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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Welcome! to Issue 32 of

‘The DeuxSèvres Monthly’ magazine.

I don’t think I’ve mentioned our barn and renovations for a while have I? Well, they are still ongoing, but with such a busy summer for both Rob and I, we haven’t managed to progress very far! We have just celebrated our 5th year here in Deux-Sèvres and on thinking back to 2008, we were sure on arrival that our house renovations would take a year to complete, two at the absolute most! Priorities certainly change - and whilst we enjoy being comfortable in our home, there certainly isn’t any rush to get things finished. Funding of course has to be taken into account as well as keeping on top of our work. We also enjoy weekends away instead of renovating! There’s the rub! Hope you’re enjoying your renovations - as I’m sure many of you reading this will be busy with one project or another! Happy October to you all and see you next month.

à plus, Sarah. Tel: 05 49 70 26 21 Email: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Emergency Numbers: 15 SAMU, Medical 17 Gendarmes, Police 18 Pompiers, Fire

112 European emergency 113 Drugs and alcohol

CONTENTS

What’s On.....................................................................................4 Hobbies,  Clubs  &  Associations.....................................................6 Getting  Out  &  About....................................................................7 Take  a  Break...............................................................................19 Health,  Beauty  &  Fitness............................................................20 Our  Furry  Friends.......................................................................21 The  Great  Outdoors...................................................................24 A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  in  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.................................27 French  Life,  Food  &  Drink..........................................................28 Motoring....................................................................................31 Communications........................................................................33 Building  &  Renovation...............................................................35 Business,  Finance  &  Property....................................................41

THIS MONTH’S  ADVERTISERS   79  Renovations.....................................................................................................39 A2B  Food  Services............................................................................................... 29 A  La  Bonne  Vie  (Restaurant)................................................................................ 28 All  Things  Equestrian........................................................................................... 21 Ace  Pneus  (Tyre  Supplier  &  Fitter)...................................................................... 32 Affordable  UK  Designs  (Kitchens  &  UPVC  D/Glazing)......................................... 2 AKE  Petits  Travaux  (Builder)................................................................................ 39 Alan  Pearce  (Plumbing  &  Heating)..................................................................... 37 Andrew  Longman  (Plumber)............................................................................... 37 An  English  Nursery  in  France.............................................................................. 25 ARB  French  Property........................................................................................... 45 Arbrecadabra.com  (Tree  surgery)........................................................................24 Bar/Brasserie  Vue  du  Chateau............................................................................ 29

...continued.

