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. Rebellion

Walpole High School

AP Scores

January 2017

Girl Talk

Girl’s Basketball

Volume XX, issue III Winter Bucket List

WALPOLE, MA 02081

NON PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO.8

GIRL T A L K

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The

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Walpole High works to keep students with Cystic Fibrosis safe Students with Cystic Fibrosis face the health risks of attending the same school Photo/Maeve O’Connor

Sophomore Deirdre Erwin poses for a picture in the busy halls of Walpole High School.

By Emily Ball Lead Reporter High school students all have one thing in common: the feeling of excitement that they get when they spot a friend in the hallway. The friend that not only provides them with a support system but also an outlet for life’s daily setbacks. But for three students diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) at Walpole High School, the peers that they have the most in common with are the ones which they are forced to avoid. For sophomore Deirdre Erwin who

Heffernan

was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis in 2001, being the only student in the building with CF was what she was accustomed to, until this year. With Jimmy Haskins and Sarah McAvoy entering WHS this year, the 2016-2017 school year marks the first time that three students with CF have attended Walpole High simultaneously. Haskins and McAvoy were also diagnosed with CF early in their lives and grew accustomed to the limitations it created for each of them in middle school; however, similar to Erwin, they both had to adjust to the added complexity

wins

of the new dynamic at the high school. This rare disease causes a buildup of mucus that impedes proper lung function and causes many long-term health issues. Patients with CF cannot stand within six feet of other CF patients, but for high school students, this limitation poses a problem with the oftencrowded hallways. Patient to patient contact could mean the passing on of untreatable bacteria that live for an hour and a half outside of the body. These bacteria can facilitate the symptoms of CF and lead to death. However, School Nurse Rachel Jackson prepared for months to create a plan of action that would make the school safer for all of the students. “I wanted to make sure that they know to communicate whatever they want to do, they just have to let me know and I can make it happen,” said Jackson. “If they want to stay after, they have to let me know so I can make sure that the other two students are not staying after, or, if they are, that they will be far enough apart.” Additionally, Jackson met with guidance to formulate an academic schedule for each of the students that would avoid possible confrontation, designated a specific seat for each student in the auditorium and marked off an individual bathroom for each student to use.

prestigious

Good

However, Erwin has found a way to defy this complication by reaching out to one of the freshmen with CF. “I actually Snapchat one of the students and I reached out to them at the beginning of the school year to tell them that I was there if they needed me,” said Erwin, “I felt we could relate about a ton of things because they could actually understand how life with this disease is.” Although two of the students have found a way to safely communicate, the threat of cross-infection is something that will forever prevent them from meeting face-to-face. Nurse Jackson’s efforts to diminish the risks have not gone unnoticed, as the parents of the students with CF trust Jackson to organize the most beneficial plan for their children. “Rachel Jackson has spent a lot of time preparing for this school year and educating the staff about CF,” said McAvoy’s mother. “She has gone above and beyond to make the school a safe and welcoming place for her CF students.” “She has put our mind at ease given the effort that she has put forth concerning this complex set of circumstances,” said Haskins’ mother. “We have the utmost faith that Nurse Jackson and the Walpole School System will continue to make every effort to ensure the health and safety of all three students.”

Citizens

Award

Staff members select Paul Heffernan for DAR award and scholarship By Melanie Weber Staff Writer

Every year, Walpole High School’s staff and students select a senior student that possesses strong citizenship and leadership qualities to apply for the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Good Citizens Award. Once chosen for this award, the student is invited to participate in an essay contest where he or she can qualify for a scholarship. These applicants must write an essay and a personal statement in two hours, and the members from the local chapter of the DAR decide who will receive their scholarships. This year, senior Paul Heffernan has been selected as Walpole High School’s recipient of the DAR Good Citizens Award, and the DAR has chosen him to receive a scholarship as well. “It is an honor to be selected by my teachers for this award and it feels great to know that my teachers believed that I am a worthy representative of our school for this scholarship opportunity,” said Heffernan.

The DAR Good Citizens Award and Scholarship Contest was created in 1934 to encourage and reward the qualities of good citizenship. According to their website, “this award recognizes and rewards individuals who possess the qualities of dependability, service, leadership, and patriotism in their homes, schools, and communities.” Students are selected for this award by their teachers and peers, and only one student may be honored as a school’s DAR Good Citizen. “Paul is a kid who always rises to the occasion and seeks out leadership roles, and he is one of the better examples of what this award is for. He is a kid who knows to always do the right thing and help out other kids when needed,” said Mrs. Tobey, who is a member of the DAR. After attending a ceremony held by the local chapter for all award recipients from the district, Heffernan received scholarship money as well as awards, including an American flag that flew over the U.S. Capitol Building earlier in the year. However, the scholarship amount will not be revealed until graduation.

Photo/ Lillie Hunter

Heffernan poses with his DAR awards for good citizenship.

Due to his achievement at the local level, Heffernan has sent his essay and application off to the state level where he has the chance to win more scholarship money and awards. How-

ever, right now, Heffernan is content with his accomplishments thus far. “The whole experience has been great, and I am very thankful to have been honored by the DAR,” said Heffernan.


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NEWS WHS AP Scores Pass State Average January 2017

WORLD

NEWS

AP

Spanish

Exam

demonstrates

By Devin McKinney News Editor The following briefs are all highlights from the World News section of The New York Times. For longer stories visit www.nytimes.com. U.S. Dismantles Sudan Embargo President Obama moved to lift Sudanese trade sanctions, which were first implemented in 1997. The sanctions prohibited trade with Sudan due to the country’s suspected sponsorship of international terrorism; however, the U.S. believes that Sudan will be able to facilitate investment into its failing economic system with the reopening of trade. In return for the sanction lift, Sudan has promised to improve access for aid groups, suspend support to South Sudanese rebels, end bombings on insurgent territories and cooperate with American intelligence. Obama’s executive order for the lift, signed on Friday, Jan. 13, will have a six-month review period, allowing the embargo to be reinstated under the Trump administration if Sudan fails to honor its agreements. Plane Crash in Kyrgyzstan kills 37 A Turkish cargo plane headed for a stopover at the Manas Airport in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan crashed suddenly in a small village near the airport, killing at least 37 people. The Boeing 747 went down on Monday, Jan. 16, and all four crew members (two pilots, a freight specialist and a flight technician) were killed in the crash. Kyrgyz officials said that 23 of the village’s 43 houses were destroyed, and some buildings burst into flames. First responders at the scene set up tents for displaced residents of the village to shelter them from cold temperatures. As of now, ACT Airlines, owner of the cargo plane, confirmed that the crash was not caused by technical issues or loading related factors. Kyrgyz officials said they will be creating a government commission to investigate the reasoning behind the crash. 26 Dead from Brazil Prison Riots Riots at the overcrowded State Penitentiary of Alcaçuz in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil have left 26 prisoners dead. The riots, which began at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 14 and lasted until 7 a.m. the following morning, resulted from drug violence between the gangs of “First Capital Command” and the “Rio Grande do Norte-based Crime Syndicate.” On Saturday, prisoners connected to “First Capital Command” began rioting during visiting hours. These inmates were incarcerated in a prison adjoining Alcaçuz. The visitors were saved, but the escaped prisoners made their way to Alcaçuz and attacked an area of the prison housing members of the “Rio Grande do Norte-based Crime Syndicate.” Many of the bodies recovered at the scene were found to be mutilated and decapitated, which is consistent with violence found in many of Brazil’s other overcrowded prisons.

