Page 1

Walpole High School

March 2017

Volume XX, issue IV Winter Sports Playoff Coverage Page 16

Coach Murphy retires Page 13

WALPOLE, MA 02081

NON PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO.8

Trump’s First 100 Days

Page 12

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Boys Hockey makes history Super 8 Round One series against BC is all tied up Photo courtesy of Kelly Heffernan

Seniors Colin Buckley, Luke Donovan, and Cam Martin celebrate Walpole’s win over Catholic Memorial on Feb. 2.

By David Moser Sports Editor ing

Walpole Boys Hockey is havtheir most historic season

ever — and it’s not over yet. Finishing the regular season with the best record in Walpole High’s history of 21-0-1, Walpole qualified for the Super 8 Tournament for the first time in

the history of the program, a first not only for the Rebels but also for any other Bay State Conference Herget team. On Feb. 2, the Rebels defeated Catholic Memorial 2-1 in a play-in game to officially advance to the Super Eight Tournament, where the eight best teams in Massachusetts compete to decide a state champion. With a victory against #2 Boston College High School on March 5 and a loss on March 7, the #7 Rebels are currently tied 1-1 in a three game series. Game Three will be Saturday night in Chelmsford. “Making the tournament is really cool because Walpole is not really known as a hockey town. It is more football, so bringing hockey into the school where everyone is rallying around us is really cool,” said senior captain, goalie James Corcoran. Since a team’s acceptance into the Super Eight can be greatly affected by difficulty of schedule or program reputation, it can be a challenge for public school teams like Walpole to get into the Super Eight because of their untested reputation and questionable schedules. Continued on Page 13

SheBreathes displays student artwork Local business uses art to empower women of all ages By Emily Ball Lead Reporter The SheBreathes Balance and Wellness Studio, located on West Street, is holding an exhibit geared toward empowering women. The studio also offers various classes—such as yoga, spiritual mediumship, and writing workshops— in order to promote a healthy mind and body. The art exhibit will be displaying the artwork of Walpole High School females from February 28 until April 1. Allison Pace, an art teacher at the high school, selected the artwork of ten female students in her Printmaking class to be featured at the SheBreathes exhibition: Lucy Gielow, Tianna Gonser, Allison Heiberger, Amanda Janowicz, Ashley Kuropatkin, Kendra Niziak, Ava Straccia, Madison Weber, Jacqueline Welch, and Alexis Winston. “I decided to include pieces from a project we did in my Printmaking classes,” said Pace. “I felt that this particular project, which incorporates text from a blackout poetry exercise, relates to the mission of SheBreathes Studio.” Junior Amanda Janowicz, one of the students whose artwork was selected, was inspired by a poem that centered around women’s empower-

Photo/ Lillie Hunter

Before a yoga class, a Walpole resident observes the Walpole High School student artwork on exhibition until April 1 at SheBreathes Balance and Wellness Studio.

ment and incorporated it into her piece. “I took the words ‘she moved’ from my poem and incorporated them into my artwork,” said Janowicz. “I am so excited that my work will be on display at the SheBreathes studio.” Jennifer Gulbrand, the founder of SheBreathes, believes that every woman has her own strength, and she is committed to guide women to find this inner strength as well as a balance in life. “We empower women by offering the

venue as a place of opportunity for sisterhood and support,” said Beth Knaus, an independent art consultant and freelance writing instructor at SheBreathes. “At SheBreathes, we’re tapping into our feminine energy to encourage ourselves and other women to ‘learn to receive’—put themselves back on the list with permission to nurture themselves, find their center, accept goodness and possibility into their lives, and encourage other women to do the same.”

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WORLD

NEWS By Brynne Bergen Staff Writer The following briefs are all highlights from the World News section of The New York Times. For longer stories, visit www.nytimes.com. Assassination of Kim Jong-Un’s Half Brother believed to be an inside job Half brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, Kim Jong-nam, was assassinated at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Malaysia on Monday, Feb. 13. Kim Jong-nam was killed with VX nerve agent by two women from Indonesia and Vietnam; however, the murder is believed to be perpetrated by the North Korean government. One of the women claims that she was paid by foreign men to carry out what she thought would be a harmless prank. Attacks from ISIS shift from East Afghanistan to North Afghanistan Islamic State militants ambushed and killed ten police officers in the northern province of Zawzjan in Afghanistan on Friday, Feb. 24. The police force was attacked as they departed from a mosque in the province. In addition to the ten police officers, the wife of the police commander was also killed when she arrived at the scene upon hearing gunshots. Although the Islamic State militants have been known for working in Afghanistan’s eastern regions, they have begun to take action in northern Afghanistan as well. Anti-immigration protests take place in South Africa’s capital Pretoria On Friday, Feb. 24, South Africa’s administrative capital of Pretoria was the site of a violent protest led by antiimmigrant South African citizens. In response, police used tear gas, rubber bullets and water cannons to put a stop to the protest. This encounter is not the first sign of foreigner hatred; however, the protest does highlight a recent rise in anti-immigrant violence. Protesters are concerned that immigrants contribute to a higher crime rate and less jobs for the South African people. To counteract the effects of these foreigners, protesters have begun to target immigrants communities and businesses.


NEWS

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March 2017

Walpole High’s annual concert to benefit music students

Music Department turns Pops Night into fundraiser for Michael Falker Scholarship By Tara Gordon Assistant News Editor

of Falker’s WHS legacy is undoubtedly Pops Night, where family and friends watch and listen to all music Michael Falker, Walpole High students perform popular pieces in a School’s previous music department very decorated WHS gymnasium on leader, spent over 40 years teaching a Friday night every May. This year, and conducting Walpole students in music department head Kenneth Gable band, chorus, and the concert orchestra has found a way to simultaneously raise before his passmoney and honor Falker’s WHS legacy. ing in 2015. A Starting this year on Wedneslarge part day, May 24, the Walpole High School annual Pops Night will serve as a fundraiser for the Michael Falker Scholarship, a program created shortly after Falker’s death. The Michael Falker Scholarship, established by Gable and the Walpole Music Department, presents financial aid to Walpole students who want to further their music career, but may not have the means to fund it. “I had talked to students, and the reoccurring theme was that Mr. Falker always mentored kids financially, so if a student couldn’t rent an instrument or couldn’t go on a trip he would find a way to Pictured above is Michael Arthur’s cartoon drawing for the scholarship foundation. Michael Arthur is a Brooklyn-based artist who works have appeared get that money,” in The New York Times, Vanity Fair other famous news outlets. Following Falker’s said Gable. “So it seemed fitting passing, Arthur created the sketch above and printed the graphic on t-shirts, that we would framed pictures, and other items to help raise money for the Foundation.

create a scholarship where the mon- sell ads in the programs,” said Gable. ey is going to go to any music stuIn the months leading up to dent K-12 who needed the money.” Pops Night, preparations are alAs the scholarship has been ready going into the event. around for approximately two years “We haven’t made an exorbitant now, Gable plans to raise money amount of money in Pops Night in the in order to continue the program. past, and rather we just come close to “The first two years [the music depart- breaking even after rentals and cost of ment] did nothing for fundraising, we tables,” said Gable.”But this year, we got a lot of donations in the beginning are reaching out to everyone saying this but I would will be a benlike to try to efit event, so al“I think it’s really beauti- ready our table keep a certain amount ful that Mr. Falker can live company has of money reduced their on through this scholarship cost, and now in the account at all because in a way, he’s still we are asktimes,” said for donahelping others create music.” ing Gable. “That tions as well.” -Greg Bond, ‘17 way we are Gearing tonever in wards the anthe position nual Pops where we can’t help someone out.” Night, music students look forward to In the past months, Gable de- performing and helping raise money cided to turn the Pops Night into for the Michael Falker Scholarship. a fundraiser for the program. “I think it’s really beautiful that Mr. “This year, I’ve been thinking of a lot Falker can live on through this scholarof ideas to raise money, and it just kind ship because in a way, he’s still helpof came to me that we have our pops ing others create music,” said senior concert in May every year. This was cre- Greg Bond, a former student of Falker. ated by Michael Falker, so it seemed fit- “Even in the afterlife, he has this legacy ting to tie the two together,” Gable said. helping others do what he loved best.” Gable has devised a couple of “It is certainly a dedication to him, ways to incorporate fundraising for based on what he has given to the comthe scholarship into Pops Night. munity and Walpole Public Schools,” “One is we are adding a raffle and real- said Gable. “We are carrying that ly looking for five or six big ticket items legacy of taking care of music stuto raffle off. In addition, we will also dents just like he did for 40 years.”

