadness plays a big role in my music.” Frattasio’s music can be found on his album “Life, And Other Dreams,” which is on Spotify and YouTube. Two more albums are in the works, including “Love Is For Real People,” which will be released in October. He regularly performs at an outdoor bar called “The Slab” in Estes Park, Colorado; he hopes to fly back to Walpole for an event and explore the states for more opportunities. “Fight for yourself. Fight for that inner feeling and voice that’s telling you it wants something more than the usual,” Frattasio said. “Fight for it, because no one else will. By far the most important thing: Dream.”

had heard me sing,” Losordo said. Today, she participates in the high school musical productions, but most of her experience singing is out of school. In sixth grade, Losordo began taking lessons with Joanna Gaughan, but currently is instructed by Richard Travers in Westwood. “Singing lessons over the years have taught me how to control [my] voice through breathing techniques, and the placement of my voice,” Losordo said. “The most important thing my teacher told me was probably the time he said to make my voice my own, basically meaning to be different than everyone else because nobody wants to hear something they’ve al-

ready heard from another person.” Losordo has learned how to become a musician by recording music in a studio. Her music can be found on YouTube and at different local events. Her channel has two videos: a cover of Adele’s “All I Ask” and her rendition of James Arthur’s “Say You Won’t Let Go.” When looking into her plans for the future, Losordo will consider either a career in music or film. Her dad is her number-one fan, so she knows that she will have support with going into art. “One thing that I have learned is to never let the fear of putting yourself out there get to you and just be confident because you’ll get good results in the end instead of holding yourself back,” Losordo said.

Photo/ Griffin Wilkins

Griffin Wilkins Class of 2019

By Tara Gordon Editor-In-Chief A typical Walpole High school musician may be required to stay after school one day each week for Orchestra or Jazz Choir; however, for Griffin Wilkins, he is singing and dancing from 3:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. practically every day. Walpole High School junior Griffin Wilkins spends six days a week at the Franklin School For the Performing Arts (FSPA) in Franklin, Massachusetts, where he is constantly practicing and performing with other local musicians. Wilkins is not in the average performing group; in fact, he has actually spent summers in Europe, singing in front of audiences around the world. “I think a standout moment in my musical career was of course touring Europe and performing in front of foreign crowds,” Wilkins said. By Tara Gordon Editor-in-Chief For Walpole High alumni Noah Millette and Zach Ganshirt, music has always been a large aspect of their everyday life. Now, music plays an even bigger role in their life, as they are two out of three members in Transitions, an alternative band that consists of Millette, Ganshirt, and friend Haley Senft. “Music isn’t just a hobby or enjoyment for me, it’s a way to heal and express myself. I find playing and listening to music very therapeutic and I’ve always used it to sort through my emotions as long as I can remember,”said Millette. Millette, WHS class of 2015, first began writing music in his early teenage years. In 2015, he joined his first band and began recording and releasing original music. Meanwhile, Ganshirt was part of a small band when he was only 13, but he credits his first legitimate experience in music to a band called Do No Harm, which he joined when he was 18. Transitions’ music culminates the musical tastes and styles of all three members. “Paramore is definitely one of my biggest influences on whole. They’re one of the first bands I got into and I still love them. Balance and Composure, PVRIS and A Loss For Words have definitely been very big influences for me,”said Millette. “My musical taste is pretty

“Another highlight would be performing and taking master classes in Disney World in Downtown Disney, where we do a medley of songs under a certain theme.” Wilkins is continuing to expand his musical career, hoping to join new regional performing troupes. “I actually recently auditioned again for the European touring group, Electric Youth, which has shows throughout the year. Also, I am in the musical Spamalot at the Franklin Performing Arts Company, as well as the the Nutcracker in December with the same company,” said Wilkins. When preparing for a performance, Wilkins is practicing at FSPA. “For music, I take voice classes for two days a week and a lot of the time I have a rehearsal for a show at night,” said Wilkins. When Wilkins is not performing around Europe, he has also been involved in variPhoto/ Transitions

ous activities in Walpole High. “I was in pep band and band class for two years, as well as marching band for a year, so that really helped me learn rhythm and tempo and a good amount of technical work in music, which I am so thankful for,” said Wilkins. “Also, being in film really helped me with my acting skills which help in musicals.” In his music career thus far, Wilkins has enjoyed all his performances and learning experiences. “My favorite part of the musical experience has been meeting all the amazing people that are within the musical community. There is something different about them,” said Wilkins. “Everyone I meet in this industry is either so friendly or has an amazing story or has something so incredible to say. And I get to call some of them my best friends, which is amazing.”