Richard

Sturges

teaches

students

during

By Brynne Bergen Staff Writer Walpole High School students’ Advanced Placement (AP) exam scores surpassed the state average in the 2015-2016 school year. The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (MDESE) reported that a total of 88.9 percent of tests taken at WHS scored at least a three out of five on the AP exam. Throughout Massachusetts, the average percentage of tests scoring a three out of five or above was 66.5 percent. The MDESE’s results show that this year, out of the 387 AP exams

one

of

his

AP

Spanish

classes.

taken at WHS, 107 students scored a perfect score of five out of five, while 126 students scored a four out of five. There has been a steady rise in the amount of students taking AP classes at Walpole High in recent years. The College Board’s Five-Year School Score Summary provides evidence that not only has the number of test takers at Walpole High School increased since 2012, but the scores have gotten higher as well. Principal Stephen Imbusch recognizes the importance of students challenging themselves and taking AP classes. “It’s good for [students] to the see the rigor that is involved in a

Walpole’s

success

college type course,” Imbusch said. Sixty-four students completed the 2015-2016 AP Language and Composition exam, making it the most popular test for students at Walpole High School. “AP Language and Composition is the most practical class,” AP English teacher Kerry Mcmenimen said. “It teaches skills that you can use in college.” As for results, students at WHS scored best on the AP Spanish Language test, where all 34 students scored at least a three out of five. “I am pleased with the results,” AP Spanish teacher Richard Sturges said. “The kids worked hard all year to become proficient students.” Doing well on the AP Spanish Exam is not uncommon for Walpole students, as all students who took the 2013-2014 exam and the 2014-2015 exam scored at least a three out of five as well. Throughout all exams, this year’s results show a .2 percent increase from last years’ scores at Walpole High School. Scores of 3 out of 5 or above are widely accepted as college credit at many universities. Teachers and administrators acknowledge the importance of AP classes for the skills they teach students, regardless of the scores these students receive. “[AP classes] set you up for success no matter what you do, regardless of whether you get credit [for college] or not,” Imbusch said.

Obituary: Edward Joseph Leitz Former WHS teacher dies after fight with Liver Disease By Emily Martin Editor-in-Chief Former Walpole High School Biology and Marine Science teacher Edward Joseph Leitz died due to a genetic liver disease on the night of Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016 at the age of 36. Leitz taught at Walpole High for over 10 years after starting in the 2003-2004 school year and retiring officially in the summer of 2016. “He was a very quiet, laid back person, but he was also a very dynamic teacher,” said science department head Maryellen O’Malley. “I couldn’t tell the difference if he was teaching a CP2 or a CP1 or an Honors class because he had the same demeanor and the same enthusiasm no matter what level of students he taught.” Since birth, Leitz and his family knew that he had a genetic liver disease, but it was not problematic during his childhood. He hoped to receive a transplant once his liver could not function properly any longer and cancer was imminent. In 2013, Leitz temporarily left his teaching job and received a living liver donation from his mother, and returned to teaching for the 20142015 school year and was working on receiving his master’s degree in science education from Montana State University. However, the disease came back in the transplant, and he officially retired in 2016 and was waiting to be put on the list for a liver donor. Eventually, he became too ill too quickly to receive a transplant and could not be considered for a transplant. Leitz passed away at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida where he had undergone treatment efforts and was waiting for a donor in the months previous to his death.

Edward Joseph Leitz Feb. 6, 1980—Dec. 11, 2016

Leitz grew up on a farm just outside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and always enjoyed being outdoors. He was an avid hunter and fisherman throughout his life. For education, Leitz received a degree in science education for biology. Ten years ago, he married his wife, Stacey, who is also a biology teacher. They moved to a house along the coast, which greatly complemented Leitz’s love for marine science. The two have a son, Noah, who is four years old. They currently reside in Carolina, Rhode Island and other family members remain in Pennsylvania. Over the summers, Leitz volunteered at the Mystic Aquarium in Stonington, Connecticut. Previously, Leitz worked for Nature’s Classroom, an educational center in Ivoryton, Connecticut that served as the desti-

I’ve finished life’s chores assigned to me, So put me on a boat headed out to sea. Please send along my fishing pole For I’ve been invited to the fishin’ hole. Where every day is a day to fish, To fill your heart with every wish. Don’t worry, or feel sad for me, I’m fishin’ with the Master of the sea. We will miss each other for awhile, But you will come and bring your smile. That won’t be long you will see, Till we’re together you and me. To all of those that think of me, Be happy as I go out to sea. If others wonder why I’m missin’ Just tell ‘em I’ve gone fishin’ -Dalmar Pepper nation for many middle school field trips, along with several other Walpole High School science teachers, including biology teacher Susan Wick. Wick said, “He was a great colleague. One of my fondest memories of him was Halloween a few years ago, where we had a scary under-the-ocean theme, and he came in wearing a full human shark costume. It was hilarious. He was quiet, but had a wicked sense of humor.” A memorial service celebration was held in Wilmore, Pennsylvania on Dec. 27, 2016 and a memorial mass was held in Kingston, Rhode Island on Dec. 30, 2016. Donations may be made to the memorial for Leitz on gofundme.com (see attached link on our website). His eulogy for the services was based on the poem “Gone Fishing” by Dalmar Pepper.


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January 2017

DEDHAM SAVINGS is pleased to present

THE WALPOLE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AND CLASSES OF THE MONTH OCTOBER

SENIOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP BRIDGET MURRAY Bridget is an excellent student. She has successfully maintained her 100% average all of Term 1. She has a strong understanding of the knowledge, skills and concepts needed to be a successful future entrepreneur. She is a pleasure to teach, and I appreciate all her hard work this term. -Mrs. Fontaine JUNIOR ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY ANN DOLAN Annie is a kindhearted, good-working and helpful student. She shows great leadership and is a dedicated student. -Mrs. Leah Milne SOPHOMORE GEOMETRY THOMAS KING Tom has been doing excellent work in Geometry. He is the only student to earn an A on both our Chapter tests. His impressive score of 97% on the Chapter 2 test was the highest score out of both my Geometry classes. Tom is showing an excellent grasp of the concepts covered; his work is of a consistently high caliber. He promptly made arrangements to take care of a quiz missed during the sophomore History field trip. I am pleased with Tom’s performance in Geometry and proudly nominate him for October Student of the Month. -Mrs. Kathleen Milne FRESHMAN SPANISH II HONORS MARGARET WALL I am nominating “Margarita” for Student of the Month on account of her excellent participation in our Spanish II Honors class. She is always creating with the language and not afraid to take risks, something that will help her to develop her skills more quickly. Her questions are thought -provoking for both students and myself. It is a joy to have her in class. -Mrs. Bacon

ACTIVITY AWARD

NOVEMBER

SENIOR JOURNALISM III MAEVE O’CONNOR Maeve is the best Photography Editor I have had in my twelve years of teaching. In addition to staying late to meet newspaper deadlines, Maeve regularly stays after school to publish online galleries in a timely fashion. Her photography team has published more online posts than any other content area on staff. She leads her staff photographers through graceful humility, reliable organization, and a care for journalistic work that extends beyond numeric grades. -Mr. Cashman JUNIOR AP CALCULUS WILLIAM PORTER Billy has been doing phenomenal work in Calculus. He earned perfect scores on four out of five quizzes during the month of November, missing only a single point. He had the highest score on each of our two chapter tests which were challenging assessments requiring students to apply their knowledge from class to new problems. Billy shows an in depth understanding of the concepts covered in class. He is able to handle both the multiple choice and free response questions. In addition, Billy is an active participant in class. He often raises his hand to answer questions, and he is a valuable asset to his peers when doing group work. I proudly nominate Billy for November student of the month. -Mrs. Kathleen Milne SOPHOMORE ESSENTIALS OF BIOLOGY BENJAMIN KELLEY Ben has been putting in great effort to learn cellular respiration and cell functions. He completes all of his work and volunteers on a regular basis. Although the concepts and terminology are very hard to process and understand, he has been invested in demonstrating his knowledge of the cell processes. -Mrs. Doyle FRESHMAN ALGEBRA I ASHLEY KUROPATKIN In Algebra I, Ashley is always working with other students to break down and solve various math problems. She shows her excitement about learning. Ashley exhibits both curiosity and a strong desire to understand her studies. She asks many questions to aid her understanding, facilitates group work, and volunteers in class. Also, she currently has the highest grade in class (99%). -Ms. Cannon