Trump takes sizable action in his first 100 days Executive orders, presidential memoranda, cabinet controversy: a breakdown of what has happened within the first 100 days of the Trump administration By Devin McKinney News Editor

In accordance with another one of his campaign promises, Trump also ordered the immediate construction of a Twelve executive orders, 12 presi- 1,900 mile wall along the U.S.’s border dential memoranda, 14 cabinet with Mexico. This action is related to members confirmed—all completed Trump’s commitment to border secuwithin in the first month and a half rity, and the construction of the wall of Donald J. Trump’s presidency. could mean more jobs for Americans. Since the Clinton administration, The majority of these executive orTrump is the first ders are focused on president to issue an either immigration executive order on control or internal Since the Clinton his first day in ofcrime problems, administration, Trump fice, and similar to as Trump also isis the first president former-president sued various orto issue an executive Barack Obama, ders and memoTrump issued five of order on his first day in randa that deal these orders during with abating drug office. his first week in office. trafficking, illegal Trump’s executive actions are con- immigration and violent crime, espesistent with many of the promises he cially against law enforcement officers. made during his presidential campaign: One of the most debated actions taken repealing the Affordable Care Act by Trump, however, was the immigra(Obamacare), building a wall along the tion ban executive order, which barred U.S.’s southern border, and restoring Syrian refugees from entering the the nation’s declining infrastructure. country indefinitely and also prevented The implications of several of these Muslims from Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, orders are not in full effect, yet they Yemen, and Somalia from entering the are starting to take shape on a national country for a period of three months. level. Trump’s first executive order, re- This action was recently met with a repealing the Affordable Care Act, is in vised immigration ban, which will go the process of changing the previous into effect on March 16, that removes laws made possible by Obamacare; Iraq from the list of banned countries, recently, the House of Representatives allows people who were previously recently authorized a budget that would issued visas to enter the country, and allow parts of the Act to be repealed reduces the refugee ban from an indefidespite the Trump administration’s nite time period to a 120 day restriction. lack of a replacement for Obamacare. The Trump administration issued

Trump attempts to fulfill his “Make America Great Again” slogan by fulfilling wishes of many of his supporters, including new restrictions on immigration, building a wall, and ending Obamacare.

a memorandum that abandoned the Trans-Pacific Partnership (T.P.P), a trade agreement between 12 countries that was established by Barack Obama. The T.P.P. was not yet approved by Congress; however, by abandoning this treaty, Trump has again emphasized his focus on internal affairs. In addition to the multitude of executive actions, most of the president’s cabinet picks have been confirmed by the Senate. Among these picks include Rex R. Tillerson as Secretary of State, Jeff Sessions as Attorney General, Betsy Devos as Education Secretary and General H.R. McMaster as National Security Advisor (after the resignation of Mike Flynn as a result of his connec-

tion with Russia). There has also been scrutiny over the recently revealed actions of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who spoke twice with the Russian ambassador to the U.S., Sergey Kislyak, while he was a campaign advisor. Sessions later denied ever having any conversations with Russian officials regarding the presidential campaign, but later recused himself from this and any ensuing investigation about the issue. With both the implications of the executive orders and the debate regarding his own cabinet the first month and a half of Trump’s presidency has been marked by a myriad of new policies and decisions that have sparked discussions on both ends of the political spectrum.


March 2017

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DEDHAM SAVINGS is pleased to present

THE WALPOLE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AND CLASSES OF THE MONTH STUDENTS OF THE MONTH

DECEMBER

SENIOR COLLEGE WRITING TAYLOR PETRUCCI Taylor has worked hard all year, but I have been especially impressed with her during her position paper process. Throughout the unit, she asked questions, dived deeper into the research, and continued to expand her understanding of the topic past the requirements. Her final essay reflected all of the hard work she put into the research and writing process. I admire her dedication to her craft and have enjoyed working with her this year. -Ms. Gould JUNIOR ALGEBRA II AMANDA JANOWICZ Amanda has been doing excellent work in Algebra 2. She shows a thorough understanding of the concepts covered. Particularly noteworthy was her score of 49/50 on the quiz on graphing rational functions. Amanda is able to identify key characteristics of rational functions and sketch their graphs. She can also write equations of both polynomial and rational functions satisfying given conditions. Her outstanding factoring skills serve her well when performing operations with rational expressions. Amanda is always prepared for class with her homework completed. Her work is neat and well organized. She is a pleasure to have in class. -Mrs. Kathleen Milne SOPHOMORE GEOMETRY VICTOR NAVARRO Victor is a very hard worker in class. He has not missed a homework all year and is a leader in our class discussions. We work in groups and we have put a few kids in his group that are struggling because we know Victor will help them. He always takes the time to make sure his group members understand the problem and works very well with them. -Mr St. Martin FRESHMAN FRENCH JADA TAYLOR Jada is kind. Jada walks into class smiling and really wants to know how everyone is feeling about the day. Jada will give hugs and talk it out with you. She has a calming way about her. Jada is doing very well in French class and has a beautiful accent. She loves to learn and she confirms that she gets the lesson with a smile and a nod. Jada will compliment someone during a lesson so that it is hard to be in a bad mood in this class. The class works well together and the giggling is refreshing when a difficult verb conjugation, a French grammar rule exception, is being discussed. Jada is a committed member of the Random Acts of Kindness club (RAK) as well. If you find a complimentary note on your locker, or a handwritten letter of praise, you can bet that Jada wrote it. If you see Jada, say hello and smile. She is wonderful! -Mrs. Frattasio

AVA STRACCIA

ACTIVITY AWARD

SPEECH AND DEBATE TEAM

Ava Straccia should definitely be the Extra-Curricular Student of the Month. She has emerged as a leader on this team. She took the lead of our second multiple reading, “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory�, by getting the script, cutting it with her peers, and organizing and directing rehearsals. Ava also attends all meetings and always responds to emails. As our Publicity Chair, she is extremely helpful when I need feedback from the executive board. Not only is she a leader on the team, but she has also inspired other students with her recent victories at tournaments by placing 3rd and 2nd in Play Reading. Bravo, Ava! -Mrs. Murray

CLASS OF THE MONTH ANATOMY

PERIOD 1

My Period 1 Honors Anatomy class is consistently exceeding my expectations, and they do so with enthusiasm. This group is engaged, attentive, ambitious and so much fun to interact with. Keep up the fantastic work, Period 1 - I am so proud of you all! -Ms. Walleston

CITIZEN OF THE MONTH SHERAYNA LOUISSAINT Sherayna is the reason that most of us in this building have a wonderful day. She has the ability to remind us to be kind and to feel concern for others. Sherayna does not know everyone in the school yet she makes sure to look a person in the eye and ask how he/she is, and will actually listen to what he/she has to say. She cares. She is beautiful inside and out. I would like to acknowledge how lucky we all are to have her in our school. Sherayna will do great things for our world. -Mrs. Frattasio


EDITORIALS

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March 2017

Society must be better informed about the Feminist Movement In order to develop an accurate opinion of the Feminist Movement and its goals, people must be educated on the evolution and progression of the group as a whole By Daanya Salmanullah Editorials Editor The success of the Women’s March on Washington and its sister marches on Jan. 21 has catapulted the world into an ongoing discussion of what it means to be a woman in modern society. Celebrities such as America Ferrera and Scarlett Johansson took to the streets with government officials and citizens alike to draw attention to the feminist movement and its ambitions regarding the inauguration of Donald J. Trump as the 45th President of the United States. The media has consequently followed in an ongoing discussion of the future of feminism; however, to truly understand feminism, you must look back into the history of feminism. Western feminism has traditionally been categorized into waves that track the progression of the movement as a whole. The first wave of feminism broadened the 19th and 20th centuries over primarily overturning laws regarding women’s suffrage. Second-wave feminism then hit in the 1960s and continued into the 1980s expanding its fight to include issues of gender norms and the role of women in society as a whole.