Current and former Walpole students transform musical hobbies into potential professions

By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor Caleb Cofsky, a 2013 Walpole High School graduate, has a musical style influenced by The Beatles, The Grateful Dead, The Who, and Neil Young. His first big step in his musical journey was playing in downtown Walpole. “It gives you confidence when you can entertain a crowd of people, the confidence necessary to keep pursuing music,” Cofsky said. Currently, he has a YouTube channel focused on acoustic music. He has videos of covers, as well as original songs. His most popular video is a cover of Gregg Allman’s “Come and Go Blues.” Cofsky is currently releasing YouTube videos weekly. Additionally, he released a 13-track album and a few singles and is working on a second album. He will play in the city of Colorado Springs in the fall. His personal style in his band Tommy The Animal is called Tommy Rock, which is his unique take on a mix between the styles of himself and his influences. “Any time I have trouble writing a new song, I think ‘what would John Lennon do in this situation? And it usually helps me,” Cofsky said. Cofsky feels that with the more practice he has writing songs and playing shows, he is always improving as an artist.

Caleb Cofsky Class of 2013

The moment Cofsky knew that he wanted to be a musician was when watching “The Kids are Alright,” a documentary on The Who. He especially looked up to the rhythm guitarist, Pete Townshend, for his captivating stage presence and songwriting ability. From a young age, Cofsky obtained a passion for the classics from his supportive parents, who he sees as rock stars. His dad would play cassette tapes of his favorite artists, and his mom enjoyed the Talking Heads and Billy Joel.

Noah Millette Class of 2015 Zach Ganshirt Class of 2015

tions, the band is hoping to release more music and continue to play together as a band. “We have a show in October and we’re hoping to release a music video and some more music by the end of this year,” said Millette. As aspiring musicians, both Millette and Ganshirt support all growing musicians. “Do your own thing. Don’t be anyone but yourself,” said Ganshirt. “Music is all about self expression, and the more genuine you are, the better your music will be. Also, be as diverse as possible with the music you listen to. There’s so much out there!”

Photo/ Caleb Cofsky

In addition to having multiple ideas for new music, he has an innate ability to write songs. He values the friendship that comes along with playing music. One of his fondest memories is when he and his band rode bicycles around the stage during a two minute drum solo in one of his outdoor shows. “[My parents] listened to so much music that I actually turned into a guitar,” Cofsky said. “They had to bring me to the hospital to get me back into human form.” Photo/ Claire Sully

Claire Sullivan Class of 2018

By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor eclectic. The band I’m in now doesn’t necessarily reflect what I listen to, but it makes things more interesting,”said Ganshirt. I mainly listen to genres within the metal and hardcore sound, but I’m also into emo, punk, post-hardcore, pop, and old school rap.” So far, Transitions has released their first EP, p.u.p., and have played several shows around the area. “Recording our EP was the most pivotal moment for us in our career and as people, we learned so much and made so many incredible memories and friends during that week,” said Millette. For the future of Transi-

Page 5

The Rebellion

Senior Claire Sullivan has dreamed of being a music star ever since she began to sing. She moved from Vermont, Italy to a small town in the United States, and observed the amount of success that other singers—Miley Cyrus, Dolly Parton, and Britney Spears—had from small towns. At her first show in Burlington, Vermont at the age of 13, Sullivan was exposed to the world of performing. Recently, she had a show at Adam’s Farm, and she will be in many performances in October, including having a lot at the Boston Arts Festival on Oct. 9th. Sullivan has been approached by different labels to sign, but she

declined the offers in order to continue her high school experience. In the meantime, she develops her artistry at Bristol Studios in Boston, and she has trained with a producer who worked with Lady Gaga, Rihanna, and Justin Bieber. She also participates in Walpole High School music, like the choir, drama club, the musical, and piano lab. Practicing one to four hours a day every day each week is part of her routine that focuses on perfecting her skills. She has worked with people to write original songs, but has focused mostly on covers. Being a musician is innate in the Sullivan family: her mother is a pianist and singer, and her father’s side of the family is very musical. Her family, especially her sis-