ACTIVITY AWARD

SARA STRANAHAN STUDENT HUMANE SOCIETY Sara has been a consistent pillar of support for the Student Humane Society since last school year. Sara can be relied on to be there to help organize and run our bake sales and various shelter fundraisers throughout the year. She attends all of the field trips to the various animal shelters and we can count on her to be the last one to leave the shelters! She has a caring heart and gets along with old and new members alike. This year, Sara has been particularly helpful volunteering to run the Humane Society bi-weekly meetings. She does everything with a smile and it is great to have her so involved again this year. -Mrs. Jordan

CATHERINE HURWITZ RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS CLUB Catherine is the reason we have a Random Act of Kindness Club. She has been able to come up with several ideas to spread kindness through our school. She had our club donate candy to the Food pantry for those who could not afford to buy any to give out. She decided that it was time to put special notes all over the school to make people happy. No matter what your mood, these signs make you feel better. Catherine, you are a special person and our school has become nicer because of you. Thank you for that. I also have the pleasure of teaching Catherine in French. -Mrs. Frattasio

STATISTICS PERIOD 3 This class of all seniors is always ready and willing to learn. Even though this is my largest class of students it is one of my most productive. They always get their work done in a timely manner. Much of this is due to my classroom leader, Sarah Bredy as she is an asset to the class. My period three class does not hesitate to ask questions or seek out help from either myself or Sarah when they need it. They are a great group of students and will be very successful when they leave Walpole High School at the end of the school year. -Mrs. Hackett

GEOMETRY PERIOD 4 This class showed an excellent understanding of the parallel lines chapter. Every student earned at least two stickers for scores of 80% or more on the three chapter 3 quizzes. Most earned stickers on all three quizzes. The students did well with writing equations of parallel and perpendicular lines which is a concept that students struggled with in the past. The students are cooperative and respectful. They enthusiastically put problems on the board and participated in modeling angle pairs on the duct tape on the floor. At the culmination of the chapter the students showed that they were able to retain and apply their knowledge of numerous concepts when every student scored at least 83% on the Chapter 3 assessment. I proudly nominate this class for Class of the Month. -Mrs. Kathleen Milne

CLASS OF THE MONTH

CITIZEN OF THE MONTH

SOPHOMORE

DANIEL MCCARTHY

Daniel is a great friend to the students in the Career and Ed program. He attended the Best Buddies football game event in October. He made sure to spend time with every student at the event ensuring they had a good time. Daniel also helped organize the Best Buddies Halloween Party. He donated decorations and made sure all the students had a blast. Daniel is an amazing role model and friend. -Mrs. Kellie Robinson

CLASS OF THE MONTH

CITIZEN OF THE MONTH

SENIOR KATHLEEN GRIFFIN Over the course of the month Katherine has used some of her free time to act as a math tutor in the Transition Room. What started out as extra help for one student quickly grew into multiple students asking her how to do any and all things math. Most of the math teachers here can attest to my (lack of) math skills, so having Katherine around was a tremendous help for both myself and the students. I would like to nominate Katherine for the Citizen of the Month because she went above and beyond to help out fellow students and she did it all with a smile on her face. -Mr. Connolly


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EDITORIALS

January 2017

Don’t get caught up in unrealistic New Year’s resolutions Set more practical goals and focus on small steps to change behavior By Lindsey Sullivan Assistant Editorials Editor “New year, new me!” The commencement of 2017 brings along an army of phrases connoting self-improvement and the feeling of a freshstart, prompting the promise that many of us dread, but most of us make anyway—New Year’s resolutions. In January, nearly half of all Americans make a New Year’s resolution, yet according to a University of Scranton study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology, only 8% of them succeed. For the two weeks following Jan. 1, the roads are filled with runners and gyms are packed with people trying to lose those pesky ten pounds. However, not far into this resolution craze, motivation and determination begin to fade. Although it may be a relief to throw away the 2016 calendar and all its ups and downs, creating a massive, long-term goal virtually overnight is asking for failure and leads to discouragement and forgotten goals. Although these bold New Year’s resolutions may be doomed to fail, that does not mean goal-setting should not be a part of everyday life. Without setting goals for yourself, improving your life is nearly impossible. However, there is a distinction between realistic goal setting, which involves taking small steps to achieve an end goal, and setting a huge goal, like losing 20 pounds Graphic/ Michaela Donato

in a week, with no plan of action. Essentially, deciding on a long-term goal without short-term steps will not set you up for success. Dr. Cedric X. Bryant, the Chief Science Officer at the American Council on Exercise, said, “People don’t take the time to celebrate the little successes because they are so focused on an arbitrary weight goal, [and] they don’t notice that they are sleeping better or feeling less anxious.” Many see the new year as a time to completely change their lives—by getting healthier, losing weight, managing money more effectively—but because of the tendency to focus on out-of-touch goals, they miss out on the real benefits of their efforts and end up abandoning New Year’s resolutions. Alongside poor goal-setting, the inopportune timing of the New Year further inhibits major lifestyle changes. The holidays are a time for seeing family and sharing a meal. From Halloween candy, to Thanksgiving dinner, to all the other holiday eating and eggnog throughout December, everyone begins the new year feeling sluggish and unmotivated. Even on New Year’s Eve, most stay up until midnight (and many stay up much later than that). Right off the bat, sleep schedules and diets are out of whack—creating a recipe for disaster. Not only is the timing in regard to the holidays unfavorable, but the time of the year of Jan. 1 is an obstacle in and of itself. Right smack in

Graphic/ Julia Kane

the middle of winter, cold temperatures and very little sunlight make for the perfect storm of laziness. Finally, the two weeks following the new year are arguably the worst time to begin visiting the gym. Packed with resolutionists, the crowd can discourage individuals quickly. According to Tim Keightley, the Executive Vice President of the Department of Operations at Gold’s Gym, “Gyms will no doubt be packed with other members—perhaps a 30 to 40 percent increase in traffic—who signed up as part of their New Year’s resolution.” Keightley advises waiting until

March to start going to a gym, especially for those focused on their fitness, for gyms will be less busy by then. The beginning of 2017 brings the temptation to commit to a huge lifestyle change—whether it be losing weight, dieting, or managing your money better—but remember to stay realistic in goal setting. If you have a major goal you are determined to achieve, do not let the calendar dictate when you begin; instead, focus on the small, manageable steps in order to ensure success. So, stop getting caught up in the New Year’s resolution fervor and celebrate all of your little victories!

Disregard for truth undermines credibility of news Public must take on responsibility of finding truth By Michaela Donato Staff Writer The 2016 word of the year is post-truth, which the Oxford Dictionaries defines as “relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief.” Also this past year, Scottie Nell Hughes, a CNN journalist and political commentator, declared, “facts don’t exist.” Hm. In a world where emotional appeals and gut-feelings reign supreme, how are we supposed to have meaningful compromise? Clearly, post-truth politics dominated the presidential election, but this intentional and caustic ignorance of fact has begun taking over all media. Recently, a far-fetched conspiracy theory about Hillary Clinton running a child-trafficking ring out of a pizza parlor in D.C. unraveled as a news story on major news platforms. The fable originated from an obscure Tweet making bold claims about a police investigation pointing to Clinton’s pedophilia ring. From there, the absence of evidence spiraled: greater news platforms picked up the story and added their own fabrications. The adult version of the game “telephone” culminated in