Don’t

Photo/ Mikaela McSharry

Photo/ Nell Gordon

ABOVE: Protesters in Washington, D.C. showcase the power of women coming together for a common cause. LEFT: A marcher in Boston, MA emphasizes the importance of gender equality among all humans.

The most modern form of feminism is referred to as the third wave: its goal is to continue to fight for the goals of the second movement. Despite the adaptation of feminism over time, the definition of feminism has never changed. Because the word “feminism” seems to favor one gender over the other only from its composition, it comes as no sur-

waste

money

prise that most people think a feminist favors the success of women over the success of men. The word “misogynist” — or a person who hates, dislikes, mistrusts, or mistreats women — also leads people to believe that feminists must hate men, or wish for their downfall. The assumed definition nevertheless goes directly against the actual mean-

on

prom

ing of the word. According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, the primary definition of feminism is the the theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes: the word clearly diverges from its supposed meaning. Before you condemn or support this movement, make sure to understand its history and true purpose.

this

year

Girls can easily find cheaper alternatives when shopping during prom season By Kayla Frost Social Media Director If spending a lot of money on prom creates the perfect night for you, then by all means, spend away! However, it i s still possible to have an unforgettable night in a twenty dollar dress and a cute DIY updo if you are someone who is on a strict budget. As prom season rapidly approaches, some students have already spent anywhere from three hundred to six hundred dollars on their prom dress alone, not to mention the additional cost of hair, makeup, accessories, transportation, photographers, and the prom ticket itself— Dress: $64.00, Shoes: $39.00, Necklace: $5.00, Total: $108.00 future expenses that really add up to a costly night. One piece of the prom package that you can cut down is the price of your

dress. Why spend so much money on a dress that you wear for only one night? There’s no way anyone can resell an old dress and get the original ticket price. Instead of buying an expensive dress from stores like Nordstrom and other designer boutiques or ordering a dress online from an upscale designer like Sherri Hill, there are many cheaper alternatives for dress shopping. For example, borrowing someone else’s dress from a prior year past, or buying a seco n d hand dress from a consignm e n t store will save money. Even ordering a dress on Amazon or a website like lulus. com will save money. Choosing a cheaper dress does not make the dress any less beautiful. As far as shoes go, don’t both- er spending a lot of money on shoes because nobody will see them under your long dress, and you will probably end up taking them off five minutes after you walk into the building. The more simple the shoe is, the less likely it is to break the bank, and the less likely it is to make your feet swell up like balloons. Some beauty tasks are easy to complete on your own, even if they take a

little practice. There is an outrageous ford the expense of prom. Prom amount of hairstyle tutorials coordinator Sandy Allison on YouTube that can teach (sallison@walpole.k12.ma.us) you how to do your own hair. and assistant principal Lee Many salons will charge a higher Tobey (ltobey@walpole.k12. price during prom season, and ma.us) coordinate this projoften the look does not turn out ect that can provide how you expected. Asking students with a your hairdresser for a simple dress, shoes or bun and winding up with a potential gift random style that you are certificates going to cry about in to hair or the car on the way home beauty sauntil you eventually take lons. This the whole thing out is too organizaexpensive, and an awkward tion can situation entirely when you also offer have to lie through your a great opteeth and say you love it. portunity The same concept to clear applies to makeup as out your well. It is cheaper to closet, as buy your own makeup they also at a drugstore and practice a accept couple of times before prom to any used find a look that works for dresses you. Paying someone to (drymake it look l i k e y o u have p e a nut butter smeared across your face if they apply a foundation Dress: $350.00, Shoes: $99.95, cleaned first of that is too thick and orange for your Necklace: $50.00, Total: $499.95 course!). skin tone, is simply a waste of monFive years from now, nobody will reey, especially if you can do your own member how you looked at prom except makeup and apply it in a way that you for you, so dress yourself up in a way know complements your own face. that makes you feel beautiful, and don’t Also, the Fairy Godmother Project is drop all of your life savings on a dress another option for students unable to af- that you think will impress other people.


EDITORIALS

March 2017

Page 5

Walpole and Norwood Residents must work together to reopen Ryan Drive entrance to Windsor Gardens Commuters

need

By Sanjana Bhagavatula Staff Writer The Walpole Rebels and Norwood Mustangs rivalry, notorious amongst all athletes, fires up emotions and team spirit. Such games always have the biggest turnout and are easily some of the most exciting games of the season. With everyone getting involved, the rivalry is part of both towns’ cultures. But, with all rivalries put aside, how do the towns work together on issues involving both their residents? Would they compromise on the safety of the residents of one town to benefit the other? The recent issue around the MBTA commuter rail station at Windsor Gardens in Norwood sparks up the debate, as Walpole commuters using the station face inconvenience and safety issues. Until the summer of 2016, commuters avoided the morning traffic jam in the Windsor Gardens parking lot by using an unofficial second entrance to the station, located at Ryan Drive, Norwood. Constructed out of wooden pallets, the entrance was weak, unsafe, and crossed the tracks in a dangerous manner. Although it was dangerous, many Walpole residents took the risk to shorten their commute to the same station. In August, however, the back entrance to the station was officially closed by The Norwood Board of Selectmen due to complaints from Ryan Drive residents. The residents asserted matters of safety in their argument: commuters dropped off in cars on the dead end street and created morning and rush hour traffic, jeopardizing the safety of children in the area. Cars parked there for the duration of the work day by travellers caused congestions, making it difficult for school buses to enter and exit the street. In terms of working together, the unofficial entrance seemed to benefit the Walpole commuters while threatening the safety of Norwood residents. The residents of Ryan Drive had a right to complain, especially as the unofficial entrance proved to threaten their safety. The Norwood Board of Selectmen also addressed liability issues concerning commuters crossing the train tracks by way of a makeshift wooden pathway that shortens their walks to the station. When it comes to issues involving both towns, safety takes precedence to all other inconveniences. Closing the entrance at Ryan Drive, however, turned the tables on the safety issue. Walpole commuters that walk to the station have now opted for walking to the main entrance via 1-A/Main St. Main St, intersecting with Mylod St, is a busy road, especially during peak morning travel hours where there is high-speed traffic. The lack of sidewalks also makes it dangerous for pedestrians to walk to the station. During winter, snow banks narrow the roads, side roads become icy and the morning darkness makes it difficult for drivers to see pedestrians. The inconvenience of the lack of a second entrance and the dangerous high speed traffic of 1-A/ Main St. have caused several travelers to stop using the Windsor Gardens station altogether. Commuters have turned to driving into Boston or to another station with available parking, as parking space at the station is given only to residents at the Berkshires at Windsor Gardens.

alternative

access

The citizens of Walpole proposed an alternate option, keeping in mind the issues from both Norwood and Walpole residents: opening up the second entrance at Ryan Dr. to pedestrians only. By creating a safe pathway for crossing the tracks, liability issues would be addressed. Ryan Drive residents would no longer face the dangers posed by cars and traffic in the dead end. By opening the second entrance to pedestrians

to

train

station

for

only, the of plight daily walkers will be satisfied, as they no longer have to take the risk of walking on Main St. Closing the entrance to pedestrians only eliminates the concerns of traffic safety for local residents. Officiating the entrance will also appeal to those who have stopped using the entrance due to safety concerns on 1A/Main St, bringing back business to the Windsor Gardens MBTA commuter rail station.

Residents from The Estates at Walpole now take this longer route to Windsor Gardens, a route that lacks sidewalks and can be hazardous during the winter.

safety

concerns

If the construction of a second entrance is approved, funds will be requested from MBTA, as the second entrance will ultimately increase their business. Instead of jeopardizing one town’s safety for the ease of another, the new proposal aims to benefit residents from both towns. Although Walpole and Norwood may have their differences on the sports pitch, the safety of all residents is always their number one priority.

Residents from The Estates at Walpole previously took this route to Windsor Gardens before the MBTA blocked the entrance via Ryan Drive in Norwood.

REBELLION

Staff

Walpole High School’s newspaper is committed to informing the public, reflecting the students’ views, creating a public forum and serving as an educational medium.

