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Walpole High School Constraining class labels

April 2017 Prom without a date

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Nurse Jackson creates scholarship to honor Anthony Conti

Students pursuing film over the next three years will receive new scholarship Photo/ Ciara Healy

Friends of Anthony Conti pose at the premiere of his Make a Film Foundation production. His film, “The Black Ghiandola,” starred many notable figures in the Hollywood industry, including Johnny Depp.

By Emily Ball Lead Reporter In honor of 16-year-old Anthony Conti—a passionate film student who died this past January after suffering from

Stage 4 Adrenal Cancer— Walpole High School Nurse Rachel Jackson has created a scholarship for students interested in studying film or film-related fields in their post secondary career. “I decided to make it film-based be-

cause that’s what he loved,” said Jackson. The $1,000 scholarship will be awarded to one interested senior who submits an essay to Jackson that meets the criteria she was looking for; however, Jackson hopes to expand the applicant pool next year, rather than solely concentrating on the film program. “We tossed the idea around of opening it up more to the digital arts such as TV Production or even Journalism,” said Jackson. “I mean, he liked to write and he liked to draw too. He did a movie all in sketches: instead of writing the script out, he drew it.” Jackson created the Anthony Conti scholarship out of monetary support from multiple donations, as well as emotional support from Conti’s family. “People were asking where they could donate money to,” said Jackson. “And I knew that his grandmother wanted to do something in his memory.” Although many members of the Walpole community donat-

ed to the cause, local donations were not the only contributions. “People from Hollywood have sent a lot of checks over,” said Jackson. “It was crazy! I was writing the ‘thank you’ notes and wondering how exactly I write a note to Johnny Depp.” As a result of the copious donations, Jackson will be able to reward the scholarship to a senior from each graduating class for the next three years. “We have enough money for us to do this year, next year, and whatever is left over we will do for his graduating year so it will be a little larger,” said Jackson. Jackson hopes to honor Conti’s name by helping a worthy student accomplish their postsecondary aspirations, just as the Make A Film Foundation was able to help Conti. “Anthony would be happy to know that he was able to help someone pursue their career in something that he loved: film,” said Jackson.

Walpole implements drug screening program at middle schools Johnson and Bird begin state-mandated interviewing with seventh grade students By Tara Gordon Assistant News Editor During the spring of the 2017 school year, Walpole Public Schools began to implement a new screening for students in the seventh grade. The state of Massachusetts mandated this screening, known as Screening Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT), and it will be mandatory for all public schools in Massachusetts at the start of the next school year; however, Walpole volunteered to start a preliminary program this spring, interviewing students at both Bird and Johnson Middle School. “Walpole, being a proactive community, opted to a pilot program in grade seven this year,” said Bird Middle School nurse Karen Doherty. SBIRT is a five minute interview with one of Walpole’s school nurses, where students are asked questions concerning substance abuse. “The types of questions we discuss are about their access to alcohol, beer and wine in the past year. We ask them questions in a form of ‘have you ever done this,’ and those are regarding alcohol, marijuana, prescription drugs, and getting in a car with an intoxicated driver,” said Doherty. SBIRT is a confidential and anony-

mous screening, as the state only requires schools to report a student’s sex, age, and their responses to questions. “We tell them before that there are no names, no identifying characteristics with anything we do,” said Walpole High School nurse Rachel Jackson. “I think for them to hear that it is confidential, it opens up the line of communication.” Although screenings are confidential, students who report answers that are considered concerning to the screener have the option to sign a consent form, which can be used to refer them to another adult. “If we are concerned for the student’s safety or others safety, then we ask for their permission to share the information, so we can refer them to their parents or the school guidance counselors, depending on our severity of concern” said Jackson. The interviewing at the seventh grade level is optional, allowing both parents to opt their student out of screening, as well as giving students the ability to refuse to participate in the interview. “There is no penalty for opting out, and the parents have the opportunity to opt out their kids out, which is why we have an informational meeting and letters sent home,” said Jackson. “Some parents did opt their kids out, but I think there will be less

Graphic courtesy of Amy Paturel

next year, because I think kids are really getting something out of it.” In order to promote delay of substance abuse, screeners praise those who test negative to any use of illegal substances, “It’s positive reinforcement that we want to give to the kids who answered ‘no’ to the questions,” said Jackson. “and the real gist of [screenings] is early intervention, and really trying to get kids to understand that if they postpone using a substance that impairs them, the difference in the chance of becoming addicted is huge.” Preparations for SBIRT began at the beginning of the 2016-2017 school year, where an individual sent from the state trained Doherty, Jackson, Johnson Middle School nurse Susan Prindall, and nurse leader Kathleen Garvin. “I think it was great for us to start this year before it was mandated so we can work out the kinks,” said Jackson.

The photo to the left, handed out to all seventh graders, shows functional MRI scans of two teens while they took a working memory test. The results show how the heavy drinker does not use the same areas normally used to complete a memory test. In school, drinkers would experience the same effect when remembering a lecture.

Next year, when the program is mandatory in all Massachusetts school districts, screeners will complete interviews with seventh and ninth grade; however, all students will still have the ability to opt out from the screening. “I think next year will be easier because the preliminary groundwork has been laid this year. I would like to see more staff trained. We need more screeners; it will be hard for the four of us to do two grades next year,” said Doherty. Going forward, WPS hopes to spread awareness of the consequences that come from underage alcohol drug usage. “We have to tell them that they are going to be exposed to this, and encourage them to make good decisions,” said Doherty. “Going to high school and going to college, this stuff is going to be out there, so I tell them this a chance for them to understand that they don’t want to get involved with substance abuse.”

NON PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO.8

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NEWS

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April 2017

WHS establishes its first female golf team Senior Abby O’Sullivan of Walpole High School’s By Melanie Weber Staff Writer After spending her summers playing golf with family and friends, senior Abby O’Sullivan decided that Walpole High School should develop a female golf team. Finding enough girls to fill a roster, O’Sullivan convinced Athletic Director Ron Dowd to start a team. “I was inspired to start the golf team because after a summer of golfing with family and friends, as well as meeting female golf players from other towns, I decided that it would be great to bring a new sport to Walpole High School,” said O’Sullivan. “We have a boys golf team, so I think it was a natural progression to start a girls golf team,” said Athletic Director Ron Dowd. Ron Dowd and Charles Ferro, the school psychologist, and local golf pro, Tom Giffin will coach the team. The girls will practice three times per week (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays) on the driving range, as well as the putting greens at Walpole Country Club. “I think it is important that we start with the fundamental skills,” said Dowd. However, unlike other sports teams, the golf team will not play in the MIAA league; it will be considered a club team and the players will pay an activ-

spearheads golf club

the start this spring

ity fee rather than an athletic user fee. they will face is to be determined. “Since it is our first year, I think it is The girls are looking forward to not best that we start as a club team, as it only the commencement of their seais important that we son, but the start see the skill level of a new team. of the girls because “I am very ex“I was inspired to start the they are not as excited for this seagolf team because after perienced as other son and hope a summer of golfing with teams,” said Dowd. we can improve family and friends, as well In addition, facing as individuals and as meeting female golf both private and as a team. Also, players from other towns.” public schools, the I hope that this -Abby O’Sullivan, ‘17 team will play in team can grow different tournaments throughout the in the future and ultimately become spring; although, the specific teams a varsity team,” said O’Sullivan. Photo/Maeve O’Connor

In their first few practices, the team has worked primarily on ball-striking and chipping on both the driving range and the greens.

Concert band and Concert Chorus earn silver medals, with String Orchestra earning a bronze medal. Photo/ Alison Giffin

The Massachusetts Instrumental & Choral Conductors’ Association (MICCA) is an organization that host events where choirs, orchestras and bands get to perform in front of judges, who give out awards and critiques. Groups do not compete against each other; instead, individual groups strive to earn either a gold, silver, or bronze medal based on their overall score. The Walpole High School band, choir and orchestra attended this event on April 1, and each received an award— the first awards with Kenneth Gable and Ashley Prickel as their teach- The concert band seniors pose with their silver plaque from the MICCA festival. Some seniors ers and conductors. Despite winning and other students doubled in other group as well, including the orchestra and the concert choir. these awards, Gable stresses that attending the MICCA festival is about medal, as did the Concert Chorus. The as receiving constructive criticisms. more than just the prizes themselves. String Orchestra received a bronze “It was the first year we actually “It is not the medal. There competed for an award in MICaward that are nine cat- CA, instead of just participating, is significant egories that so it was really cool for all of our or even imgroups are groups to win an award in our first “As I have told the students, portant. As judged on: year,” says senior Haley DiMartino. what matters is that the I have told tone quality, Students were ecstatic to receive their groups perform to the best the students, balance and awards, and Gable also expressed how of their ability, continue to what matblend, intona- proud he was of all the performers. strive to improve and deters is that tion, expres“The students were provided with the groups sion and style challenging, quality literature in all velop a passion and underperform to and phrasthree performing ensembles. Based standing for quality literature the best of ing, dynam- on their performances, they all met and quality performances.” their ability, ics, rhythm the challenge head on and demon-Kenneth Gable continue to and precision strated one of their best performances. strive to imand tempo, Again, the emphasis is not the award prove and develop a passion and un- articulation bowing or diction, techni- that they won, but proving to themderstanding for quality literature and cal facility, repertoire. The ensembles selves that they are capable of perquality performances,” said Gable. showed proficiency in these catego- forming at a high level and that we all The Concert Band received a silver ries and earned their awards, as well can continue to grow as musicians.”