an unfounded smear piece, implicating not only Mrs. Clinton but additionally the innocent owners of the pizza parlor, and further resulted in an armed gunman’s seizure of the parlor to liberate the non-existent child sex slaves. This unfolding demonstrates many issues with modern news reporting. All too often, authors deceive readers with their sources: either they wrongfully interpret sources they do not understand, knowingly use erroneous sources, misappropriate sources out of context, or scrap sources altogether and fabricate stories. Another deception journalists occasionally use is they work in tandem with sources to foment each’s argument but in reality, neither source has any credibility. For example, an article cites a scientist’s experiment as evidence for credibility, and the scientist simultaneously cites the article as evidence for the experiment’s credibility. In this scenario, the article gains authority from the experiment and the experiment gains authority from the article—while neither the article nor the experiment needs any truthful content to back each’s respective credibility. This sort of circumvented citing technique, combined with outright invention of fact, facilitated the so-called Pizzagate scandal. Further, bias is another culprit in the decadence of news. It is unreasonable to expect a media outlet to be free of all bias; when a journalist recounts an event, even if factual without opinion, the journalist’s selection of detail tends towards a particular purpose. Reading the New York Times and watching Fox News during the election season, any

viewer could see which candidate the outlets backed, as they consistently told the stories that worked in favor of a particular candidate. The issue of separating news from bias isn’t one-sided; the New York Times, CNN, MSNBC and NPR command the left; primarily Fox News helms the right. Though these sources have both liberal and conservative writers, overall, they have very circumscribed attitudes and purposes. The ultimate question arises: how can any news story be trusted, if all are written by inherently biased authors and published by inherently biased outlets? Morally and ethically, the responsibility to produce news content that is factual and without editorial comment falls on the journalists. However, unfortunate as it is, this responsibility is neglected. With raging bias and strategically planted leaks, all news must be verified and vetted through an analytical process in order for it to be taken as anything more than gossipy, self-serving speculation. Readers, for you, that means researching different authors and stories and pinpointing their biases so that you may read their “news” content and narrow down for yourself what is true. I’m afraid you won’t be left with too much. It has become acceptable to tell unconfirmed stories and even blasphemous lies as the truth and the task of confirming sources and facts has fallen by the wayside. Now is the time to hold journalists accountable for their content. A world without truth, a world of post-truth, is one in which we all suffer in disconcert and chaos.


EDITORIALS

January 2017

Are

Apple

Computers

the

Best

Page 5

Computers?

As students enter more rigorous and electronically focused courses throughout their high school and college careers, many parents and students find themselves looking to purchase a new laptop. The options for laptops are widespread, but the main debate focuses on Macs and PCs. Ph

a s/ Ci o to

ra Healy

computers are not the best.Chromebooks have become popular most recently through their incorporation into schools. The benefits of Google Classroom, Drive, Docs, Sheets, and more have allowed chromebased computers such as Acers, Samsungs, Lenovos, and others to access documents without having to download pricy programs like Microsoft Word.

Furthermore, the price of chromebooks is significantly cheaper than those of their competitors: Macs. Chromebooks sell from $249 and up, while Apple computers start at $1,000. Though “chromies” — as they are lovingly known throughout Walpole High — may not come with Retina display or OSX, they come with more customization options than Macs. You can choose your background and login just like any other computer, but you can also customize your tabs and google browser page.

capable of running on Windows. PCs, on the other hand, are extremely limited to solely the Windows software. Additionally, Macs are much better in terms of their built-in security systems, making them much less susceptible to malware and viruses. Yes, it is still possible for Macs to fall to complicated viral attacks, but research shows that they are much more efficient than PCs in terms of battling malware. As a result, Macs last much longer and are much less likely to crash. In terms of technical support, Apple services greatly surpasses that of PCs,

with numerous locations in small areas and specified Genius Bar experts to help with customers’ problems, either over the phone or in person. Overall, Macs simply prove to not only be better looking appliances, but also easier to use, with more logical approaches to coding a daily user’s activities. And not only are they easier to use, but they also can connect with any other Apple products one may have in his or her home, including iPhones, iPads, and many more. With these advantages in mind, Macs’ pros inarguably outweigh those of a PC.

By Meghan Foley Business Editor

No, Apple

Emily Martin Editor-in-Chief

Yes, Apple computers are the best

computers in the market. For the past decade, Macs have dominated the technology landscape, always emerging with new breakthroughs and irresistible features. With such a history in mind, Macs prove themselves superior to any other desktop or laptop manufacturer. First off, Macs are much more versatile than PCs. While most people run their Macs on OSX programs, Macs are still

For most students, the most appealing part of having a chromebook is the customization of the tabs. When you log into a chromebook tabs pop up with Google Drive, Gmail, X2 and other usual websites. Also, Google Drive is accessible on most devices, allowing users to access their work if they are not on their own laptop. Chromebooks are the best option for students in college and high school. Cheaper, more accessible, and easier to understand- they make the perfect laptop.

A Letter to College-Bound Underclassmen on Application Advice Senior staff writer shares the ins and outs of applying to college By Kayla Frost Staff Writer If you are an underclassman, you may be surprised to see a college advice article in January, as opposed to June. But take it from me, a senior who just made it out of the college application process: it’s best to know the ins and outs of applying well before it comes time to hit the send button. Cut and dry, here’s what you need to know: Your grades matter. Do not rely solely on your junior year grades to get you into college. Freshman and sophomore grades will affect your GPA, and it is much harder to try to raise your GPA junior year than it is to maintain a strong GPA throughout all of high school. Start the college process early. Visit and tour colleges during February and April breaks of junior year so that you have an idea of what schools you like before the summer. The summer after junior year is the best time to get ahead on the application process by creating a final list of schools. Have some safeties, and have some reaches. Use Naviance to look up schools that have your specific interests, (if you do not know what Naviance is, make sure you actually pay attention to your guidance counselors when they talk to you junior year — really, pay attention) and then use Google for further research. Write down any school you like, and then try to cut

down your list to however many seems appropriate for you. Keep in mind that every school does have an application fee. Here’s a hint: if you cannot see yourself going there, do not apply. Know your colleges. Once you have a finalized list of potential schools, research whether or not the schools require the submission of SAT, ACT, or SAT Subject Tests scores (I’ll say it again — check to see if you need to take subject tests). Then, take these tests early, at the end of junior year, to give yourself time to take them more than once. You must separately submit these scores to colleges, and pay for each submission. Watch out for hidden supplements. There are often writing requirements within the question section on the Common Application, and they might come as a surprise when you go to submit the application. Create a checklist for every college and start completing it during the summer. Dedicate a couple of summer nights to fill out your common app, and write your college essay (you might be able to guilt your English teacher into letting you use class time to do this in June, or at least have them read your essay to give feedback). Once school starts, it may come as a shock how little time there actually is to tour schools or schedule interviews. Keep your parents in the loop. Your parents need to fill out certain financial aid profiles, such as the Free Applica-

tion for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the College Scholarship Service (CSS) profiles, or the Institutional Documentation Service (IDOC) in order to apply for financial aid. Each profile has a due date, and different colleges require different profiles. Educate yourself, and your parents, on the financial aid process. Deadlines are real, but also not real.

You must submit all college applications by the deadline listed; however, you do not need to wait until the deadline to submit your application. As soon as you are done with the application, you can submit it to a college. When you do so, make sure to tell your guidance counselor so they can send your transcript to the school. You do not need all of your material sent in at the same time, as long as it all gets there eventually.

REBELLION

Staff

Walpole High School’s newspaper is committed to informing the public, reflecting the students’ views, creating a public forum and serving as an educational medium.