Check out our website whstherebellion.com

Send a Letter to the Editor. Letters Should be 200 Words or fewer, and can be emailed to walpolerebellion@gmail.com

Editors-in-Chief Business Manager Emily Martin Meghan Foley Andrea Traietti Assistant Business ManNews Editor ager Devin Mckinney Grace Sewell Assistant News Editor Layout Editor Tara Gordon Abigail Hile Editorial Editor Social Media Daanya Salmanullah Editor Assistant Editorials Kayla Frost Editor Photo Editor Lindsey Sullivan Maeve O’Connor Entertainment/LifeGraphic Editor style Danielle Borelli Editor Staff Photographers Rebecca Boyajian Ciara Healy Sports Editor Lillian Hunter David Moser Cameron Johnson Lead Reporter Julia Kane Emily Ball Caroline Pitman

Mandy Scully Staff Writers Breanna Andreassi Brynne Bergen Megan Brigham Emily Butler Aidan Chariton Craig Cieplik Eva Clarke Lindsay Cordopatri Gabriella Donahue Michaela Donato Grace Donovan Jessica Ferguson Elizabeth Foley Sophia Giovaniello Tanya Gupta Catherine Hurwitz Hope Jordan

Caitlin Kahaly Emily Linclon Kelsey Mazzocca Katherine Mazzotta Abigal McLaughlin Brendan Moser Delaney Murphy Molly O’Connell Olivia O’Connell John O’Meara Kevin Quinn Alexis Rodia Callie Ross Samantha Simons Emily Smith Nicole St. Germain Rachel Tetreault Melanie Weber Sydney Weinacht Thomas Wilber


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March 2017

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The Rebellion

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Students together Editorial By Andrea Traietti and Michaela Donato Editor-in-Chief and Staff Writer Walpole Public Schools administrators and School Committee members are currently working to change Walpole High’s curriculum and daily class schedule. Specifically, there is one major change surrounding the Physical Education curricu-

lum: future WHS students will be required to take one semester-long (half school year) physical education course all four years of high school. The change comes with Walpole High’s 2017 Coordinated Program Review (CPR), which occurs every six years. The CPR provides a holistic evaluation of Massachusetts schools, examining and rating

If the current seven-course schedule remains, Physical Education will limit access to elective courses such as: -Art -Music -TV Production -Journalism -Film -Woodshop -Foreign Languages -Computer Programming -Entrepreneurship -Personal Finance

March 2017

The Rebellion

Page 9

and Administration should work to adjust to P.E. curriculum change every component of the school environment and academics, and ensuring that the school is in compliance with federal and state laws. This year, administration has chosen to address one specific law that Walpole High School has violated for a number of years: Chapter 71, Section 3. This law, revised in 2000, states, “Physical education shall be taught

as a required subject in all grades for all students in the public schools for the purpose of promoting the physical well-being of such students.” Right now, the Walpole High School Student Handbook requires only one semester of physical education total in order for students to fulfill the graduation requirement. The school has held this standard for six years, thus violating the law since the start of the 2011-2012 school year. However, when the law was first enacted in 2000 Walpole was actually in compliance, requiring students to participate in four years of physical education. The Walpole High curriculum was in fact following the law in 2011, at the time of the last CPR. However, shortly after, the curriculum changed to its current status, requiring only one semester of physical education. In order to amend this violation, Walpole High School will revert to the policy used prior to 2011 and will require all students, beginning with the Class of 2021, to take a one-semester physical education course every year of high school. While this change does put Walpole High in check with the Massachusetts law, it threatens the crucial diversity of opportunities that Walpole High currently affords its students. Foreign language, art, business, technology and intense academic classes flourish with the current one-year, single semester physical education requirement, a minimal requirement that doesn’t limit schedule flexibility. Students can experiment with and concentrate on specialized courses that really interest them, and these courses can both provide a relief for students and expose them to interests they did not know they had. If Walpole High enacts the new fouryear requirement, students will not be able to pursue the classes that interest them because the one-semester gym course will limit the course options that fit in their schedules. Tough decisions between passions and requirements will arise for many students, and this curriculum shift will rob students of opportunities to learn about themselves and about plausible paths for their futures. Frustrating as the scheduling process is now, it will grow increasingly more frustrating as guidance struggles to balance students’ academic needs with this gym requirement. In fact, is it even possible to fit 1,200 students into gym classes

during the available seven periods each semester when there are only three physical education teachers? Alongside these practical issues with the new requirements, the inelasticity of the current seven period schedule presents an even larger problem. In order to maintain students’ ability to take choice classes (not to improve students’ opportunities, just to maintain them), administration will need to reconfigure the schedule. The most obvious adjustment would be to shorten class duration and add another period so that students would not have to sacrifice any of their choice classes for physical education. In response to talk of an additional period, however, many teachers forcefully and swiftly reject the idea. The possibility of an additional period and the gym requirement also concerns students: for some, it will mean another class to prepare for and another semester class to take with gym. The schedule modifications necessary to adequately adopt the four-year requirement are more than modifications; a complete overhaul of the current schedule is the only option. And when reconstruction of the schedule looms, the proposed curriculum change becomes an elaborate process involving the entire district—from negotiations with the teachers’ union to departmental restructuring to course catalog adjustments to reexamined start and end times to rescheduled bus routes to an entirely new budget. Integrating this proposed curriculum change is more than rewriting some some sections of the handbook; this change will take years to enact and will burden teachers, students and administrators for just as long. Does rushed compliance with a law that both Walpole and the Department of Education have disregarded for the past six years actually warrant these irreversible intellectual impairments? Even if administrators manage to draft a schedule that maintains current opportunities available to students, the timing and the mode of implementation of the new schedule will create even more problems. For next year, administration plans to make all freshmen complete a onesemester physical education class without changing the schedule in any way. This new requirement without a schedule change may not have an immediate major impact on the student body, for roughly 90 percent of freshmen choose to take gym during their freshman year anyway. Thus, only about 15 percent of freshmen would have to amend their schedules to accommodate for the mandatory requirement. Overall, students won’t face major issues next year. However, as soon as the class of 2021 becomes sophomores, a major schedule change will simply have to be enacted in order to give these students the opportunity to choose other elective courses. As previously men-

tioned, basically the only logical change is to shorten class times and add another period. This idea seems well 2000 and good until it’s not. In the end, the schedule Massachusetts DOE introduces change will not be the changes to Physical Education panacea to all of the Law: “Physical education shall problems created by the implementation of be taught as a required subject the gym requirement. in all grades for all students in If implemented in the 2018-2019 school the public schools for the year, as currently purpose of promoting the planned, the change physical well-being of will help freshmen and sophomores, the beginsuch students.” ning waves of classes required to take PE. However, juniors and seniors—the classes of 2019 and 2020—will not have the same gym requirement, since administrators are planning to wave in the new requirement with each class rather than all at once. Are juniors and seniors really going to be expected to suddenly be able to pick up a new class or possibly several new classes more than halfway 2011 through their high school careers? 1) CPR; Administration must consider the 2) PE Curriculum consequences of the physical education requirement and subsequent schedule changes from four change. These amendments won’t just years of required PE put Walpole High back on track with state laws; at the same time, they will to 1 year, 1 semester seriously alter the quality of the eduof PE. cation that Walpole High has to offer, the opportunities that students will have to grow into wellrounded and independent thinkers, and the overall identity of our school and student body. These out2017-2018 comes should not All freshmen are be taken lightly. required to take a In terms of immediate one-semester PE course course of acduring every year of tion, administration needs to be high school. upfront and clear about the developments in curriculum and schedule changes, not only with incoming freshmen, but with the older grades who will face different consequences with the schedule change. Before any requirement is 2018-2019 made, a definite and appropriate plan WHS must be secured for future students. administrators plan Before administration changes the physical education requirement, they to implement a schedule need to have a definite replacement change to help students schedule—even if the new schedule will not be implemented at the same fulfill the PE requirement time as the physical education requirewhile still maintaining their ment is implemented. And most imporelective choices. tantly, students should have a say in the changes that will affect not only their own educations, but the educations of Walpole students for years to come. Page Design and Graphics/Abby Hile


The Rebellion

Page 8

Students together Editorial By Andrea Traietti and Michaela Donato Editor-in-Chief and Staff Writer Walpole Public Schools administrators and School Committee members are currently working to change Walpole High’s curriculum and daily class schedule. Specifically, there is one major change surrounding the Physical Education curricu-

lum: future WHS students will be required to take one semester-long (half school year) physical education course all four years of high school. The change comes with Walpole High’s 2017 Coordinated Program Review (CPR), which occurs every six years. The CPR provides a holistic evaluation of Massachusetts schools, examining and rating