NEWS By Brynne Bergen Staff Writer

The following briefs are all highlights from the World News section of The New York Times. For longer stories, visit www.nytimes.com.

Two dead in shootout on Champs-Élysées in Paris

Music Department wins MICCA medals for first time with Gable as department head By Elizabeth Foley Staff Writer

WORLD

On Thursday, April 20, a shootout on the Champs-Élysées in Paris left two dead. A gunman killed a police officer and left two others injured during the incident, which occurred just before 9 p.m. on Thursday night. The police force then shot and killed the gunman who attempted to escape on foot. Claiming responsibility for the shooting, the Islamic State said the gunman was a soldier of the Caliphate, Abu Yousuf al-Belgiki. The police force was targeted only a few days before citizens voted for Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron in the first round of the French presidential election on Sunday, April 23. The two will face off in a runoff election on May 7.

Uganda ends search for Joseph Kony Uganda began to end their search for Joseph Kony and his Lord’s Resistance Army. The country has started to withdraw 1,500 troops from the Central African Republic this past week. Kony, responsible for the deaths of over 100,000 people, was able to avoid capture after being accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity. The United States military is also planning on terminating the search mission for Kony. The Uganda People’s Defense Force claims that the Lord’s Resistance Army poses no direct threat to the country.

American Military drops “mother of all bombs” on ISIS site On Thursday, April 13, the United States dropped the “Mother of All Bombs” on an Afghanistan site. The bomb, which is considered the most powerful conventional bomb that the military possesses, was released on an ISIS cave complex in order to defeat the Islamic State more quickly. The number of casualties is unknown; however, there is a possibility that the bombing killed civilians and allies. The Afghan government was warned about the bombing beforehand.


April 2017

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DEDHAM SAVINGS

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is pleased to present

THE WALPOLE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AND CLASSES OF THE MONTH JANUARY

SENIOR JOURNALISM III REBECCA BOYAJIAN In the month of January, senior Rebecca Boyajian was the most productive writer on the Journalism staff of over sixty students. She published six reviews ranging from movie reviews on “Rogue One” and “Sing” and “Hidden Figures” and “Passengers” to an awards show review on the Golden Globes to a television review on Netflix’s new show, “Series of Unfortunate Events.” Her movie review of “A Monster Calls” was even retweeted by the production company Focus Features (@FocusFeatures)—a retweet that significantly improved our monthly totals for page views as well as our brand recognition outside of Walpole. More impressively, in addition to being the most productive writer on staff, she is also one of the most ambitious and most humble content Editors I have ever had on staff. Moreover, because of productivity and humble yet ambitious leadership, I proudly nominate Rebecca Boyajian to be January’s Student of the Month. -Mr. Cashman JUNIOR ALGEBRA II SELENA GIAMPA Selena has been working hard in Algebra II all year. She has stayed for extra help prior to assessments, but her grades were not at the level that she wanted. Selena took advantage of retake opportunities to demonstrate her knowledge but that was not always working for her either. At the tail end of Chapter 7, something fell into place for Selena with a couple of strong quiz scores and a phenomenal grade of 94% on the Chapter Test, which was one of the top few scores in her class. Selena currently has an average in the A range. I am proud of the improvement that Selena has shown, and the fact that she continued to put in the effort until it finally paid off for her. -Mrs. Kathleen Milne SOPHOMORE FRENCH III MAIREAD NEE Mairead is an organized and diligent young lady. She is extremely busy with performances outside of school yet finds time to stay on task in my class. Mairead is one of my best participants in oral discussions and always has a smile on her face. Mairead is kind, respectful and honest. I am lucky to have her in my class for the second time and I am thrilled that I can watch her perform in shows when she is local. Thank you for your hard work, I appreciate you. -Mrs. Frattasio

ACTIVITY AWARD

SANJANA BHAGAVATULA MATH TEAM Sanjana has been a welcome addition to the math team this year. She takes the time to read through the note packets and attempts questions in categories that are beyond the scope of her current math course. In particular, Sanjana has competed in the Trigonometry category in our past two meets, despite the fact that she is only a sophomore and has not covered Trigonometry in class yet. Usually the Trigonometry round is reserved for upperclassmen, but on the practice rounds Sanjana managed to earn points in the category, outscoring most of the Juniors and seniors and prompting me to put her into that round. I am appreciative of the fact that Sanjana attempts all problems and does not complain about which categories she is placed in. She will do whatever is best for the team. -Mrs. Kathleen Milne

CLASS OF THE MONTH

FRENCH III PERIOD 1 This group of kids work terrifically well together. They are open to any new activities I offer. They work hard to understand my French, which is important since I speak no English during class hours. This group helps each other and treats each other with respect and kindness. They are quick to praise each other and quick to laugh with each other. I love to teach them and they inspire me each class hour. -Mrs. Pierce

CITIZEN OF THE MONTH

SENIOR AILEEN COEN Aileen has gone above and beyond as the President of the Best Buddies Program. She attends workshops to better her involvement with the students and officers in the program. Aileen encourages students and their parents to get involved. I have been significantly impressed with her enthusiasm, compassion and patience with all the students with special needs that she comes in contact with. -Mrs. Robinson

FEBRUARY

SENIOR AP CALCULUS GREGORY BOND Greg is doing phenomenal work in Calculus. He has shown a thorough mastery of the concept of integration including a perfect score on his Chapter 5 test. Greg’s work on the unit test was flawless. In addition, he showed improvement since the previous chapter test. Greg has taken advantage of extra help. He always has his assignments complete and is ready to participate in class. He is deserving of Student of the Month. -Mrs Kathleen Milne JUNIOR LATIN II JOSHUA LAMPERTI Josh has made the leap from CP2 Latin to CP1 Latin and he is doing very well. Josh has been meeting the challenges that CP1 brings for him and is working hard. Josh is great in class— he pays attention and always tries his best. Josh is also very good to his classmates— friendly, humble and compassionate. Josh is an all-around great kid and well deserving of Student of the Month! -Ms. Kay SOPHOMORE SPANISH III SANJANA BHAGAVATULA Sanjana is a pleasure to have in class. She works hard, is very creative, participates all the time and asks great questions. She is a real leader in the classroom. -Mrs. Flaherty FRESHMAN FRENCH II SAVANNAH CAMPBELL Savannah is a happy young lady who comes to class with a smile and a Bonjour. I appreciate that Savanna cares about her work and will ask questions so that she can learn from her mistakes. She is kind and respectful. She is helpful and will work with anyone in class. The best part of my day is when I see Savannah at the end of the day and she still wants to chat with me. Merci Savannah, you are the best! -Mrs. Frattasio

ACTIVITY AWARD

HENRY ROSE MATH TEAM Henry has been a valuable member of the math team since his freshman year. He was the only senior on our team who participated in the February meet, and he earned the highest score on the team, which included an impressive perfect score in the Geometry round. Henry has served as my representative for the freshman activity fair for several years, has often been the first team member to pass in problem sets, and has earned points for the team as a result of reading the note packets, which I hand out. I am proud to nominate Henry for extracurricular award for his strong performance in his final math meet of his high school career as well as his significant contributions to the team over the past four years. -Mrs. Kathleen Milne

CLASS OF THE MONTH

CALCULUS PERIOD 6 This group of Calculus students earned their highest-class average on a chapter test during the month of February. Some of the scores were phenomenal. Most of the students showed an excellent grasp of the concept of integration including substitution, applying the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and making a connection between integration and areas. A number of students continue to take advantage of extra help after school, showing a dedication and commitment to understanding the concepts. Students are prepared for class, ask good questions, and work well both individually and cooperatively. I proudly nominate this class again (nominated but did not win in December) as Class of the Month. -Mrs. Kathleen Milne ANA SULLIVAN

CITIZEN OF THE MONTH

Ana is a wonderful, caring individual. She not only cares about her peers, but the faculty at Walpole High as well. I think she deserves to be recognized for being so kind hearted to everyone she encounters each and every day. Thank you Ana for adding a little more brightness to my day! -Mrs. Hackett


OPINION WHS students find ways to promote school spirit

April 2017

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Following the unexpected cancellation of school-sponsored dances in the fall, the WHS student body has not given up its school spirit Photo/ Mandy Scully

Senior Nathaniel Kelley, head of the brigade and senior class president, pumps up the crowd at the fall pep rally.