Check out our website whstherebellion.com

Send a Letter to the Editor. Letters Should be 200 Words or fewer, and can be emailed to walpolerebellion@gmail.com

Editors-in-Chief Emily Martin Andrea Traietti News Editor Devin Mckinney Assistant News Editor Tara Gordon Editorial Editor Daanya Salmanullah Assistant Editorials Editor Lindsey Sullivan Entertainment/Lifestyle Editor Rebecca Boyajian Sports Editor David Moser Lead Reporter Emily Ball

Business Manager Meghan Foley Assistant Business Manager Grace Sewell Layout Editor Abigail Hile Social Media Editor Kayla Frost Photo Editor Maeve O’Connor Graphic Editor Danielle Borelli Staff Photographers Ciara Healy Lillian Hunter Cameron Johnson Julia Kane Caroline Pitman

Mandy Scully Staff Writers Breanna Andreassi Brynne Bergen Megan Brigham Emily Butler Aidan Chariton Craig Cieplik Eva Clarke Lindsay Cordopatri Gabriella Donahue Michaela Donato Grace Donovan Jessica Ferguson Elizabeth Foley Sophia Giovaniello Tanya Gupta Catherine Hurwitz Hope Jordan

Caitlin Kahaly Emily Linclon Kelsey Mazzocca Katherine Mazzotta Abigal McLaughlin Brendan Moser Delaney Murphy Molly O’Connell Olivia O’Connell John O’Meara Kevin Quinn Alexis Rodia Callie Ross Samantha Simons Emily Smith Nicole St. Germain Rachel Tetreault Melanie Weber Sydney Weinacht Thomas Wilber


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January 2017

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The Rebellion

January 2017

Page 9

The Rebellion

At some point in the fifth grade, teachers separate boys and girls into different rooms to give them the talk—the puberty talk. Girls talk about girl stuff and boys talk about boy stuff. There’s little to no open conversation with both genders—until middle school. During the awkward sixth through eighth grade years when boys and girls sit down together and learn about reproductive health, both genders experience awkwardness and even shame because they naturally assume the topic is not for a public space. Consciously or unconsciously, society perpetuates the stigma surrounding periods. In recent years, movements such as Free The Tampons and Distributing Dignity have attempted to destigmatize this topic by increasing access to period products for impoverished women and women in the workplace. The Rebellion recently conducted a survey about the stigma in Walpole and at Walpole High School. After being open for 24 hours, the survey closed with 350 respondents: 238 female, 90 male, 14 other, and 7 prefer not to say. Here are the results.

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Page 8

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The Rebellion

January 2017

Page 9

The Rebellion

At some point in the fifth grade, teachers separate boys and girls into different rooms to give them the talk—the puberty talk. Girls talk about girl stuff and boys talk about boy stuff. There’s little to no open conversation with both genders—until middle school. During the awkward sixth through eighth grade years when boys and girls sit down together and learn about reproductive health, both genders experience awkwardness and even shame because they naturally assume the topic is not for a public space. Consciously or unconsciously, society perpetuates the stigma surrounding periods. In recent years, movements such as Free The Tampons and Distributing Dignity have attempted to destigmatize this topic by increasing access to period products for impoverished women and women in the workplace. The Rebellion recently conducted a survey about the stigma in Walpole and at Walpole High School. After being open for 24 hours, the survey closed with 350 respondents: 238 female, 90 male, 14 other, and 7 prefer not to say. Here are the results.

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Jimmy Fallon Hosts Awkward, Politically Driven 74th Golden Globes “La La Land” becomes highest winning film in Golden Globes history

By Grace Donovan Staff Writer At award shows, discomfort can easily encompass the room when watching somebody trip onstage only to go on and awkwardly stumble through their acceptance speech. The 74th Annual Golden Globes was certainly no exception as it kicked off the 2017 award season with its fair share of awkward moments; however, the attendees found themselves the least of everyone’s worries with the majority of cringeworthy moments coming instead from the people putting on the show—including first-time host: Jimmy Fallon. After a “trying-too-hard-to-be-funny” pre-recorded intro, in which Fallon planned an elaborate dance with pal, Justin Timberlake, to parody the seventime nominated musical “La La Land,” the show continued off to a shaky start

when the teleprompter suffered technical difficulties during the opening monologue. Fallon’s Golden Globes debut was nothing short of awkward as he was left alone to improvise his monologue. Rather than bring his own humour to the stage, Fallon resorted to his impersonation skills—breaking into a full-fledged Chris Rock impression. While Fallon’s awkward moments were definitely the most notable, there were many cringe-worthy blunders before the show even began. On the red carpet, NBC’s “Today” show correspondent, Jenna Bush Hager, confused “Hidden Figures” with “Fences” while interviewing singer Pharrell about his nomination for “Hidden Fences.” Michael Keaton later made the same flub on stage as he read the nominees for Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture. The red carpet mishaps did not stop there: Al

Roker awkwardly mistook Jessica Biel for Jessica Alba, and Natalie Morales wrongly associated Jeffrey Tambor with the show “Transgender”—when he is actually from “Transparent.” After too many cringe-worthy moments, Tracee Ellis Ross finally put a plug in the awkwardness as she shined with her effortless stage presence. Winning for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series (musical or comedy), Ross proved herself to be extremely comfortable up on stage, even sharing her age of 44 years old—talking with the sort of comforting charisma the night needed. Coming from the show “Black-ish,” Ross dedicated her award to “all of the women, women of color, and colorful people.” Despite Fallon’s desperate opening monologue attempts, he found more success with other politically based jokes—opening the door for others to follow suit. Fallon earned many laughs by recognizing the Golden Globes as “one of the few places where America still honors the popular vote.” His remark about the Russian hacking scandal was also well-received as Fallon confirmed that the votes were counted by “Ernst & Young & Putin.” Fallon was not the only one who used the Globes as a platform to comment on the election. Hugh Laurie did not shy away from sharing his opinions when he won Best Supporting Actor for “The Night Manager.” The Brit earned many laughs when he predicted how these may be the last Golden Globes as “it has the words Hollywood, Foreign,

and Press in the title.” He apologized for his “gloomy” outlook but nonetheless stated that some republicans even feared the word “association.” Later in the night, Meryl Streep piggy-backed on some of Laurie’s comments when she took home the Cecile B. DeMille Award—which included a reflective montage of Streep’s film success, in which she was honored as “the most celebrated actress of our time.” When Streep took the stage, the majority of her acceptance speech was based around “one performance this year that stunned” her—and not in a good way. “It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter,” said Streep, “Someone he outranked in privilege, power and the capacity to fight back.” Through her speech, Streep, intentionally and effectively, tied in Hollywood, foreigners and the press while simultaneously using the platform to take jabs at Trump. Choking up at the end, Streep dedicated her award to Carrie Fisher: “As my friend, the dear departed Princess Leia, said to me once: take your broken heart, make it into art.” Even with a fair share of awkward moments, many big winners took the Golden Globes stage including “La La Land,” which dominated the night with a record-breaking seven wins. Despite the film’s big win, critics are questioning if the musical will be able to hold its own at the Oscars. Kicking off the 2017 award show season, the Golden Globes leaves audiences anticipating who will win at The Academy Awards.

“Grease Live” still reigns as best live musical

“Hairspray Live” was fairly successful but does not compare to “Grease Live” By Libby Foley Staff Writer “Hairspray Live” is the newest addition to the long list of musicals performed live on TV. While “Hairspray Live” received fairly good reviews, “Grease Live” still reigns as the best live musical performed on TV. Both musicals were entertaining; however, “Hairspray Live” lacked the believability and authenticity of “Grease Live’s” cast, the efficiency and flawlessness of “Grease Live’s” overall production, and the audience reach that “Grease Live” had, due to its relatability to the audience. Charismatic, energetic, moving: three words the cast of “Grease Live’s” performance epitomizes. Julianne Hough played the lead in “Grease Live” as Sandy—a young innocent girl who falls in love with the most notorious greaser at her school. Hough dazzled with her dancing abilities and attempted to hit every note just as Olivia NewtonJohn had. The male lead, Danny Zuko, was played by Aaron Tveit, a broadway veteran who brought his expertise to the production. Tveit may have not matched John Travolta’s jet black hair, but Tveit’s commitment to the role was shown through every dance and song. Finally, the best performance of the night was Vanessa Hudgens’s emotional performance as the rebellious Rizzo. Hudgens’s father died the day before the performance, which made her performance even more moving. Hudgens nailed every note she sang and perfectly displayed her character’s arc.

