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Facebook: Alamo Today & Danville Today News | editor@yourmonthlypaper.com August 2020 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • PAGE 1

& AUGUST 2020

DANVILLE TEEN DELIVERS HOPE VIA ADOPT-A-DOLL By Fran Miller

Elaine Duke and Matthew Durkin run the Mobile Food Pharmacy, filling prescriptions on the spot. Photo courtesy of FBCCS.

FOOD BANK OF CONTRA COSTS & SOLANO LEADS THE FIGHT TO END HUNGER

By Jody Morgan

Now celebrating its 45th anniversary, the Food Bank of Contra Costa & Solano (FBCCS) is keeping pace with the rising need for nutritious food generated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Already serving 178,000 individuals a month prior to shelter in place orders, FBCCS currently reaches 270,000 clients a month. Fresh produce accounts for almost 50% of products clients receive. Innovative programs tailored to support the specific requirements of county residents of all ages coping with food insecurity fulfill the organization's mission: “Leading the fight to end hunger, in partnership with our community and in service of our neighbors in need.” Founded in 1975 as the Community Food Coalition of Contra Costa, the non-profit provided 36,000 pounds of food during its initial year. Renamed Contra Costa Food Bank in 1991, the organization merged in 1993 with the Solano Food Bank. In 2019, FBCCS delivered 25 million pounds of food carefully selected to promote health. FBCCS even offers free budget-friendly recipes and cooking tips to help recipients prepare nutritious meals. A member of Feeding America (originally Second Harvest Network) since 1982, FBCCS uses the buying power of the national organization to stretch every dollar donated to maximize availability of healthy food at local distributions. Asked about requests for additional aid during the pandemic, Amy Faletti, FBCCS Agency Relations Manage, noted a moratorium on adding new agencies. “Instead, we have focused on serving our current agency partners (about 230) who have seen huge increases in demand. Our agencies on average have seen 40-200% increases in service since March.” Many people who have never faced food insecurity are suddenly wondering

See Food Bank continued on page 14

Local Postal Customer

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage PAID Permit 263 Alamo CA

ECRWSS

When 17-year-old Lauren Rivera was younger, she loved playing with American Girl dolls. She designed clothes for her dolls, created fun videos with them, and took the dolls everywhere she went. But as Lauren grew up, she naturally lost interest in her dolls, and each was relegated to storage – until a novel and entrepreneurial idea provided them with new life. “I volunte er re g u l arly w it h Family House at O a k land Children’s Hospital,” says L auren, a Danville resident and Carondelet High School rising senior. “I see how challenging it can be to have a family member who is Lauren Rivera sick in the hospital. I wondered if there was something I could personally do to help the kids. I realized that there were lots of beautiful American Girl dolls collecting dust in people's homes, and at the same time there were, lots of little girls who would love to own an American Girl doll but maybe never had the chance. I thought it would be nice to bring them all together.”

See Dolls continued on page 18

THE RAZZIES

By Linda Summers-Pirkle

The Golden Raspberr y Awards, or “The Razzies,” is a satirical annual ceremony that, based on votes from members of the Golden Raspberry Foundation, awards the worst “cinematic under-achievements.” The winners receive a statuette which is a golf ball-sized raspberry atop a mangled super Mo and John at CNN. 8mm film reel which has been spray-painted gold. It has an estimated street value of $4.97. Co-founded by John J.B. Wilson and Alamo native Maureen “Mo” Murphy, the Razzies recently celebrated its 40th anniversary. I recently caught up with Mo for a question and answer talk.

See Razzies continued on page 12

The Editors Serving the communities of Alamo, Diablo, and Danville

Volume XX Number 8

3000F Danville Blvd. #117 Alamo, CA 94507 Telephone (925) 405-6397 Alisa Corstorphine ~ Publisher Editor@yourmonthlypaper.com

Facebook: Alamo Today & Danville Today News Instagram:@AlamoandDanvilleToday

Volume XI Number 8

The opinions expressed herein belong to the writers, and do not necessarily reflect that of The Editors. The Editors is not responsible for the content of any of the advertising herein, nor does publication imply endorsement.


PAGE 2 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • August 2020

www.yourmonthlypaper.com | Instagram: @Alamoanddanvilletoday | #atdtnews

BOULEVARD VIEW By Alisa Corstorphine, Editor

In March, my 27 year old daughter had left her job to travel for a year. She was going to spend a bunch of time in South America and then head to Europe. She made it eight days in Costa Rica before that country started shutting down due to COVID, and she ended up coming back to Alamo for the time being. Having no job lined up, she started doing a massive photo scanning project for her grandmother and fostering kittens for the local Feral Cat Foundation. When it came time to name our first set of kittens, I suggested using old family names. My daughter asked for ideas, and the slippery slope began. I had an ancient Family Tree Maker software program that I had purchased an update for but never completed the process. We got that done and then were able to connect the information to my lagging Ancestry.com subscription. Over 1,400 extended relatives that I had previously input into our family tree years ago were now visible again. With the names in front of us, our set of kittens became Beals, Joe, Rix(sford), Consolidation Coal Company miners/workers in front of a row of workhorses. Harlowe, and Minnow (definitely not a family name, but that’s another story!). I enjoy sleuthing and research. It is my “jam.” I find the thrill of the hunt and finding connections exhilarating. During SiP, a neighbor found a woman’s Illinois drivers license on the Iron Horse Trail. Worried that the license holder may be visiting from out of town and needing the license for identification for a plane trip home, she asked if I could make a post on NextDoor to find the owner. I decided to see if there was another way of contacting the person, and through a lot of digging I was able to connect with a daughter who noted her mom was vacationing in the area and put us in touch. Success! The woman had been frantically searching for the license and was so relieved to have it back. Keeping busy with projects, and connecting with others, even virtually, during this strange time in our lives has definitely been one of the highlights of our time at home. So, the genealogy project merged with kitten fostering and the scanning of literally tens of thousands of family photos. The genealogy project inspired my daughter to explore family trees for some of her friends. So many of them know very little about the branches of individuals who came before them. Researching names, another fun find was had when it was discovered a safety deposit box is being held by the state of California for the deceased parent of a friend (see if you or other family members have unclaimed property in California by searching at https://ucpi.sco.ca.gov/ucp). Paperwork to access it is in the works! While going through some of the scanned pictures, there was a set of about 25 images from the early 1900s. The images were printed and used as postcards, many with little notes. What caught my eye was an embossing on many of them with the words “Flanders, Buxton, IA.” Enjoying the Images of America book series that feature old photos from places around the US (in our area look for Images of America, San Ramon Valley: Alamo, Danville, and San Ramon assembled by Beverly Lane, the Museum of the San Ramon Valley, and Ralph Cozin), and being part of our local Alamo History Tour, I sensed the post cards were special. I didn’t know if they were unique, but thought I’d dig a little deeper. I did a Google and an eBay search and was surprised to learn the town no longer exists. I spent about 15 minutes learning more about Buxton before reaching out to some Iowa historical groups as well as a “Lost Buxton” Facebook group. I sent them a link to the pictures. Fairly quickly, I received a reply from the owner of the “Lost Buxton” Facebook page, Rachelle Chase. She was thrilled to see the images and wrote, “These are FANTASTIC!” She noted some of the images I had sent were ones she hadn’t seen before. What a great connection to have made! I learned Buxton was where my paternal grandfather was born and my great-grandparents were married. Through my exchange with Rachelle, I also learned she is the author of Images of America, Lost Buxton, and Creating the Black Utopia of Buxton, Iowa, books that are now on my summer reading list.She shared with me that Buxton was a coal mining town of 5,000 residents, established in 1900 by the Consolidation Coal Company, which was owned by the Chicago and North Western Railroad. Ahead of its time, blacks and whites were treated equally in Buxton -- they were neighbors, their kids went to the same school, and they worked for the company and received equal pay. Additionally, African Americans were doctors, lawyers, dentists, teachers, and more and made up 40%-55% of the population for most of its existence. By 1922, when the mines played out, Buxton proper was pretty much a ghost town. I am glad the new images I found can be added to that history. Lately, many of us have been organizing, cleaning, and purging around our homes. If you have interesting pictures, or other historical finds I encourage you to dig a little and see if someone else would enjoy them. While most thrift stores have reopened, they are often finding donations are exceeding capacity. If you are looking for other venues to pass on items you no longer need, try selling on eBay, posting on NextDoor, or joining the Facebook group “Buy Nothing Diablo/Blackhawk/Danville, CA.” There are many folks who would love your excess bounty of household items or even food or herbs from your garden. Most recipients I have given things to I never meet. I leave the items on my front porch for pickup, and they make their way to their new home! While times are strange, there are still many opportunities, places to explore, and things to do. Hopefully, you’ll be inspired to tackle a project or spend time on something you are passionate about.

EXPLORE DOWNTOWN DANVILLE FOR “HEARTS AROUND HARTZ”

This summer, the Town of Danville’s got heart! Following up on last year’s popular ‘Dogs of Danville’ public art exhibit, the Town is presenting “Hearts Around Hartz,” a fantastic new exhibit featuring 17 uniquely adorned heart sculptures placed all around downtown. The new public art exhibition will run through October 16th. The hearts in the exhibit are all unique, each one created by a different Bay Area artist. Some of the hearts boast a Danville theme with imagery ranging from oak trees, to Mount Diablo, to more playful designs and motifs. To learn more about the hearts and the artists, or to take part in sponsoring one of the pieces, visit www.danville.ca.gov/heartsaroundhartz. When the exhibition closes, an online auction of the pieces will be held. All proceeds from the online auction go toward a public art fund for future public art projects. For more information, contact Visual Arts Coordinator Marija Nelson Bleier at (925) 314-3460 or mbleier@danville.ca.gov.

ENTERING KINDERGARTEN THIS FALL?

Girl Scouts Daisies is open to girls in grades K-1st. Daisy Scouts do everything from planting an indoor garden, to helping their community, to adding achievement petals to their vests. Your girl will make friends, grow her confidence, and build skills that will help her in school and beyond. In these unprecedented times, Scout leaders know families like yours are looking for ways to bring optimism, joy, and purpose to each day. Whether you’re familiar with Girl Scouts or are looking to get to know more about Scouting for your daughter, leaders are eager to answer your questions. At meet-ups, girls entering Kindergarten will attend virtual troop meetings and experience a sampling of what Scouts has to offer. They will have the opportunity to earn their first Girl Scout patch and participate in some scouting traditions. For more information, contact Anna Lomas at alomas@gsnorcal.org, or visit www.gsnorcal.org.

Your New Home Office

• Private bedroom with desk & WiFi • Peaceful gardens • Meals available • Visit for the day or overnight And Gift Shop now open by appointment

710 Highland Drive, Danville 925 837 9141 sandamiano.org and on Facebook


Facebook: Alamo Today & Danville Today News | editor@yourmonthlypaper.com August 2020 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • PAGE 3

Celeste Pacelli “is the consummate professional.” GATED ESTATE WITH SPECTACULAR VIEWS

TUSCAN VILLA IN TRILOGY

NEW PRICE

1 6 Hilferd Way, Danville

1852 Viognier Court, Brentwood

1698 Reliez Valley Road, Lafayette

5 Bed |  3.5 Bath  |  5,284 Sq Ft  +/-   6.65 Acre +/-

2 Bed | 2.5 Bath | 2846 Sq Ft | 0.24 Acre +/-

4 Bed | 3.5 Bath | 4,026 Sq Ft +/- | 1.3 Acre +/-

$4,498,000 | DanvilleViews.com

$1,289,000 | 1852ViognierCourt.com

$3,198,000 | 1698ReliezValleyRoad.com

GORGEOUS ESTATE WITH VINEYARD

SINGLE STORY WITH MAGNIFICENT VIEWS

JUST SOLD

3716 Northgate Woods Ct., Walnut Creek

1514 Rancho View Drive, Lafayette

219 Montego Drive, Danville

4 Bed | 4.5 Bath | 5,143 Sq Ft +/- | 1.2 Acre +/-

4 Bed | 3 Bath | 2.942 Sq Ft +/- | 1+ Acre +/-

4 Bed | 3 Bath |  2,106 Sq Ft  +/- |  0.29 Acre +/-

$3,250,000 | 3716NorthgateWoodsCourt.com

$1,799,500 | 1514RanchoViewDrive.com

Represented Buyer | $1,655,000

Celeste’s clients say: “…Celeste was a pleasure to work with. We had an extremely difficult sale and she was always on the ball. She made the whole process so seamless. I would highly recommend her services” See my 61 Zillow Reviews

Celeste Pacelli Broker Associate 925.395.1511 celestepacelli.com DRE 01862387

Compass is a real estate broker licensed by the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. License Number 01527235. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only and is compiled from sources deemed reliable but has not been verified. Changes in price, condition, sale or withdrawal may be made without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footage are approximate.


PAGE 4 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • August 2020

SAN RAMON VALLEY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

The San Ramon Valley Genealogical Society (SRVGS) was organized in 1985 with the idea of providing resources, assistance, and educational opportunities in a social environment that would allow its members to successfully research their ancestry. To fulfill these goals, the society offers monthly meetings with speakers who present topics covering various aspects of genealogical research. The group publishes a monthly newsletter and offers several special interest groups where members with common interests can meet and discuss their specific areas of research. SRVGS also provides resources ranging from a large selection of reference books, to information on local genealogical libraries. Classes are offered for the beginning researcher and those interested in genetic DNA. There are many educational opportunities and Zoom presentations currently available to explore genealogy from the safety of your own home. To become a member, visit srvgensoc.org, and click on the “Join SRVGS” tab on the left side of the Home page.