If the current seven-course schedule remains, Physical Education will limit access to elective courses such as: -Art -Music -TV Production -Journalism -Film -Woodshop -Foreign Languages -Computer Programming -Entrepreneurship -Personal Finance

March 2017

The Rebellion

Page 9

and Administration should work to adjust to P.E. curriculum change every component of the school environment and academics, and ensuring that the school is in compliance with federal and state laws. This year, administration has chosen to address one specific law that Walpole High School has violated for a number of years: Chapter 71, Section 3. This law, revised in 2000, states, “Physical education shall be taught

as a required subject in all grades for all students in the public schools for the purpose of promoting the physical well-being of such students.” Right now, the Walpole High School Student Handbook requires only one semester of physical education total in order for students to fulfill the graduation requirement. The school has held this standard for six years, thus violating the law since the start of the 2011-2012 school year. However, when the law was first enacted in 2000 Walpole was actually in compliance, requiring students to participate in four years of physical education. The Walpole High curriculum was in fact following the law in 2011, at the time of the last CPR. However, shortly after, the curriculum changed to its current status, requiring only one semester of physical education. In order to amend this violation, Walpole High School will revert to the policy used prior to 2011 and will require all students, beginning with the Class of 2021, to take a one-semester physical education course every year of high school. While this change does put Walpole High in check with the Massachusetts law, it threatens the crucial diversity of opportunities that Walpole High currently affords its students. Foreign language, art, business, technology and intense academic classes flourish with the current one-year, single semester physical education requirement, a minimal requirement that doesn’t limit schedule flexibility. Students can experiment with and concentrate on specialized courses that really interest them, and these courses can both provide a relief for students and expose them to interests they did not know they had. If Walpole High enacts the new fouryear requirement, students will not be able to pursue the classes that interest them because the one-semester gym course will limit the course options that fit in their schedules. Tough decisions between passions and requirements will arise for many students, and this curriculum shift will rob students of opportunities to learn about themselves and about plausible paths for their futures. Frustrating as the scheduling process is now, it will grow increasingly more frustrating as guidance struggles to balance students’ academic needs with this gym requirement. In fact, is it even possible to fit 1,200 students into gym classes

during the available seven periods each semester when there are only three physical education teachers? Alongside these practical issues with the new requirements, the inelasticity of the current seven period schedule presents an even larger problem. In order to maintain students’ ability to take choice classes (not to improve students’ opportunities, just to maintain them), administration will need to reconfigure the schedule. The most obvious adjustment would be to shorten class duration and add another period so that students would not have to sacrifice any of their choice classes for physical education. In response to talk of an additional period, however, many teachers forcefully and swiftly reject the idea. The possibility of an additional period and the gym requirement also concerns students: for some, it will mean another class to prepare for and another semester class to take with gym. The schedule modifications necessary to adequately adopt the four-year requirement are more than modifications; a complete overhaul of the current schedule is the only option. And when reconstruction of the schedule looms, the proposed curriculum change becomes an elaborate process involving the entire district—from negotiations with the teachers’ union to departmental restructuring to course catalog adjustments to reexamined start and end times to rescheduled bus routes to an entirely new budget. Integrating this proposed curriculum change is more than rewriting some some sections of the handbook; this change will take years to enact and will burden teachers, students and administrators for just as long. Does rushed compliance with a law that both Walpole and the Department of Education have disregarded for the past six years actually warrant these irreversible intellectual impairments? Even if administrators manage to draft a schedule that maintains current opportunities available to students, the timing and the mode of implementation of the new schedule will create even more problems. For next year, administration plans to make all freshmen complete a onesemester physical education class without changing the schedule in any way. This new requirement without a schedule change may not have an immediate major impact on the student body, for roughly 90 percent of freshmen choose to take gym during their freshman year anyway. Thus, only about 15 percent of freshmen would have to amend their schedules to accommodate for the mandatory requirement. Overall, students won’t face major issues next year. However, as soon as the class of 2021 becomes sophomores, a major schedule change will simply have to be enacted in order to give these students the opportunity to choose other elective courses. As previously men-

tioned, basically the only logical change is to shorten class times and add another period. This idea seems well 2000 and good until it’s not. In the end, the schedule Massachusetts DOE introduces change will not be the changes to Physical Education panacea to all of the Law: “Physical education shall problems created by the implementation of be taught as a required subject the gym requirement. in all grades for all students in If implemented in the 2018-2019 school the public schools for the year, as currently purpose of promoting the planned, the change physical well-being of will help freshmen and sophomores, the beginsuch students.” ning waves of classes required to take PE. However, juniors and seniors—the classes of 2019 and 2020—will not have the same gym requirement, since administrators are planning to wave in the new requirement with each class rather than all at once. Are juniors and seniors really going to be expected to suddenly be able to pick up a new class or possibly several new classes more than halfway 2011 through their high school careers? 1) CPR; Administration must consider the 2) PE Curriculum consequences of the physical education requirement and subsequent schedule changes from four change. These amendments won’t just years of required PE put Walpole High back on track with state laws; at the same time, they will to 1 year, 1 semester seriously alter the quality of the eduof PE. cation that Walpole High has to offer, the opportunities that students will have to grow into wellrounded and independent thinkers, and the overall identity of our school and student body. These out2017-2018 comes should not All freshmen are be taken lightly. required to take a In terms of immediate one-semester PE course course of acduring every year of tion, administration needs to be high school. upfront and clear about the developments in curriculum and schedule changes, not only with incoming freshmen, but with the older grades who will face different consequences with the schedule change. Before any requirement is 2018-2019 made, a definite and appropriate plan WHS must be secured for future students. administrators plan Before administration changes the physical education requirement, they to implement a schedule need to have a definite replacement change to help students schedule—even if the new schedule will not be implemented at the same fulfill the PE requirement time as the physical education requirewhile still maintaining their ment is implemented. And most imporelective choices. tantly, students should have a say in the changes that will affect not only their own educations, but the educations of Walpole students for years to come. Page Design and Graphics/Abby Hile


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March 2017

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A&E

March 2017

Oscars

night

marked

Page 11

by

best

picture

fiasco

“Moonlight” mix-up clouds historic breakthroughs for 89th Academy Awards By Rebecca Boyajian A&E and Lifestyle Editor Following the night of the Oscars, most viewers were left with one image in mind: how presenter Warren Beatty stood befuddled amongst the equally enchanted crew of “Moonlight” as he attempted damage control in what will likely go down in history as the most epic blunder to take place on an Oscars stage. “I want to tell you what happened. I opened the envelope, and it said ‘Emma Stone, La La Land.’ That’s why I took such a long look at Faye and at you. I wasn’t trying to be funny. This is ‘Moonlight,’ the best picture.” Nearly as soon as the statuettes were transferred onstage from the “La La Land” cast into the hands of the “Moonlight” crew, tweets, memes and whatever else people could think up were flooding social media. In the days that followed the ceremony, the best picture mishap was at the forefront of any and all Oscars buzz. While the mistake was an iconic moment undeniable in it’s entertainment value, it heavily clouded other record-breaking firsts that took place during the 2017 Oscar ceremony. Most notably, this year featured six black nominees, the highest number

of black actors or actresses to have ever been nominated in a single year by the Academy. While the number sounds discouragingly small it is a stride in the right direction especially after last year’s #OscarsSoWhite fiasco. While the discussion may have felt repetitive, it was delightful to hear the cringey mishap commandeering Oscar conversation rather than it being about Hollywood’s blatant racism. The lack of diversity amongst the Academy’s nominees was understandably the center of last year’s Oscars discussion; however, with ample diversity amongst this year’s nominees viewers were able to celebrate and enjoy the show rather than feel upset due to unfairness. “Moonlight,” a powerful story that follows strong Cheron on his journey coming to terms with his sexuality, scored three Oscars. Forty-three year old Mahershala Ali scored big for his striking role as Juan in the film, taking home the award for Best Supporting Actor and breaking barriers in the process, becoming the first Muslim to have ever won an Oscar. After receiving his award, Ali proceeded to sweetly thank his wife in his acceptance speech, making his moment on stage not only a historic one but a favorite amongst viewers. “I just want to thank my wife, who was

in her third trimester during awards season. We just had a daughter four days ago. I just want to thank her for being such a soldier through this process... and really carrying me through it all. Thank you.” Viola Davis won best supporting actress for her role as Rose Maxson in “Fences,” earning her own place in history as she became the first black woman to win a Tony, Oscar and Golden Globe for acting. She joined the list of 23 other actors and actresses who accomplished the same feat like Helen Mirren, Maggie Smith, Christopher Plummer, Jessica Lange and Al Pacino. After stepping on stage, Davis thanked those who helped her with the film, then proceeded to grace viewers with the most heartfelt and memorable speech of the night. “Thank you to the Academy. You know, there’s one place that all the people with the greatest potential are gathered. One place and that’s the graveyard. People ask me all the time, what kind of stories do you want to tell, Viola? And I say, exhume those bodies. Exhume those stories. The stories of the people who dreamed big and never saw those dreams to fruition. People who fell in love and lost. I became an artist—and thank God I did— because we are the only profession that celebrates what it means to live a life.”