ter Ana, is her biggest supporter throughout her musical endeavor. Her musical style is a mix between an individual take and the features of her idols. “It’s pop and a flare of country,” Sullivan said. In her future, Sullivan dreams of moving to Los Angeles, California or Nashville, Tennessee. She has reached out to labels, artists, and music producers in Los Angeles to get a head start. Sullivan’s steps to her career are not partial to herself: she loves to see others pursuing a career in art like her. “Never give up. I always say life’s a climb,” Sullivan said. “It’s all about those steps: the littlest steps that will take you to where you want to be.”


A&E

Page 6

October 2017

Lesser-known alternative artists to add to your playlist

Passionate and creative singer-songwriters found online Photo/ Elevator Mag

By Catherine Hurwitz Enterainment Editor

Photo/ YouTube

Photo/ Musixmatch

Photo/ MetroLyrics

Daniela Andrade

Billie Eilish

Joseph Vincent

Misterwives

Starting out as a teenager using her father’s recording devices, Montréalbased Daniela Andrade now sweeps away YouTube viewers with her profound charm. Andrade posts her original songs, covers and vlogs to YouTube. She sings into an old-fashioned microphone and has a classy style of jet black hair juxtaposing against pale skin. Singing in a similar style to How I Met Your Mother’s version of Edith Piaf’s famous anthem, Andrade covers “La Vie En Rose” with an acoustic guitar. Additionally, she executes the classic “Stars Fell on Alabama” as a duet with Hanbyul Kang. She also covers Christmas songs with an acoustic twist, as well as pop hits. Beyond covers, Andrade is a singersongwriter. “It’s really important to let yourself be expressive, and you’ll slowly find yourself,” she said in one vlog. Her Christmas original, “No One But You,” and her popular piece, “Dark Coffee,” incorporate acoustic guitar with a string background. Andrade’s love for music is apparent in her videos and can fit any mood.

Being only fifteen years old, Billie Eilish Pirate Baird O’Connell surpasses many other girls her age with musical innovation. Bille Eilish’s unique style is what sets her apart from all others. Eilish has recorded with her older brother, Finneas O’Connell. Her appearance may seem monochrome to some with her grey-blonde hair and pale skin, but her eyes and colorful clothing make her stand out. Eilish’s hit “sHE’S brOKen” not only highlights the clarity of her voice, but it claims her creativity with a play on words through mixing “she’s broken” with “he’s ok.” The fan-favorite “Ocean Eyes,” one of her highly quotable songs, features a mystical music video with her staring at the camera to enchant the listeners. She brings many bright colors into the music video for “Bellyache.” Vogue and Billboard recognize Eilish as an emerging young artist. She has pop roots, but is primarily an independent artist. Taking a big, creative step forward in the music world is seen as risky to most at such a young age, but Eilish conquers the risk with originality and drive.

As an emerging artist from San Fernando Valley in Southern California, Joseph Vincent Encarnacion captures the hearts of his listeners with acoustic and relaxed vibes similar to Ed Sheeran. Going by simply Joseph Vincent, this singer-songwriter appeared on the Ellen Show back in 2010 with his viral cover of Iyaz’s “Replay.” Vincent’s neutral colors and earrings give off a suave vibe, which couples with his mellow tone on the ukulele and acoustic guitar. One of his covers is the Tagalog song “Kahit Maputi Na Ang Buhok Ko,” which has the pleasant meaning of children growing old together. Even his covers of classics, like Extreme’s “More than Words,” show his immense vocal range and groove into the music. Vincent’s most popular original, “Blue Skies,” is one based on his own experiences through relationships. Two of his other many original songs include “Magnetize” and “Memory.” Vincent can catch attention by sitting unplugged in front of a camera or by playing with a background band in his well-executed music videos.