SONS IN RETIREMENT SAN RAMON VALLEY

Looking for things to do in your retirement? Consider joining Sons in Retirement San Ramon Valley Branch 128. There are monthly luncheons with interesting speakers and good fellowship. Additionally, members have lots of fun participating in a variety of activities including golf, hiking, biking, bocce ball, movies, cooking, finance, reading, computers, and more. Many other activities such as travel, dine outs, excursions, baseball games, and holiday parties include spouses, friends, and guests. NOTE: Due to current Coronavirus challenges, and for the safety and well being of members and guests, the SIR128 August meeting will be a virtual event using Zoom. The guest speaker will be Mr. Bill Clarkson, current mayor of San Ramon. Learn about the “state of the City” at this interesting presentation. The presentation will be held Wednesday, August 19th at 11AM. If you’re interested in accessing the August virtual meeting as a guest, please email membership@sir128.com. To learn more about the Retirement branch, please visit www.SIR128.com.

VETERAN SERVICES BRING THE “OFFICE” TO YOU With the COVID-19 County Health Order making it more challenging to get services from government offices, the Contra Costa County Veterans Services Office is removing barriers by opening a virtual office space. The virtual Veterans Office can give you close to an in-person experience. Veterans can learn about and apply for benefits, access VA health care, receive referrals for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder therapy, and much more. Visit the office website at www.contracosta.ca.gov/vets, during open office hours, for one-on-one assistance. Hours of operation are Mondays through Thursdays from 9am to noon and 1pm to 4pm, and on Fridays 9am to noon. Staffing the virtual office are Veterans Service Manager Sidney Jones, an Air Force Veteran, and Veteran Services Representative Buck Carmichael, a Marine Corps Veteran. Both have a combined three decades of experience connecting vets to critical services. For more information, please call the Veteran Services Office at 925-313-1481.

MOONLIGHT ON THE MOUNTAIN

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CELEBRATING THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE 19TH AMENDMENT: WOMEN WIN THE RIGHT TO VOTE!

In 2020 American’s celebrate the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution. The 19th Amendment states: The rights of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of sex. On August 18,1920, the Tennessee legislature became the 36 th and final state to ratify the 19th amendment. On August 26, 1920, the amendment was certified and added to the U.S. Constitution. The 19th amendment is sometimes called the Susan B Anthony amendment in honor of the suffragette leader. To celebrate this centennial, the Museum of the San Ramon Valley (MSRV) will be putting on two events. The first event takes place every Saturday in August from 10AM-noon at the MSRV. Outside the museum, there will be an outdoor exhibit providing information about woman suffrage with docents (in masks and social distancing) telling stories and answering questions. The second event is an online program titled “Women Win the Vote in California.” It will be held on August 20th from 11:30AM-1PM. This program will feature a video of the current Women Win the Vote exhibit at the Museum. In addition, a Powerpoint presentation on the history of woman suffrage provided by exhibit organizer and museum curator Beverly Lane will be given. The presentation will be followed by a question and answer session. To attend the online program, visit www.museumsrv.org, and go to the Events section. Click on “Women Win the Vote in California” and register. If you have questions, please call the Museum at 925-837-3750. The MSRV is located at 205 Railroad Ave., in Danville. The Museum is presently closed.

THE VETERANS MEMORIAL BUILDING OF SAN RAMON VALLEY NEEDS YOUR HELP!

Due to the Coronavirus pandemic, the yearly Corned Beef and Cabbage Fundraiser which was scheduled for mid-March was canceled. The volunteers at the Veterans Memorial Building of San Ramon Valley thank everyone who donated auction items and/or bought tickets for the event and donated the ticket price back. As much as this helped, fundraising goals are far short for the year. For this reason, the group is even more committed to the “Tips for Change” fundraiser at Gianni’s Italian Bistro, to be held on August 10th. You can now place your order for take-out or delivery from the Gianni’s website at www.giannissanramon.com or by phone at (925)820-6969. Specify a time between 4:30PM and 7:30PM on August 10th. To pickup your order, call the restaurant when you arrive, and it will be brought out to you. Gianni’s Italian Bistro is located at 2065 San Ramon Valley Blvd. in San Ramon. Thanks for your support at this difficult time. To learn more about the Veteran’s facility and programs, visit www.vmbsrv. org or email info@vmbsrv.org.

You’re invited to join Save Mount Diablo for a virtual Moonlight on the Mountain fundraising event on Saturday, September 12th at 5:30PM via livestream. This is Save Mount Diablo’s signature annual fundraising gala, a celebration of Diablo’s precious beauty and support for Save Mount Diablo’s essential work. The virtual gala will include everyone’s favorite Moonlight on the Mountain experiences, such as entertainment, exciting silent and live auctions, inspirational presentations, a live Fund-a-Need, virtual audience participation, and more! Hopes are that this virtual event will allow even more of the Bay Area’s conservation community to join and participate this year. Registration is complimentary. Visit https://bit.ly/3eXJStf to learn more. Save Mount Diablo is a nationally accredited land trust and conservation organization based in the San Francisco Bay Area. The organization has been preserving lands on and around Mount Diablo and educating the public about the mountain’s natural values since 1971. The group is comprised of biologists, conservationists, hikers, bikers, equestrians, bird watchers, and people who just love to look at the mountain. Save Mount Diablo is a tax-exempt non-profit 501(c)3 organization. Tax ID # 94-2681735966. Learn more about them at www.savemountdiablo.org.


Facebook: Alamo Today & Danville Today News | editor@yourmonthlypaper.com August 2020 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • PAGE 5

DUDUM REAL ESTATE GROUP W H E R E R E A L E S TAT E I S S T I L L P E R S O N A L

JUST LISTED

JUST LISTED

NEWLY ACTIVE

PENDING

305 MIRANDA LANE, ALAMO 3 BEDS + OFFICE, 2 BATHS, 2,259 SF, 0.52 ACRE LOT

305 LAKE DALE COURT, MARTINEZ 3 BEDS , 2.5 BATHS, 1,332 SF, 0.05 ACRE LOT

530 RYAN TERRACE, SAN RAMON 3 BEDS, 3.5 BATHS, 1,790 SF, CONDOMINUM

3526 EAGLE POINT ROAD, LAFAYETTE 4 BEDS, 3.75 BATHS, 2,866 SF, 3.07 ACRE LOT OFFERED AT $2,200,000 ZOCCHI & ASSOCIATES | 925.360.8662

OFFERED AT $1,589,000

OFFERED AT $656,000

OFFERED AT $818,000

MARGY LYMAN | 925.963.6380

KATIE HENDERSEN | 925.286.0026

ALISON J. PETERSEN | 925.984.7214

PENDING - MULTIPLE OFFERS

PENDING

PENDING

SOLD

103 BALDWIN DRIVE, DANVILLE 5 BEDS, 3 BATHS, 2,629 SF, 0.24 ACRE LOT

750 RYAN TERRACE, SAN RAMON 3 BEDS, 3.5 BATHS, 1,790 SF, CONDOMINUM

2094 FOSTORIA CIRCLE, DANVILLE 3 BEDS, 2 BATHS, 1,233 SF, CONDOMINUM

20 BEVMAR LANE, ALAMO 4 BEDS, 4 BATHS, 4,214 SF, 0.55 ACRE LOT SOLD FOR $3,650,000 MARY PISCITELLI & PETER GILLIS | 925.765.9095

RENDERING

OFFERED AT $1,349,000

OFFERED AT $818,000

OFFERED AT $650,000

ALISON J. PETERSEN | 925.984.7214

ALISON J. PETERSEN | 925.984.7214

KORY MADGE | 925.366.9899

SOLD

SOLD - MULTIPLE OFFERS

SOLD - MULTIPLE OFFERS

SOLD

2484 BILTMORE DRIVE, ALAMO 6 BEDS, 5.5 BATHS, 4,487 SF, 0.7 ACRE LOT

2638 ROUNDHILL DRIVE, ALAMO 5 BEDS, 3 BATHS, 3,151 SF, 0.38 ACRE LOT

1098 UPPER HAPPY VALLEY ROAD, LAFAYETTE 3 BEDS, 2 BATHS, 1,883 SF, 0.26 ACRE LOT

1195 MONTEGO, WALNUT CREEK 3 BEDS, 2 BATHS, 1,739 SF, 0.03 ACRE LOT

SOLD FOR $2,050,000

CALL FOR DETAILS

SOLD FOR $1,510,000

CALL FOR DETAILS

BRYAN HURLBUT, HURLBUT TEAM | 925.383.5500

DON & PAMELA COLOMBANA | 925.878.8047

DON & PAMELA COLOMBANA | 925.878.8047

DON & PAMELA COLOMBANA | 925.878.8047

ALISON J. PETERSEN 925.984.7214

BRYAN HURLBUT 925.383.5500

REALTOR | DRE#01177737

REALTOR | DRE# 01347508

®

®

DON & PAMELA COLOMBANA 925.878.8047 925.482.4142

EVA ELDERTS 925.726.9409

JOHN FONDNAZIO 925.817.9053

JULIE DEL SANTO 925.818.5500

KATIE HENDERSON 925.286.0026

KERI FRYER 925.980.9979

REALTOR | DRE# 02039328

REALTOR | DRE# 01938194

BROKER/OWNER DRE# 01290985

REALTOR | DRE# 02061210

REALTOR® | DRE# 02068960

MARY PISCITELLI & PETER GILLIS 925.765.9095 925.765.0629

MEREDITH & BONNIE KUMMELL 925.984.1344 925.980.9952

SABRENA LAWTON 925.768.2992

STEFANIE PASSEY 925.268.0780

TERESA ZOCCHI 925.360.8662

REALTOR® | DRE# 01821910

REALTOR® | DRE# 01442889

REALTOR® | DRE# 01907345

REALTORS® DRE# 01426129 / 01364038

REALTORS® DRE# 00905114 / 01364056

®

®

®

REALTORS® DRE# 01979180 / 01979181

KORY MADGE 925.366.9899

LESLIE SHAFTON 925.360.9192

MARGY LYMAN 925.963.6380

REALTOR® | DRE# 01345227

REALTOR® | DRE#01944775

REALTOR® | DRE# 02067680

DRE# 01882902

WWW.DUDUM.COM

DANVILLE

WALNUT CREEK

LAMORINDA

BRENTWOOD

SIERRA TAHOE

Distinctive Properties

©2020 The information herein was obtained by sources deemed to be reliable by Dudum Real Estate Group. Dudum Real Estate group has not independently verified the information contained herein and therefore, assumes no legal responsibility for its accuracy. Buyer should investigate any matters or items disclosed, identified or about which they have concerns to their own satisfaction. DRE Lic. 01882902


PAGE 6 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • August 2020

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AN OMNIPRESENT DANGER: HOW TO PREPARE FOR THIS YEAR’S WILDFIRE SEASON

By County Supervisor Candace Andersen

As our County continues to deal with the COVID-19 virus and its effects, it is important to remember other dangers still exist within our communities. Wildfire season, traditionally between the summer and fall months, will overlap with the pandemic emergency and likely cause fire damage across our state. Six of the 20 largest fires in California’s recorded history have happened in the past five years, while 10 of our state’s most destructive wildfires have occurred in the past five years. Unfortunately, it is estimated that 95% of wildfires in our state are caused by people, often the result of combustible debris and vegetation. Despite these statistics, however, and our current predicament, there are several steps each of us can take to reduce the risk of one breaking out in our community. While I am proud of the many outstanding fire protection services in our County and the work they do to keep our communities safe, it is ultimately every property owner’s responsibility to remove fire hazards on their property, whether it be residential, commercial, or raw land parcels. The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District (SRVFPD) is happy to offer guidance and aid to the residents it serves. SRVFPD provides all-risk fire, rescue, and emergency medical services to the communities of Alamo, Blackhawk, the Town of Danville, Diablo, the City of San Ramon, the southern area of Morgan Territory, and the Tassajara Valley. For SRVFPD homeowners who live near open space or have wildland adjacent to their property, they are encouraged to sign-up for a free workshop on wildfire preparedness. Though there are no upcoming class at this time due to the pandemic, classes are typically held at the District’s Administrative Office, located at 1500 Bollinger Canyon Road in San Ramon. The SRVFPD also maintains a list of weed abatement providers in its area, which can be found at www.firedepartment.org. The Contra Costa County Fire Protection District (CCCFPD) provides fire and emergency medical services for much of Contra Costa County including Walnut Creek and Lafayette. On their homepage at www.cccfpd.org/wildfireprep, there is great information about how to best protect your family and home from wildfires. Among other resources, there is a very helpful Wildfire Preparedness and Evacuation Guide. Another excellent resource is the Diablo Firesafe Council (DFSC). Their stated goal is to serve as a catalyst for bringing together people, agencies, and the means to substantially reduce the impact of wildland fire on our communities. Their Resources list at www.diablofiresafe.org includes information about preventing wildfires around the house, plant performance information, and a Community Wildfire Protection Plan for our County. To get well-versed in wildfire preparedness, residents should become acclimated with several key terms fire officials use to broadcast the status of our area in regard to wildfire danger. “Fire Weather Watch, indicates fire weather conditions are possible, and “Red Flag Warning” advises fire conditions are ongoing or expected to occur shortly, and therefore residents must use extreme caution. These are among two of the most important warnings. For current fire weather watches and red flag warnings, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/fire2/cafw/index.php. There are several, seemingly easy, ways all residents can reduce the risk of wildfires: mow your lawn before 10AM, and never when it is windy or excessively dry; obtain a campfire permit and understand campfire safety; maintain your vehicle by securing chains, checking tire pressure, and properly maintaining brakes; and learn how and when to safely burn debris. All homeowners and tenants should create a defensible space, which is the buffer you create between a building on your property and the grass, trees, shrubs, or any wildland area that surrounds it. It is advised to remove all dead and dying vegetation from around the house, roof, gutters, and decks. Keep tree limbs 10 feet from structures and other trees. Residents should also be mindful of proper wiring in their homes and electrical outlets, not overloading garages, and frequently cleaning dryer vents. These measures will help protect your home from catching fire. It is also imperative to have several escape routes planned ahead of time from your home and community to ensure a successful evacuation in the event of a fire. As we have seen in recent major fires, knowing of impending dangers and when to evacuate is critical. All residents should register their cellphones with the Contra Costa Community Warning System (CWS). To register, visit www.cococws.us or call 925-313-9622. You should also follow CWS @CoCoCWS, Fire @ Contracostafire, and Sheriff @cocosopio. Residents should also be aware of AM Radio 1610, which broadcasts emergency information in the San Ramon Valley. The year 2020 has indeed been unprecedented. While the Coronavirus has dominated the public discourse over the past several months, it is vital that we not forget about necessary preventative measures that need to be taken to save lives and structures during wildfire season. We must continue to remain vigilant to ensure our communities remain safe. My office is here to serve the residents of Contra Costa County District 2, which includes San Ramon, Danville, Alamo, Walnut Creek, Saranap, Parkmead, Lafayette, Moraga, Canyon, and Orinda. Please contact us if we can provide you with additional information on this topic or on other County issues. I can be reached at SupervisorAndersen@bos.cccounty.us or 925-957-8860.