BH Assurances  /  Allianz....................................................................................... 41 Bill  McEvoy  (Plumber  /  Heating  Engineer).......................................................... 36 Blevins  Franks  Tax  &  Wealth  Management......................................................... 44 Bois  Nature  Energie  (Firewood  &  Fencing)......................................................... 24 British  Mobile  Mechanic  (John  Purchase)........................................................... 32 Building  &  Pool  Services...................................................................................... 38 Buzay  Auto........................................................................................................... 33 Café  des  Belles  Fleurs.......................................................................................... 30 Caniclôture  (Hidden  fencing)............................................................................ 21 Chris  Bassett  Construction.................................................................................. 40 Chris  Parsons  (Heating/Electrical/Plumbing)...................................................... 36 Christies  (English  Book  Shop  and  Tea  Room)...................................................... 7 Cleaning  Services  by  Karen.................................................................................. 45 Clean  Sweep  Chimney  Services........................................................................... 38 Concept  Construction......................................................................................... 38 CSB  Construction................................................................................................. 39 Currencies  Direct  (Money  Transfers)................................................................... 42 Cut  46  (Hair  Salon).............................................................................................. 20 DB  Electricité....................................................................................................... 35 David  Cropper  (Stump  Grinding  &  Jungle  Busting)............................................ 26 DJ  Jeff  (Professional  DJ)....................................................................................... 7 D.J  Maintenance  (Handyman)............................................................................ 35 EcoPower  (Solar  Thermal  Trading  Company)...................................................... 35 Electricien  Anglais  en  France.............................................................................. 35 Environmental  Heating  Services......................................................................... 37 Franglais  Deliveries............................................................................................. 32 French  Tuition  (Pascale  Terry)............................................................................. 17 Fresco  Interiors.................................................................................................... 38 Gardening  &  Cleaning  Services........................................................................... 45 George  Rayner  Computers.................................................................................. 33 Give  the  Dog  a  Comb  (Dog  Grooming)............................................................... 21 Glass  2  France...................................................................................................... 2 Hallmark  Electronique  (Electricians  &  Sat.  Engineers)........................................ 35 Heather’s  Pet  Care  Services................................................................................ 21 Holistic  Therapy  -­‐  Soul  to  Sole............................................................................. 21 Homes  In  France  (Tony  Murdoch)....................................................................... 47 I  C  O  Electricté..................................................................................................... 35 Insink  Plumbing................................................................................................. .. 37 John  Etherington  Home  &  Garden  Care.............................................................. 26 John  Snee  Groundworks..................................................................................... 40 Jon  Crocker  Photography..................................................................................... 45 Julia  Hunt  -­‐  Agent  Commercial............................................................................ 45 Karen  Renel-­‐King  (Sworn  Translation)................................................................. 17 Keith  Banks  Pool  Services.................................................................................... 36 La  Deuxieme  Chance  (Annie  Sloan  chalk  paint  supplier).................................... 39 Laura  Walker  Jewellery........................................................................................ 7 Leggett  Immobilier.............................................................................................. 46 Les  Jardins  St  Laurent  (Bistro)............................................................................. 29 Le  Logis  -­‐  The  Perfect  Pig  Company..................................................................... 30 Le  Petit  Cadeau................................................................................................... 7 Man  &  Van........................................................................................................... 33 Mark  Sabestini  Renovation  &  Construction........................................................ 40 MB  Plumbing  &  Building  Services....................................................................... 36 Michael  Hobson  (Painter  &  Decorator)............................................................... 39 ML  Computers..................................................................................................... 33 Motor  Parts  Charente.......................................................................................... 32 Mutuelle  de  Poitiers  Assurances......................................................................... 32 Nathan  Foster  Building  Services.......................................................................... 40 Needa  Hand  Services........................................................................................... 38 Pamela  Irving  (Massage  &  Reflexology).............................................................. 21 Philip  Irving  (Mini  Digger  hire)............................................................................. 40 Polar  Express  (Frozen  Foods).............................................................................. 29 Premier  Autos  (Mechanic).................................................................................. 32 Reiki  with  Suzanne  Cole-­‐King.............................................................................. 21 Restaurant  des  Canards....................................................................................... 28 Rob  Berry  (Plasterer)........................................................................................... 38 Robert  Walker  Plomberie.................................................................................... 37 Ross  Hendry  (Interface  Consulting  &  Engineering)............................................. 34 Salon  International  du  Mariage........................................................................... 8 Sarah  Berry  Online  (Graphics  &  Website  Design)............................................... 33 Satellite  TV  (Nigel  Gubb)...................................................................................... 33 sarl  Down  to  Earth  (Groundwork  &  Construction)............................................. 40 SCP  Notary........................................................................................................... 46 Siddalls  (Financial  Advisors)................................................................................. 43 Silverwood  Books................................................................................................ 10 Simon  The  Tiler.................................................................................................... 37 Spectrum  IFA  Group  (Amanda  Johnson)............................................................. 42 Steve  Enderby...................................................................................................... 39 Sue  Burgess  (French  Courses  &  Translation)....................................................... 16 The  English  Mechanic  &  Son  -­‐  Tony  Eyre............................................................ 32 The  Market.......................................................................................................... 7 Total  Renovation  Services  (Michael  Dominey)................................................... 37 Tracey  Bowring  (Hairdressing  &  Nails)................................................................ 20 Vendée  Carriers................................................................................................... 32 Vendée  Pools.................................................................................................. 36