Lead singer Mandy Lee, guitarist Marc Campbell, bass guitarist William Hehir, saxophonist Mike Murphy, percussionist Etienne Bowler, and multi-instrumentalist Jesse Blum come together as Misterwives. This lesser-known pop band based in New York City is influenced by Motown, as it includes many genres including funk and pop. The group originally got together by pure coincidence: Lee and Hehir were brought together by mutual friends, jammed together and were later joined by the rest. Lee said, “it was serendipitous for us to all meet very randomly and work so well together.” Misterwives features many elaborate costumes in its videos. For example, “Machine” features an Egyptian warrior theme, “Not Your Way” takes the viewer back in time to a 1920’s silent movie, and “Reflections” is based in a private school setting. The chemistry of the group is apparent. The song “Our House” was written by Lee inside a treehouse that Bowler built. Lee, although the face of the band, is still equally accompanied by her fellow musicians.

“IT” breaks box office record YouTube videos for learning

Audiences flock to Stephen King’s horror film A world of information found at the fingertips By Eva Clarke Staff Writer

Breaking the box office with $123 million in its opening week, the latest cinematic remake of Stephen King’s original book “IT” has become the highest grossing horror movie of all time. The horror classic provides audiences with a refined version of past productions: the 1990 miniseries and movie, which are both based off the original 1986 novel. Although the film classifies as a horror movie, “IT” is webbed with humorous content from random clumsy moments to sarcastic remarks between the main characters that serve as comic relief to contrast the horror elements of the film. Set during the 1980s, the movie depicts the lives of seven preteens, including Bill (Jaeden Lieberher), Richie (Finn Wolfhard), Ben (Jeremy Ray Taylor), Stanley (Wyatt Oleff), Mike (Chosen Jacobs), Eddie (Jack Dylan Grazer) and Beverly (Sophia Lillis), from Derry, Maine­—who call themselves the Losers’ Club because of the names they get called by the school bullies. The movie takes off after the first scene, as the club attempts to save Bill’s missing brother, Georgie, who disappears after confronting the sewerdwelling demon while looking in the sewer for his lost sailboat. The Los-

ers’ Club’s search and rescue mission is haunted by the same demon that took Georgie, but holds different forms depending on each child’s individual fears. However, primarily, the demon takes the shape of the infamous clown: Pennywise, played by Bill Skarsgård. The kids end up calling the evil entity “IT.” This demonic figure declares his presence with a horizontally floating red balloon that is only seen by the children. The balloon and the movies’ iconic catchphrase “you’ll float too” have inspired many pranks involving red balloons and sewer grates all across the country. The chilling results of the constant spam of jump-scares and the short, yet absolutely jaw-dropping, moments of violence by the young actors and actresses provide influxes of eerie feelings and shock viewers into intrigued states. With part two underway, the thrill is not over yet. The second half of “IT” features the Losers’ Club in their adult years as they face the demonic Pennywise for the second time in attempts to defeat it once and for all. This part two continuation of “IT” will be coming out in 2018 and filming has already begun. This time, the movie will be set in recent years—sometime around 2016. Audiences are already anticipating the return of Pennywise, but until then stay away from the sewers.

By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor

School can be stressful, as each student has at least five different academic classes to juggle along with extracurricular activities and maintaining relationships. To help solve the students’ struggles to perfect time management, thinking outside of the box is the root to staying on task. Thus, watching YouTube videos can be educational and play the role of a teacher to reinforce the subject. The “Amoeba Sisters” is run by Sabrina Peterson and Brianna Rapini, who teach science as characters of Petunia and Pinky the amoebas respectively. The channel is engaging with its kawaii cartoon drawings of the subject, as well as puns and relatable examples. Peterson illustrates for the videos, and Rapini, with a degree in biology and a background in public school teaching, narrates the videos. In 2006, Salman Khan founded “Khan Academy,” a nonprofit company devoted to educating the world. Through YouTube, the channel focuses mostly on math, but it also includes the subjects of science and engineering, computing, arts and humanities, economics and finance, test prep, and colleges and jobs. Starting a source for history students

to visit in 2012, Adam Norris has made videos on YouTube as a “one stop guide to all things APUSH.” Norris is an advanced placement United States history teacher from Cheektowaga, New York. The videos detail historical events in more depth than the typical history class. “CrashCourse,” one of the most popular educational YouTube channels, is essential for inquisitive students. The Vlogbrothers, John and Hank Green, founded “CrashCourse” to teach world history and biology. Today, the channel is a collaboration between other Graphic/ Catherine Hurwitz educators to release videos pertaining to a myriad other subjects. Animations through Thought Café and whims such as the mystery documents entertain while educating viewers throughout the world. Neil Hepworth, master of grammar, runs a YouTube channel devoted to letting students understand concepts from third grade that progress into challenging material. Hepworth’s quirky personality and entertaining grammar examples with his cat Twiggy promote a feeling of ease and a desire to learn YouTube videos can be viewed at the student’s own pace and can be rewinded at any time. Education is at the fingertips of anyone: watching videos on the box of a smartphone is available to anyone willing to think outside of the box.