By Kayla Frost Staff Writer Since the Walpole High student body is so heavily influenced by town pride and school spirit, there was concern about how WHS would ever be able to display its diehard school spirit after it was announced that all school sponsored dances would be cancelled. However, instead of taking the cancellations as a defeat, the students

AP

exams

at Walpole High have started to use other powerful social outlets to maintain a strong sense of school pride, which is arguably at an all-time high. A main reason for the increase in school spirit throughout the 201617 school year is the WHS Brigade, a student run fan section that cheers at sporting events. The Brigade, although it has been prominent in WHS sports history, has been fully resurrected this past school year. There was

should

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an abundance of students who attended important sporting events, including volleyball’s senior night against Norwood, field hockey’s battle in the state championship against Longmeadow and hockey’s streak in the Super 8 tournament. The presence of a positive student section was able to help lead various teams to success and build school spirit for everyone involved. Aside from just sports, other school activities have been very successful in maintaining school spirit, for example, Mr. WHS, a competition where senior boys can compete for the title of Mr. Walpole High School. Student council was able to bring back this old tradition, and to say that students were excited is an understatement. On the night of the event, WHS students of all ages came out to the auditorium to watch and vote on their favorite performance. The event turned out to be a night of hilarity for the students, while also bringing everyone together with a fun activity to promote school spirit. Similarly, the Date Auction is a student council run event where students auction themselves off to the rest of their peers. Each student is presented to the audience, and their peers must bid on them by using “stuco bucks” that they earned by dressing up for spirit days during the weeks prior to the competition. There were many contestants who

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signed up for this event, and the school was booming with daily conversations about it leading up until the night. The event gave students something to talk about, something to look forward to together, and also another night of fun to exercise the classic WHS school spirit. The success of these events proves how WHS students will use any opportunity to express their school spirit. As a reward for positive school behavior, the students were awarded a Saint Patrick’s Day dance, which many people attended; however, it was clear that there were not nearly as many people at the Shamrock Shake as there were at dances in past years. It is safe to say that WHS has been able to find success elsewhere in expressing school spirit, and overcome the initial upset of the dance cancellation announcement. It is no secret that WHS students in particular have a lot of town pride and passion, and all students want the community to view WHS as a spirited and united group of young adults. Instead of allowing the cancellations of the school dances—a source of positive school spirit for years—to defeat the student body, the students instead chose to overcome the challenge to their school pride, and successfully found other ways to show the town of Walpole that they have endless school spirit, and love, for Walpole High.

for

students

WHS needs to revise their exam policy for next year’s AP courses By Emily Martin Editor-in-Chief It’s that time of year again. Teachers getting in their last minute preps, students burying their noses in their books—that’s right, it’s AP week. But long before the exams come around, students are already getting worried. In November, students get an e-mail in their school accounts: “Dear Student and Guardians, It is Walpole High School’s policy that enrollment in an AP course requires taking the AP Examination. The AP Examination is provided by the CEEB (College Entrance Exam Board) and given at Walpole High School in May. Any student who fails to pay for and/ or take the exam will be removed from the AP Course. Colleges to which he/ she has applied will be so informed. The cost is $95.00 per exam and payment is due by Friday, February 3, 2017.” Unlike many other schools, including Westwood High, Walpole High School requires its students to take an AP exam if they take an AP course. While the school’s efforts may be well-intentioned, this policy is flawed, and as such, it should not be mandatory for AP students to take their AP exam at the end of the year. For one, many colleges do not even accept AP credit from high school courses, and students will be required to retake the class in college. As a result, many students feel less motivated to put in their full effort for the exam or simply view the exam as a waste of their time. After all, why should high schoolers be forced to pay for an exam that won’t even benefit them in the future? If the school is going to force

students to take the AP exam, then they should pay for the exam itself— especially since the cost of AP exams brings about major financial concerns. With each exam costing a whopping $95, parents and students have no choice but to pay due to Walpole’s policy. As families are trying to save up for the upcoming college years, these AP exams do take their toll on a family’s wallet—especially when the AP exams don’t count towards college credit in the future. In other words, parents are forking over money and getting nothing in return. Lastly, the policy also states that if a student opts out of taking the exam for an AP course, then the student will be removed from the class. This takes away from the purpose of taking an AP class in the first place; AP courses are offered for students who want to challenge themselves or pursue a certain subject in depth than the traditional high school courses allow. Why punish students who take AP courses for the right reasons? Walpole High needs to revise their AP exam policy for future years. With other nearby high schools to model after, students should be allowed the choice of whether or not they want to take the exams. Some colleges do still take AP credit, and students should have the opportunity to take the exam if they wish to do so. With a new policy like such in place, students would have more freedom to explore their AP course and focus less on the exam. After all, a passion for learning is what every school strives to instill in their students. Let’s not ruin that passion with something as frivolous as an exam that may not even impact anything in a student’s life.

Photo/ Andrea Traietti

Every student is required to pay $95 for every AP exam that he or she takes. In the e-mail regarding AP exams, teachers include the total amounts for the number of APs that a student takes, with six AP exams adding up to $570.

REBELLION

Staff

Walpole High School’s newspaper is committed to informing the public, reflecting the students’ views, creating a public forum and serving as an educational medium.

Check out our website whstherebellion.com Send a Letter to the Editor. Letters Should be 200 Words or fewer, and can be emailed to walpolerebellion@gmail.com Editors-in-Chief Business Manager Mandy Scully Caitlin Kahaly Emily Martin Meghan Foley Staff Emily Linclon Andrea Traietti Assistant Business Writers Kelsey Mazzocca News Editor Manager Breanna Andreassi Katherine Mazzotta Devin Mckinney Grace Sewell Brynne Bergen Abigal McLaughlin Assistant News Editor Layout Editor Megan Brigham Brendan Moser Tara Gordon Abigail Hile Emily Butler Delaney Murphy Opinion Editor Social Media Aidan Chariton Molly O’Connell Daanya Salmanullah Editor Craig Cieplik Olivia O’Connell Assistant Opinion Kayla Frost Eva Clarke John O’Meara Editor Photo Editor Lindsay Cordopatri Kevin Quinn Lindsey Sullivan Maeve O’Connor Gabriella Donahue Alexis Rodia Entertainment/ Graphic Editor Michaela Donato Callie Ross Lifestyle Danielle Borelli Grace Donovan Samantha Simons Editor Staff Photographers Jessica Ferguson Emily Smith Ciara Healy Elizabeth Foley Nicole St. Germain Rebecca Boyajian Lillian Hunter Sophia Giovaniello Rachel Tetreault Sports Editor Cameron Johnson Tanya Gupta Melanie Weber David Moser Julia Kane Catherine Hurwitz Sydney Weinacht Lead Reporter Caroline Pitman Hope Jordan Thomas Wilber Emily Ball


OPINION

April 2017

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Examining the effect of class labels on student performance The following article was originally written by Emily Ball, a junior enrolled in AP Language & Composition at WHS, in the form of a research paper. The paper has been modified from its original format to more appropriately convey the purpose to the audience By Emily Ball Lead Reporter The dumb jock, the popular blonde, the nerd who does everyone’s science project just to get attention— all of these labels shape how one views him or herself throughout childhood and adolescence. As students pass the age of unleveled classrooms, they begin to delve into the era of leveled classes that provide a new system of labeling: whether one is an AP, Honors, CP1, or CP2 student. These labels unjustly define students and their academic capabilities. As a result, student performance and identity in the classroom is dependent on the class level that one chooses to define him or herself with; students develop expectations regarding their own potential for academic success and shape their actions around these suppositions. In a recent experiment, two Walpole High School Statistics classes— one AP and one CP1— agreed to take a curriculum-based quiz that would test their expectations by interpreting the effect of classroom labels. I visited both classes on separate days, gave the same discourse beforehand, and passed out the quiz. The twist was that there were three different copies of the same quiz: one labeled as “AP,” one labeled as “CP1” and the control group just labeled as “Statistics.” In the AP class, student reactions to the quiz were nothing but positive, con-

sidering they believed that the quiz was either at their level or meant for students two levels below them. “When I saw that the quiz was for CP1 students I felt very confident,” said AP Statistics student Conor McMahon. “Being in [an AP class] I expected that I would do very well on this quiz.” The CP1 students’ reactions were quite different, however, as they believed that the quiz was either designed for their level or two levels above them. “I feel like my expectations were lower on doing well on an AP quiz rather than a CP1 quiz,” said CP1 Statistics student Olivia West. The effect of class labeling on the individual is evident from the reactions to the quiz: it causes them to formulate certain expectations regarding who they are as a student and how well they are able to perform in the classroom. Along with proving the theory that classroom labels affect expectations, the results from the Statistics quiz also correspond with the idea that these expectations contribute to the overall level of individual performance. The AP students, having high self-efficacy, would expect to perform well on any of the three