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VALLEY VIGNETTE

By Beverly Lane PARKS FOR THE SAN RAMON VALLEY THE 20TH CENTURY: A NEW COUNTRY CLUB AND STATE PARK, PART II

11 Critical Home Inspection Traps to be Aware of Weeks Before Listing Your Danville, Alamo Home for Sale

Country clubs and state parks were new concepts in the twentieth century. Both were Danville-Alamo - According to industry experts, altogether. In most cases, you can make a successfully established in the San Ramon Valley. there are over 33 physical problems that will come reasonable pre-inspection yourself if you know what One of the first country clubs in California under scrutiny during a home inspection when your you're looking for, and knowing what you're looking opened south of Mount Diablo in 1915. It was home is for sale. A new report has been prepared for can help you prevent little problems from growing founded by Robert Noble Burgess, who had grown which identifies the eleven most common of these into costly and unmanageable ones. up and knew the area of the club as a young boy. problems, and what you should know about them To help homesellers deal with this issue before He was the son of Danville Presbyterian Church’s before you list your home for sale. their homes are listed, a free report entitled "11 minister J. C. Burgess. An entrepreneur from his Whether you own an old home or a brand new one, Things You Need to Know to Pass Your Home early life, he convinced the owner of the Oakwood there are a number of things that can fall short of Inspection" has been compiled which explains the Stock Farm to sell him the 6,000-acre property. requirements during a home inspection. If not issues involved. Eventually, he owned 10,000 acres, including the identified and dealt with, any of these 11 items could To hear a brief recorded message about how to Mount Diablo summit. cost you dearly in terms of repair. That's why it's order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1844-941-0941 and enter 1003. You can call any time, His vision and energy in creating the Mt. Diablo critical that you read this report before you list your 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Park Club was extraordinary. Facilities for members home. If you wait until the building inspector flags these issues for you, you will almost certainly Get your free special report NOW to learn how to included a golf course, tennis courts, and lake ensure a home inspection doesn't cost you the sale swimming. Hundreds of people bought homes, and experience costly delays in the close of your home of your home. enjoyed the club amenities and the open space around sale or, worse, turn prospective buyers away the mountain. He managed to convince the owners of This report is courtesy of The Jackson Group-EXP Realty DRE #01763819. Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently under contract. Copyright © 2019 the new electric line; Oakland, Antioch, and Eastern; to extend the Danville Branch out of Saranap to the club in 1916. San Franciscans could leave the San Francisco Ferry building and reach the club in one and one-half hours. His grand opening was held in 1916. This was a park for people of means, and it provided income for local residents as well. Workers from Danville and environs worked as groundsmen, cooks, and cleaners. Young men became caddies and earned their first spending money.

MOUNT DIABLO STATE PARK

Mount Diablo was always a favorite location for excursions, hiking, picnicking, riding, and hunting. Talk about a state park on the mountain began early, with the Danville Grange No. 85 minutes regularly citing such a discussions. State Senator William R. Sharkey from Contra Costa County introduced legislation which created a 630-acre area around the summit as the Mt. Diablo State Park and Game Refuge in 1921. It was one of seven parks created prior to the formal establishment of the State Park System in 1927. On June 19, 1921, an estimated 1,000 people celebrated the creation of the Park and Game Refuge. During a dedication sponsored by the Mt. Diablo Parlor of Native Sons of Martinez, there were speeches and music at the base of the mountain at 11AM, a basket lunch with refreshments provided by the Grange, and a 3PM dedication at the summit. Still, visitors had to pay a toll to get through private land to the summit A 1921 celebration at the Mt. Diablo summit during the twenties. A Mount Diablo State Park League, the Grange, the Danville Women’s Club, the Alamo Community Club, and others pushed for a larger park and the end to tolls. According to his diary, young George Wood pursued the project by leading Sierra Club hikes, writing letters, and surveying potential lands for the Park. On March 19, 1928, he wrote: Got up early and left for S. F. Had Mr. Johnson and Mrs. Clark sign letters to State Board of Park Commissioners asking for enlargement of Mt. Diablo State Park. Took the letters to Hotel Witcomb where meeting was held by the Com. to hear proposals from all over Cal. A great many were submitted, and meeting lasted till 5PM. I presented the Mt. Diablo program for S.R.V. Chamber of Com. Many people there. Returned home this eve. Finally, land was acquired for a total holding of 1,400 acres. Another huge celebration on April 26, 1931, took place with a parade beginning in Martinez which included flower petals strewn on Danville Blvd. next to the Sunset Nursery. Unfortunately, a huge rain storm prevented the planned program at Rock City, so the dedication took place at the Mt. Diablo Country Club gate. Governor James Rolph came for speeches and the dedication, but the storm stopped him at the Club. After enjoying some libations, he was somewhat unsteady for the actual ribbon-cutting. Rose Fereira, who worked at the Club at the time and was always tart tongued, said he was “drunk as a skunk.” From 630 acres in 1921, to 1,400 acres in 1931, the State Park has grown to 20,000 acres. People throughout Contra Costa County support Mt. Diablo today. Photo by Mark Harrigan. and enjoy the state park today, as Save Mount Diablo works to expand the park, and the Mount Diablo Interpretive Association helps interpret the park’s natural and cultural resources. Next year will mark the 100th anniversary of this treasure: Mount Diablo State Park. Major Sources: Seth Adams, History of Mount Diablo (a chronology from Save Mt. Diablo); F. W. Beechey, Narrative of a Voyage to the Pacific, 1831; Virginia Bruch, “1851 Mount Diablo Survey Established Base & Meridian Lines for California” in California Historian, Summer, 1998; Contra Costa Gazette June 24, 25, 1921; Danville Grange Minutes, 1911, 1921; Edna Purcell, History of Contra Costa County; Leader Ransom, Letter to Saml. D. King in California Historical Society Quarterly, 1955; George Wood, Diaries, 1927-1931.


PAGE 8 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • August 2020

ST. ISIDORE SCHOOL

By Carol Bender, Principal HAPPY AUGUST!

It is with great excitement that I write this letter of introduction to you as the new principal of St. Isidore School (SIS). As an educator and administrator for over 25 years, it has been my ministry to serve in the Catholic school community. I place tremendous emphasis on preserving our Catholic identity, instilling the mission of our faith, and providing a program of academic excellence integrated with current and innovative practices. It is an incredible honor and privilege to lead SIS. My first introduction to serving in Catholic education began on the peninsula, under the Archdiocese of San Francisco. I attended a Catholic elementary school, high school, and university in the city. After ten years of teaching in Belmont and San Bruno, I began the track of Catholic school leadership in a vice-principal position. Two years later, I was hired as principal at Our Lady of Angels School (Burlingame). It was back then that I first heard of SIS while serving on a WCEA Accreditation Team. I was immediately impressed by the school’s strong sense of community and dedication to educating students both academically and spiritually. After moving to Danville in 2005, I was reconnected to SIS where I was hired as a fourth-grade long-term substitute teacher, for former SIS principal Maria Ward while on maternity leave. I would never have thought back then the opportunity to teach her son 14 years later and follow in her leadership position would have come to fruition. Since that time, I have been a member of the SIS community as a teacher and vice-principal. As a result of that long association, I embrace the

SAN RAMON VALLEY CHRISTIAN ACADEMY By Jamie Westgate, Principal

One of my favorite scriptures in the Bible is John 16:33. It reads, “In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world!” It’s such a comfort to know that trouble is an expected part of life, yet we can have confidence in God’s ultimate power and control even during our most challenging uncertainties! Our governor recently announced new mandates that apply to both public and private schools in an effort to keep students, staff, and teachers safe during the Coronavirus pandemic. Although most of us are likely disappointed by this news, we can still be encouraged that we will see God do great things in these times. At this point in time, teachers, staff, and school board members have begun shifting our plans to a distance learning format. However, we’re also committed to getting our campus ready for students’ safe return as soon as we are given permission to do so. I’m confident we will see God at work in the details of all of those plans, both on and off campus. I was pleased and proud of the stellar job of our staff, students, and parents did during the fourth quarter of school last year when we completed the year in a distance format. We’re excited to build on that foundation. Turning on a dime in March, we met 85%-95% of our academic benchmarks by the end of the year while still maintaining opportunities for spiritual discipleship and unity within our “nest,” all hallmarks to who we are at SRVCA. With a summer in which to prepare, this year we plan to meet 100% of our goals, despite the need to begin our year in a distance learning model. Students in all classes, TK-8th grade will have daily live instruction with classroom teachers, as well as their enrichment teachers in Spanish, Art, Music, P.E., Library, and Computers. Using instruction mixed with age appropriate activities and assignments, we are confident our kids will not only be successful in meeting academic expectations, but they will also love school! Planned virtual chapel experiences, special events, and even social hang-outs will help students grow spiritually and socially amidst this prolonged social distancing period. Although we are disappointed by the thought of starting the year in our homes, we are still very grateful and excited for all we can still do! Back on campus at SRVCA, our readiness plan for students’ return is in full swing. Thanks to our parent church, Community Presbyterian Church, we have plenty of space to use for social distancing. We have purchased equipment to be used for extensive disinfection procedures and we have crafted a plan to ensure the very best for our students and staff members. We plan to immediately begin on-campus teaching as soon as the County Department of Health approves. I can only imagine how excited we’ll all be to be back in our “Eagle’s Nest.”

www.yourmonthlypaper.com | Instagram: @Alamoanddanvilletoday | #atdtnews Catholic identity and traditions manifested in our school community.

LOOKING AHEAD

Serving as a principal during a pandemic is a monumental task! No prior coursework or study could have prepared someone in a school leadership position for what one faces today. The feeling of uncertainty that surrounds each day and a longing for a sense of normalcy, hearing children’s voices in the hall and on the playgrounds, is a constant. My heart goes out to school administrators throughout the country who are making critical decisions on how best to serve their school, many of whom have minimal resources. I have spent this past month connecting with our teachers, parents, and diocesan leadership on how to navigate these complexities. Time expended in analyzing what other academic institutions across the nation are outlining for the upcoming year and modeling our practices for a forward-moving curriculum has become commonplace. We created an instructional task force to provide and seek input in planning, initiated a technology team to support instructional practices, and established a health/safety committee to prepare for our students’ safe arrival. After much consideration, our parent community was notified we would open Tuesday, August 18th, in a five-day on-site program with staggered times. This would require us to temporarily restructure our two grade-level classes of 36 students, to three cohorts of 24 students; a first for SIS. Each of our cohorts will continue in this format for the school year, with the classroom teacher and full-time assistant (12:1 ratio). However, Governor Newsom’s recent announcement to open in a distant learning format put a spin on our plan. In preparation, our professional development centered on distance learning is already in motion. The faculty and staff are committed to broadening our MAKE YOUR OWN WORKSHEETS ONLINE @ WWW.ATOZTEACHE learning experiences as we implement best practices, expand technology platforms, and engage students in new and relevant content. I am confident that our faculty and staff will deliver a rigorous academic and faith-filled NAME:_______________________________ DATE:____ program for our students, both online and in person. The Danville/Alamo area is a tightly connected community, and I look forward to sharing highlights of SIS with you. We pray you remain in good health, stay safe, and enjoy the last days of summer!

M C K P M L J P E V U V F G U D B U I O L M C

T S D A G D J F H H T O H N L H K W N U T M G

August AUGUST WORD SEARCH

M E B G S O S A G E P H C I A H E A R T S I N

Y P Q A U E G G C Y K A R P C U A W Q D W G I

E Z H S N V S N E C K R G M O J M Z O O M A T

T R O C F N Q O V I R T U A L M Q R E O S G I

S Y R H L E L U R G Y Z E C V W V M C R Q O R

U F S O O L K H F Z S N C J N T F D C S M O W

• ARITHMETIC • HEARTS • AUGUST • HORSE • CAMPING • HOT • CLOCKTOWER • LOCAL • CREEKWALKING • MUSICINTHEPARK • HARTZ • OSAGE • HARVEST • OUTDOORS

G Y E O W U A T K G G D S N F E S X K B O H R

U N K L E O U I G N I K L A W K E E R C C E M

A G B H R W K R A P E H T N I C I S U M I K N

X U W A S Z X P Z Z D W Y L H P C P X D W G V

• POPSICLE • READING • ROSES • SCHOOL • SMALLBUSINESS • SUNFLOWERS • SUPPORT

O X S R G N I D A E R B A R I T H M E T I C L

W Y P V E W C I N I H C C U Z P T R O P P U S

F U E E M V I Q Y R O V E R E W O T K C O L C

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R F U S M G A E N H L P B X P O P S I C L E Z

See answers on page 21

L U K T E A C H E R S S E N I S U B L L A M S


Facebook: Alamo Today & Danville Today News | editor@yourmonthlypaper.com August 2020 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • PAGE 9

FLUTE LESSONS THROUGHOUT COVID AND AFTER

By Karen Van Dyke

Aspiring musicians, whether or not enrolled in music lessons at the onset of COVID, currently have two excellent resources working in their favor: the ability to take on-line music lessons, and a creative outlet during these challenging times through expression and development on our instrument. Budding music students who were planning to begin flute lessons this fall with the start of school are in luck; they can still do so! Lessons via Zoom and other virtual conference platforms have proven to be very effective for starting or carrying on flute studies for students of all ages and levels of advancement. I am pleased to be able to accept new students in my Danville flute studio in an on-line format, until in-person lessons become safe, and thereafter at my home studio. Lessons cover tonal work, technique, musicianship, interpretation, performance skills, and sight reading through examination of the classical solo repertoire. Lesson curricula are custom planned depending on the age and goals of the student. All ages and levels are welcome. All-state band, college music major/minor hopefuls, school band students in need of formal instruction, and total beginners thrive in my studio. Recently relocated to Danville from San Jose, I am a lecturer in the Music Department at Stanford University, where I founded the highly acclaimed Stanford Flute Ensemble over two decades ago. In addition to my work at Stanford, I maintain an active and versatile career as a private flute teacher, freelance orchestral and chamber musician, and for the last 26 years as Director of Northern California Flute Camp, an international summer program for students ages 12-18 held in Carmel Valley. In my 35 years of private teaching, my students have occupied the flute sections of all-state, county, and area youth ensembles, have won competitions, and numerous graduates of my private studio have gone on to major in music at top music schools. For further information on lessons or to schedule an introductory Zoom lesson, please email kvandyke@stanford.edu, or visit www. Advertorial karenvandykeflute.com.