List of most Annual Academy

People are usually attempting to figure life out at age 32, but for “La La Land” director Damien Chazelle, it will be remembered as the age he acquired his first Oscar and earned the title of youngest to win Best Director. Chazelle, age 32 and one month, took the record this year from its previous holder Norman Taurog, director of “Skippy” (1931), who was age 32 years and 260 days. Amongst first time winners was Kevin O’Connell, who finally earned an Oscar after 21 nominations. He took home the Sound Mixing award for “Hacksaw Ridge,” breaking the longest losing streak in Oscars history. The monstrous Harry Potter franchise winning an Oscar only now seems a little hard to believe, but sure enough, “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” earning best costume design was the first. All of the Potter films, excluding “Chamber of Secrets,” and “Rise of the Phoenix,” had been previously nominated by the Academy, but evidently came up empty handed. Colleen Atwood, the brilliant wizard behind “Fantastic Beast’s” elaborate wardrobe, has already acquired four Oscar wins and 12 nominations in her career. Her other wins go on to include “Alice in Wonderland,” “Memoirs of a Geisha,” and “Chicago.”

notable 89th Awards Winners

Foreign Language Film

Cinematography

The Salesman

Best Picture

La La Land

Moonlight

Actor In A Leading Role

Casey Affleck

Costume Design

Fantastic Beats And Where To Find Them

Actress In A Leading Role

Directing

Emma Stone

La La Land

Actor In A Supporting Role

Mahershala Ali

(Original Score)

La La Land

(Feature)

“City Of Stars” from La La Land

O.J.: Made In America

Role

(Short Film)

Viola Davis

The White Helmets

Zootopia

Music

Music (Original Song)

Documentary

Feature Film

Suicide Squad

Documentary

Actress In A Supporting

Animated

Makeup And Hairstyling

Production Design

La La Land

Film Editing

Short Film (Animated)

Hacksaw Ridge

Piper


Lifestyle

Page 12

HOW

TO

March 2017

OVERCOME

Strategies to deal everyday stresses of

YOUR

with the high school

By Grace Donovan Staff Writer Whether you get stressed out from time to time or you suffer from a chronic anxiety disorder, we are all familiar with the overwhelming symptoms of stress. We’ve all been ready to pull our hair out trying to find a way to nurture our nervous systems, but it is important to remember that no matter what your state of anxiety is—we all deal with it differently. There is definitely no “one-size-fits-all” treatment to cure your anxieties, but the next time you’re stressing, try some of The Rebellion’s strategies to see what works for you. TALK TO SOMEONE! School psychologist Charles Ferro stressed the importance of externalizing your problems. “Talk to anybody,” he said. “Friends are obviously kids’ first option, and they usually work the most, but once it gets to a point where it is beyond something a friend can do, then you need real help, and it can be from any trusted adult— it does not have to be a parent.” “There are definitely a lot of people who feel like there is nowhere to go or no one to talk to,” said junior Lucy Gielow, who suffers from anxiety. “And they don’t end up getting the help they need—which will subsequently make whatever their problem may be infinitely worse.” If you’re uncomfortable discussing these feelings with your friends, turning to a professional may be the best option. It is understandable if the idea of sharing all your personal information with some adult stranger is terrifying, but, odds are, this pro-

fessional has heard it all and in the long run can be incredibly helpful. And a quick side note: talking to a therapist does not make you “crazy.” Although there is a stigma around seeking professional help for your mental woes, it’s the same as seeing a doctor when your leg is broken. You would never try to fix a broken leg on your own; and just the same, if you find yourself overwrought with stress or anxiety, seeking help is the best thing you can do for yourself. USE, DON’T ABUSE, MENTAL HEALTH DAYS Give yourself a break every once in awhile! Mental health days are sometimes necessary to maintain a balanced, healthy lifestyle. After one of those weeks when all your teachers test-bomb you, a mental health day can be a great way to recover and gather yourself in order to rejoin your studies as a renewed student ready to learn.

But mental health days only work if you use them reasonably. “You can only miss so much [school] before you’re anxious about coming back,” said Ferro. Missed days and make-up work pile up, and too many absences can instead become another source of stress, so don’t take mental health days lightly. Junior Ellen Irmiter said, “I had a friend once who told everyone she was sick with the stomach bug because she thought that admitting that she took a mental health day would be seen as a weak thing to do.” You shouldn’t feel guilty for doing what’s best for your health, and you shouldn’t feel ashamed when you need a day to yourself. Again, in the same way you’d rest if your leg were hurt, it is not weak to listen to your mind when it is telling you that you need a break. High school’s a grind, and everyone handles it differently. DON’T HAVE FOMO! Mr. Ferro reveals that one of the most overlooked stresses for teenagers is the “fear of missing out,” or FOMO, which the obsessive use of social media exacerbates to an entirely new level. As teenagers we live through our phones: every “hangout” is documented and plastered all over the internet. PutGraphics/ Danielle Borelli Layout/ Emily Martin and ting our lives Danielle Borelli on display

has become an important part of upholding our social reputations; however, when you’re the one watching your friends’ night unfold without you, you can feel alone. But, in this technology-crazed day and age, you are eventually going to stumble across that Snap story of your friends hanging out while you lie alone in your bed binging “Shameless” on Netflix— and when this happens, you can either let it stress you out or take it in stride. Do not freak. Do not stress. Finish that “Shameless” episode, and either make sure you initiate plans next time, or start looking to surround yourself with a group of people who will include you. Chances are there are plenty of other kids just like you sitting home watching their friends hangout through Snapchat. STRESS APPS Instead of refreshing your Instagram for the thousandth time, why not attempt to expand your app repertoire to include technologies that will boost your health and decrease your stress? Pre-panic attack, open up a meditation app and do some deep breathing. Before you fall asleep the night before a big test, listen to a sleep hypnosis to ensure optimal rest. Maybe even download a yoga app to destress after school. Even if you do not have easy access to a cell phone that does not mean that there is no help for you. Mr. Ferro performs hypnosis right downstairs in his office. “Hypnosis is outstanding if the kids one, need it, and two, buy into it,” said Ferro. What harm could come from giving it a chance?


SPORTS

March 2017

Page 13

Porkers Coach Marianne Murphy retires from coaching

Murphy steps down after fifteen years of coaching and five championships Photo/ Stacy Murphy

Coach Murphy discusses game strategies during one of the Porkers’ games in the fall of 2016, her final season as the Porkers Head Coach.

By Emily Martin Editor-in-Chief In the fall of 2017, the Porkers will take to the field without head coach Marianne Murphy, a figure who has been a staple in the Porkers’ program for over 15 years. Since 2001, Murphy has

helped the Porkers to five State Championships — 2002, 2004, 2006, 2013 and 2016 as head coach. She was the assistant varsity coach in 2001, and took over the program in 2002. Following years of success with the team, Murphy will retire from her position as head coach of Walpole’s field hockey team.