quizzes they took, and they did just that. For the AP Statistics students, the average score on the quiz labeled AP was a 7.3 out of 8; on the CP1 quiz, a 7.5. Because their class title denotes higher intelligence, the AP students expected to perform better on the quiz which they presumed was for CP1 students. In contrast, the CP1 students have lower self-efficacy and expected to underperform on the AP quiz; the results of the quiz proved this statement true. The average score for CP1 students on the quiz they assumed was reflective of their academic standard was a 6 out of 8: a generally mediocre score. The quantitative evidence proves that expectations affect academic performance and is demonstrated in the average score that CP1 students received on the quiz classified as AP — a 4 out of 8. Although the quiz taken by the whole CP1 class was exactly the same, the average score on the quiz categorized as CP1 was 25% better than the average score on the quiz labeled as AP. The variance in the performance on the quiz is reflective of the expectations students have regarding their academic abilities and provides further evidence that scholastic achievement is dependent on one’s class label. In the classroom setting, labels are key factors in the development of student identity. Most educators believe that creating leveled classes will benefit students by providing them with a community of like-minded individuals; however, this perceived notion is false, since it is the labels themselves that are harmful to the students, especially the lower-leveled students, as they begin to expect less from themselves. These labels are constraining and affect a student’s self-efficacy and self-image. How can one avoid the repercussions of class labels? Perhaps teachers can learn to create a fairness across the board, or maybe even a system that teaches students to believe in their own individual learning capacity. After all, even the dumb jock deserves a shot at success.

Freedom of the Press: the key to preserving democratic ideals America

must

By Andrea Traietti Editor-in-Chief

foster

an

open

that are so central to democracy in the United States. More specifically, Freedom of the Freedom of the Press is one of our First Press pertains to the ability to distribute Amendment rights. It is a right that ideas and opinions regardless of whethgoes hand-in-hand with the freedom of er or not they contradict the beliefs of speech, one of the most highly valued the government or other citizens. Freerights of democratic society. However, dom of the Press is most commonly unFreedom of the Press is also a right that derstood in the context of the American is too often unappreciated and over- media. The media, often times the bane looked, probably because we as Ameri- of every politician’s existence, is ironcans simply have grown ically an absolute necessity for accustomed to it witha functioning demoout understandcratic governing its purpose. ment. The The media serves as In general, m e d i a perhaps the most essential linkage our First serves Amendas perinstitution in America: it’s how we learn m e n t haps about the doings of our representatives and rights are t h e important most our leaders, but it’s also how major issues and ones for a e s ideas citizens gather attention and make number of sential their way onto politicians’ agendas.” reasons, but linkage especially beinstitution cause they in America: it’s pertain to how we learn about the individual rights the doings of our representatives and that are es- sential to democracy. our leaders, but it’s also how major isA threat to these rights is a threat to sues and ideas citizens gather attention each and every American citizen, and and make their way onto politicians’ moreover to the ideals of freedom agendas. Overall, while the media is a

media

focused

on

truth

ly difficult to uncover the truth. However, that doesn’t mean that citizens and politicians should turn their backs on the media. In fact, we must do the exact opposite. In a time when the current administration continues to challenge and discredit the media, we have to support it. The media is how citizens learn and it’s how IntheJamesS.BradyPressConferenceRoomintheWhiteHouse, reporters cover breaking stories and communicate with American voices are heard. While the responadministration officials. sibility to seek the truth great source of information for citi- lies with citizens, and while the truth seems to become more confused every zens, it is even more crucial day with current domes and when used to spread international affairs, one ideas and opinions thing is for certain: the and offer diverse When Freedom of the press must remain inperspectives and Press is maintained, so dependent. When Freesolutions to probdom of the Press is mainlems. Therefore, is democracy.” tained, so is democracy. the media is a tool Republican Senator that promotes individLindsey Graham might uality and fosters democracy. The media is important, but it’s defi- have put it best when he said, nitely not perfect. In the current politi- “the backbone of democracy is a free cal and social climate, “fake news” and press and an independent judiciary, and intense political bias make it extreme- they’re worth fighting and dying for.”

Page Design / Lillie Hunter


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April 2017

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The Rebellion

Page 8

April 2017

Page 9

The Rebellion

If you are looking for destinations to add to your summer bucket list for 2017, then look no further! The Rebellion staff recently compiled a list of some of our favorite hidden treasures in Massachusetts that are less than a short day trip away.

A

“As you pull in you’re hit with an amazing scenic view with a huge castle overlooking the water. Even the drive up there is beautiful. After going there once, there’s no doubt that I’ll be back again.” -Lindsay Cordopatri, ‘17

I

W I C H, PS

IDDEN GEMS

Pho Pasteur (Boston, MA)

toN, M os

A

OF MASSACHUSETTS

By Emily Martin and Daanya Salmanullah Editor-in-Chief and Opinion Editor

A

BR

RWOOD,

Pho Pasteur is a Vietnamese restaurant located between Chinatown and the theater district in Boston. This family owned institution was established in 1991 with the goal of providing authentic cuisine at an affordable price. Pho Pasteur has received many awards, some of which include the Best of Boston Award in 1998 for Best Vietnamese, and the 2016 Boston A List Award for Best Vietnamese.

MA

I M F I EL D

NO

GREAT R I N GT O N

,M

BA

A

H

,M

R

MS, M DA

Castle Hill is a part of the Crane Estate in Ipswich, which offers trails for walking and hiking through a scenic route with sea and salt marsh. The hill specifically, however, is a sight to be seen. Placed at the top of a green hill lined with trees, the historic mansion not only functions as a beautiful backdrop for sightseeing and pictures, but also offers a rich history with its origin. Originally owned by John Winthrop Jr, the estate has been around since the 1630s. Eventually, Richard Teller Crane Jr. purchased the estate and built the Italian Renaissance-style villa.

“Ever since I was little, my cousins and I loved going out to the falls when we were visiting each other in the Berkshires. The water is refreshing—especially on really hot days— and unlike anything we have in eastern Massachusetts. With a calm swimming hole and a cliff jump all in one place, there is something for everyone who is looking for a way to escape the heat in the summer. I highly recommend that you make a day trip out to this beautiful place! It is definitely worth the drive!” - Emily Martin ‘17

MA

Bellevue Falls, also known as Dry Brook Falls, is a waterfall that provides a swimming hole and an 8-foot cliff-jumping site in Adams. Set in the Berkshires, this natural landmark combines the beauty of the mountains and rivers with the fun of summertime adventures. The cost of visiting the falls is free, and parking is offered in the nearby Bellevue Cemetery from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. Just keep taking right turns in the cemetery until you come to a white picket fence, and then park and follow the well-worn path down to the swimming hole.

Castle Hill (Ipswich, MA)

B

Bellevue Falls (Adams, MA)

P LA

An Unlikely Story is a bookstore and cafe located in Plainville. The owner of the shop, Jeff Kinney, is best known as the author of the “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” series. Him and his wife started up the bookshop in order to provide a place to host authors’ events and offer a place for residents to enjoy breakfast or lunch while unwinding with a book. With such a unique history, this local bookstore is a must-add to your favorite hang-out spots.

“ “ “It is not a glamorous shopping trip, its more like a hunt for treasure. It’s a large flea market filled with something for everyone. I always come back the next day for something I left behind.” -Lindsey Sullivan, ‘18

“I visited An Unlikely Story with my friends for the first time last summer. It’s a really huge bookstore, but what makes it cool is the atmosphere inside. The store combines whimsical decorations and literary recommendations to create an environment that is more welcoming and versatile than the local Barnes and Noble. The cafe inside is also a great place to sit down with a good book or some school work while you drink coffee.”-Devin McKinney, ‘17

N, MA

“Great Barrington is one of those quaint, little towns that you could see in a movie. There was so much to do for such a small, unknown town! When I visited, I went shopping and grabbed lunch. I loved every single part of the town. One of my favorite parts of my visit was seeing the bookloft. It was a super cute bookstore that I would definitely recommend to anyone interested in reading.“ -Emily Ball, ‘18

Serving as America’s oldest outdoor antiques market, the Brimfield Antique Flea Markets in Brimfield is a fun outing for anyone who enjoys shopping, exploring quirky historical pieces, or is just looking for a new adventure! Lining Main Street for almost a mile, antique shops are abundant and provide a huge site for the fair to take place. With this flea market appearing on the HGTV show “Flea Market Flip,” the market has become a destination for shoppers all over New England. This year, the market will be open May 9-11, July 11-16, and September 5-10. In a market as immense and venerable as Brimfield, you never know what you are going to find!