Lifestyle

October 2017

Page 7

Seasonal drink s to tr y this fall Hallway Talk: It is time to spice up your drink order Is Pumpkin Spice Overrated? By Emily Smith Staff Writer

To get in the fall mood, coffee shops are releasing new must-try festive flavors. Instead of sticking with the

classics, order these autumnal drinks while they are still in season. Everyone gravitates towards the pumpkin spice flavors once fall rolls around, but there are plenty of other options just as delicious that can also “spice things up” this season. Student’s favor-

ite shops like Marylou’s, Starbucks, and Dunkin’ Donuts are all bringing their own flavors to the table. So, instead of continuing to order the same beverage every time you pull through the Starbucks drive-thru, have some fun and expand your coffee horizons.

Dunkin’ Donuts Maple Pecan Macchiato $3.39 (Medium)

Marylou’s Cinnamon Hazelnut Fluff $2.63 (Medium)

Starbucks Chai Tea Latte $4.25 (Grande)

Photo/ Ciara Healy

Photo/Caroline Pitman

Editor-in-Chief Lindsey Sullivan takes to the hallways to get the inside scoop

Photo/Caroline Pitman

on Pumpkin Spice Lattes.

“Isn’t pumpkin spice a cologne?”

-Danielle Abril ‘21

“I have never had a Pumpkin Spice Latte personally, but I am very interested to try it. I hate the stigma be-

hind them that they make you basic.” How to order: for a regular with almond

-Jeff Lennon ‘19

How to order: Ask for a Maple Pecan Macchiato with butter pecan swirl.

How to order: Ask for Cinnamon Hazelnut fluff with a mocha base, and whipped cream.

Ask latte

In honor of the new flavor Dunkin’ Donuts added this August, fifteen new franchises opened on Maple Streets, Roads, and Avenues around the country. They gave away free Maple Pecan Macchiatos to the first five hundred customers at each new location on August 28. Even though it is no longer available for free, the new fall flavor is definitely worth a try. This coffee is extremely customizable as well, as it is available hot, iced or frozen in all brews. With seven locations in Walpole alone, it’s easy to get your hands on this festive favorite.

The newest Marylou’s franchise in Westwood may have only just opened last month, but they have already become a town favorite. With over fifty iced coffee flavors, there is no excuse to order the same thing twice. Hidden among Marylou’s sea of flavors is Cinnamon Hazelnut Fluff. Even though it is over ice, this drink gives off major fall vibes. Marylou’s combined a sweet marshmallow flavor with hazelnut and a cinnamon blend to top it off. With a mocha iced coffee base, the unique ingredients add an unexpected kick.

Chai has always been a classic fall essential, and no one knows the in’s and out’s of it like Starbucks. The chai tea flavor has been on the menu fulltime since the company’s beginning, but it is predominantly ordered in the fall because of its variety of spices that scream autumn. Chai tea is essentially black tea, but what makes it so special is that it is blended with a variety of spices like cinnamon, cloves and ginger. It is time to try something new from Starbucks this season, so give this exciting blend a turn in the spotlight.

chai milk

The ultimate 2017 fall bucket list Fall themed activities designed to fully embrace the autumn season