MONTE VISTA HIGH SCHOOL

By Dr. Kevin Ahern, Principal

Summer break was very busy as site and district staff spent much of their time off planning for the reopening of SRVUSD schools this August. At their July 16th meeting, the SRVUSD board voted to begin our school year with remote learning. As a result, the Monte Vista (MV) staff is focusing our collective energies on developing quality virtual classrooms for our students. We learned a lot during this past spring’s shelter-in-place order, so we are looking forward to building on that learning in order to provide our students with a great educational experience, albeit in a virtual setting. Since we are virtual, things will be clearly different as the first day of school approaches. While the physical office remains closed, MV’s counselors will return virtually on July 27th, and the virtual office will re-open on August 3rd. Our annual Freshman Orientation will now be held virtually on Wednesday, August 5th with our Mustang Mentors presenting their program via Google Meet and Zoom. Stampede Day will be postponed until we return to in-person school. The California Interscholastic Federation has also made adjustments in response to the shift to remote learning. As a result, MVs fall athletic programs have been postponed. The current plan is to move from three to two seasons of sports which means that most fall sports teams will begin in mid-December. MV looks forward to great athletic seasons once it is safe to move forward. MV welcomes several new faculty members this year including Maureen Duddy and Gabriel Lee in Math, Robin Hart in Special Education, and Ryane Siegel in Dance. We also want to congratulate long time day custodian Ray Tessendorf who is now MV’s new Lead Custodian. There are several more positions pending, so we look forward to welcoming a few more new faculty members before the onset of the school year. A lot of work on the MV campus has been completed this summer -- almost completely focused on cleaning and sanitizing each classroom, office, etc. -- and those areas of campus are looking great. Hats off to our site custodial team for their hard work in making our campus look so amazing. The first day of school is August 11th, and although this year is very different from any other we have experienced, we are looking forward to another awesome year at MV.

TROOP 302 RECOGNIZES FIVE NEW EAGLE SCOUTS

The Boy Scouts of America (BSA), that now also includes girls in their troops, meets the needs of busy families by creating a one-stop activity that encourages life skills introduction, outdoor appreciation, and confidence building for children ages 10-18. Scouting helps shape these young adults values and open up their awareness of everything around them. Walnut Creek based Boy Scout Troop 302 recently named five new Eagle Scouts. The Eagle Scout ranking is the highest award given by the BSA. For Clayton Madison-Dawson’s Eagle project he worked at Alamo Elementary School and did landscaping and construction of a bench. Clayton also led volunteers in the construction of a bench and digging of holes for plant placement. He turned the barren area under the redwood trees into a lovely garden with ferns and rhododendrons. Grady Milligan renovated Shadelands Ranch Picnic Area for his Eagle project. He led a team of volunteers to renew the picnic area by digging up rotten boards and an old sprinkler system and then weeded and leveled the area. Pressure treated wood was laid to create a border for tanbark and to section off the picnic area. Gopher wire and week barrier was put down before the tanbark was spread out. Picnic tables were brought in to create a outdoor space for picnics. Cooper Madison-Dawson performed his Eagle project at Grace Presbyterian Church. Cooper and volunteers repaired and painted a heavily used shed. The volunteers emptied the storage shed and tore out the failing floor. Gravel was brought in to create new walkways and to fill in the shed floor. New plywood floors Serving the Bay Area with honesty and integrity since 1973 were laid and the shelves were rebuilt. The exterior roof of the shed was painted and the 2395 Monument Blvd., Suite J 3191-J Crow Canyon Pl sliding door and lock were repaired. Concord San Ramon Carpets, Hardwood, Laminate & Stone Colby Milligan led a team of 20 Scouts, (925) 680-4433 (925) 866-2200 www.MacFloor.com • info@macfloor.com

See Scouts cont. on page 10

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PAGE 10 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • August 2020

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GIRL SCOUT BRONZE AWARDS

Girl Scout Junior Troop 30825, based in Danville, kept the momentum going during this year’s unforeseen pandemic. In spite of orders to stay-at-home, the girls were able to plan and execute projects for their Junior Bronze Award. The award, the highest for the Junior level scout, highlights ingenuity, creativity, and community building through projects that give back and can be passed on to younger troops as a legacy of all that it embodies to be a Girl Scout. In order to start a Bronze Award project, Girl Scouts must first complete a Girl Scout “Journey,” an extended engagement with a topic created specifically for leadership development that culminates in a “Take Action” project to make the world a better place. The troop then divided into groups based on each girl’s interest. The groups discussed strategy and planned execution of their projects. They enlisted the help of their families when needed and were able to complete their projects by the award deadline. In all, each girl put in 20 hours to complete their Scouting Bronze Award project, Troop 30825 - Mini Library project in order to achieve this esteemed award. The first group’s created a mini library set up to allow access to book exchanges within the community. The second group’s created cat scratchers utilizing cardboard left over from Girl Scout cookie cases. It was a wonderful way to up-cycle materials while providing enrichment to cats in the shelters. Both of these projects gave tangible evidence of every Girl Scout’s goal to exact positive change as a young girl and well into adulthood. These projects and awards give girls the necessary tools to be well-rounded, thoughtful, and compassionate women capable of achieving anything they put their minds to. Scouting Bronze Award project, Troop 30825 For more information, contact Anna Lomas at alomas@gsnorcal.org, or visit www.gsnorcal.org. - do it yourself cat scratchers.

QUICK TRIPS

MIDDLE HARBOR SHORELINE PARK By Linda Summers Pirkle

It was June 1999. We traveled from Caen to Reville in the Normandy region of France in our rented Fiat station wagon. We were heading to a gîte I had read about in a Travel + Leisure magazine article. Manoir de Cabourg is an 18th century stone manor house situated right on the beach. A half-mile from the center of the tiny town, down a two-lane poplar tree lined road, my husband, our three kids, and I arrived at our home away from home. Madame Marie and her aunt, also named Madame Marie, were our charming hosts who had recently converted a three-story cottage into a rental. The house was perfect for our family, with the first-floor kitchen and living room, a cozy master bedroom and bath on the second floor, and a spiral staircase leading to a third story attic bedroom with three single beds for our children. Windows looked out to the sea and the Islet of Tatihou on one side and a pasture with cows on the other. We were on the Cotentin peninsula, one of the places where fierce fighting took place during the Normandy invasion that started on June 6,1944, a turning point during World War II. It was an idyllic vacation. The two Madame Maries were impeccable hosts, preparing a list of places to visit during our vacation, and even inviting us into their home for tea and biscuits, while the younger niece shared a bit about their lives. An artist, Madame Marie was in the process of converting another stone building into her new studio. Among our day trips we visited Parc Festyland, a kid’s theme park, the fishing village Honfleur, and Sainte-Mère-Église. We were in Normandy to coincide with the 55th anniversary of D-Day, and our tour of the Memorial de Caen and Normandy Beach Museum was an incredibly moving experience. My fondest memories were early morning walks on the uninhabited beach mere steps from our back door and the spectacular view of the sea from our little stone cottage. Another World War II historical destination, a bit closer to home, is the Middle Harbor Shoreline Park. During WWII, the park was part of the Oakland Army Base Supply Depot. Civilians and military workers processed and shipped different types of goods including aviation materials, electronics, weapons, clothing, food, fuel, lumber, medicine, and medical equipment for the war effort. During

the busiest time of the war, 8.5 million tons of cargo were moved at the site. Today, the Middle Harbor Shoreline is part of a 38-acre shoreline park which was built and operated by the Port of Oakland for the community and has more than two miles of pathways that encircle Middle Harbor. The primary goals of the park included creating a place for learning about the local history, natural environment, and maritime activities, as well as stewardship of the environment. The most amazing feature for me, and a reason why I keep going back to Middle Harbor Shoreline Park, is the spectacular view of San Francisco. Often the only other visitors are scrappy gulls and a security guard or two. Manoir de Cabourg is located on 10 route du Martnet, 50760 Reville, France. The little cottage is no longer a rental, but they do offer two double rooms. Middle Harbor Shoreline Park is located on the San Francisco Bay and the Port of Oakland entrance Channel at 2777 Middle Harbor Road, Oakland. It is open dawn to dusk, seven days a week. Linda Summers Pirkle is a travel writer, consultant, and long-term Danville resident. To share your “Quick Trips” ideas, email Coverthemap@gmail.com.

Scouts continued from page 9

adults, and friends to clean up the debris and pulled weeds that blocked the lower parking lot waiting area at Alamo Elementary school for his Eagle project. They installed weed barrier and then put down gravel to create a level and mud free zone for children to wait for pick up and rest after school or after sports practice. Colby also had volunteers construct a bench for extra seating and relaid some colorful stepping stones. Hunter Bush: took on the project of refurbishing Alamo Elementary School’s amphitheater which is used for lunch and Left to right - Clayton Madison-Dawson, Grady Milligan, school assemblies. Hunter led volunteers in sanding and restaining the large wood amphitheater. Congratulations to all five scouts on their great achievement.


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PAGE 12 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • August 2020

CLIP NOTES

www.yourmonthlypaper.com | Instagram: @Alamoanddanvilletoday | #atdtnews

By Jody Morgan

Juan Ponce de Leon, the first European to explore the Florida shoreline, landed in 1513 on a mission to find the legendary island of Bimini, reputed to be rich in temporal treasure and wondrously blessed with magical waters generating eternal rejuvenation. Alas, his explorations failed on both counts. The secret to long life, at least for trees, isn’t found in the state now known as Florida. On a wind-swept ridge on the opposite side of the continent, the world’s oldest fully documented individual living tree had already weathered more than 4,000 winters when Ponce de Leon initiated his unsuccessful quest for the fountain of youth. The venerable The “Good Old Days” are now! bristlecone pine nicknamed Methuselah, in reference to the longest-lived Biblical Rates are better than 50-60 years ago figure, is now estimated to have resided in California for some 4,850 years. Although hardly youthful in appearance, Methuselah and his tribe continue to thrive for thousands of years by sustaining growth on their most vigorous limbs. A John Muir quotation heads the National Park Service’s bristlecone pine Kevin Corstorphine DRE#01944908 pamphlet: “On the roughest ledges of crumbling limestone are lowly old 805.845.5200 Kevin@alisonmortgage.com giants, five or six feet in diameter that have braved the storms of more than a The Alison Company www.alisonmortgage.com Nationwide Financing on Commercial Property thousand years. But whether old or young, sheltered or exposed to the wildest gales, this tree is ever found to be irrepressibly and extravagantly picturesque, Razzies continued from front page offering a richer and more varied series of forms to the artist than any other species I have ever seen.” Q - As a film editor, producer, singer, co-founder of the The sculptural specimens in the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest section Razzies, as well as an Alamo native, I believe readers would of Inyo National Forest (headquartered in Bishop, California) grow between find your story interesting. When you attended the first Razzies 9,000 and 11,000 feet above sea level in conditions where other vegetation in 1980 at John Wilson’s (your business partner) apartment to cannot compete for the limited resources. Poetically described as depauper“honor” the worst in film, did you ever imagine you would be ate, the alkaline soil is poor in nutrients and parsimonious in provision of celebrating the awards 40th anniversary? moisture. Although the key to achieving arboreal longevity may lie in setting A - John and I went to UCLA Film School but didn’t know each other until down roots where fungal and insect pests, as well as pathogens borne by we worked at Kaleidoscope Film, which was the first production company visitors, seldom survive, few other organisms appear prepared to emulate the outside the studios to create movie trailers and TV advertising for upcoming ascetic lifestyle of these horticultural hermits. major motion pictures. We were kids and having fun. John saw a double Many factors contribute to the bristlecones’ ability to withstand the ravages feature, Can’t Stop the Music and Xanadu, and wanted to get his money back. of gale force winds, extremes of temperature, and unfiltered ultraviolet light. We all gathered at his place to put on the antithesis of the Oscars, based on Their slow growth rate conserves energy and produces dense wood difficult the best of the worst. I had always been involved as a filmmaker or presenter for pests to penetrate. Instead of shedding old needles every two or three while doing my paying gigs on the side (like 10 years at HBO), and in 2010 we years like most other pine species, bristlecones retain their needles for thirty agreed I would come on board more seriously as a co-founder to up the ante. to forty years. Lateral roots, rather than a main tap root, anchor the trees to Organically, the Razzies grew its little legs and took off around the world. We rocks and reach out for nutrients and water while sustaining only the section added the Razzie Redeemer Award, the Roving Razzie Reporter, and other of the tree to which they are attached. Hence, if a root is compromised, only ideas to flesh out the original concept with the tag line “Own your own Bad.” a small part of the tree suffers damage. Ancient trees maintain life-supportWe now have press and a membership that spans the globe. Basically, it’s a ing bark with limbs festooned by needles in limited places on their leeward simple concept that everyone understands when they’re suckered into paying sides. Gnarled spikes of deadwood stripped of bark and polished smooth by for, or wasting their time on, something that should have been entertaining. wind-blown sand, rocks, and ice offer sharp accents to the robust texture of Did I expect to be doing this 40 years later? No, I had other plans and was pursuing branches bristling with green growth. other things, but I own half of this, and it’s a fun challenge. I was able to apply my In a 1958 National Geographic article, Edmund Schulman detailed his docskills, working on projects as a writer, producer, and editor. No one else owns us, so umentation of the advanced age of Methuselah and neighboring trees through we can do what we want and hopefully with the right impact and purpose. analysis of the bristlecones’ growth rings. Describing the significance of this Q - In an interview, you mentioned a bit of advice to future recipients of discovery, Eric Rutkow writes in American Canopy: Trees, Forests, and the See Razzies continued on page 14 Shaping of a Nation: “Schulman’s finding held great promise for a variety of reasons. Tree rings recorded climatic activity with remarkable precision -- wetter years generated widely spaced rings, drier periods kept them close, and all trees in a given area corresponded. Consequently, these bristlecones were silent but scrupulous witnesses to several millennia of Serving Alamo & Danville Since 1979! droughts, floods, shifting rivers, and retreating glaciers. Their rings offered scientists, specifically dendrochronologists (those who study tree rings), a chance to reconstruct the local climate to dates contemporaneous with the building of the Egyptian pyramids.” Farther east in Nevada, a still older bristlecone stood until 1964. Named Prometheus for the mythological Greek immortal who gave humans fire, the tree was the 114th specimen examined in August 1964 by Donald www.actionpoolrepair.com Currey, a graduate student in geography. Researching climate change, he attempted to use a borer to take a core sample. Unable to extract a core yourpoolman@hotmail.com sample either because his borer broke or he was unskilled in the technique, Currey obtained permission from the Forest Service to cut down the tree to count its rings. Prometheus had 4,844 rings. Oops! Donald had killed Contractor Lic# 978033-C53 the world’s oldest non-clonal tree. Chagrined by his error, he worked to protect the remainder of the Prometheus stand by helping Great Basin achieve National Park status in 1986.