An Unlikely Story (Plainville, MA)

C ETO

I L LE ,

MA

If you’re looking for a classic New England town, then Great Barrington is the destination for you. Settled in 1726, this town provides the perfect balance of Massachusetts and small town culture. Not only is the town center is lined with cute shops and restaurants, but Great Barrington is also surrounded by similar towns, including Lee, Stockbridge, and Lenox, home of the famous Tanglewood Music Festival, where friends and families gather to hear professional orchestras and choirs perform.

Brimfield Antique Flea Markets (Brimfield, MA)

IN OV

W

PR

A

Great Barrington (Great Barrington, MA)

I NV

“My favorite way to spend the weekend is at a show in downtown Boston followed by a great meal at Pho Pasteur. Their food is mouthwatering, their servings are huge, and their price is phenomenal. I’ve even gone with my broke high school friends and we all agree that you get the best deal for this great four star cuisine.” -Daanya Salmanullah, ‘17

Luke Adams Glass Co. (Norwood, MA) Luke Adams Glass Co. is located in Norwood and is truly a hidden jewel. Not only is it a shop for beautifully sculpted glass works, but also a place for you to experience glass blowing for yourself. Offering classes by hour or specific work, Luke Adams provides a great place to try something new and unique to make your next summer even more memorable with self-made paperweights, jewelry, ornaments and more.

The Lobster Pot (Provincetown, MA) This restaurant, located in the heart of Provincetown at the end of the cape, has been made an icon by both its neon sign and seafood. Whether you want waterfront dining or a more traditional setting, The Lobster Pot offers both accompanied by traditional New England cuisine. Not only has The Lobster Pot received positive accolade from locals, but the restaurant has also received numerous awards for their food, including Best Seafood on the Cape Cod A List, one of Zagat Restaurant Survey’s Top Restaurants on Cape Cod, the favorite for three categories in Cape Cod Life Magazine, and a member of Trip Advisor’s Hall of Fame.

“ “ “When I first visited Luke Adams Glass Co. I was able to learn the art of glassblowing while I made my own glass pumpkin with colors that I chose. Now I go there whenever I want to give someone a special ornament because I know how each and every one of them are handmade.” -Grace Sewell, ‘17

“The few times I have been to The Lobster Pot with my family have been very enjoyable. The restaurant has an excellent location and a fun atmosphere. I absolutely love their lobster grilled cheese and fried oysters. Every time I have been to the Lobster Pot, it has been a very enjoyable experience for my family.” -Ciara Healy, ‘18 Page Design/ Abby Hile Photos/ Daanya Salmanullah, Lindsay Cordopatri, Kayla Frost & Maeve O’Connor


The Rebellion

Page 8

April 2017

Page 9

The Rebellion

If you are looking for destinations to add to your summer bucket list for 2017, then look no further! The Rebellion staff recently compiled a list of some of our favorite hidden treasures in Massachusetts that are less than a short day trip away.

A

“As you pull in you’re hit with an amazing scenic view with a huge castle overlooking the water. Even the drive up there is beautiful. After going there once, there’s no doubt that I’ll be back again.” -Lindsay Cordopatri, ‘17

I

W I C H, PS

IDDEN GEMS

Pho Pasteur (Boston, MA)

toN, M os

A

OF MASSACHUSETTS

By Emily Martin and Daanya Salmanullah Editor-in-Chief and Opinion Editor

A

BR

RWOOD,

Pho Pasteur is a Vietnamese restaurant located between Chinatown and the theater district in Boston. This family owned institution was established in 1991 with the goal of providing authentic cuisine at an affordable price. Pho Pasteur has received many awards, some of which include the Best of Boston Award in 1998 for Best Vietnamese, and the 2016 Boston A List Award for Best Vietnamese.

MA

I M F I EL D

NO

GREAT R I N GT O N

,M

BA

A

H

,M

R

MS, M DA

Castle Hill is a part of the Crane Estate in Ipswich, which offers trails for walking and hiking through a scenic route with sea and salt marsh. The hill specifically, however, is a sight to be seen. Placed at the top of a green hill lined with trees, the historic mansion not only functions as a beautiful backdrop for sightseeing and pictures, but also offers a rich history with its origin. Originally owned by John Winthrop Jr, the estate has been around since the 1630s. Eventually, Richard Teller Crane Jr. purchased the estate and built the Italian Renaissance-style villa.

“Ever since I was little, my cousins and I loved going out to the falls when we were visiting each other in the Berkshires. The water is refreshing—especially on really hot days— and unlike anything we have in eastern Massachusetts. With a calm swimming hole and a cliff jump all in one place, there is something for everyone who is looking for a way to escape the heat in the summer. I highly recommend that you make a day trip out to this beautiful place! It is definitely worth the drive!” - Emily Martin ‘17

MA

Bellevue Falls, also known as Dry Brook Falls, is a waterfall that provides a swimming hole and an 8-foot cliff-jumping site in Adams. Set in the Berkshires, this natural landmark combines the beauty of the mountains and rivers with the fun of summertime adventures. The cost of visiting the falls is free, and parking is offered in the nearby Bellevue Cemetery from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. Just keep taking right turns in the cemetery until you come to a white picket fence, and then park and follow the well-worn path down to the swimming hole.

Castle Hill (Ipswich, MA)

B

Bellevue Falls (Adams, MA)

P LA

An Unlikely Story is a bookstore and cafe located in Plainville. The owner of the shop, Jeff Kinney, is best known as the author of the “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” series. Him and his wife started up the bookshop in order to provide a place to host authors’ events and offer a place for residents to enjoy breakfast or lunch while unwinding with a book. With such a unique history, this local bookstore is a must-add to your favorite hang-out spots.

“ “ “It is not a glamorous shopping trip, its more like a hunt for treasure. It’s a large flea market filled with something for everyone. I always come back the next day for something I left behind.” -Lindsey Sullivan, ‘18

“I visited An Unlikely Story with my friends for the first time last summer. It’s a really huge bookstore, but what makes it cool is the atmosphere inside. The store combines whimsical decorations and literary recommendations to create an environment that is more welcoming and versatile than the local Barnes and Noble. The cafe inside is also a great place to sit down with a good book or some school work while you drink coffee.”-Devin McKinney, ‘17

N, MA

“Great Barrington is one of those quaint, little towns that you could see in a movie. There was so much to do for such a small, unknown town! When I visited, I went shopping and grabbed lunch. I loved every single part of the town. One of my favorite parts of my visit was seeing the bookloft. It was a super cute bookstore that I would definitely recommend to anyone interested in reading.“ -Emily Ball, ‘18

Serving as America’s oldest outdoor antiques market, the Brimfield Antique Flea Markets in Brimfield is a fun outing for anyone who enjoys shopping, exploring quirky historical pieces, or is just looking for a new adventure! Lining Main Street for almost a mile, antique shops are abundant and provide a huge site for the fair to take place. With this flea market appearing on the HGTV show “Flea Market Flip,” the market has become a destination for shoppers all over New England. This year, the market will be open May 9-11, July 11-16, and September 5-10. In a market as immense and venerable as Brimfield, you never know what you are going to find!

An Unlikely Story (Plainville, MA)

C ETO

I L LE ,

MA

If you’re looking for a classic New England town, then Great Barrington is the destination for you. Settled in 1726, this town provides the perfect balance of Massachusetts and small town culture. Not only is the town center is lined with cute shops and restaurants, but Great Barrington is also surrounded by similar towns, including Lee, Stockbridge, and Lenox, home of the famous Tanglewood Music Festival, where friends and families gather to hear professional orchestras and choirs perform.

Brimfield Antique Flea Markets (Brimfield, MA)

IN OV

W

PR

A

Great Barrington (Great Barrington, MA)

I NV

“My favorite way to spend the weekend is at a show in downtown Boston followed by a great meal at Pho Pasteur. Their food is mouthwatering, their servings are huge, and their price is phenomenal. I’ve even gone with my broke high school friends and we all agree that you get the best deal for this great four star cuisine.” -Daanya Salmanullah, ‘17

Luke Adams Glass Co. (Norwood, MA) Luke Adams Glass Co. is located in Norwood and is truly a hidden jewel. Not only is it a shop for beautifully sculpted glass works, but also a place for you to experience glass blowing for yourself. Offering classes by hour or specific work, Luke Adams provides a great place to try something new and unique to make your next summer even more memorable with self-made paperweights, jewelry, ornaments and more.

The Lobster Pot (Provincetown, MA) This restaurant, located in the heart of Provincetown at the end of the cape, has been made an icon by both its neon sign and seafood. Whether you want waterfront dining or a more traditional setting, The Lobster Pot offers both accompanied by traditional New England cuisine. Not only has The Lobster Pot received positive accolade from locals, but the restaurant has also received numerous awards for their food, including Best Seafood on the Cape Cod A List, one of Zagat Restaurant Survey’s Top Restaurants on Cape Cod, the favorite for three categories in Cape Cod Life Magazine, and a member of Trip Advisor’s Hall of Fame.