© Sarah  Berry   2013.     All   rights  reserved.    Material   may   not   be   reproduced  without  permission.    While   care   is   taken  to  ensure  that  articles  and  features  are  accurate,  Sarah   Berry   accepts  no  liability   for   reader  dissatisfaction.     The   opinions  expressed   and  experiences   shared  are   given  by  individual   authors  and  do  not  necessarily  represent  the   views  or  opinions  of  the  publisher.    Please  ensure  you  verify  that  the  company  you  are  dealing  with  is  a  registered  trading  company  in  France  and/or  elsewhere. <<The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly>>  est   édité   par  Sarah   Berry,  La   Bartière,   79130,   Secondigny.   Tél:   05  49  70   26  21.    Directeur  de  la  publication  et  rédacteur  en   chef:   Sarah   Berry.   Crédits   photos:  Sarah  Berry,   Clkr  et   morgeufile.com.  Impression:  Raynaud  Imprimeurs,  zone  industrielle,  BP13,  79160,  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize.    Dépôt  légal:  octobre  2013  -­‐  Tirage:  5000  exemplaires.    Siret:  515  249  738  00011  ISSN:  2115-­‐4848

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

What’s On... October 2013 1st-­‐  31st  October  -­‐  Exhibition  ‘Couleur  dans  les  Églises’ Exhibition   of   photos   of   church   wall   paintings,  polychrome   statues   and  carvings   and  church  windows  by  Howard  Needs.    At   l’Office   de   Tourisme  du  Pays  Mellois,  Melle.    Info:  05  49  29  15  10.   3rd  October  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Chef  Boutonne See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 3rd  October  -­‐  Harmonics  Concert In   the   Salle   d’Animations   next   to   Marie   in   Civray.     Doors   open   7.30pm  and  start  time  8.00pm.  Tickets  5€  per  adult,  children  under   12  free.     Tickets  may  be   obtained   at  the  door.    Contact  Dolly  Ait   Boualou  by  email:  sylvie.murray@wanadoo.fr 4th  October  -­‐  Tour  de  Finance For   financial  advice  and  more,  visit  this  event  in  Saumur.    See  details  and   advert  on  P.42/3  for  details  or  contact  Amanda  Johnson  or  Sue  Cook. 5th  -­‐  13th  Ocober  -­‐  Pomm’Expo Big  event  in   Secondigny  spanning   two   weekends.    Various  events   scheduled   including   cycle   race,   brocante,   markets   etc.     Further   details  can  be  found  on  http://pommexpo.fr. 6th  October  -­‐  Fete  des  Plantes In  the  grounds  of  the  Chateau,  Bressuire  9.00am   -­‐  7.00pm.    Entry   Fee  3€  for  adults,  children  are  free.    See  Advert  on  P8. 6th  October  -­‐  Fete  des  Plantes At  Parc  de  la  Verrerie,  Faymoreau  85240.  9.00am  -­‐  6.00pm. 7th  October  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Limalonges See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 9th  October  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Aigre See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 12th  October  -­‐  Disco  Night At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux.    For  info  please  see  advert  on  P.30. 13th  October  -­‐  Fete  des  Plantes Les  Pepites  Botaniques,  la  Haye  Foussiere  44690.  10.00am  -­‐  6.00pm,   Free  entry. 13th  October  -­‐  Book  Launch Alison   Morton’s  Perfiditas   Book   Launch   at   the  Journée  du   Livre,   Sainte-­‐Verge  79100.  9.30am  -­‐  6.00pm  at  the  Salle  Alcide-­‐d'Orbigny.   FREE  entry. 14th  October  -­‐  Financial  Seminar By   Blevins   Franks,  at  Château   du   Griffier,  Niort.  10.30am-­‐12noon.     For  details  please  see  advert  on  P.44. 14th  October  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Champniers See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 18th  October  -­‐  Fun  Mexican  Themed  Evening At  A  La  Bonne   Vie  Restaurant,  Le  Beugnon.     For   details  please  see   advert  on  P.28. 18th-­‐20th  October  -­‐  Hope  Book  Sale At   the   Salle   des   fetes,  at   Clussais-­‐La   Pommeraie   from   10.00am  -­‐   4.00pm.     If   you   have   books,  DVDs,  CDs,  bric-­‐a-­‐brac   and   pre-­‐loved   clothes  in  good  condition,  of  if  you  would  like  to  volunteer  to   help,   please  use  the  contact  form  on  our  website.  www.hopeassoc.org. 19th  October  -­‐  The  Fenery  Beer  Fest At  Fenery,  11am-­‐4pm.    Entry  3€.    Please  see  advert  on  P.8  for  details. 19-­‐20  October  -­‐  Fetes  des  Plantes Domaine  de  Péré,  Prissé   la   Charrière  79360.   5€  entry   for   adults,   free  for  children. 21st  October  -­‐  Blue  Week  Coffee  Morning At  Salle  de  Fêtes,  4  Bel  Air,  Viennay  79200.    See  Page  10  for  details. 31st  October  -­‐  Halloween  Night At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux.    For  info  please  see  advert  on  P.30.