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INCREASE YOUR INCOME AND PROPERTY VALUE, OR MAKE ROOM FOR LOVED ONES

INSTALL AN ADU IN YOUR BACKYARD! By Cole McKnight, Perpetual Homes

It’s no news that there is a housing crisis in California. A 2016 study identified that California will need 3.5 million more homes by the middle of the next decade. Most Californians simply cannot afford a decent house at current price ranges. Many Californians have had to move farther and farther out of town to find cheaper places to live, struggling with horrendous commutes and more time away from family. Others grapple with parents or adult children who simply cannot afford to live nearby. In order to solve this housing shortage, California has turned to Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs). An ADU is simply a second small dwelling on the same grounds as your single-family home. The ADU can serve as a small house, backyard retreat, or even a home office. ADUs are oftentimes called granny flats, in-law units, tiny houses, or secondary dwelling units. In addition, many multi-family attached properties can add two detached ADU’s per property. ADU’s are appealing because they cost less than other forms of housing and make use of existing land.

WHO WOULD BE A GOOD CANDIDATE FOR ADDING AN ADU?

• Homeowners who need additional monthly income • Adults with aging parents who require financial support or in-home care • Families with recent college graduates that have returned home • Those in need of a home office • Adults that need a quiet space to getaway (ie. a “man- cave” or studio) Homeowners can look at ADUs as an investment in the future simply because they can be considered rental units to provide an extra income. In addition, they can offer more space for family members. Some people even decide to downsize and live in the ADU while renting out their primary dwelling. Alamo ADU’s command approximately $3,600 per month; a 15% return on investment! As our nation ages, many Americans are turning their attention to caring for their parents. The cost of paying for full-time health care can be exorbitant. Allowing aging parents to live in an ADU on your property can be a life saver! Millennials are returning home in record numbers. It’s estimated that 85% of college graduates now circle back to the bedrooms they lived in during high school. An ADU can provide your kids with their own place to live, while preserving your empty nest and your sanity. These days, more companies are allowing their employees to work from home, which can be challenging. An air conditioned office shack can provide a perfect quiet retreat for someone that works from home. Prices start at $29,500 for an approximate 118 square foot office shack, and mid $150,000 for ADUs. ADUs range from 499 square feet - one bedroom/ one bath to 1,200 square feet - 3 bedrooms/2 baths. Wi t h t h e h o u s i n g shortage and rapidly increasing rents/mortgages, it is becoming increasingly difficult to afford living in the Bay Area. An ADU can be the perfect solution for bringing in additional revenue or for housing multi-generational families. The highly regarded ADU builder, Perpetual Homes, specializes in providing affordable, sustainable, turn-key backyard ADU’s in the Bay Area. Perpetual Home ADU’s are placed on a permanent foundation so they are earthquake resistant. Assembled off-site to ensure the highest standards of quality, with minimal disruption to the homeowner, Perpetual Homes offers a huge array of floor plans/ exterior design options, and dwelling sizes. To find out more about adding an ADU, visit www.perpetualhomesadu.com, email perpetualhomesadu@gmail.com, or call Kathy Anderson, owner DL1557865 Advertorial 925-980-2351.

LIFE IN THE ALAMO/ DANVILLE GARDEN

ROSES FOR THE LANDSCAPE By John Montgomery, Landscape Architect, ASLA

The plants we bring into our landscapes shape our experience through their beauty as well as their significance. Throughout recorded history, few plants have received the same attention as the rose, as a star of formal, cottage-style, and naturalistic gardens, and a symbol of love and beauty nearly worldwide. There are rose gardens, rose societies, and countless anonymous rose-lovers searching for the right plant for them. Finding the right rose for you is definitely a matter of the heart, but there are some practicalities to consider. Roses have been domesticated for so long that there are literally thousands of varieties, with different habits, growth patterns, and needs. Ask yourself what you want in a rose: will you be cutting them for vases, or is a long bloom season the most important quality? Should it be able to climb up an arbor? How about intensity of scent? Deciding these factors can help narrow down your choices just a little. Many of the classic hybrid rose favorites are what are known as bush roses. These can range from a couple of feet in height to more than 10 feet, so be sure and check that label! Long-stem roses are a kind of bush rose that are ideal if you love to have cut flowers in the house. These plants have been bred specifically to flower on strong, upright stems, perfect for the vase. While roses have a reputation for being fussy to care for, there are also options that are much more low-maintenance. Ground-cover roses are popular for hedging and for retaining hillsides. Without the same pruning needs as bush roses, they are a well-behaved, tough-as-nails landscape plant. Climbing roses are often equally hardy. Just make sure to give them strong support and plenty of space to grow in, as they will absolutely take off once established! As for our favorites, well… It’s true that there are some roses we just can’t pass up. Among them are the ever-elegant Iceberg cultivars (there’s a bush Iceberg and a climbing one) as well as the Flower Carpet series of groundcover roses. We also have a real soft spot for the peachy hybrid “Just Joey” (shown here) and the ever-stunning fragrant “Peace” rose. Once you find the right roses for you, have no fear when it comes to planting them in your landscape. The best part about growing roses is that you can give people flowers almost anytime you want: roses for your dad, for your neighbor, or set out in a “free” vase on the street corner. We believe flowers are one of the truest expressions of love, and when it comes to love, we must never hold back! For Landscape Design consultation or for plant advice and inspiration, you can find the J.Montgomery studio online at jmontgomerydesigns.com. Advertorial


PAGE 14 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • August 2020

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Food Bank continued from front page

what to do. Lisa Sherrill, Communications Director, explains, “Anyone in need, regardless of income, is welcome to come to a distribution to get help with food. No documentation is required at this time. To find a site, visit foodbankccs.org and pull down the Find Food menu or call 855-309-FOOD.” Retiring after 43 years as Executive Director, Larry Sly writes in the Fall 2019 edition of At the Table, the FBCCS newsletter: “I feel like the luckiest person in the world to have had a professional life dedicated to helping provide healthy food to people in our community.” Innovative programs launched during his tenure include Community Produce in 2012, College Pantry in 2017, and Mobile Food Pharmacy in 2018. Ordinarily replicating a farmer's market, Community Produce distributions have been re-configured during the pandemic with pre-bagged items and proper social distancing. Nick Clark, Community Produce Administrator, gets grateful comments a hundred times a day from clients receiving as much as 20 pounds of produce at one of 140 distributions scheduled each month. Through the California Association of Food Banks, FBCCS receives, sorts, and distributes about 14 million pounds of fresh produce a year. The Association's website asserts: “California Clark, Community Produce Administrator, shows off fresh produce produces over half of the nation's fruits, nuts, and vegetables, yet millions of Californians Nick going to clients. Photo courtesy of FBCCS. don't know where their next meal will come from.” The Farm to Family team finds growers and packers with excess produce, sometimes tasty, nutritious, slightly blemished, or undersized items retailers reject that would otherwise go to waste. In addition to accepting donations, the Association purchases produce at favorable prices. The College Pantry Program recognizes that many area college students struggling to pay tuition, housing, and book bills neglect basic nutritional requirements. Some come close to starvation. Poor diet decreases ability to focus on academic subjects. Not knowing where the next meal is coming from generates severe stress. FBCCS currently donates food to six local community college food pantries and one four-year university campus. Healthcare providers encourage patients to eat a proper diet, knowing nutritious food is good medicine. But many low-income individuals lack the means to obtain appropriate products. Made possible by a grant from the Yocha Dehe Nation, the FBCCS Mobile Food Pharmacy program operates at five sites in Vallejo, Fairfield, Dixon, and Vacaville. During a Family Health Services appointment, patients receive a food prescription they fill immediately at the adjacent Mobile Pharmacy. Boxed staples are low in sodium and sugar and high in fiber and protein. In 2019, prescriptions filled included 3,200 boxes and 120,000 pounds of produce. Joel Sjostrom, FBCCS President and CEO, continues the battle to eliminate hunger and meet the challenges of the COVID-19 crisis. He writes in the Spring 2020 issue of At the Table: “I love that our mission statement says to LEAD --it doesn't say assist, help, or simply warehouse and deliver food -- but to LEAD. Collectively we can have a huge impact feeding those in need.” Drive-thru pick-ups, added in answer to numerous calls from folks afraid to attend large central distributions, served 12,000 individuals between the time shelter in place orders were issued in March and early July. Responding to requests from high-risk clients afraid to leave home, FBCCS joined the County Proactive Outreach Task Force, partnering with other community organizations to directly deliver boxes of food using County Connection buses. Volunteers are a critical part of the team. Operations Director Hisham Hamdy explains that without the more than 1,000 volunteers donating time monthly, FBCCS could not afford to provide the amount of food currently being distribMaggie Petersen loves working with uted. Asked what she would advise individuals contemplating volunteering, Danville resident Maggie Petersen responded, fellow volunteers and staff at the Food Bank. Photo courtesy of FBCCS.

Razzies continued from page 12

the Razzies Award. Can you share that? A - Simply, we are all humans who make mistakes. I like to say, “Look at us; we’re the Razzies. We’ve done stupid things. When some of us reach the tip of the fame-pedestal it can be easy to lose perspective. Sometimes, it’s out of laziness, sometimes it is something that was very passionate but just didn’t work, or sometimes it was to grab money from an unsuspecting audience. Any of it is OK: just own it, and the audience will be more forgiving. In fact, you’ll gain admiration. It’s always been the case. Q - Over the last 40 years, have you noticed any difference in the recipient's ability to enjoy their moment of “Razzie Fame” in an industry that notoriously takes itself so seriously? A - Halle Berry gave an iconic and perfect response to receiving our Razzie Award. Usually, it’s the audience that calls out something that doesn’t work first. And we’re there to allow a platform by which the performer or filmmaker can “own their bad,” deny it, or blame someone else. Today, stars are more apt to recognize and respond to our award via social media (Dwayne Johnson) or by showing up (Sandra Bullock). It’s become a badge of honor to attest to a mistake than run from it. The smart ones know how to be humble, and their fan base actually grows because they seem more relatable. Composer Alan Menken, who’s won every other award on the planet, reached out to us to get his Razzie Award to add to his collection. That shows talent, humility, and humanity. Q - Sadly, you could not broadcast your 2020 awards this year due to COVID-19. What are your plans for next year? A - Yes, we had what we thought was the perfect deal for broadcasting our

See Food Bank continued on page 20

40th show. We were set to tape when COVID-19 hit, and our production was shut down. And now, here we are with 2020 movie productions shut down, theaters locked up, and everyone working from home. Knowing the creative process, the only filmmaking that can be done remotely from home is animation. I quickly did a video for our 40th from my home in two days and posted it. It was not a big televised production we had anticipated but something, and that is OK. Q - Can you share any memories of living and growing up in Alamo? A - In retrospect, I feel I had a rather ideal childhood. Growing up in Alamo, I went to St. Isidore’s school through 8th grade, Carondolet for high school, DVC for junior college, and then to UCLA for film school. My education, faith, and pretty carefree childhood has culminated in the person I am today. My parents who were, and still are, independent instilled the importance of those values that allowed me to go through the ups and downs in an industry that can be rather brutal. As we know, we do not have control of what comes tomorrow, but if we deal with each situation presented, have the right perspective, and work from the heart, it makes it so much easier. I have great respect for those who create something that is thought provoking, uplifting, and inspiring. My partner and I, although very different, recognize great humor, and we call out something that is not --“Wait a minute-you can do better than that!” Learn more about The Razzies at www.razzies.com.