“ “ “When I first visited Luke Adams Glass Co. I was able to learn the art of glassblowing while I made my own glass pumpkin with colors that I chose. Now I go there whenever I want to give someone a special ornament because I know how each and every one of them are handmade.” -Grace Sewell, ‘17

“The few times I have been to The Lobster Pot with my family have been very enjoyable. The restaurant has an excellent location and a fun atmosphere. I absolutely love their lobster grilled cheese and fried oysters. Every time I have been to the Lobster Pot, it has been a very enjoyable experience for my family.” -Ciara Healy, ‘18 Page Design/ Abby Hile Photos/ Daanya Salmanullah, Lindsay Cordopatri, Kayla Frost & Maeve O’Connor


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Page 10

April 2017

Proud to be local!

Serving individuals, families & businesses since 1912. 982 Main Street • Walpole 508.668.1080 WalpoleCoop.com Member FDIC Member SIF

10" x 13"


A&E

April 2017

Page 11

Visually captivating "Lost City of Z" uncovers unknown story of explorer Percy Fawcett Dazzling new adventure film “Lost City of Z” transports its viewers into the mysterious Amazon alongside a British crew of explorers By Rebecca Boyajian A&E Editor Dusting off historical tales not well known by the general public and translating them onto the big screen is a wildly popular cinematic trend that offers a fresh alternative to the overpopulation of nostalgiaheavy sequels and re-dos. Director and screenplay writer James Gray offers his audience a unique historical gem in his visually captivating adventure film “Lost City of Z.” In the 1920s, Percival Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam), a British soldier with an expertise in mapmaking, is presented with an opportunity to embark on a journey to map the uncharted territory within the Amazon River and jungle. Fawcett is joined on his voyage by crew members Arthur Manley (Edward Ashley) and Henry Costin (Robert Pattinson). After venturing through the perilous obstacles on the course of the Amazon River, the crew happens upon the ruins of an old civilization. The ancient antiques found on the site were far more advanced than what anyone thought could be created at such an early time in the world. Upon the adventurers’ return, they are met with heavy ridicule

Percival Fawcett, played by actor Charlie Hunnam, is pictured above exploring the uncharted Amazon River and jungle.

and doubt when presenting their evidence and ideas of the lost city. Throughout the film (amidst his multiple returns and advances made toward proving the city’s existence), Fawcett continuously claims his journeys are backed by his desire to open people’s minds and show them that the Amazonians, inaccurately and offensively referred to as “savages,” are wildly intelligent people. Charlie Hunnam, known for his role as Jackson Teller in “Sons of Anarchy,” superbly embodies Percy. The role was originally given to Brad

Pitt, but due to scheduling conflicts it was passed down to Hunnam, who ended up blending flawlessly into the chemistry of the film. Since gaining fame for his role as Edward Cullen in the “Twilight” saga, Robert Pattinson has acquired a knack for dramatic acting through multiple roles in independent films, and his experience immensely aided him in his role as explorer Henry Costin. Another major noteworthy performance in the film was by Sienna Miller, known for her roles in films like “Foxcatcher” and “Stardust.”

Miller plays the highly intelligent Nina Fawcett, wife of Percy, who struggles with the rigid gender norms set by society in the 20s. The film’s representation of Percy Fawcett recently came under some scrutiny when historians pointed out the fallacies and misinterpretations between his real-life character and on-screen persona. Director and screenplay writer James Gray’s response to the controversy was that he never claimed that the movie would be a documentary or entirely factual. The controversy sparked a greater discussion as to whether filmmakers have a responsibility to represent a historic story earnestly and authentically or if filmmakers can ethically fudge the truth when cinematic aesthetic is at stake. Pushing aside the drama around the film’s historical accuracy and looking simply at the quality of the film, Gray does a splendid job transforming author David Grann’s novel of the same name into a thoughtful and meaningful film. Overall, “The Lost City of Z” transports its viewers into the deep Amazonian jungle alongside Fawcett and his crew in this dramatic quest to squash closed-mindedness while achieving personal spiritual fulfillment.

The new Netflix releases of April 2017

Any and all Netflix addicts scouring for their next fix, have no fear! Netflix has welcomed many new shows sure to satisfy all binge-watchers. By Emily Butler Staff Writer

“Between”

“Girlboss”

“Bill Nye Saves the World”

Viewers who enjoy a dark or attentiongrabbing series will be rapt within the first episode of new Canadian science fiction drama series “Between.” In the town of Pretty Lake a mysterious disease is killing off citizens 22 years and older and the show centers around the younger population’s frantic efforts to find a way out of town. Jennette McCurdy, star of Nickelodeon’s “iCarly,” plays the pregnant teen daughter of a Pastor who is forced into a government quarantine despite wanting to flee town.

Netflix has finally added its much anticipated series “Girlboss,” based off the novel of the same name which follows the life story of Nasty Gal fashion brand owner Sophia Amoruso. The series focuses heavily on Sophia’s struggles being the founder of the brand Nasty Gal and her experiences creating a startup business. So far the series has one season complete with thirteen episodes and stars lead actress Britt Robertson. Fans of “The Carrie Diaries,” and “Gossip Girl” will inevitably fall in love with the new show.

Just when you thought that Bill Nye’s legacy didn’t expand past the walls of your elementary school classroom, the acclaimed scientist has now made a comeback on Netflix. With one season and thirteen episodes Nye covers a large range of topics spanning from politics, society and pop culture. Bill’s reconstructed show still features his signature quirky humor while offering a diverse range of topics and guest appearances.

New Arrivals

Life in Pieces Absolutely Fabulous Last Man Standing Kevin Hart: What Now

New Movies

Gremlins Cool Runnings Trouble with the Curve Secret Life of Pets

New Originals 13 Reasons Why Sandcastle Sandy Wexler The Crown

New Episodes

Trailer Park Boys Grace and Frankie The Get Down Chewing Gum


Page 12

Lifestyle

April 2017 Layout/Lindsey Sullivan

Going to prom S p r i n g music festivals offer without a date? p r e v i e w t o s u m m e r f a s h i o n t r e n d s

Going dateless does have some benefits By Gabby Donahue Staff Writer

#1) Avoid awkward conversation Going to prom with someone you aren’t super comfortable with can be, well, uncomfortable! Avoid awkward small talk and swap out random chatter about your math teacher for a full-fledged prom table conversation with your friends. #2) Prom prep with your friends Who doesn’t love taking mirror selfies or doing makeovers? Get your friend group together and spend the few hours before prom getting ready together. Put on your favorite jams, break out your polaroid cameras, and go at it! #3) Freedom on the dance floor Going to prom with a date, especially someone you don’t know too well, can be really nerve wracking. Instead of feeling insecure on the dance floor, hit up prom with a group of friends and break out whatever semiembarrassing dance moves you want! #4) No obligations So your date wants you to go to his friends house for pictures, but the rest of your friends are going to the park. And oh, during prom you want him to sit with your friends, but his crew is at a different table. What about deciding where to go after prom? Avoid these conflicts by heading to the big night with your friends and having no obligations to stick around with your

Here are some afford and appropriate ways to incorporate the trends of Coachella into your school wardrobe Graphics/Danielle Borelli

By Grace Donovan Staff Writer For two weekends a year, people from all over the country—some from different parts of the globe—gather in the dust of the Colorado Desert for the most anticipated music festival of the year. Not only does Coachella provide lineups of artists from your favorite indie singers to the A-lister behind this week’s #1 song, the festival is renowned for the exotic bohemian, hipster style sported by its attendees. Coachella trends often foreshadow the summer styles that spread throughout the fashion industry nationwide. Luckily, you do not need to own Rihanna’s $500 narrow lens Fendi sunglasses or stroll around in a barelythere crochet top to capture the essence of Coachella style. Here are some affordable and appropriate ways to incorporate 2017’s Coachella essentials into your everyday school style:

From fringe boots to vests to skirts to jackets, fringe is a necessity when attending Coachella. To make this look your own, try out a simple t-shirt with a fringe trim on the bottom—found at your nearest Forever 21 or Zara—and you will have effortlessly incorporated a Coachella staple into your wardrobe.

While fishnet tights paired with a leather mini skirt or a pair of high waisted shorts may meet Coachella’s dress code, this look can be modified for a more modest appearance. Try wearing your favorite patterned tights underneath your jeans instead. By creating layers, the delicate fishnet design will peek through the rips in your jeans in a more appropriate fashion.

As the wind picks up desert dust, Coachella guests have been pictured using bandanas to shield their faces from the sand—a look straight out of a midwestern cowboy movie. To mimic this look, tie your favorite bandana in your hair to complete a cute messy bun or wrap a handkerchief scarf around your wrist as a bracelet. These unique accessory choices are versatile, so see how they look in your belt loop or hanging from your bag.

By far the biggest trend in footwear this year is platform shoes. Swap out those signature Coachella heavy platform boots for a lighter, more practical pair of stylish platform sneakers. “Superga” platforms are currently all the rage.