What’s Coming Up...

16th-­‐17th November  -­‐  Hope  Assoc  Charity  Shop  Weekend See  details  on  advert  on  P.8 30th  November  &  1st  December  -­‐  Salon  de  Mariage 2  day  wedding  event   at  St   Jean  d’Angely.  Please  see  article   on   P.8   for  more  information. 7th  December  -­‐  NALA  Xmas  Fair At   Chateau   de   Puybelliard,   nr   Chantonnay.   See   information   opposite  for  details.

Monthly services  at  the  English  speaking  Church  in  Deux-­‐Sèvres Jassay The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,     has  a   Home   Group   Service   at   Jassay  commencing  at   11.00am     every  2nd  Sunday  in  the  month.   It   is   held  at   the   home  of  Ann   White,  where   a   warm  welcome   awaits   everyone  for   a   time   of   worship  and  fellowship. Chef-Boutonne The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd  also  holds  services   on  the   1st  Sunday  of   each  month  at  10.30am  at  The  Little  Stone   Church   in   Chef-­‐Boutonne.     After   each   service   tea   or   coffee   is   served  and  there  is  an  opportunity  to   meet  other  people   in  the   area. Parthenay The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd  also  holds  services   on  the  4th  Sunday  of  each   month   at   10.30am  in   the   Presbytery   Rooms,  rue  de  la  Citadelle,  Parthenay,  opposite  St   Croix  Church.   After  each  service,  tea  or  coffee  is  served  and  everyone  is  invited   to  a  'bring  and  share'  lunch. For   further   informa\on   about   loca\on   of   churches   and   about   what   else   is   happening   near   you,   please   take   a   look   at   our   website   www.church-­‐in-­‐france.com   or   contact   us   at   office.goodshepherd@orange.fr

The Filling  Station  ~  Poitou-­‐Charentes The   Filling   Station   is   a   network   of   local   Christians   of   all   denominations   who   meet   together   regularly   for   spiritual   renewal   and  evangelism  purposes.    ALL  WELCOME. Please   see   our   website   for   details   of   meetings   and   spring   programmes  www.thefillingstation.org.uk  or  locally  contact   05  49  87  18  58  or  email:michael.willis@sfr.fr

Only 67 days until our NALA Xmas!!

A Taste of Xmas

The NALA  Animal  association  is  holding  a  Xmas  Fair  on   Saturday   7th   December   at   the   Chateau   de   Puybelliard   near   Chantonnay.   A   great   chance   to   visit   this   lovely  chateau,   buy   your   Christmas   presents,  wreath,  decorations,  crackers  and  indulge  in  wonderful,   traditional   Christmas  foods:  glorious  cakes,   mince-­‐pies,  puddings,   sausage   rolls   and   much   more!   Those   who   have   attended   our   afternoon  teas  know  that  we  have  some  of  the  best  bakers  around   giving  their  time  and  expertise  so  it’s  definitely  an  occasion  not  to   be  missed! There   are   some   stands   still   available   so   traders   please   contact   chateaupuybelliard@yahoo.fr.  Or  for  further  information,  visit  our   website:    www.nosamislesanimaux.com. Page 4


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

                                                                         