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PAGE 16 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • August 2020

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TECHNOLOGY MATTERS

SOONER THAN LATER By Evan Corstorphine, Portable CIO, Inc.

ALAMO IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION (AIA)

By Roger Smith, President ALAMO CERTIFIED FARMER’S MARKET

NOTE: The Alamo Certified Farmer’s Market complies with all County Health Department requirements. Plan a visit to the Market each Sunday year-round, from 9AM – 2PM, in Alamo Plaza, off of Danville Blvd., near Bank of America. Look for fresh berries, stone fruits, melons, asparagus, dairy, flour, tamales, BBQ, and more. All produce is picked fresh and is at the local Farmer’s Markets within 24-48 hours. Check out the new vendors as well your old favorite vendors!

AUTOS OF ALAMO FESTIVAL

Each year, our Community Affairs committee begins planning in January for our annual Autos of Alamo Festival. There is significant work to be done. However, in March, with COVID-19, everything as we knew it to be was changed. It is with regret that our 2020 Autos of Alamo Festival (originally scheduled for Thursday, September 10th) will be canceled this year. We look forward to seeing all of you at our 2021 event!

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY’S ENVISION 2040 PROJECT AND ITS POTENTIAL IMPACT ON ALAMO

The Contra Costa County General Plan outlines the County’s goals for physical growth, conservation, and community life in the unincorporated areas, and it contains the policies and actions necessary to achieve those goals. County staff members use the General Plan to guide decisions about zoning, permitted development, provision of public services, and transportation improvements. “The task is to envision Alamo in 2040 and to imagine the future for our community, its challenges, opportunities. and realities.” You can only visualize the future of a community by examining its history and the forces that led to the present. What created this community, and what are its particular attributes and characteristics? What attracts people to live here, buy a home, and raise their families? How will future economic and political trends, and dynamics of demography affect the community, and to what extent should those forces of change be embraced, controlled, mitigated, or rejected? To foster discussion, please review Alamo Improvement Association’s Position Statement on State and County Density Issues, found at www.AlamoCA.org, that are important to Alamo.

EMERGENCY EVACUATION PLANNING AND PREPARATION FOR WILDFIRE SEASON

Many folks were able to join our recent Zoom meeting on “Emergency Evacuation Planning and Preparation for the Wildfire Season.” The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District (SRVFPD) presented an excellent Power Point and Q&A Session on Wednesday, July 22nd. It included: • Evacuation maps and the processes to initially establish evacuation mapping and its on-going evolution • The district website and QRF scan code for mobile phone use • Discussion on developing technology for real-time enhancements to evacuation routes • Planning for how to save and protect your home, yourself, family, pets • Perimeter planning for clearing shrubbery and trees • Do’s and dont’s for emergencies San Ramon Valley Fire Battalion Chief James Selover and Ron Marley, Emergency Preparedness Coordinator at the SRVFPD were both involved in the presentation. Ron assists with the Fuels Management and Disaster Management Programs. Although new to SRVFPD, Ron has been in the emergency services field for 35+ years. If your missed the original presentation, this presentation will be available for the community online. Please visit www.AlamoCA.org for more information.

AIA MEMBERSHIP

Now celebrating its 65th year, AIA, a non-profit 501 (c)(3) organization, has an outstanding history of serving our community and helping shape it into “Alamo the place where we love to live!” Visit www.AlamoCA.org for information on AIA, articles of interest to Alamo (as well as Danville, Diablo, and Walnut Creek) residents, membership forms, and more. Don’t be left out; now is the time to renew or become a new member of AIA! Please follow us on Facebook, Linkedin, and Twitter.

At Portable CIO (PCIO), we spend significant time rescuing and recovering dying computers. There are a few things you can do to avoid needing our rescue and to keep things running smoothly. It’s much easier and cheaper to be proactive than reactive. First, I want you to look for the signs of a failing hardisk. Dying disks are the primary cause of failure in computers. The first and best indicator is that everything has become much slower than it used to be. However, dying hardisks aren’t the only reason why computers become slow. If you unwittingly upgraded to an “Internet Security” product like Norton, McAfee or AVG, instead of using an “antivirus-only” type product, that will significantly slow down a computer. And, if you have unknowingly installed a lot of software that configured itself to start up with your computer, this will also bog things down. Another strong indicator of upcoming disk failure is that when you’re doing nothing on your computer, the disk light on your computer is still almost always constantly blinking, or it’s solidly on. Again, there are plenty of alternate explanations for this, but none of them are indicators of a healthy system. Whatever the reason, if your hardisk is continually engaged like this, your computer is going to run poorly, your performance will suffer, and anything you do will be painfully slow. In my experience, a dying hardisk is often the culprit. When you call PCIO, it’s our job to figure out as much as possible about your situation. Without information, we can’t offer accurate advice. This requires that we ask you questions. You may be surprised how many people get prickly, frustrated, or even indignant because we ask them questions about what is going on. We know you are not a computer expert! However, we also know that you are the one using the computer, and therefore, you have much more anecdotal information about what is going on than we do. Please, help us help you. It doesn’t matter how old your computer is. There are a multitude of factors that determine how long your disk will last. Failures usually follow a bell curve. Generally, a disk will wear out after 3-4 years. However, we’ve seen them die in 10 days, and we’ve seen them last 10 years (it’s a wide bell curve!). Some failures are related to the design or to issues in the manufacturing process that affect the longevity of tens of thousands of disks manufactured in the same batch. A common contributing factor is that the computer does not have enough RAM. Low RAM is probably one of the best indicators of premature disk death. Low RAM causes the hardisk to be over-worked for a prolonged amount of time, as overflow “paging” space is written to the hardisk instead of to your RAM. Not only does low RAM make the computer slower to use while the hardisk is being used as RAM, but it causes the computer to pummel the disk with excessive read and write operations, thus shortening its life. It prematurely ages the disk, wearing it out. Standard disk checks available to us through the operating system will not always indicate a worn out disk. Disk checks are designed to look at the storage media for media errors. If an error is found, a flag is thrown, and you’re told there are bad clusters, or bad sectors, or disk I/O errors. A worn disk may show none of these indicators yet clearly be incapable of performing the way it was designed. This is a judgment call we have to make in our shop. After working on thousands of computers, we know what “normal” is, and we know how a computer ought to operate. We also know what happens when we wait too long. Disks degrade slowly, so folks tend to get used to slow computer performance as it bogs down, and they won’t recognize how bad it’s become. One day, the computer “suddenly” seems slow, and that’s when we get the call. When we replace the disk with a solid state drive (SSD), the machine performs better than new, and people are shocked by how well it works. Without exception, with a SSD the computer is faster and better than when you bought it. My last point is if your computer is not running well, please call for help sooner than later. Do it now, not at the point of everything failing or not booting. When you bring us a computer that still boots, we can usually “clone” your existing hardisk over to a SSD -- not always, but usually. The advantage to catching the failure in time and cloning is that your software, the way everything looks, and the programs you have installed all stay the same. When you wait until that computer fails, we must rebuild your computer from scratch. That means every bit of software and (hopefully) your data needs to be reloaded onto the computer before you can use it. This is a longer process and may require your participation with finding licensing keys, accounts and passwords, and other time-consuming tasks. In addition, if you didn’t have good backup and waited too long, all of your data is at risk for loss. If you have a computer that feels like it’s lost a step, an evaluation would be a good idea. In this time of social distancing, we will perform our initial checks remotely. If your computer needs to visit our shop, we observe mask and distancing protocols, and disinfect computer equipment with UV light. Give us a call at 925-552-7952 or email info@pcioit.com, and we can chat more. Advertorial


Facebook: Alamo Today & Danville Today News | editor@yourmonthlypaper.com August 2020 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • PAGE 17

TOO MANY ACCOUNTS

By Peter T. Waldron, Managing Partner of Spectrum Wealth Partners

People have myriad reasons for having multiple accounts and account types, be it psychological or financial. This article will discuss why consolidating or reducing accounts may be beneficial to your financial health. We will explore some of the reasons why people have too many accounts, note the problems that can arise in having them, and lastly look at the potential benefits of account consolidation. This article will arm you with information to be more successful with your own comprehensive wealth planning. Many people have multiple accounts for different reasons. These reasons include to prevent fraud, to compare advisors, to receive discounts, or to hide funds. Other times multiple accounts are held just because the owner has not taken the time to close out accounts when life changes occur. People assume that by opening accounts at different locations, or even multiple accounts at one location, they can reduce their exposure to fraud; this is not usually the case. People also use multiple accounts to test out how financial advisors perform against each other. Some spend time opening multiple These babies were spotted in an Alamo front yard with momma keeping a close eye on them. Be careful driving especially around dawn and accounts to receive discounts or other offered perks. Finally, some people feel the need to hide money dusk as young ones of all kinds are afoot. Photo by Ted Shapas from their spouses, so they open additional accounts. The greatest challenge that comes with having multiple open accounts is when one of the three “D’s” occurs: death, divorce, or disability. With a death or divorce, each account will have to be repapered, administrated, and/or transferred. When a disability occurs, each of the accounts will need to be managed by someone. It is possible that in either of these situations the accounts will be managed by someone who has little experience with multiple accounts and may not even be aware of all the open accounts. With that said, many people rely on professional help to navigate them. It is important to recognize that having multiple advisors on multiple accounts can create a disadvantage to your wealth. This can lead to one zigging when the other is zagging. If one advisor sells a position and the competing advisor buys the same position, the client can be left in the same starting place. The decision to consolidate accounts may make it easier to make decisions and plan for your future. It also gives you the opportunity to work as a team with your spouse and ideally your advisor to help you understand your current wealth and what your financial goals are. Reducing the amount of open accounts you have may give you a clearer picture of your finances as you are not trying to check on accounts at various places. Most importantly, tracking the performance of your accounts will be easier. If you have an under-performing account, you and your advisor can make a shift quickly (if your advisor has you invested in 100% liquid vehicles). Lastly, by having fewer accounts, it will be substantially simpler to manage the income from your wealth, the gifting of your wealth, and ultimate transfer of your wealth. Whatever your current situation is, we recommend evaluating how many accounts you have and determining if you have too many. We think you owe that to yourself, your spouse, your family, and your financial future. To schedule a complimentary review of your financial situation, please contact me at 925-786-7686 or email peter.waldron@ lfg.com.

Peter T. Waldron: California Insurance License #0E47827. Peter T. Waldron is a registered representative of Lincoln Financial Advisors, a broker/dealer, member SIPC, and offers investment advisory service through Sagemark Consulting, a division of Lincoln Financial Advisors Corp., a registered investment advisor, Spectrum Wealth Partners is not an affiliate of Lincoln Financial Advisors. 3201

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PAGE 18 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • August 2020

ESTATE PLANNING FOR BLENDED FAMILIES

By Robert J. Silverman, Esq.

As of the last census, about 15% of adults in the United States had been married at least twice. Careful estate planning is important for everyone but particularly for blended families. Fortunately, smart, thoughtful planning can help avoid problems by balancing and reconciling potential competing interests among blended family members. Let’s start a hypothetical case study to explore some common issues that challenge many blended families. Jay, a divorcee, is 65. He has children, Jeff and Judy, who are 40 and 35. Jay remarries another divorcee, Bea, 55. Bea has a 20 year old child, Betty. Jay brought into the marriage a house worth $1,000,000 (with no mortgage) and cash, securities, and retirement plan funds totaling $200,000. He and Bea live in his house. Bea brought into the marriage cash, securities, and retirement plan funds totaling $400,000. First, Jay and Bea need to consider and discuss with their estate planning attorney the following about each other and their loved ones: health, children, income, principal residence, retirement plans, and other major assets, if any. Other key facts include how long they plan to keep Jay’s house and how they handle their finances. The above factors will, to some extent, help filter the various kinds of available estate planning choices that may best help them accomplish their objectives. One choice involves Jay and Bea keeping their assets separate and each establishing a separate estate plan (i.e. a Living Trust, Will, Power of Attorney and Advance Healthcare Directive). They would each make their own decisions about to whom, how, and when their assets will be distributed on their respective deaths. Each Living Trust may or may not include distributions to his or her children, spouse, or a combination thereof, and these distributions might be distributed outright and/or held in trust for some period of time. Another common, efficient alternative is for Jay and Bea to establish a joint

Dolls continued from front page

So Lauren created ‘Adopt-a-Doll.’ She collects gently used American Girl dolls, cleans them up, and places them for ‘adoption’ with girls who are struggling with serious illnesses, homelessness, or domestic abuse. To get started, she called her friends who owned American Girl dolls, she emailed families within her church community, she publicized in school newsletters, and she reached out to her high school’s alumni association. She also created a website. “One person didn’t have a doll to donate, but she said she really wanted to support the program so she donated an American Girl gift card instead!” says Lauren. “That was amazing and so generous. I used the gift card to purchase a brand-new doll for a little girl whose sister is going through treatment at Children’s Hospital.” Then, she set out to find girls who might want to adopt the dolls. “Since seventh grade, I have been volunteering at Family House by providing meals to the families staying there. I talked to the manager, Rachele, and she agreed to partner with me on this. (Lauren has also arranged partnerships with Shelter Inc. and Shepherd’s Gate to distribute dolls to girls who are dealing with homelessness and domestic abuse.) Rachele calls me when a little girl checks-in and confirms that she would like a doll. Then, I try to match her up with a doll that looks similar to her (an American Girl doll distinction). I deliver the doll to the new ‘mom,’ take a photo, and have the girl sign a thank you note, so that the original owner can be assured that her special doll has safely ended up in a loving home.” Lauren has become an adept doll refurbisher, mending clothes, fixing loose limbs, and detangling hair. “Sometimes, people have donated dolls that were in pretty bad shape, such as having a missing eye,” says Lauren. “Most of the time, it’s out-of-control hair! I watched YouTube videos to learn how to clean them up. Also, I have a friend who is an expert at this – she helped me tighten the limbs and redo the hair on several dolls. You have to be very careful with American Girl doll hair. I wash the hair using fabric softener New doll recipient.

www.yourmonthlypaper.com | Instagram: @Alamoanddanvilletoday | #atdtnews Living Trust for all of their collective assets, which splits into two pots (“sub-trusts”) on the first death. Once the assets are segregated into these two sub-trusts following the first spouse’s death, sensitive decisions need to be made by Jay and Bea about the assets of the deceased spouse (placed in the deceased spouse’s sub-trust), including a) what access, if any, will the surviving spouse have to these assets and how will the funds be invested?, b) what distributions will be permitted and/or mandated?, c) what assets, if any, will go directly to the deceased spouse’s children (i.e. instead of being held in trust for the needs of the surviving spouse)?, and d) who will serve as trustee (“manager”) during the surviving spouse’s lifetime? Alternatively, some couples choose not to have the deceased spouse’s assets held in trust. Instead, they mandate that a certain portion goes outright to the surviving spouse, and a certain portion goes outright to the deceased spouse’s children. Of course, there are pros and cons of these various ways to handle a deceased spouse’s assets. In any event, sensitive and important issues need to be explored and decisions must be made in reconciling the potential needs of the surviving spouse and each spouse’s desire to provide for his/her children. Thoughtfully discussing these issues and alternatives with your estate planning attorney is crucial in enabling your attorney to draft customized estate planning documents that foster the wishes of both spouses. Sadly, poor (or no) planning frequently results in damaged or destroyed relationships, and sometimes litigation between step-parents and step-children. Next month’s article will describe some strategies that may help guide Jay’s and Bea’s decisions about optimally balancing and reconciling these potential conflicting interests. |Estate Planning | Trust Administration & Probate | Real Estate | Business| Please contact me to request a complimentary: i) “Estate Planning Primer”; ii) Real Estate titling brochure; iii) introductory meeting. I am an attorney with R. Silverman Law Group, 1855 Olympic Blvd., Suite 125, Walnut Creek, CA 94596; (925) 705-4474; rsilverman@rsilvermanlaw.com.