April 2017

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Page 13

Next Sunday Class — April 2nd 8:45am-3:30pm Next 1 Week Class — April 17th 8:45am-3:30pm Next Saturday Class — May 13th 8:45am-3:30pm And 1 Week Class — June 26th 8:45am-3:30pm And 1 Week Class — July3rd

8:45am-3:30pm


Sports

Page 14

April 2017

Foley and Hurley commit to Assumption College Lacrosse captains begin their last season as Rebels before becoming Greyhounds By Delaney Murphy Staff Writer

Photo

With the 2017 lacrosse season underway, both Walpole Boys and Girls Lacrosse have impressive records of 8-0 and 6-1 respectively. Senior captains Alison Foley and Jake Hurley have been standout attackers since they stepped on the field freshman year, and both committed to continue their lacrosse careers at Assumption College, a Division II school located in Worcester, MA. “I chose Assumption because I loved the atmosphere. As soon as I walked in for my visit, I felt at home,” said Foley. “It’s really hard to find college coaches that can balance the intensity of college sports and still provide a fun atmosphere for the team, and my coach does that perfectly.” Similarly, Hurley said, “I chose Assumption because it was a good Division II sports school but also a good academic school. I also loved the campus and liked how it isn’t too far away.” Both Foley and Hurley play attack for Walpole High School, a position that entails being on the offensive end and possessing good stick and ball handling skills, as attackers are responsible for most of the scoring. However, both players will switch to the midfield position at Assump-

tion, which requires them to constantly switch their focus from scoring to defending and setting up plays. Foley and Hurley both had impressive junior year performances, highlighted through their

over a decade, beginning in the third grade and devoting much of her time to the sport since then. After the high school season comes to a close, Foley continues to play throughout the summer on club team the Bay State Bullets. Hurley’s love for the sport started even younger, as he picked up lacrosse in the first grade. Like Foley, Hurley has played on the club team the Primetime Penguins during the summer and fall since his sophomore year and played in a box lacrosse league during this past winter. Foley credits her love for to P ho

2016 statistics. At the close of the 2016 season, Foley had 63 goals and 40 assists as well as 102 draw controls, 65 ground balls and 47 caused turnovers. Hurley’s stats proved to be just as impressive, for as in the 2016 season, he racked up 58 goals and 20 assists in 19 games. In addition, Hurley’s 2017 season started off strong with six goals and two assists after the first two games. Foley has been playing lacrosse for

r and Lillie Hunt er O’Conno aeve s/ M

lacrosse to the sport’s i n t e n s i t y. “Nothing compares to the feeling in my gut right before a big game,” said

Foley. “The rush of adrenaline that I feel as I race down the field uncontested ready to snipe a corner of the net or the feeling I get as time slows and I see a gap in the defense to thread a pass through is indescribable.” Intensity was also a major aspect that Hurley loved about the sport. “I love lacrosse because it’s a lot faster than other sports and you’re always moving,” said Hurley. Although both athletes have the opportunity to achieve their goals next year at a collegiate level, they still have to face the inevitable last game wearing a Rebel jersey. Before they step on the field as a Rebel for the last time, both captains have big goals that they hope to help their team accomplish during their last high school season. “I want to continue to improve our record as a team,” said Foley. “Throughout my career in high school lacrosse, our team has continued to go further in tournament each year and this year I expect nothing less. I hope to leave Walpole Lacrosse with a legacy that the youth program can look up to.” “I hope to help lead my team to a successful season and a deep playoff run,” said Hurley. “I hope to continue to prove people wrong.”

Softball starts Dropping the ball: Baseball Rebels loses three games in a row season with 4-1 record Walpole loses to Franklin, St. Johns Walpole Prep and Needham high schools 5-1 in By David Moser Sports Editor Walpole High Baseball started their season with three wins in a row; Milton (8-1), Dedham (4-3) and Xaverian (2-0). Despite this hot start, Walpole dropped their next three games to St. John’s Prep (40), Franklin (4-3), and Needham (7-0). With senior captains Cam Martin, Charlie Auditore and Larry Gaughan at the helm, the Rebels look to get back on the winning track. On the first warm day of spring, Gaughan started on the mound for the Rebels’ opening day versus the Milton Wildcats. Lasting until the sixth inning, Gaughan secured an impressive 8-1 home win. In another exciting feat, Walpole also scored three runs off of Needham’s D1 Northeastern commit — forcing the starter off the mound in only the third inning. Next, the Rebels closed out a 4-3 win over defending Herget champion, the Dedham Marauders. “Dedham was a huge win,” said Martin, who starts in left field. “They won the Herget last season, so beating them means a lot carry-

Photo/ David Moser

Junior Sean McCarthy connects with a pitch against Milton.

ing us into the rest of our season.” Since defeating Dedham, the Rebels beat Xaverian, but their troubles were just about to begin. After three losses against St. John’s Prep, Franklin and Needham, Walpole hopes to turn their season around — especially with hitting. “We have had trouble at the plate in the last couple games, but I am confident that once we start hitting better we will win games” said Martin. The Rebels have a chance to turn their season around on Wednesday, April 25, against the Natick Redhawks.

defeats Needham most recent win.

By Kevin Quinn Staff Writer After losing to Hopkinton in the first round of the playoffs last year, the Rebels look to bounce back this season in an effort to make the playoffs for the second time under coach Sprague. On Monday, April 10, the Rebels opened up the season against the Milton Wildcats with a win. The Rebels had a rocky start after falling 2-0 in the first inning, but went on to win the game by slaughter rule with a final score of 15-7. “The beginning of the game was pretty rough, but it was our first game and we really picked ourselves up after the second and third inning, and the game flowed smoothly after that,” said senior captain Michaela Federico. Next, Walpole took on Dedham on Wednesday, April 12. The Rebels were able to hold on to an early lead to close out the game 6-4. On Thursday, April 13, the Rebels played Brookline. Walpole overwhelmed the Warriors 10-0. During the win, junior Kate Wilmot had her first career no hitter. “The game before I did not pitch that well but going into the Brookline game

Photo/ Kevin Quinn

Junior Maddy Morano stands ready at the plate during Walpole’s game against Milton.

I felt great. All my pitches felt good and they were moving” said Wilmot. Following their huge win over Brookline, Walpole took on King Philip on Wednesday, April 19. The game went back and forth throughout, but the Rebels lost 11-8. Walpole had two more games scheduled — Friday, April 21, against Oliver Ames, and Saturday, April 22, against Notre Dame Academy — but they were both postponed due to weather conditions. After defeating the Needham Rockets 5-1, the Rebels are now 4-1.


April 2017

SPORTS

Page 15

A walk down memory lane Springtime Rebellion staff writers research past Walpole High Teams and clubs By Molly O’Connell, Hope Jordan & Tanya Gupta Staff Writers Before high schools create a new sports team, they typically pilot new teams as clubs to measure popularity before the activity is officially a high school sport. Just this year, a new girls golf club has emerged. With the start up of this new golf club, the Rebellion staff has discovered through faculty interviews and yearbook research other interesting sports and clubs that once were a part of the Walpole High sports culture. For one, Gymnaestrada was a team that consisted of gymnastics routines and dance performances that were not orientated around competing for prizes or medals, but rather focused on their yearly performance. Current physical education teacher Terri Thornton coached the team, along with the rest of the department and the then athletic director, coach John Lee, all worked together to put on the event. The girls and boys gymnastics team worked together for five weeks in order to put on the performance sometime in March. From pyramids to hand stands and even comedy acts, the sport became very popular. “I know the hit of the night was the finale. We called it Tableau. And hand picked kids got painted up silver, so they wore speedos, painted up with silver paint mixed with glycerine, they had bathing caps on and so there entire bodies

Photo/ Terri Thornton

NHL, NBA playoffs, paired with the MLB regular season create an exciting environment for all Boston sports fans Gymnaestrada lines up for a picture at the conclusion of one of their Tableau performances.

were painted,” said Terri Thornton. Over time, the event took off rapidly and it became increasingly hard to get tickets, with a cap placed on the amount of tickets each family could buy. “The first night people were banging on the doors to get in and we had to hire police because we could only seat so many, so we went to two nights,” said Thornton. Towards the end of the 1980s, Gymnaestrada started to hold fewer events as the physical education teachers were getting married and starting their own families. In 1988, the sport came to an end. Another sport that is now just a piece of Walpole’s past is the ski team, which existed as early as 1969. It consisted of cross country and downhill

skiing, which Walpole High School art teacher Sandy Allison was a member of from the years 1978 to 1980. They eventually changed to a club after no one volunteered to become the cross-country coach, and the ski club faded away within the next few seasons. Both Sandra Allison and Sal Reale were interested in starting up the club again, and Allison brought a group to Canada in the late early 2000s. In the end, many teams, clubs and sports have come through Walpole High. Many have had memorable seasons, many have had historic seasons, but Gymnaestrada and the Ski Team are at the top of the list. Now with the start up of a girls’ golf club, Walpole High will have yet another team ready to make its impact on the history books.