Local Markets

Paperback Jan Books  in  English

2nd Oct:  Café  Cour  de  Miracle,  Vouvant  85120.  2.30pm  -­‐  4.30pm 3rd  Oct:  Brasserie  Vue  du  Chateau,  Bressuire  79300.  10am  -­‐  12pm 3rd  Oct:  Bar  le  Palais,  St  Aubin  le  Cloud  79450.  2pm-­‐5pm 4th  Oct:  Bar  de  la  Paix,  Thouars  79100.  12pm  -­‐  2pm 4th  Oct:  Le  Tipsy  Bar,  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize  79160.  4pm  -­‐  6pm 6th  Oct:  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux  79160.  2pm  -­‐  4pm 9th  Oct:  Les  Jardins  St  Laurent  Hotel,  Parthenay  79200.  10am-­‐12pm 9th  Oct:  Le  Don  Jon  Bar,  Moncontour  86330.  2pm  -­‐  4pm 10th  Oct:  Pause!  Cafe,  L’Absie  79240.    2pm-­‐  5pm   11th  Oct:  Jan’s  home,  La  Ferrière-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  79390.  11am  -­‐  4pm 12th  Oct:  Cafe  Le  Chauray,  St  Maixent  l’Ecole  79400.  10am  -­‐  1pm 19th  Oct:    Beer  Fest  at  Fenery.    11am-­‐4pm 30th  Oct:  Jan’s  home,  La  Ferrière-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  79390.  1pm  -­‐  6pm 31st  Oct:  Le  Relais  des  Deux  Moulins,  Clessé  79350.    4pm  -­‐  6pm   For  more  info  contact  Jan  on: 06  08  30  73  29  or  email:  paperbackjan@gmail.com

Open Fish 4 Chip Fish, Chips & mushy peas!

• • Tuesdays: • • • Wednesdays: • Thursdays: • • Fridays: • • Saturdays: • • • • • • Sundays: Mondays:

6-8pm

Mondays: Bar Tilleuls, Champniers (near Civray) Tuesdays: Sauzé-Vaussais (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Wednesdays: Chef Boutonne (near Chateau) Thursdays: Sauzé-Vaussais - Lunchtime & Evening. (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Fridays: Mansle (Car park of Simply Supermarket) Tel: 06 37 53 56 20 or visit : www.mobilefishandchipsfrance.com

Benet 85490 Lencloître (1st Monday in month) 86140 Lezay 79120 Coulonges-sur-l’Autize 79160 Thouars 79100 Parthenay 79200 Sauzé-Vaussais 79190 Niort 79000 Thouars 79100 Melle 79500 Chef-Boutonne 79110 Airvault 79600 Niort 79000 Coulon 79510 Saint-Maixent-l’École 79400 Neuville-de-Poitou 86170

Photo: Lisa Roberts

                                                                                             

Looking for   Authentic,   Fresh   Products  from  Our  Region?  

The Thursday  weekly  market  of  La   Mothe   St-­‐Héray  fulfills  all  these  functions.   In   addition   this   summer,  a  novelty.     On   the   1st   Thursday  of   July,   August,   September   and   October,   the   market   will   run   throughout  the   day.  Local   residents  and  residents   of   nearby   villages  and  tourists  can  take  advantage  of  this  opportunity  to   find  products  that  will   delight  the  taste  buds  and  other  small   pleasures.  Do  not  miss  this  opportunity! Information  :  05.49.05.01.41.

Miss English Films? If the  answer  is  “YES!”  you  will  be  pleased  to  read   that  there  are  cinemas  in  the  area  showing  films  in   English.

Mr T’s Friterie

Open 6.30

-9pm

With regular venues at:

                           F    oire         16170  (27th  month) • Aulnay    17470    (from  6pm)  •          Rouillac   • St  Hilaire  de  Villefranche  17770 • Gourville  16170                   • St  Jean  d’Angély  17400 • Loulay  17330 • Matha 17160

+ See www.frying2nite.com  for  details  or  call  06  02  22  44  74

Reel Fish & Chips Traditional English style Fish & Chips

2nd Oct 4th Oct 5th Oct 16th Oct 17th Oct

The Canteen, Etusson 18H30 - 21H30 Bar Tabac, Bouille-Loretz 18H30 - 21H00 Bar Vue du Chateau, Bressuire 18H30 - 21H00 The Canteen, Etusson 18H30 - 21H00 Bar Tabac, St Martin du Sanzay 18H30 - 21H00

Tel: 06 04 14 23 94 or visit: www.reelfishandchips.net

It’s difficult   to  have  advance  dates  of  screenings   in  time  for  publication,  but   you  can  ask  to  have  your   name  added  to  the  mailing  lists  so  you  are  kept  up-­‐to-­‐date  of   screenings  throughout  the  winter  months. Send  your  email  to: Parthenay  cinema:    cinema.foyer@gmail.com Melle  cinema:  lemelies.melle@wanadoo.fr La  Chataigneraie  cinema:  stella.freeman@wanadoo.fr