This article is intended to provide information of a general nature, and should not be relied upon as legal, tax and/ or business advice. Readers should obtain specific advice from their own, qualified professional advisors. Advertorial

and style it with curlers and a special wire brush. Mr. Clean Magic Eraser is also great for scuffed bodies!” “My American Girl dolls were part of some very happy childhood memories,” says Lauren. “It feels great to give someone who is having a tough time in their life something to smile about. I realize it’s a small thing to do – this isn’t saving the world. But when a little girl receives a doll from someone she doesn’t know, I hope it tells her that somebody cares New doll recipients. about her, she is loved, and the world is good. Also, it’s fun to rescue American Girl dolls from storage and give them a brand-new life. Every doll deserves a good home!” Those interested in making a doll donation (Lauren currently works only with American Girl dolls) or organizations interested in partnering with Lauren can contact her at lauren@adopt-a-doll.org.

TELECARE CONNECTS WITH THE HOMEBOUND

Since 1971, member volunteers of TeleCare, a philanthropic program of Assistance League® of Diablo Valley, have been making daily reassurance calls, Monday through Friday, to seniors and the homebound in our community. Clients can anticipate a friendly exchange of ideas with trained volunteers who provide high quality, consistent communications. If a client cannot be reached, family members will be notified. This service is free! Additional TeleCare activities include an annual holiday party, and they also receive greeting cards from the Assisteens, an auxiliary where tweens and teens learn to participate in a community service at a young age. Make that call to get you or someone you know connected! For more information call 925-934-0901. To learn about Assistance League of Diablo Valley’s other philanthropic programs, please visit www.assistanceleague.org/diablo-valley.


Facebook: Alamo Today & Danville Today News | editor@yourmonthlypaper.com August 2020 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • PAGE 19

YOUR PERSONAL NUTRITIONIST

A PLAN FOR FEEDING OUR SCHOOL CHILDREN AT HOME By Linda Michaelis RD, MS

We are all in this pandemic together. At this time, our children are doing online classes and parents are trying to keep the day structured. We need to figure out the best solutions to feeding our kids when we aren’t packing lunches each day. Sit everyone down and establish plans for meals and snacks as the year gets started. If your child (or yourself) has gained weight during Shelter in Place (SiP), do not let this get out of control. Here are some popular suggestions to be included in your plans.

BREAKFAST

Breakfast is a good time to have protein and fiber along with a serving of bread. These are important food groups that will help foster a good attention span. • Kids generally like scrambled eggs. Add in diced ham, bacon, or turkey as well as veggies like spinach, onions, and mushrooms. Serve with a toasted whole wheat English muffin or whole wheat bread alongside. • Kodiak Pancake Mix is available at Safeway, Target, and Costco. The mix provides the equivalent of 2 oz. of protein per three small pancakes. As indicated on the box, the protein portion can be enhanced by adding egg whites, or an egg and milk. Add berries and a drizzle of maple syrup to make them delicious. Make a batch on the weekend and freeze them, which will provide a portion that can easily be reheated. • Quaker Oatmeal Squares is a great cereal. It tastes like the cold version of oatmeal, and kids really like it. I find Kashi Go Lean cereal to be the best choice, but it is a bit too earthy for some children. However, Kashi Go Lean can be mixed with another cereal like Honey Nut Cheerios to please younger palates. • Make overnight oatmeal. Soak oatmeal with almond milk, and add low sugar yogurt and berries. The oats soften and become tasty overnight in the refrigerator.

SNACKS

The best snacks combine protein and fiber. Some popular suggestions: • “Ants on a log” (peanut butter on celery with sprinkled raisins) • 2 oz. beef jerky along with a Cutie orange or an apple

• Low sugar yogurt like Siggis, Oikos Triple Zero, or Fage plain yogurt with added berries • Cottage cheese with applesauce and cinnamon. • 1 oz. packages of nuts and a fruit. • Ham or turkey wrapped around a kosher pickle. I do not recommend granola, Cliff, or other bars because kids think they are healthy and overeat them. I also find that kids overeat cheese sticks or cheese in general because they think it is healthy. Cheese has little protein and is mostly fat.

LUNCH

SiP allows for better timing of lunch as school lunches are commonly held too early or too late in the day. For lunch, keep the protein level high and serve alongside veggies and low carb foods to keep the brain active. Some lunch suggestions include: • Shredded chicken cooked in salsa verde, enchilada sauce, or other sauce. Make into tacos with soft tortillas or wrap in lettuce. • Cook meatballs in an Instantpot and serve with broccoli and rice. • Reheat turkey burgers and serve on English muffins with carrots, celery, and ranch dressing. • Leftover meatloaf is a great lunch along with string beans and a potato. For afternoon snacks, especially when there has been low levels of activity, serve a tray with veggies and dips. Kids enjoy red peppers, jicama, raw string beans, cucumbers with a sprinkle of salt, and even small Gherkin pickles or pepperoncinis.

DINNER

With everyone home and being able to eat more balanced meals during the day, hunger should be lessened at night. At dinner time, we do not need large servings of protein. We should focus more on veggies and whole grains. As long as half the dinner plate is veggies or a veggie and a salad, serve a small dessert. In this hot weather, I would suggest a fruit juice bar such as Outshine made with natural juice for a treat. Please contact me if you feel that you need an objective nutritionist to create a successful plan. I have already had some backyard sessions with families. I am glad to inform you that nutritional counseling is covered by most insurance companies including Aetna, ABMG, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Cigna, and UHC. Please visit my website www.LindaRD.com to learn more about my services. Feel free to email me at lifeweight1@yahoo.com, or call me at 925-855-0150 to tell me about your nutritional concerns and see how I may help you. Advertorial


PAGE 20 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • August 2020

PREJUVENATION

By Jerome Potozkin, MD One of the trends my colleagues and I have seen is younger people seeking to maintain their looks and youthful appearance. They are seeking to prevent wrinkles, sun spots, as well as sagging skin. This trend has been growing in the last five years as we see new developments in skincare and aesthetic treatments. Like the saying goes, the key is “an ounce of prevention…” A necessary step to maintaining one’s youthful looks is a great skincare routine. The single most important piece of advice I could give young people is to use sun protection early and often. Photo-damage to the skin is what causes visible signs of aging more than true chronological aging. Ultraviolet radiation breaks down collagen and elastin, causing a loss of volume and addition of wrinkles, as well as dramatically increasing the risk of skin cancer. Sunscreen usage is the single most important thing you can do to keep your skin looking its best as well as to help prevent skin cancer. I recommend the daily use of a broad-spectrum sunscreen. The two other key steps that should be part of a basic skincare routine are using topical antioxidants (I’m a big fan of SkinCeuticals C E Ferulic) as well as a topical retinoid such as prescription strength Tretinoin or over-the-counter Retinol. Please consult with a physician before using anything while pregnant or planning a pregnancy. With people posting on Social Media and spending more time on Zoom and video conferences during this pandemic, they are becoming more focused on their appearance. Our practice is seeing people in their 20 and 30s asking for Botox treatments. There are multiple types of Botox like neuromodulators such as Dysport, Xeomin, and Jeuveau. These agents all work by relaxing muscles. They help treat and prevent the formation of dynamic wrinkles caused by the

Food Bank continued from page 14

www.yourmonthlypaper.com | Instagram: @Alamoanddanvilletoday | #atdtnews pull of muscles under the skin. Some people have strong facial muscles and begin to etch the glabella frown lines (lines in between the brows also known as the elevens) as early as their twenties. Botox works by relaxing the muscles causing these lines, and both softens and prevents them as well. Currently, Botox is the most popular nonsurgical cosmetic procedure worldwide. As we age, we start to see color and texture changes of the skin. Most of these changes are from the sun. Mild chemical peels can be helpful in addressing these. Advances in technology have allowed us to also offer some milder laser resurfacing options such as the Clear and Brilliant Laser. The Clear and Brilliant Laser is our most popular resurfacing treatment for younger patients seeing early signs of photoaging. The process is also very popular with patients suffering from melasma (a disorder of pigmentation). Clear and Brilliant treatments require minimal to no downtime and can yield significant results. Loss of volume in the face typically starts in our thirties. Hyaluronic acid injectable fillers can counteract this loss of volume. The most popular fillers tend to be in the Restylane and Juvederm families. Fillers accomplish two things as they both fill lost volume and also stimulate our body’s natural collagen production. It is important to seek the services of a skilled injector who can evaluate exactly where filler would help most as well as which filler would work best. The last thing you would want is to be overfilled or have a distorted, unnatural appearance. The most common areas I see younger people seeking to have filled are the so called “tear troughs,” or groove under the eyes, lips, and smile lines. As with anything in medicine, I am a big fan of prevention. As far as prejuvenation goes, the key aspects are sun avoidance and sun protection, not smoking, eating a healthy well-balanced diet, and managing stress. For those needing additional help, we are here for you. If you are interested in exploring prejuvenation options, please call us today to schedule a consultation. Dr. Jerome Potozkin is a Board Certified Dermatologist specializing in minimally and non-invasive cosmetic procedures. We are accepting new patients and can be reached at (925) 838-4900 and www.MyBeautyMd.com. Advertorial

“If you are thinking about volunteering somewhere, and the issue of hunger touches your heart, consider the Food Bank. This is a place where it truly does take a village of volunteers and staff working together every day to address food insecurity. There are a variety of volunteer opportunities.” Maggie discovered the Food Bank's “Wednesday Regulars” in 2006. She now works in several capacities including the “Boxing Team.” She writes, “We work three Fridays a month, packaging from 400-700 boxes on the first Friday, and 1,200 boxes on the second and third Fridays. The food that goes into these boxes is purchased by the Food Bank, generally weighs about 30 pounds each, and contains food staples such as cereal, canned fruits and vegetables, peanut butter, tomato products, pasta, beans, etc.” Maggie also volunteers on Tuesdays sorting and packaging donated baby food. Volunteers refer to a list in the sorting room defining the number of months items may safely be used beyond sell-by dates if undamaged, but baby food has to be current when it leaves the warehouse. Hunger hurts -- not just those experiencing food insecurity but Each client takes home as much as 20 pounds of produce from a Community Produce distribution. every member of our society. One in four individuals FBCCS serves Photo courtesy of FBCCS. is a child. Studies on the effects of childhood hunger cited by Feeding America and the American Psychological Association conclude that in addition to stunting physical development, lack of adequate nutrition adversely affects cognitive and socio-emotional development and often results in long-term health issues. Preventing childhood hunger helps our youngest citizens fully realize their potential. Failing to do so swells the ranks of people needing continuous costly care. Dr. Jack P. Shonkoff, Director of the Harvard University Center on the Developing Child writes: “The healthy development of all children benefits all of society by providing a solid foundation for economic productivity, responsible citizenship, and strong communities.” Hamdy, with 21 years of experience in the field of fighting hunger, relates, “When I go to a distribution, I always discover a new reason why I do what I do. I see a kid pick up an apple and beam like he’s just gotten the best Christmas present.” Hamdy explains, “As long as people are in need, we will keep doing what we are doing. As we advocate for feeding people, we are looking for ways to put ourselves out of business by eliminating hunger.” Everyone can help! Monetary donations are especially needed since annual fundraising events have been canceled in compliance with pandemic regulations. Donations of shelf-stable products are easy to make. A Neighborhood Food Project Coordinator drops off a reusable bag to fill and picks it up on the designated day (the second Saturday of alternate months). September is Hunger Action Month. Wear orange in recognition of your support for the mission of ending hunger. Try volunteering! Take an empty paper plate and write on it what you can’t do when you are hungry. For instance, “I can't focus when I am hungry.” On the other side, write what you want to do to eliminate hunger. Take photos of what you do, and post them on your personal social media pages, and encourage your friends to join you in fighting hunger. Lisa Sherill notes: “I am a hunger fighter because I am a mom, and I can't imagine my child going hungry, and I want to make sure no one has to experience hunger.” Learn more at www.foodbankccs.org.