Unlike the near perfection reached by the cast’s performance in “Grease Live,” most of the cast members in “Hairspray Live” lacked the fervor needed to sufficiently play their role. Ariana Grande lacked Penny’s usual spunkiness and made Penny seem like a ditz. Maddie Baillio did her best to honor the lead role of Tracy, but her shyness hampered her from coming anywhere near the legendary performance of Nikki Blonsky as Tracy in the 2008 film of Hairspray. Likewise, Garrett Clayton’s performance as Link Larkin was pitiful and lacked any energy or authenticity. The only actress to completely nail her performance was Kristin Chenoweth, who played the role of the cunning Velma Von Tussle. In addition to the “Hairspray Live” cast’s vapid performances, the actual production of the musical was lacking. Many technical errors were made, making the production seem unprofessional. During the opening number of “Hairspray Live,” a technical error with Baillio’s mic caused a loss of sound that was noticeable for the audience. Additionally, there was a timing issue with the camera during one of the songs, leaving the viewers looking at an orange wall for a couple seconds. “Grease Live” barely had any mishaps, except for one incident in which Vanessa Hudgens lost her mic while dancing during the last number, “We Go Together;” however, the actress recovered quickly and the incident was hardly noticeable.

Finally, “Grease Live” was, in fact, a more successful and efficacious production than “Hairspray Live” due to the amount of viewers who tuned in to watch the performance and the rating on the Nielsen scale—an audience measurement system that measures audience size and composition. “Grease Live” racked in 12.2 million viewers and a 4.3 rating on the Nielsen scale; on the other hand, “Hairspray Live” had only 8.9 million viewers and a 2.3 rating on the Nielsen scale. The reason “Grease Live” had so many viewers is due to the fact that the story in Grease is much more relatable to teenagers today. Grease’s story of high schoolers trying to find love and find themselves is much more understandable and engaging than Hairspray, a tale of a girl who finds herself on a dance show and initiates

change for the show and for civil rights. Overall, “Grease Live” and “Hairspray Live” may be the two newest musicals performed on live television, but only one of them had a cast that truly paid homage to a timeless musical. Only one of them was efficiently produced without nearly a hitch. Only one of them was truly able to captivate the viewers watching with an approachable storyline: “Grease Live.”


Lifestyle

Page 12

January 2017

Stay cute and cozy for this cold winter season Check out our style tips for your 2016-2017 winter wardrobe By Gabby Donahue Staff Writer In standard winter-weather fashion, you wake up in the morning, throw on leggings, a sweatshirt, and your Ugg boots from middle school, and move on with your day. But, if you decide that 2017 should be the year you swap out your hoodie for something more fashionable, allow these winter fashion tips to guide you this season. This season, new fabrics and textures are replacing the classic wool sweater, although you can never go wrong with a timeless knit. If you’re looking to up your game or just change things up, try out velvet or silk—two materials that are on the current edge. Featured in slip dresses, off the shoulder tops and strap-

py tanks, the options are endless when it comes to these fresh, revived fabrics. Another cool style that has more recently moved into the picture is patchwork denim. Light against dark or dark against light, this trend is guaranteed to add contrast to any outfit. An additional fashion that has been growing in popularity is fur—faux, of course. Coming in a myriad of colors and textures— b l a c k , b r o w n , grey, white, s h a g g y , sleek—fur vests, coats and even sweaters featuring accents of the fun fabric are all the rage right now. If you are looking to stay both warm and maintain the appearance of an A-lister celebrity, fur is perfect for you. Going along with the warmth as-

pect, longline coats are another outerwear trend everyone is wearing right now. Some dusting the knee and some dusting the floor, different lengthed, different colored, and different patterned longline coats can be found in almost any store at the moment. Adding a cool vibe to any outfit and also covering you up for the cold, these coats are perfect for winter weather. Timeless and classic, turtlenecks as well as chunky knit sweaters continue to rule the scene this season, as they have done in many seasons past. Again, keeping you bundled up and cozy, turtlenecks and knits are perfect for the cold. As colors such as camel and grey seem to be the

most popular among these sweaters, pair one with some fun accessories like scarves, long necklaces, even a colorful longline coat, and you’re golden! In the shoe department, we’re all saying deuces to the ankle bootie, hello to over-the-knee! These thigh-high boots are slowly but surely replacing the ever-popular ankle skimming shoe. Coming in both suede and leather, pairing these kicks with jeans, slips, and skirts will complete any outfit while also adding an extra layer of warmth to your lower leg! This winter season, open up your wardrobe to new trends while still braving the cold. If you constantly keep leani n g t o wards throwing on the first sweatshirt you see, remember there are always stylish alternatives to keep you both cute and cozy.

The Rebellion’s 2016-2017 Winter Bucket List Try

these

local

By Emily Butler Staff Writer Some may remember the classic scene in “Elf” when Buddy tells Walter about how he planned his whole snowfilled winter day. “First we’ll make snow angels for two hours, then we’ll go ice skating, then we’ll eat a whole roll of Tollhouse Cookie Dough as fast as we can, and then we’ll snuggle.” Buddy’s enthusiasm may come off as strange for people who are not fond of the winter cold but for those who relate to Buddy’s excitement, here’s a list of things to do in the winter and the best places for all of our favorite activities.

Ice Skating Gillette stadium: While Gillette has a smaller rink compared to some places, it compensates by having a convenient location. Gillette also has a Dunkin Donuts pop up shop inside if you find yourself in need of a hot cocoa or coffee to warm up. With a coat donation to Cradles to Crayons the admission price is $2 off.

activities

to

make

the

Frog Pond: The Frog Pond is a larger rink located on Beacon Street, Boston, MA, it tends to be a little more crowded than Gillette but has a great winter

of

your

City Hall Plaza Skating Path & Winter Market: For the first time this winter City Hall plaza Boston is being transformed into a literal winter wond e r-

ambience. T h e benefits of hauling your cold winter self to Boston is the proximity to great shopping, and food. If you don’t feel like walking around there is a cafe located right in the skating rink that has free donuts and cocoa on especially cold days. Photo/ Grace Donovan

most

land. T h e skating path is a new take on a traditional skating rink that is sure to delight skaters who are tired of the traditional circular rink. Also inside the Winter Market is an array of vendors and a DJ to spice up your skating experiencing.

Graphics/ Danielle Borelli

Layout/ Emily Martin

winter

months

Local Skiing Blue Hills in Canton offers well groomed ski trails for beginners and experts alike. Daily lift tickets range from $2947 depending on the time. For those have never skied before, Blue Hill’s offers group and private lessons. They are open 1 p.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. on Sunday.

Hot Cocoa Swiss Miss is not going to cut it if you want to have the best hot cocoa experience this winter. For those who are willing to travel into Boston, L.A. Burdick and Max Brenner’s Cafe’s offer gourmet hot cocoa that will change the way you drink winter beverages forever. Brenner’s mint-Nutella and salted caramel white hot chocolate is a bucket-list worthy drink as well as L.A Burdick’s rich Caribbean cocoa bean infused hot chocolate that will transport you to a European cafe.


SPORTS

January 2017

Page 13

5 Wa y s To D e a l W i t h M u s c l e S o r e n e s s Every athlete has the same problem after every game or practice: muscle soreness. However, how each athlete deals with this problem varies. Five Walpole athletes have chimed in on how they each handle their sports related muscle soreness — pickle juice, Advil, sleep, stretching and rolling and ice baths. Below is what each athlete had to say:

3. Sleep

By David Moser and Aidan Chariton Sports Editor & Staff Writer

1. Advil Senior volleyball captain Kayla Frost just finished her third year on varsity, helping to lead the team to the South Sectional Finals — the Rebels’ furthest playoff run in school history. On the season, Frost had a total of 54 sets played out of a total 79. She also had a total of 160 digs, eight aces, two kills, and three assists. With Volleyball’s long run in the State Tournament, soreness is obviously a problem. “I typically take three Advil before a practice or game so that my muscle soreness does not interfere with my ability to play,” said Frost. “After a long practice, I usually take two or three more Advil so that I can prevent soreness for the next day.” Advil is not the only medicine students use, many take other pain relievers, such as motrin and aleve.