The National Holidays, Religious and Feast Days 2013 Friday 1st  November......... All  Saint’s  Day (Toussaint) Monday  11th  November... Armis\ce  Day  (Armis9ce  1918) Wednesday  25th  December. Christmas  Day  (Noël)

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Hobbies, Clubs & Associations... Alone in  France? We  are  a  group  of  people  living  alone   in  the   L'Absie  area  who  meet   regularly  for  coffee  and  lunches.    We   meet   on  the  1st  and  3rd  Tuesdays  at  11am   for  coffee  at  the  Pause  cafe  in   L'Absie.    Our  lunches  are  at  different  venues  each  month.  There's  a   warm  welcome  if  you'd  like  to  join  us.   More  details  from  Frank  05  49  69  80  47. Open Door Lending Library Over 7000 fiction and non-fiction books and DVDs Open Tuesday and Friday mornings from 10am to midday at 18 rue Pierre Pestureau, Civray (86400) Individual membership 6€, family membership 10€ www.opendoor-civray.com

Book Group....meeting 2nd Thursday of the I am   a   Jewish   man   with   a   non-­‐Jewish   wife   from   the   UK   looking  for  Jewish  people  of  any  nationality  living  in  the  area   of   La   Chataignerie   who   would   like   to   meet   for   tea   and   conversation.    Please  email:  suelauris@hotmail.co.uk

month from 3pm at Christies Tea Room & Bookshop, Gençay, 86160. Take a look at the Book Group page on the website: www.chezchristies.com for more information.

Craft Café  Creatif Rubber Bridge:would any of you bridge players out there in the Deux-Sèvres, be interested in making up an occasional 4? Email David Rowe: djfrowe@hotmail.com or' phone 05 49 63 26 57.

Association Meridien Green We are   an   Anglo-­‐French   group   which   was   founded   in   2001   for   mutual   understanding   of   each   other's   language   and   culture.   We   meet   twice   weekly   in   the   Salle   des   Associations   in   St   Coutant,   79120.     The   best   way   to   find   out   more   is   to   visit   our   website   -­‐   www.meridiengreen.asso.fr  or  contact  Maureen  Dalby:   05  49  29  94  50.  The  name   of  our  group  comes  from   the  fact  that  St   Coutant  is  on  the  Greenwich  Meridian!

Do you   enjoy   knitting   or   sewing,   crochet   or   papercraft,   but   prefer  to  do   it   in  the  company  of  others,  over  a  cup  of  tea  and  a   piece  of  cake?    If  so,  why   not  come  and  join  us  in  L'Absie  for  an   enjoyable   afternoon   with   like-­‐minded   people.   For   further   details   contact   Margaret   on   02   51   69   50   32   or   email   knight.margaret@orange.fr  

2nd Sunday Motorcycle Club www.2ndsundayclub.fr If you would like to attend our coffee mornings please contact us via the website........New members always welcome!

Book Club  Thouars.    Do  you  enjoy  reading  a  cracking  good  story?   And  talking  to  others  about  it?  Do  you  live  in  north  79,  south  49   or  north  86?  Come  along  to  our  book  club..... Contact  Alison  Morton  at  info@bookclubthouars.fr  for  more  details.

Les Amis Solitaires We are  a  group  of  people   living  alone  in  France.    We  meet  up   for   coffee  mornings   from   11am,  every   2nd   &  4th   Thursday   at  The   Lemon  Tree  in  Sauzé  Vaussais.    More  details  from  Gwen  on   05  49  87  91  79  or  email  gwanshep@gmail.com

The Harmonics Singing   Group.   Based   in   the   Salle  

d'Annexe behind  the  mairie  in  Civray.  We  meet  each  Wednesday  from   2.00pm   to  4.00pm.   No   experience   necessary   just   a   willingness   and   commitment   to   learn.   We   sing   all   sorts   of   music   and   in   several   languages,  whatever   the  music  dictates.  We   are   a  small   and  friendly   group  who  would  love  to  meet  you. Contact:  Dolly  Ait  Boualou:  05  45  22  89  32  or  sylvia.murray@wanadoo.fr

Through the Lens Group Local photography group meets on the last Monday in each month to chat about all things photography! New members welcome. For further information contact: Ian Gawn: 02 51 00 84 52 or Brian Preece: 05 49 72 09 94

A R E Y O U A M O D E L R A I L W A Y ENTHUSIAST? If so, join a group of likeminded modellers who meet on a monthly basis to visit members' layouts and swap information. We are based on the DeuxSevres/Vendee border but also have members in the Vienne and Charente. If you are interested please contact Gerry Riley for more information on 05 49 63 34 01. Secondigny Running Club... Put the bounce back in your step. Join our friendly and supportive running group. All abilities welcome. Email Kelly for more details: kellyencezelle@hotmail.co.uk

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Getting Out & About...