Facebook: Alamo Today & Danville Today News | editor@yourmonthlypaper.com August 2020 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • PAGE 21

OSTEOSTRONG: THE FASTEST RESULTS IN THE SHORTEST PERIOD OF TIME!

By Roger Pelphrey, Osteostrong Danville

Osteostrong is not a gym, diet, drug, or supplement. In fact, it’s something entirely different than what you may expect. Results are predictable and measurable. Sessions take 15 minutes or less, one time a week. People of all ages are loving the results they are getting at Osteostrong Danville. So, what is it? Osteostrong is a natural way to trigger a person’s built-in adaptive responses that will increase bone density, improve balance, and promote physical strength. Osteostrong is for people of all ages, and we currently have clients from age 8 to 97 taking advantage of these easily attainable results. The simple concept is changing the paradigm of how we increase bone density, strength, and balance while not leaving you feeling sore or sweaty. Over 35,000 people in the U.S. have seen incredible results such as an increase in bone density, completely reversing their osteoporosis and elimination of back, knee, and hip pain. The average person has a 77% improvement in balance after five sessions and a 73% improvement in strength in their first year alone. Does this sound too good to be true? Below are comments from a few members telling their journey with Osteostrong. ~ Denise came into Osteostrong in January 2019 very skeptical, but she was looking for an alternative to medications for her osteoporosis. She decided to try Osteostrong, and 11 months later, she retested her bone density, and it had improved by over 8%, and her diagnosis has moved from osteoporosis to osteopenia. Denise would tell you she is Osteostrong for life! ~ Sandra began her journey with Osteostrong in November 2018. She had been diagnosed with osteopenia in her 30’s and had taken the prescribed medications for osteoporosis for many years. Not happy with the results of the medications and a compression fracture she got after sneezing, Sandra was looking for an alternative. Almost a year into Osteostrong, Sandra was riding her bike and was hit by a car. Fortunately for Sandra, she did not break anything and only received some bruising. Both Sandra and her doctor were very surprised that she did not break a bone from the fall. They believe it was because of Osteostrong that she did not break anything. ~ Doug, who is in his early 40’s, injured his knee about 15 years ago. It required surgery to repair. After the surgery, Doug’s knee was not the same, and he struggled going up and down stairs. To make matters worse, Doug learned that he had osteoporosis. Doug searched for an alternative to help his ailing knee along with his osteoporosis. After one session with Osteostrong, Doug said his knee felt 1,000% better. Today, Doug can easily go up and down stairs and can do much more with his family now that he is Osteostrong. Do you want to learn more about Osteostrong and see if it is something for you? Give us a call, or visit https://OsteostrongDanvilleBlackhawk.as.me/Virtual to schedule a complimentary one-on-one information session. Mention this article and we will give you two free sessions as an additional bonus. We are located at 3442 Camino Tassajara Rd. (Safeway shopping center) in Danville. Call us at 925-967-2809, or visit our website at www.osteostrong.me. Advertorial

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

GROCERY SHOPPING FOR SENIORS AND VETERANS

Mobility Matters is a nonprofit agency that provides grocery shopping for ambulatory seniors and veterans who cannot take other forms of transportation. Since the shelter-in-place order went out, our seniors are relying on Mobility Matters to help them get groceries. The group is looking for volunteers that are willing to help out our community by grocery shopping for these folks. Most volunteer drivers grocery shop once every week or two. Please contact David Benet at (925)284-2215 or david@mobilitymatterscc. com if you are interested in more information about volunteer opportunities.

Word Search answers from page 8

Comprehensive Dilated Eye Exams

Contact Lens Exams

Prescription Glasses and Sunglasses In many cases, we are able to make your glasses in our office with our On-Site Lab

215 ALAMO PLAZA SUITE D ALAMO, CA 94507 www.poplarspecs.com

OPEN MONDAY TO SATURDAY MONDAY—FRIDAY: 9 - 6 SATURDAY: 9 - 4

925.202.2846


PAGE 22 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • August 2020

HOPE FOR HEADACHES & MIGRAINES

By Dr. Niele Maimone, DC

If you find yourself or a loved one in the clutches of regular headaches or migraines, it is vitally important to understand what you’re actually experiencing so you can navigate your care properly and emerge from the pattern of pain. Understanding the difference between a headache and migraine makes all of the difference in the treatment outcome for those who suffer. What is a headache? Headaches are unpleasant pains in your head that can cause pressure and aching. The pain can range from mild to severe and usually occurs on both sides of the head. Some specific areas where headaches can occur include the forehead, temples, and back of the neck. A headache can last anywhere from 30 minutes to a week. According to the Mayo Clinic, the most common headache type is a tension headache. Triggers for this headache type include stress, muscle strain, and improper head or neck positioning. What is a migraine? A migraine is usually an intense pounding headache that can last for hours or even days. The pounding or pulsing pain usually begins in the forehead, the side of the head, or around the eyes. The headache gradually gets worse. Just about any movement, activity, bright lights, or loud noise seem to make it hurt more. Nausea and vomiting are common during a migraine. Migraines may happen only once or twice a year, or as often as daily. Women are more likely to have migraines than men. There are different types of migraine headaches. The most common types of migraines are: Classic migraines start with a warning sign called an aura. These types of migraines are also called “migraines with aura.” The aura often involves changes in the way you see. You may see flashing lights, colors, a pattern of lines, or shadows. You may temporarily lose some of your vision, such as your side vision. You may also feel a strange prickly or burning sensation, or have muscle weakness on one side of your body. The head pain of classic migraines may occur on one side or both sides of the head. Common migraines don’t start with an aura. These types of migraines are also called “migraines without aura.” Common migraines may start more slowly than classic migraines, last longer, and interfere more with daily activities. The pain of common migraines may be on only one side of your head. Common migraines are more common than classic migraines.

HOW DO WE TREAT MIGRAINES AND HEADACHES?

The treatment for a migraine is very similar to the treatment for a headache with the exception of the focus. At Align Healing Center, we treat migraines with a focus on reducing neurological inflammation and increasing circulation, whereas with headaches we focus on the reduction of muscle tension and physical stress. Depending on the individual, a combination of the following therapies are used to break the patients pain cycle. • Class IV Laser Therapy: Laser treatments are very effective at treating migraines and headaches. The laser is a form of light therapy that increases blood flow to the affected area in order to release the tight muscle and pump away inflammation that has built up around the nerve. It is a very gentle and relaxing treatment that almost always causes IMMEDIATE relief from the pain. • Gentle Chiropractic Care: This can help to realign vertebrae that have become misaligned and have begun to irritate the nerves in the head and neck. By gently adjusting the neck, the pressure on the nerve is decreased, and symptoms of headaches and migraines begin to decrease. This can be done without rotating or “popping” the neck. • Specialty Lab Testing: In chronic cases, nutrient deficiencies can be found to contribute to headache and migraine symptoms. By specifically testing for inflammation, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, offending foods, hormones and toxicity, we can pin-point specific issues that are contributing to the migraines or headaches. • Custom Treatment Protocols: Once labs reveal specifics about the patient’s personal status, we go to work creating a custom treatment plan to help the body heal and reduce the irritation to the muscles and nerves.

HOW EFFECTIVE IS THIS TREATMENT?

We have treated hundreds of people suffering from headaches and migraines, and our patients have seen a huge decrease in the incidence and severity of their migraines and headaches, allowing them to get back to normal life. Dr. Niele Maimone, DC of Align Healing Center Maimone Chiropractic Inc. in Danville has been active in natural health and functional medicine since 1999. For more information or to set up a complimentary consult, call 925-362-8283 or visit www.alignhealingcenter.com. Advertorial

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THE EYE OPENER

BACK TO SCHOOL 2020 By Gregory Kraskowsky, O.D., Alamo Optometry

With summer vacation ending, it is time to turn our attention to back to school. Kids of all ages, from elementary school all the way to graduate school, will most likely start the year via remote learning. For all students, screen-time via smartphones, computers, iPads, and laptops, which was increasing prior to life with COVID-19, has jumped dramatically for both students and parents who have been working from home for the past few months. Now more than ever, it is paramount to make sure all students (and parents) have proper eyewear while using electronics for the best success during this difficult time. First on the “to-do” list is to schedule a comprehensive eye exam if one has not been done recently. I often tell patients that sometimes a minor prescription lens correction for the computer can be very beneficial. Even though a person can “see fine,” it does not mean that they cannot improve their situation. A small prescription can help alleviate a lot of the eyestrain and fatigue associated with long-term electronics usage. In addition, we have become huge advocates of the blue light filter/anti-reflective coating on lenses. While eliminating blue light is not possible, these coatings severely reduce the excessive blue light and glare from screen and monitor use. As with most things, all lens coatings are not created equally. Less expensive online or commercial coatings are not bad. However, they do not have the same quality and effectiveness. Our office offers a two-year scratch warranty on lenses. Hopefully, our children will return to in-person learning soon. When that does occur, it will be important to have your student ready. Vision at school requires several elements for success. These include sharp distance vision for being able to read the board and/or screen, good near vision and binocular vision (eye teaming) to be able to read and study for long periods at a time, and depending on the class, the ability to look back and forth from the board or screen to up-close to take notes on paper or computer with ease. In addition to these visual requirements, the eyes also need to be healthy to be able to sustain these demands. Conditions such as dry eyes induced from allergies or medications, and the itching and tearing from seasonal allergies, can hinder vision and thus need to be diagnosed and addressed. It is for these reasons that your child’s eyes should be checked by an eye care professional. School and pediatrician screenings usually only test distance vision and do not address health issues of the eye nor near vision, depth perception, or binocular vision. Many times, a child or adult, has “good vision” but is still having issues with near work which can lead to blurry vision, double vision, headaches, and overall difficulty sustaining up-close work for any period of time. Obviously, all reading issues are not caused by vision and/ or binocular vision conditions, but that should be the first place you should check out to make sure all is well. It is recommended for vision, ocular health, and the reasons stated above that students get an annual eye exam. The testing we do at the office goes much more in depth and covers more than pediatrician and school screenings. We have instituted many COVID 19-related safety precautions to welcome students and parents back to the office. We look forward to seeing the entire family soon. Dr. K. at Alamo Optometry is your hometown eye doctor for outstanding service, vision care, and designer eyewear. He can be reached at (925) 820-6622, or visit his office at 3201 Danville Blvd., Suite 165 in Alamo. For more information, visit www.alamooptometry.com, and join in on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter @Alamo Optometry. Advertorial

MEALS ON WHEELS

Seniors in our community need your support! Meals on Wheels Diablo Region has been supporting seniors since 1968. Two of the programs, Meals on Wheels and Friendly Visitors, rely on the support of volunteers. Your help is needed now more than ever. Meals on Wheels volunteer drivers deliver meals to local homebound seniors through regular two hour shifts once per week or as substitute drivers. Friendly Visitors volunteers provide weekly one-hour companionship visits to isolated seniors. To volunteer for either program, please call (925)937-8311.


Facebook: Alamo Today & Danville Today News | editor@yourmonthlypaper.com August 2020 • ALAMO TODAY & DANVILLE TODAY NEWS • PAGE 23

LOOK AS GOOD AS YOU FEEL

By Dr. Barbara Persons

In a society that is always on the go, preoccupied by work, family, and the near future, we tend to neglect the time we need for ourselves. Self-care is often on our to-do-list, but it is never checked off. As a result, we forget about ourselves and the needs that we have in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. It is important to start recognizing personal well-being as a top priority instead of “putting it off until later.” We actively think about self-care such as exercising, reading, or maintaining a vibrant and youthful appearance, improving your self-confidence significantly. Self-confidence and self-care go hand-in-hand. I believe that when you look good, you feel good, and you radiate that positivity from within to those around you. Almost everyday, my patients tell me that they look older than they fee. Fortunately, there is a way to realign our inner youth with our outward appearance. Facelifts are a result-driven procedure that provide full facial rejuvenation with a single healing period. As we age, our skin becomes less elastic and loses volume, resulting in folds, fine lines, and wrinkles. During a facelift, the underlying musculature is tightened, and unwanted skin is removed, creating a younger, fresher, appearance. Similarly, a necklift can be coupled with a facelift. A necklift removes the excess or sagging skin around the neck in order to match the youthful appearance of the face. Both procedures result in virtually undetectable scars that are located discreetly within the hairline and around the ears. If you are seeking more subtle treatment, Botox® and dermal fillers (otherwise known as fillers or a liquid facelift), might be the treatment for you. Although Botox® has many different applications, its primary use is to reduce fine lines and wrinkles on the face. By relaxing the lines etched in our faces by the passage of time, Botox® can turn back the clock on the visible signs of aging. Some of my personal favorite fillers include Restylane®, Juveau®, Belotero®, and Radiesse®. These can help to add volume, fullness, and dimension to the face. Dermal fillers are highly versatile and can treat many areas of the face such as the lips, under eyes, smile lines, cheekbones, and jawline. The total cost for Botox®

and fillers varies depending on the needs of each person and can be discussed during an office visit or phone call. At our Lafayette and Brentwood locations, we are closely following local and state government guidelines to implement additional measures of safety for our patients and staff. We are also offering COVID-19 antibody tests with results in as little as 10 minutes. Our current hours of operation at our Lafayette location are Monday-Friday 9am-5pm and our Brentwood location on Saturdays 8am-11am. To schedule an appointment, please call our office at 925-238-4012. We at Persons Plastic Surgery look forward to seeing you soon. Barbara L Persons, MD, FACS is a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon and owns Persons Plastic Surgery, Inc., located at 911 Moraga Rd, Suite 205 in Lafayette. She can be reached at 925-283-4012 or drpersons@personsplasticsurgery.com. Advertorial

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AUGUST 2020 ~ Alamo Today & Danville Today News  

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Hyperlocal, positive news serving Alamo, Danville, and Diablo, CA.

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