2. Pickle Juice Junior Billy Porter, boys soccer captain-elect, just finished his third year on varsity starting as an outside midfielder. This season, Porter had nine goals to help lead the Rebels to another Bay State League title. Often playing the majority of each game, Porter struggled with muscle soreness and cramping at different points throughout the season, but pickle juice is one strategy he used to help. “A big problem of mine in the beginning of the season was that I was really prone to cramping in my calf muscles,” said Porter. “It got so bad that I had to get taken out of several games and played another at about 50 percent. The trainer [Rory Fawcett] recommended drinking pickle juice 30 minutes before a game because of its extremely high sodium content. After that, I never cramped again.”

5. Ice Baths

Isaiah Shephard, senior Boys Basketball captain, is entering his third and final year of varsity basketball. In the Rebels’ Holiday Tournament this year, Shephard helped Walpole make the championship. In the first game against Hingham, Walpole won 78-71 with 17 points from Shephard. In the second game — also the championship game against Westwood — the Rebels unfortunately lost 59-58; however, Shephard ended the game with 23 points. Often playing the majority of each game, Shephard usually deals with soreness with one simple strategy. “Sleep is definitely a big help for soreness,” said Shephard. “If I get to bed late, or do not get enough rest, it shows in my performance. On average I get about seven hours of sleep a night, but nine after games. The night before games I make sure I am in bed by 10, too.”

4. Stretching and Rolling Despite the fact that she is only a sophomore, Meghan Hamilton is not only a starting first-line center, but also in her third year on Walpole Girls Hockey. Head coach Joe Verderber called Hamilton up in her eighth grade year because the team did not have enough players to fill out a competitive roster. In her first game of this season, Hamilton scored to help lead Walpole to a 3-0 win over Archbishop Williams. Having played three years on varsity as well as being a first-liner, Hamilton uses stretching as a suitable cure for any soreness. “I use a stick roller to roll out my legs in the locker room before every game,” said Hamilton. “We also do line dynamic stretches off the ice, and then I have one of my teammates help stretch me out more.”

Finishing up his final winter track season, senior captain Jack Kennefick has had his fair share of issues regarding muscle soreness. In his second meet of this year, the annual Winter Festival Invitational, Kennefick finished the 600 meter run in a time of 1:26.28 — his personal best so far in his four years at Walpole High. Along with many other runners at WHS, Kennefick utilizes ice baths as a treatment for muscle soreness. “I usually take an ice bath once a week” he said. “I use six pounds of ice, and stay in the tub for about ten minutes. The ice helps get the lactic acid out of my muscles, and relieve any aches or soreness I have in my legs.” In theory, the cold exposure from ice baths help fight small tears in muscle fibers and relieve soreness from repeitive excercise.

Graphics/ Michaela Donato

Where are they now? Alumni

athletes

Photos provided by athletes

shine

Rob

in

post

high

By Kevin Quinn Staff Writer

Boush:

Graduating from Walpole High in the spring of 2014, Rob Boush went on to Johnson and Wales of North Miami to play Golf. Boush is now in his junior year, and in his third season with the team. “College golf is much more demanding physically than high school golf,” said Boush.

Golf,

school

collegiate

Class

“We have a strict workout program, and we usually have to take a plane or a coach bus to our tournament, whereas in high school it was either by bus or car.” Boush is part of a 15 man roster, but only the top five players from each school can golf in a tournament. In each tournament, Boush consis-

of

careers

2014

tently competes for the Wildcats. “I have worked hard to position myself in the four spot for most events,” he said. In Boush’s latest tournament, he shot his career best for a round with a 72 at the Dave Adamonis Sr. Invitational. Boush aims to continue to succeed throughout his upcoming season.

Bri Doherty: Lacrosse, Class of 2014 After graduating from Walpole High School in the spring of 2014, Bri Doherty, the former captain of the girls lacrosse team, went on to play Division II lacrosse at Stonehill College. The former Bay State League All-Star for girls lacrosse is now in her junior year and will be starting her junior season as an attacker on March 5, at Rollins College. “We have been looking pretty good

so far this year, so I think it will be an intense game, hopefully with us coming on top,” said Doherty. During her freshman debut, Doherty saw action in six games, finishing the season with three draw controls and helping the Skyhawks to a record of 15-5. In her sophomore season, Doherty played in 13 games, scoring eight goals and adding one assist, in addition to

winning five ground balls and four draw controls as the Skyhawks finished 9-9. Doherty is studying Health Administration at Stonehill and looks forward to the commencement of her junior season. “This season’s team has a lot of talent and chemistry which will help us win a lot of games,” she said. Heading into her third season, Doherty continues to succeed at Stonehill.


Page 14

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January 2017


SPORTS

January 2017

Page 15

Girls Basketball aims for the postseason Brady’s Back Senior Sydney

captain Scales

By Sophia Giovaniello Staff Writer

After falling short of the MIAA Division II Tournament by one game last year, Walpole Girls Basketball (5-3) has had a clear goal since the start of the season: qualify for the postseason. “The frustration from not making the tournament last year by one game is motivating us a lot this season. I am really excited to see how we do this year. I have high expectations,” said senior captain Kelly Fogarty. One of the Rebels’ biggest assets has been their ability to put points on the board, especially from Fogarty, their leading scorer. Earlier in the season on Dec. 16, when the girls won their first game in Brookline, Fogarty put up 41 points herself. “[Fogarty] is always a huge offensive asset for us, and that game she was unstoppable. It was also an all around, strong team win and a good way to start our season,” said senior captain Emma Flynn. Fogarty, the three time A Shot For Life 3-Point Competition champion, is currently averaging 26 points a game and has committed to the University of Maine to play Division I basketball. More recently, McDonald’s All-American Game Organizers selected Fogarty as one of the four nominees in Massachusetts to receive consideration to play in McDonald’s AllAmerican Game, a national game featuring the best players in the whole country. Walpole also has one freshman on their roster this year: Sydney Scales. Scales consistently comes off the bench to-

Kelly lead

Fogarty Walpole

and going

freshman Tom Brady leads forward New England Patriots to another AFC championship Photo/ Ciara Healy

By Craig Cieplik Staff Writer

In her first start of the season, freshman Sydney Scales lines up a throw against Needham. The Rebels lost to Needham 43-40 on Jan.

wards the end of the first quarter as a point guard or shooting guard. In a recent game against Needham, Scales had her first start of the year, and she put up 12 points for the Rebels. “I think [Scales] is great to have on our team. Although she’s a freshman, she doesn’t play nervous or afraid, and she hustles all over the floor,” said senior captain Melanie Weber. After losing to Wellesley on Dec. 20, the girls played in the Rivard Holiday tournament at Oliver Ames High School over winter break. Taking wins against Brockton and Oliver Ames, the Rebels were the champions of the two-day tournament, improving their record to 3-1. “Our aggressiveness and hustle

free 10.

during this tournament proved to other teams that we are not to be taken lightly. These games put Walpole on the radar,” said Flynn. Walpole lost their first game after break to Milton, 53-49, but just three days later won against Dedham making their record 4-2. The Rebels then played Needham, but were on the losing side of a tough 43-40 final score and most recently they won against Natick making their record 5-3. If the Rebels stay above .500, they will achieve their season goal of qualifying for the State Tournament. Weber said, “After the way we have playing and practicing lately, we should have much success in our future games and hopefully in the postseason.”