noon in the corn maze to fall photoshoots in the pumpkin patch, farms are the quintessential location for the perfect fall outing. Stop by nearby Wards Berry Farm for one of their delicious smoothies or to visit the barnyard animals after a hayride. Volante Farms is Pumpkins lined up at Tangerini’s Farm this autumn. worth the drive to grab a fresh lunch at the sandwich counter or to select the perBy Grace Donovan fect Halloween pumpkin. Photos from Lifestyle Editor Tangerini's famous sunflower patch As the cold weather approaches, so seemed to go viral on Instagram this does apple picking, Friday night foot- summer, but lucky for you sunflowers ball games, hayrides and haunted remain in season throughout the fall. You could never create a fall bucket houses. Shorts and t-shirts are replaced list and not include one of the season’s by oversized sweaters and your famost beloved activities: apple picking. vorite ripped jeans while those worn Locations such as Jane and Paul Farm, out flip-flops retire for the season. AlLookout Farm and The Big Apple all though it may be the perfect weather provide a variety of apples and farm to stay in with a blanket, cup of hot fresh produce. Although exploited by chocolate and a movie—we should many teenage girls as the source of a all try to enjoy our last days outside trendy fall Instagram pictures, apple before it gets too cold. With endless picking is still the most traditional seasonal activities to complete, your weekends should never be boring. way to embrace the season—plus it gives Farms are a staple of the autumn you an excuse to make delicious fall lifestyle. From an adventurous after- treats from caramel apples to apple pie. Photo/ Caroline Pitman

In terms of nightlife, WHS students can most likely be found supporting the Rebels at Turco Field. Walpole’s own “Friday Night Lights” attract students of all ages to come cheer on the Rebels while socializing with friends. If the football games are not your thing, invite some friends over for a bonfire. After a long week, huddling around a firepit under the stars can be a fun and relaxing way to kick-start your weekend. If you want to go the extra mile to make things as Tumblr as possible then grab some blankets,pillows and fairy lights for decoration with some music in the background. Also, don’t forget the s’mores! With Halloween upon us, haunted houses have reopened for the season. For the thrill seekers, make your way out to Barrett’s Haunted Mansion in Abington, Massachusetts to “[take] fear to another level.” From 7-11:00 P.M. on Oct. 17 and 24, Barrett’s will be turning off all of the lights for the two night special: Darkness Unleashed. Meanwhile, weekends (including Friday) through Oct. 29, Canobie Lake Park will be hosting Screeemfest: an exciting, frightful event for people of all ages to enjoy haunted houses, live shows and games. If you are looking to stay more local, head over to the Norfolk Aggie to support their Haunted Hayride fundraiser.

“I think that the

haters need to sit down, have

a good Pumpkin Spice Latte and re-evaluate.”

-Jenna McDonald ‘19

“I think there is a culture of calling Pumpkin Spice Lattes overrated and it has really closed people’s minds. I think we all need to accept each other no matter what our opinions are on Pumpkin Spice Lattes.” -Jonny Benoit ‘18

“Pumpkin Spice Lattes

are for basic girls, and I will never be trying one.” -Tim Hogan ‘22

“Honestly Pumpkin Spice Lattes THE MOST overrated thing. They’re charg-

ing you what, 7 dollars at Starbucks to

get a large? Why? It’s a scam, it doesn’t even taste like pumpkin. Do you know

what a pumpkin tastes like? Not that.” -Sam Byrne ‘18

“Maple Pecan is better.” -P.J. O’Toole

“I think they are really good. It is a statement you need to have

to know that you are in fall.” -Maggie Sullivan ‘20


Sports

Page 8

October 2017 Photo/ Callie Ross

Photo/ Jack O’Meara

GIRLS SOCCER (4-5-1)

GIRLS

SWIMMING & DIVING ( 2-2)

Led by senior captains, Conor McMahon, Andrew Gubanov, Katie O’Leary, Katarina Ruda and Carlie Cavanaugh, swimming and diving is off to an even start. The swim team’s last meet was against Marshfield, losing 83-98.

R E B E L

Starting the season 0-2, after losses to both Mansfield and Needham, the Rebels secured their first win of the season against Norwood. With a score of 37-0, senior quarterback Brett Lavanchy went 16 for 20 throwing.