Boys Tennis battles for state tournament berth Two freshmen boys stand out on the tennis court during the start of this tennis season By Aidan Chariton Staff Writer After Walpole Boys Tennis did not qualify for the State Tournament last season for the first time in 14 years, this year’s team looks to rebound from its 1-3 start and return to the postseason. Led by senior captain Anish Gali as the top singles player and freshmen Varun Mandulapalli (2nd singles) and Danny Colbert (3rd singles), the team consists of a variety of personnel in regard to age and experience. “We have been playing some really high caliber teams, but they have all been extremely close matches,” said Gali. “Overall I’m excited for this year’s outcome and eager to see the upsets we make this year.” Currently, the freshmen have a 5-3 record. Mandulapalli has won all of his matches except one to a Natick player. Colbert has split his matches, 2-2. Throughout their matches, both Mandulapalli and Colbert have played mostly upperclassmen, as Mandulapalli played 3 seniors and Colbert has played 2 juniors. “Playing against older kids is a different kind of experience which is cool, because we are much younger than them but still get to compete with them,” said Madulapalli. Although this is both Madulapalli and Colbert’s first year playing high school tennis, the game is certainly not new to them. Prior to high school, Madulapalli played competitively in different tournaments. In October of 2016, the United States Tennis Association ranked Madulapalli 86th out of 522 youth players New England region. Colbert

in Boston

Photo/ Lilliam Hunter

Varun Mandulapalli and Danny Colbert pose for a picture after their matches against Catholic Memorial.

never competed at the club level; however, he has been playing in his leisure time for about 6 years. “I’ve played tennis since I was 9 or so, but this is my first time [playing] competitively,” said Colbert. “I really like how high school tennis is an individual sport and a team sport at the same time.” Gali, the team’s number 1 singles player, currently has a record of 1-2 with his one victory being over a strong Catholic Memorial opponent in a tight competition. Additionally, seniors Pat Donovan and Sean Lynch have been making solid contributions for the team in doubles play. Donovan is most prominently known for being the captain of Walpole High School’s historic hockey season this year. He decided

to join the tennis team this spring, with aspirations of translating his success from the ice to the pavement. “It was easy to go from hockey to tennis because the things I really liked about hockey are still there in tennis, like the competitiveness and being apart of a team” said Donovan. “While tennis is less intense [than hockey], it’s still competitive because this team has a commitment to win.” While it is Donovan’s first season, Lynch has four years of high school experience on the tennis court. With their mix of experienced players, the Rebels look to rebound from their 1-3 start and qualify again for the postseason. “We have a lot of potential this year,” said Lynch. “We just got to do better in game situations.”

By David Moser Sports Editor Spring time has to be the best time of the year for Boston sports fans. On any day, there can be Bruins playoff hockey, Celtics playoff basketball, Red Sox regular season rivalries, or all three. Another recent Super Bowl from the Patriots does not hurt either. Second baseman, hockey winger and diehard Boston sports fan, senior Paul Heffernan said, “This is the best time of the year for Boston sports because the Bruins and Celtics are entering the playoffs and the Red Sox begin their season.” Despite not being playoff time, the Red Sox season is no less exciting. The Sox are currently 11-8 with their most recent win over the Baltimore Orioles, 6-2. Heffernan added, “So much going on always gives hope and happiness to all Boston fans. Besides the Sox, Bruins and Celtics, the Patriots are busy making offseason deals and preparing for the draft. During the early spring every year, all four teams are in crucial stages of their championship pursuits, and with talent across the board Boston fans can hopefully expect success and progress over the next few months.” Finishing their season with a final record of 44-31-7, the Bruins clinched their first playoff berth in three years. Although the Senators unfortunately eliminated Boston with an OT winner in Game 6 (3-2), the Bruins — with 11 players of their Game 6 roster playing in their first Stanley Cup series — look poised and ready for another playoff appearance in the years to come. Concurrent with the NHL playoffs, the NBA postseason is also underway The Celtics, after securing first place in the east with a final record of 53-29, have been battling the eight seed, Chicago Bulls. As of Monday, April 24, the Celtics and Bulls are tied two games apiece. In the end, spring in Boston is such an exciting time all because of its four championship caliber teams. For the better part of the last 17 years, Boston has seen five Super Bowl victories for the Patriots, three World Series championships for the Red Sox, one Stanley Cup championship for the Bruins, and one NBA Finals championship for the Celtics. With each team firing on all cylinders so often, there is never a dull moment while being a Boston sports fan.


Feature

Page 16

April 2017

Walpole High: Around the World

This Spring Break, Walpole High School’s language and science departments chaperoned three trips abroad: France, Galapagos and Ecuador, and Taiwan. By Devin McKinney News Editor

FRANCE Photos/ Caroline Pitman

For the first time in Walpole High School history, a group of students traveled to the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. Science teachers Susan Wick, Lindsey Reichheld and Leah Milne took 19 students ranging from sophomores to seniors to the country through the program EF International Tours. The EF program aims to provide a more holistic cultural immersion of the country as opposed to simply a tourist perspective. The group began their trip in Quito, where they got the opportunity to explore and experience the city. The students then made their way to the Andes Mountains in which they visited various villages and volunteered to help build a school in the lo-

cal area. The students also got the chance to live one day in the life of local women in these villages to observe cultural differences in depth. The group finally flew to the Galapagos islands in which they traveled to four of the five islands: San Cristobal, Santa Cruz, Baltra and Isabela. They traveled to nature reserves where the tour guides taught them about the diverse wildlife found on the islands. “Our time in the Galapagos was very meaningful because some of the wildlife there doesn’t exist anywhere else in the world, so it is interesting to see how the animals there aren’t afraid of people because they haven’t learned fear,” said senior Taylor Petrucci.

Photo/ Lisa Osborne

The students and teachers who went to France toured numerous places, including those pictured of Monet’s Garden and the Eiffel Tower.

Photos/ Taylor Petrucci

Eiffel Tower, Opéra, Versailles and Mont Saint-Michel, which is considered to be the eighth wonder of the world. The students emphasized the importance of the new friendships that they formed while on the trip. “I think it was cool that the group was really close by the end of [the trip]. I couldn’t have asked for a better group to go with,” said junior Ellen Irmiter. Students were also able to apply their language skills while participating in a culturally enhancing trip. “Students were able to experience French culture beyond the classroom, use their linguistic skills speaking French, and hopefully develop an interest in becoming a lifelong traveler,” said Osborne.

ECUADOR & THE GALAPAGOS ISLANDS

Students who went to Ecuador and the Galapagos visited the village of Alausi and the national park on the island of San Cristobal.

TAIWAN The students who went to Taiwan explored the Wutai Township as well as the tea plantations of the Meishan township.

Photos/ Ryan Barry

Foreign language department head Lisa Osborne and English department head Lauren Culliton took 16 students, ranging from sophomores to juniors, to France. The students left on Saturday April 15 and returned on April 22. They first visited the province of Normandy in which they toured the site of the D-Day battle as well as Château de Chambord and Giverny (Monet’s garden). “Going on this trip, I didn’t realize that I was going to see the whole country. Exploring Monet’s Garden and the Chateaus of Normandy, and even just driving from place to place, I really felt like I was able to see all of France,” said junior Tara Gordon. The students also visited the Musée d’Orsay, Invalides, the

Nineteen Students traveled to Taiwan over April break, the biggest group that Mandarin teacher Gordon Strick has brought abroad out of the four trips he has chaperoned since 2009. Strick, along with Latin teacher Gabriel Bakale and Special Education teacher Margaret Fisher chaperoned the trip. The group flew into Taipei, the capital of Taiwan, at the beginning of break. The city of Taipei offered various attractions, one of which is Taipei 101, one of the tallest buildings in the world, as well as night markets, museums, temples and mountains. “My favorite part of the trip was driving through the mountains. We could see everything; we had a view of the cities, fields and little towns spread throughout the valley. It was amazing,” said junior Ryan Barry.

However, probably the most anticipated part of the trip was the excursion to a coral island off the coast of Taiwan called Xiaoliuqiu where the students got to go snorkeling. Strick brought students to China twice before switching over to Taiwan. Strick emphasized the benefits of traveling to Taiwan as both a culturally and academically enriching experience. “Taiwan is the best of China, it’s the first democracy in 5,000 years of Chinese history. It is very traditional, and everyone speaks Mandarin,” said Strick. “[The country] is friendly, safe, and clean, it has all of the best aspects of China that make it both culturally interesting and also educational because they can practice their Chinese.” Page Design/ Abby Hile

April 2017  

Volume XX Issue V

April 2017  

Volume XX Issue V

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