Boys Hockey opens season 11-0, clinches another tournament berth Seniors Cam James Corcoran Photo/ Lillian Hunter

Martin, lead the

Andrew Moore Rebels to record

Senior captains Owen Hunter, James Corcoran and Pat Donovan pose with officer Tim Songin, Justin Lutz and Tom Songin after Walpole wins Songin Cup Tournament

By Aidan Chariton Staff Writer Starting off their season with a nine game winning streak, Walpole Boys Hockey is sending a message to the rest of the Bay State Conference: the Rebels are a force to be reckoned with. The team has played well on both sides of the ice, averaging 6 goals per game (for a total of 54) and letting up only four goals. Additionally, the team’s success has earned them an impressive state ranking at number 9 on MassHSHockey.com. On top of being undefeated, the Rebels took home the trophy in their annual Son-

gin Cup with victories overActon-Boxborough, 7-0, and Boston Latin, 5-0. ¨It means a lot winning [the Songin Cup] for the fourth year in a row,” said Walpole senior captain James Corcoran. ¨Especially since it is my grandfather´s cup.¨ After the Songin Cup, the Rebels’ most prominent win thus far is their 3-0 victory over Wellesley — a team that is also highly ranked on MassHSHockey.com — on Wednesday, Dec. 21. Senior Cam Martin provided one goal for the Rebels, which was accompanied by two more goals from junior Tyler Page.

and start

“We played a lot more physical than them,” said Martin. ¨We capitalized on our chances.¨ Additionally, the team has defeated other strong opponents such as Oliver Ames and Milton, winning 4-0 and 6-1, respectively. This year’s addition of seniors Andrew Moore and Cam Martin, who both played on club teams last year, has proved to be very impactful for the Rebels. Thus far, Moore has scored four goals and Martin has scored 13, three of which were in Walpole’s game against Milton—serving as Martin’s first career hat-trick and the team’s first hat-trick this season. In addition, Martin has also managed to score a goal or have an assist every game for a nine game point streak. “[They have made] huge differences with both of their levels of skill and levels of competition,” said Walpole head coach Ron Dowd. Ultimately, Dowd and the team hope that their performance in the Songin Cup as well as their winning streak are sources of confidence and momentum that continue to propel them throughout the rest of the season. “Winning the Songin Cup definitely gave us confidence that we can score many goals and create big leads,” said Martin. “[Going forward] we need to stay focused and take it one game at a time, treating each game with equal importance for the rest of the year.”

The Pats secured the number one overall seed in the American Football Conference with a 14-2 record after what was one of the most memorable seasons in recent memory. This year’s team is especially deep as there are several players at each position that can make big plays. As they move into the playoffs, they not only have a round one bye, but ESPN and Fox Sports cite the Patriots as a Super Bowl favorite. As a result of Deflategate, the Patriots defined their team by depth right from the beginning of the season. Because of Tom Brady’s suspension in the first four games of the season, two backup quarterbacks, Jimmy Garoppolo and Jacoby Brissett, had to fill the void. The team went 3-1 in those games and made the team look like prime Super Bowl contenders even without their star. After the future Hall of Fame quarterback returned, he set a single season touchdown to interception ratio record when he finished with a 28 touchdowns to 2 interceptions in 432 passing attempts over the course of the season. James Randall, a senior at Walpole High who attends Patriot games on a regular basis, was surprised at how well Brady played coming off the suspension. “Missing four NFL games is a big deal, and the fact that he missed that long and has come back to play tremendously really says something about his character,” said Randall. Once again Brady has thrown together a MVP caliber season and has his team in position to add another trophy to their collection. Similarly, despite losing superstar Rob Gronkowski, Martellus Bennett has stepped up as Brady’s go to receiver in the Red Zone to snag a career high seven touchdowns this year. The addition of wide receiver Michael Floyd is also showing dividends after just one game as he scored a touchdown and delivered a huge block clearing the way for a 77 yard Julian Edelman TD. The Patriots have placed third in average points per game averaging 27.6 points as well as having one of the best defensive units in the NFL. New England finished the 2016 regular season as the top ranked defense in the league, something they have not achieved since 2003. Despite losing Pro Bowlers Jamie Collins and Chandler Jones, the depth of the defense has really shown through these tremendous numbers. They also lead the league in tackles made, a statistic which shows that they know how to stop the ball. Walpole High senior and Patriots season ticket holder Liam Parquette said, “The team is playing very well considering some of the injuries they have had to battle through, but I’m fully confident we can make it all the way this year.”


NEWS

Page 16

January 2017 Layout / Abby Hile

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l o o h Sc i t h n g i o H yC le n o o p l h Wa ore Ant ollywood H m o n h w sop s his o te a Film e r c

By Tara Gordon Assistant News Editor A typical day for today’s high school student may consist of taking a test, going to a basketball practice, and then completing his or her homework for the next day. However, for one Walpole High student, a normal day includes going through 30 minutes of special effects makeup, working alongside Johnny Depp, and walking around the set of his own Hollywood film, all while fighting a rare form of cancer. In the past six months, Walpole High sophomore Anthony Conti has worked with countless professional actors, directors, and producers through the Make A Film Foundation in order to make his dream of creating an original Hollywood film come true. In the early summer days of 2016, Anthony Conti was enrolled in Walpole’s summer film course run by Walpole Film Festival director Michael Alan, where he worked on small film projects. During the second week of the course, however, Anthony received shocking news: he was diagnosed with adrenal cortical carcinoma, a rare disease caused by a cancerous growth in the adrenal gland. Shortly after his diagnosis, Anthony contacted the Make A Film Foundation, a nonprofit organization that helps children with serious medical conditions create their own original films. “He reached out to them and kept sending them correspondents on what he wants to do and his ideas for a script,” said Walpole

High c o u n selor Keith Wick. Within no time, Anthony started working with acclaimed film writer Scott Kosar through the foundation to create his own screenplay, the first step in what became a large scale production of his very own movie. “They got to know him, and it took off from there,” said Wick. In the following months, Anthony began acting and directing “The Black Ghiandola,” among dozens of professionals in the film industry. “We have had a large list of cast and crew members, and the movie was directed by three talented people: Ted Melfi, Catherine Hardwicke, and an inspiration to me, Sam Raimi,” said Anthony. “Just to see him working on set was a once in a lifetime opportunity.” Anthony’s passion for film began in his childhood. “When I was nine or ten, I enjoyed the acting, and then began enjoying the other sides of film making, and being on the other side of the camera,” said Anthony. “I like entertaining people, and I guess film making was the best way to get that across.” Anthony’s movie is now in the editing process, where he works with Hollywood editors as well as an award winning music composer, Trent Reznor, who has created music scores for films including The Social Network and Gone Girl. The title of the movie, “The Black Ghiandola,” has special meaning to Anthony. “Ghiandola is Italian for adrenal gland, which is where my illness is,” said Anthony. “There is deep

How one student used ttle his biggest ba for an as inspiration nplay original scree

meaning in the script, it is not just a horror film; it is a metaphor for my condition, and I think that’s the best part.” Anthony also hopes to inspire others with his short film. “I want other people to hear about this, and I want other kids going through hard times to find Make A Film, or find a way to get their dreams expressed,” Anthony said. “It has given me motivation and it’s provided me an outlet for my creativity, to not only get mind off my situation, but to have a largescale project that you’re a part of.” As far as future film endeavors, Anthony is determined to continue working towards his dream career as a filmmaker. “I still love to act, and I do hope to eventually pursue acting and filmmaking, of course I do not know where I will be at the end of my treatment,” said Anthony. “But I know I would even be a custodian on a film set if I could. Filmmaking is something you can’t get bored of, and it is one job that I don’t care if I get paid for or not.” Throughout his treatment, Anthony

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is grateful for the support from Make A Film, as well as his family, friends, and even the Walpole High Film Department, which used its annual fundraiser, known as the Turkey Shoot, to showcase some of Anthony’s original short films, and even raise money for the Make A Film Foundation. “Anthony is a character,” said Michael Alan. “Very funny, but also very interested in film, and he did a great job editing film during the first week of our summer course.” “The Black Ghiandola” will be finished in the coming months, and it will be The Make A Film Foundation’s fourth large scale project. “The support and love that I have gotten from every single member of the Make A Film Foundation is incredible,” said Anthony. “The fact that they could give me a chance to help me achieve my dream has been such a life changing experience, and I can not thank them enough for that.”

January 2017  

Volume XX Issue III

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