Small Colour Advert only 34€

Presentation to  Croix  Rouge.

The President   of   the   French   Red   Cross,   Jacques   Chevessier   welcomed   representatives  of  the   Association   Aidez   last   month  to   receive   a  cheque   for  500€.     This  was  the  result  of  recent  Christmas   and   Summer   markets,   and   Paperback  Jan’s   “Clear   Your   Clutter”   event  in  May. The  Association   Aidez  was  founded  there  three  years  and  consists   of  eight  members   including  Lin  Adams   and  Linda  Reffold  (pictured   below).  

HOPE BOOK SALE 18/19/20 OCTOBER 10am - 4pm Salle des fêtes, Clussais-La-Pommeraie, 79190 (D45 Sauze Vaussais to Lezay Road) Thousands of English and French books, fiction and non-fiction for adults and children, each for just 1 euro. If you  have  books,  DVDs,  CDs,  bric-­‐a-­‐brac  and  pre-­‐loved  clothes   in   good   condition,   or   if   you   would   like   to   volunteer   to   help,   please  use  the  contact  form  on  our  website.  Someone  will  be  in   touch  for  collection  asap.

Above: Jacques Chevessier with Lin Adams and Linda Reffold of Association Aidez. Photo: www.lanouvellerepublique.fr

Please see www.hopeassoc.org for further details.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY Combined Services Support Group Present

The Fenery Beer Fest Saturday

19th October, 2013 Salles des Fetes Fenery

11.00 to 16.00hrs

Tickets €3.00  per  person to include 1 free drink

Admission by ticket only British Draught Beer Sausage and Chips Tea, coffee and cakes Raffle, stalls and Entertainment In aid of SSAFA

Contact: Mick and Terri Laverick 05 49 64 07 24

or

Ali Sherwin 05 49 95 62 71

Salon International  du  Mariage The   first   international   wedding   exhibition   is   being   organized   by   wedding   planner,   Samantha   Bottomley   at   the   stunning   historic   Abbaye   Royale   which  is  situated   in   the  centre  of   the   picturesque   town  of  St.  Jean  d'Angely  in  the  Charente  Maritime.

During the   two   days   there   will   also   be   catwalk   shows   with   examples  of  wedding  dresses,  hair,  make-­‐up  and  accessories. For   more   information:   www.salon-­‐international-­‐du-­‐mariage-­‐ en.com or  telephone  05  46  32  60  60  or  07  85  62  73  03.

Open from  9am  until   6pm  on  Saturday  30th  November  and   Sunday   1st   December,   this   exhibition   plays   host   to   a   great   variety   of   professional   companies   and   individuals   who   specialize   in   the   wedding  and  event  planning  industry.   Featuring  Goodmoon  Reception,  who  organize  weddings  across  the   region,  Hotel   Golf   de  Saint   Junien,  which  is  a  superb  location  for   a   reception   and  David  Page,  Terry  Keep  and  Objectif  Sourire  who  are   all   professional   photographers.   In   addition   we   have   the   calming   influence   of   Sam  and   Emma  from   Charente   Hair   and  Bridal,  who   transform   brides   on   their   special   day.   Harriet   Carpenter   is   launching  her  new  business  as   a  videographer  Créa-­‐Mémoires.    In   addition   we   have   DJ's  and   a  classical  pianist   in   the   form   of   Brian   Sanders. We  have   wedding  dress  designers,  travel  agents,  jewellers,  florists   such   as   Ellerymay,   professional   pastry  chefs   and   caterers  such   as   The   Kitchen   Ambassador   and   Crique   Patisserie,   who   design   the   most  divine  wedding  and  celebration   cakes,  and  a  number  of  other   exhibitors.    We  even  have  a  mobile   crèche  facility,  Silly  Billy's,  who   you  can  hire  for  your  event  to  keep  your  younger  guests  occupied. You   may   need   help   planning   your   wedding,   birthday   party   or   wedding  anniversary  and   we  will  be   able  to  discuss  your  plans  face   to   face  with  a  host  of  experts,  both  French  and  British  who  will  be   showcasing  their  products  and  services  on  the  day.  