Game Three against BC High on Saturday in Chelmsford

Historic

Walpole

Boys

Hockey

“Murph inspired her players to work hard and be the best we could be, and this motivation is the reason why all of her teams were successful,” said senior captain Melanie Weber after spending four years on varsity. Being the head coach for many years, Murphy has impacted numerous athletes that participated in the field hockey program. “High school sports provides student athletes with an opportunity to work together as a unit to achieve individual and team goals, and these girls become more confident and composed individuals,” said Murphy. “They become leaders and learn how to adjust and handle many difficult situations. There are many life lessons that they endure during their time as student athletes and they will carry them out into the real world.” In her time as head coach, Murphy has had over 40 girls move on to play field hockey at the collegiate level with at least half playing Division I. Additionally, the Boston Globe named Murphy Coach of the Year in the years 2006 and 2013 and the National Field Hockey Coaches Asso-

Kampper’s return Benjamin Kampper returns after boot camp Photo provided by Kampper

Season Continues into Super Eight Continued from Page 1 “This year is huge for public schools,” said senior forward Cam Martin. “We proved a lot of people wrong, as there were obviously doubters that favored the private schools. No one thought a public school could make it this far.” “Walpole came in and proved the entire state wrong,” said Mike Abelson, a Suite Sports correspondent — a group that reports on Massachusetts high school hockey. Walpole’s impressive season is highlighted by seniors Martin and Corcoran. Martin is a second line winger who leads the team in scoring with 23 goals in all 23 games so far — including the OT winner over CM. “[Senior captain Owen] Hunter did a tremendous job tying their center up on the faceoff, and I went at the puck, and tried to hit it as hard as I could,” added Martin. Corcoran has made countless saves and has played several games on his head this season to lift Walpole to its incredible undefeated season. With 14 shutouts this season, Corcoran has also set a MIAA state record for most shutouts. Additionally, in the Rebels’ 6-0 win over Norwood, on February 18, Corcoran assisted sophomore Ryan Boyajian with a cross ice pass for a Walpole goal — another impressive stat especially for a goalie. Corcoran’s most recent shutout comes after Walpole’s 1-0 win over Boston College High School.This Super Eight victory is the Rebels’ first in their bestof-three series against the Eagles. The lone goal comes thanks to sophomore forward Connor Foley, who broke through BC’s defense for a breakaway only two minutes into the game.

“The puck was in front of me in the neutral zone, and I saw the defenseman step up, so I tapped the puck by him and went on a breakaway hoping for the best,” said Foley. The Rebels then held on for the remainder of the game, with another incredible performance from Corcoran — who saved 19 shots in the third period alone. However, Boston College High School delivered the Rebels their first loss of the season on March 7. With eight minutes left in the first period, Boston College High School scored their first goal of the series. Although Walpole had their chances in the rest of the game, they were unable to find the back of the net. BC added to their point total by scoring an empty-net goal in the closing minute to win the game 2-0. In addition to making the Super Eight, Walpole’s record awarded them the Bay State Conference title — the Rebels’ first since 1988. The Rebels also set a school record for biggest goal differential in the regular season, for Walpole had 107 goals for and only 11 goals against. Walpole’s leading scorer this season is no other, but Martin with 23 — an overall Bay State League high this season. Martin’s 23 goals also outnumber last season’s goal count high of 10. “Having 23 is great. I am fortunate enough to have unbelievable teammates that move the puck well to give me the chances for my goals,” said Martin. With their first loss of the season, the 23-1-1 Rebels look to extend their historic season in the critical Game Three of the Round 1 series. For updates and game information, follow @whs_rebelsports on Twitter.

ciation awarded Murphy the Northeast Regional Coach of the Year in 2010. A large part of Murphy’s success with the Porkers extended from her own accomplishments in her years at Bentley College, now Bentley University. Graduating in 1980, Murphy was the second leading scorer for the college’s field hockey team for many years and was inducted into the Bentley College Hall of Fame in 1991. Despite Murphy’s retirement from Walpole High’s field hockey program, her persistence in achieving excellence and morals will continue to impact the team in the years to come. “Being the coach of a program with a tradition of excellence holds both players and coaches accountable. Without high expectations one would be complacent and accept mediocrity,” said Murphy. “We all have the desire to win, the will to succeed and constantly look to keep abreast of new ideas and skills involved with field hockey. Many programs would love to have the traditions and winning attitude that the Walpole program has continued to carry on for over 40 years. This is a program that we are all very proud of.”

Benjamin Kampper poses for his official Naval photo.

By Melanie Weber Staff Writer After spending nine weeks at the Recruit Training Command in Chicago, Illinois for boot camp and then an additional nine weeks at Naval Technical Training Center in Meridian, Mississippi, physical education teacher Benjamin Kampper finally returned back to Walpole High School on Monday, Jan. 30. Kampper was inspired to join the Navy two years ago when a Marine recruiter spoke to the Walpole High School faculty about the Marine Educators workshop. After spending four days at Marine Boot Camp, he asked questions about his eligibility, got the approval from Principal Stephen Imbusch and started the process of joining the Navy. “It was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. This country has given me so many opportunities, and it was time to give something back,” said Kampper. During his time at boot camp, Kampper not only trained to become a mem-

ber of the Navy, but he also learned many life lessons. The drill sergeants shave the heads of their recruits, take away all of their belongings, require all of their recruits to wear the same clothes and refer to each of their recruits as ‘recruit’ instead of using their real names; therefore, the recruits must find new ways to create identities for themselves. “The only way to stand out is through your actions; I reaffirmed to myself that I am an optimistic, motivated leader,” said Kampper. “You also learn the importance of putting the mission of the Navy ahead of all else. This can easily be applied to everything else I do in life; just having a ‘team-first’ mentality.” In addition, Kampper’s experiences in boot camp taught him a lot about perspective and how to keep a positive mindset no matter how negative a situation may be. “In the Navy, we say ‘things can always be worse.’ If you are having a bad day at school or at practice, just stay positive and look for any reason to remain hopeful. This is the mindset that got me through boot camp, and it is a mindset I will bring to every aspect of my life,” said Kampper. Throughout his training, Kampper proved to be one the most physically fit and scholarly sailors at boot camp; he was awarded the “Honor Graduate” for having the best PFA (physical fitness assessment) and academic test average out of 419 sailors. Now that he is officially a part of the Navy, Kampper will report to his new station in Newport, Rhode Island, one weekend every month. In addition, he will do two weeks of training during the summer to remain up-to-date on his job. “I love this country. I have always had so much respect for the members of the Armed Forces, and it was a constant regret of mine to not have served myself,” said Kampper.


Page 14

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March 2017


SPORTS

March 2017

Page 15

SPORTS Students celebrate Patriots’ win Walpole High School students gathered in the streets of Boston with fans to attend Patriots’ parade By Craig Cieplik Staff Writer

After the Patriots clinched the Super Bowl LI victory, the town of Walpole was ecstatic, especially the students at Walpole High School. Students took to the streets of Boston for the victory parade, despite administration’s decision to not give out excused absences. On the day of the parade, 428 students were not present at school at all and another 136 got dismissed early in the day. It was a cold rainy day in Boston, but more than one million loyal Pats fans attended the parade. Some Walpole students even flocked to the streets of Boston following their dismissal after three periods—the required amount for a student to be considered present for the day. In his weekly eNotes to parents and community members, Principal Stephen Imbusch said, “Many of you (about 50%) took personal responsibility for your children on Tuesday and

sent them off to the parade to show appreciation for their team. More of you took the opportunity to send your children to school, thereby teaching them that their personal responsibility was to their studies.”

they ultimately secured the victory. “As an athlete, I am inspired by the Patriots’ ‘come-from-behind’ victory; coming back from such a large deficit truly exemplified the impact that determination, dedication and perseverance has on athletics,” said basketball captain Emma Flynn. Jubilated by the historical win, numerous students recall feeling united with excitement and enthusiasm. “In a time where we live in a country that is very divided about so many political issues, it is great to see an event where everyone can come together as a one group and celebrate,” said senior class president Nathaniel Kelley, who attended the parade. “The Patriots have made it so people who normally do not get along are partying in the streets together, and it is really a great thing to witness and to be a part of.”

In a time where we live in a country that is very divided about so many political issues, it is great to see an event where everyone can come together as a one group and celebrate.” -Nathaniel Kelley, ‘17 Many students attended the parade in response to the inspirational performance of the Patriots, coming back from a 25 point deficit. New England scored 31 unanswered points to force the game into overtime for the first time ever in Super Bowl history where

Photos/ Maeve O’Connor, Julia Kane and Caroline Pitman

Pictured above: Students celebrate among other Patriots fans as the team travelled closely past on duck boats. The parade was scheduled to start at 11 a.m., but did not begin until 12 p.m. Nonetheless, fans waited out the delay to scream and dance in the confetti filled streets.