VOLLEYBALL (7-2)

Volleyball started off season bringing home a win against Wellesley. A win against Norwood their current record at

Celtics Will

Photo/ Breanna Andreassi

Led by senior captains, Bryan Kraus, Kyle Poli and Matt Conti, the golf team recently beat We y m o u t h and Needham after a slow s t a r t .

their 3-2 3-0 put 7-2.

be

Celtics General Manager Danny Ainge already brought Banner 17 to the Garden with the first Big Three of Ray Allen, Kevin Garnett, and Paul Pierce. This summer, he constructed another Big Three: Al Horford, Gordon Hayward, and Kyrie Irving. However, the Irving acquisition was not without a major blow to Celtic assets. Boston gave up Jae Crowder, Ante Zizic, the Brooklyn Nets’ 2018 first round draft pick, the Miami Heat’s 2020 second round draft pick, and most importantly Celtic point guard Isaiah Thomas—commonly known as IT. The question remains: Is this new Big Three worth the loss of IT? Celtics fans—in Walpole and across the state—hope Ainge’s big moves will bring home Banner 18. William O’Malley, chemistry teacher at WHS and Celtics fan, believes that Irving has the capability to take the Celtics to the next level—one that Thomas could not quite reach.

FIELD HOCKEY (7-0-1)

After beating Norwood 6-1 the Porkers closed September with an undefeated record. The Porkers have scored a total of 44 goals so far in their season.

BOYS

CROSS

COUNTRY

(3-3)

Irving worth

at the

“IT would have gotten us to or possibly through the Conference Finals every year. Irving gets us to the League Finals and gives us a much better chance to win,” said O’Malley. Trey Wilkes, senior captain of Walpole High School’s varsity basketball team, holds Irving’s offensive talents as some of the best in the NBA. “Having Kyrie Irving gives the [Celtics’] offense a huge boost, as he’s one of the best offensive players in the game right

now,” said Wilkes. “Just being 25 [years old] he hasn’t even really hit his prime yet which is promis-

Photo/ Hope Jordan

Boys cross country defeated Norwood, Framingham and Natick for their three wins. Seniors Sean Corriveau and Sebastian Almar recently missed meets due to injury. Sophomore Shane Grant has been the top runner for the boys so far in this season.

BOYS SOCCER (4-3-1)

After tying Needham 0-0 and losing 1-0 to Nauset Regional, the Rebels defeated Weymouth High School 2-1 with a last minute goal from junior Pat Sullivan. Now, the Rebels look to take down Wellesley, a team they previously beat 3-2. This season, the Rebels are looking to win the Herget title for a third consecutive year.

Photo/ Caroline Pitman

sign

Irving

By Aidan Chariton Staff Writer

GOLF (2-4)

(2-4)

Photo/ Caroline Pitman

R O U N D U P

FOOTBALL (2-2)

Photo/ Ciara Healy

COUNTRY

In the last meet of the month against Natick, the Rebels lost 1745, adding another loss to their record. Freshman Mia Costa has set the freshman records for both the 5K and the home course.

Following a slow start with a 1-2 record, Walpole Girls Soccer recently beat Carver 5-0 followed by a 1-1 tie against Weymouth and a 5-1 victory over Norwood with senior captain Libby Foley as leading scorer. Photo/ Caroline Pitman

CROSS

Photo/ Sydney Weinacht

the loss

loss of

of

Thomas

ing for the future of the franchise.” On top of his experience—particularly in high-pressure, post-season games—Kyrie is one of the best scoring guards in the entire league. In the 2016-2017 season Irving averaged 25.2 points per game—especially impressive considering he had to split his field goal attempts with James—placing him at 11th in the NBA. Additionally, Irving’s unique ball handling and ability to craftily finish around the rim makes him one of the flashiest players in the league. Although being able to perform fancy moves does not necessarily make a player better, it certainly sells tickets to games. Not many Celtics fans are angry to

Thomas this

season?

have picked up Irving on the team, but there are some who believe Ainge gave up too much for him. “It’s a heavy price to pay, no doubt,” said Matthew Geagan, writer for CBS Boston. “There is no doubt Trader Danny took a gamble on this move.” Many fans were extremely displeased with the loss of the first draft pick, since it is predicted to be a top three pick this year, and they were even more aggravated when they discovered that the Celtics would be losing a second draft pick. “They really only have the cap space for one more large contract anyways,” said O’Malley. “If they use this on Irving, which over the next two years I believe is the plan, they would not have been able to fit a high first round draft pick with Brooklyn’s pick this year.” Whether the Celtics gave up too much for Irving is up for debate, but from the moment Ainge made the trade official, the trade off became history. He cannot go back, so the only thing left for those who bleed green is to hope this new Big Three can return Boston to the NBA Finals.

October 2017  

Volume XXI Issue I

October 2017  

Volume XXI Issue I

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