Claude Julien fired

By Kevin Quinn Staff Writer On Tuesday, Feb. 7, the Boston Bruins fired their head coach, Claude Julien, after 10 years with the team. The Bruins are 33-24-6 under Claude Julien this season. So far the Bruins are 8-2-0 under interim head coach, Bruce Cassidy. “I think that Claude was a great coach, but his time ran out, and he lost the respect of the players,” said WHS Boys Hockey senior forward Paul Heffernan. “He also refused to adjust to the changing culture of the game, but I appreciate the work that he did here and the Stanley Cup that he brought us.” In total, Julien was 419-246-94 with the Bruins which makes him Boston’s all time winningest coach. Julien coached the Bruins to two Stanley Cup Finals, winning one in 2011 and losing the other in 2013. Julien also coached the Bruins to the President’s Trophy in 2014, meaning they had the best record in the NHL. Before Julien coached with the Bruins, he coached the Montreal Canadiens for three seasons and the New Jersey Devils for one season. Julien had a record of 4-5-1 in his last 10 games when Don Sweeney, the General Manager of the Bruins, fired him. Cassidy stepped in as the interim head coach after he was the assistant coach since May of 2016. Cassidy joined the Bruins organization as the assistant coach of the Providence Bruins in the 2008-2009 season. Cassidy then became head coach of the Providence Bruins after the 2010-2011 season. He held that position until he became the assistant coach of the Boston Bruins at the beginning of this season. “I obviously like [Julien] a lot as a coach,” said senior WHS Boys Hockey forward Cam Martin, “but he didn’t really work in Boston. He needed a change of scenery.” On Tuesday, Feb. 14, Julien was hired by the Montreal Canadiens only a week after being fired the Bruins. The Canadiens are in first place and are six points above the Bruins with 82 in the Atlantic conference. The Bruins are in third place with 74 points in the Atlantic Conference and are in sixth place in the Eastern Conference. Since the hiring of Julien, the Canadiens have a record of 6-2-0. Martin said, “Well, if you want my honest opinion, the Bruins are better than ever. Julien liked to play a relaxed style of play and Cassidy is more of an aggressive coach who likes to get the defense involved in the play.”


Page 16

Sports

March 2017

Sports Coverage Coverage Sports

Girls Basketball Falls to Westwood in playoffs

Photo/ Maeve O’Connor

Rebels upset higher seeds in both first and second rounds By Sophia Giovaniello Staff Writer After ending the regular season with a record of 12-8, the Rebels notched the 11 seed in the Division 2 State Tournament bracket. After two upsets over higher seeded teams from O’Bryant School of Mathematics and Science (6) and Falmouth High School (3), the Rebels season came to an end on March 6 against the 7 seed Westwood at Massasoit Community College. Walpole fell to the Wolverines in a very lowscoring game ending 36-32.

“We struggled to get our offense going early and as the game went on it became more of a defensive battle which unfortunately didn’t result in the outcome we wanted,” said senior captain Kelly Fogarty. Walpole started off their playoffs on Thursday, March 2 with a 40 point upset over 6 seed John D. O’Bryant School of Mathematics and Science. Ending with a score of 6828, the Rebels finished the first quarter at 31 points and kept a steady lead throughout the rest of the game. Following the win against Photo/ Caroline Pitman

Freshman catie martin takes a shot off of one skate in a Regular season game against milton.

O’Bryant, the Rebels traveled to the the Cape to play the 3 seed, Falmouth High School. Led by strong performances from underclassmen Jillian White with 14 points and Sydney Scales with 12 points, Walpole upset the higher seed with a score of 53-31. Senior captain Melanie Weber said, “I am proud of how far we came since the beginning of the season and the improvement we made as a team. The strength from the underclassmen makes me confident the program’s success will only go up from here.”

Senior Courtney Brigham plays defense against a Burlington player.

G i r ls H o ckey co nti n u es to b eat th e O d ds

Girls hockey continues to not let seeds dictate their destiny with 2 upset wins By Kevin Quinn Staff Writer

Walpole Girls Hockey (108-2) came into the Division 2 MIAA tournament seeded 24, but after two upsets over nine seed Mansfield/OA/Foxboro and eight seed Cohasset/Hanover, the Rebels have proved that seeds will not dictate their destiny. On March 11, at Gallo Arena in Bourne at 3:15, the Rebels will be playing against one seed Notre Dame. “It will be an interesting game since we are the 24 seed and they are the 1 seed, but there is

no obstacle that my team cannot get through, so I think it will be a very good game,” said senior captain Cam Johnson. Two minutes into overtime against Mansfield/OA/Foxboro, sophomore forward Olivia Malone scored the goal to seal the 1-0 overtime win. The Rebels second round game was against Cohasset/Hanover at the Bog in Kingston on March 5. The game went scoreless throughout regulation with both teams missing out on major scoring chances especially on the power-play. The game would go through the first over-

B oys W r estli n g m a k es th ei r m a r k

time without scoring a goal even though it was in the Rebels offensive zone most of the period. “We dominated the whole game and their goalie played really well. We did not capitalize on our opportunities throughout the game,” said Johnson. Eventually in double overtime, freshman Catie Martin scored the winning goal with an assist from Johnson. About their next game against Notre Dame, Johnson said, “We are going to have to be aggressive and capitalize on their mistakes since they are a very strong team.” Photo/ Maeve O’Connor

Boys Wrestling places within top three at Sectionals for first time since 1980 By Aidan Chariton Staff Writer Walpole Wrestling headed into the post-season ranked 24 in Massachusetts on masswrestling.com, with high hopes for the Division 2 Central Sectional Tournament in Marlborough. As a whole, the team placed second overall with 211, losing only to Algonquin with 222, and became the first Walpole team to place in the top 3 at sectionals since the 1980-1981 season. “I’m really proud of the team and all of their hard work,” said Senior captain Matt Rando. Individually, junior captain Tyler Splaine, junior Paul Kauranen, and freshman Anthony Borelli all placed first in their weight classes—120, 126, and 106 respectively. Borelli’s victory makes him the first WHS freshman to ever win his weight class at sectionals. “Rolling with older kids had no effect on me,” said Borelli

who wrestled many older kids this season, “I knew I had just as much experience as them.” Borelli also said that winning his weight class at Sectionals had been a goal of his for awhile. “I remember looking at the sectional championship board, I told myself that...I could do it,” he said. Additionally, senior captain Mike Shea, junior captain Luke Wassel, junior Nick Stelmash, senior Chris Conroy, junior Dylan McGraw, junior Aidan Fitzgerald, junior Sean McCullough, and sophomore Javier Rios all placed in the top 5 for their weight classes, qualifying them for the Division 2 State Tournament. “The team did really well, and we had 11 State Tournament qualifiers,” said Shea. “That’s the most we’ve had out of all the years I’ve been here.” The WHS wrestlers had great success at the Sectional Tournament, but they were not the

Junior Luke Wassel battles his opponent from the bottom position.

only ones, as head coach Sean Petrosino became the first WHS coach to receive the Div. II Central Coach of the Year award. “[Petro] is an amazing coach, he always pushes us because he wants us to succeed,” said Kauranean. “He came to our school when we were young and told us in a few years we would be a legitimate team, and here we are.” WHS sent 11 wrestlers to

compete at the All-State Tournament, two of them,Shea and Splaine,placed 5th in their weight classes and qualified for the All-State tournament. Shea competed in 6 matches and came out with a record of 4-2, and Splaine wrestled in 5 matches, accumulating a record of 3-2. “We had some tough brackets, but we did pretty well,” said Splaine. “In wrestling it really comes down

to who wants it more.” Splaine and Shea both finished at the All-State Tournament with a record of 1-2, ending their seasons and Shea’s wrestling career at WHS. The team’s season was officially over, but it will certainly not be forgotten, due to their many accomplishments this season, including surpassing the previous record of most team wins in a season—18— with their record of 21-3.

Page Design/ Abby Hile

March 2017  

Volume XX Issue IV

March 2017  

Volume XX Issue IV

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