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

News from  the  Pays  de  Gâtine!   by Julia Salvat

La Semaine  Bleue.    21st  –  25th  October  2013 La  Semaine  Bleue  is  a  national  week  for  the  elderly  and  retired  which   aims   to   inform   people   of   the   services   available   for   an   ageing   population.    As  part   of  this,   on   15th   October   2013  a  forum  (entry   free)  is  being  held  at  the  Bocapole  in  Bressuire.  Various  conferences,   workshops  and  stands  have  been  organised  by  the  Caisse  de  Retraite   and  the  CLIC  offices  in  Bressuire,  Thouars  and  Parthenay. On  Monday,  21st  October  2013  at  10.00am  at  the  Salle  des  Fêtes,  4   Bel  Air,  79200  Viennay,  a  coffee  morning  has  also  been  arranged  for   the  many  British,  Dutch   and  German   families   living  in   the   Gâtine.     The  presentation,  in   French  and  English,  will  cover  the  work  that   the   French   Social   Assistants   carry   out   through   the   Antenne   Medico-­‐ Sociale  (Health  &  Welfare  centres)  and  is  for  people  of  all  ages. The  Social   Assistant  is  central  to  getting   help  with   any   worries  you   may  have,  whether   they  be  at   home,   school   or   work  or   if   you  are   concerned   about   the   welfare   of   a   loved   one   or   find   yourself   in   financial   difficulty.     Although   you   might   not   need   help   today,  you   might   in   the   future,   or   you  might   know  someone  who   needs   help.   The  work  Social  Assistants   do   could   be  vital   to   you,  your   family  or   friends. In   order  to  attend  this  free   presentation  please  contact:  Julia  Salvat,   Pays  de  Gâtine.  Email:  julia.salvat@gatine.org  . Julia  SALVAT,  Pays  de  Gâtine.     Tel:  05  49  64  25  49  ~  Email:  julia.salvat@gatine.org Website:  www.gatine.org

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Preparing Your Work for Publication Have you  written  a  book?    Do  you  plan  to  see  it  in  print?   Whether   you’re   submitting   your   work   to   a   literary   agent,   a   traditional   publisher,  or  you  intend  to  fund  the  publication  yourself   (to   self-­‐publish)  it’s  vital  to  make  sure  your  work  is  the  best  it  can   be  before  you  take  the  next  step.     Your  manuscript   says  a  lot  about   you   and  your   professionalism   as  a  writer,  so  aim  high  with  these   practical  steps: 1. 2. 3.

4.

5.

6.

Draft and  re-­‐draft.  Don’t   submit  the  first  draft  of  the  first  book   you’ve  ever   written   to  an  agent  or  publisher.  Take  some  time   to  learn  your  craft. Put   your   finished  manuscript  aside   for   a   couple  of  weeks  to   get  some  distance.  Go  back  to   it  with  fresh  perspective  –  you’ll   be  surprised  at  what  you  see  when  you  re-­‐read! Find   a   beta-­‐reader   –   someone   who   has   a   background   in   writing,   publishing   or   editing   who   can   give   you   honest   feedback  about   what’s  working  (and  what’s  not).  Friends  and   family  might  be  too  polite  to  highlight  anything  negative. Format   your   manuscript   professionally  –  most   literary  agents   and  publishers  want  to  see  a  document  prepared  in   Microsoft   Word,  double  spaced,  in  12  pt   type,  using  an  easy-­‐to-­‐read   serif   font   such  as   Times  New   Roman,  with   all  pages  consecutively   numbered. Hire  a  professional  copy-­‐editor   or  proofreader.  They’re  trained   to   spot   inconsistencies  and   errors,  and   will   go  through   your   manuscript  on  a  microscopic  level.  Never  try  to  proofread  your   own   work   –   you’re   too   close   to   it   to   spot   the   errors   a   professional  will  pick  up  in  an  instant. Decide  who   to  submit  your  work  to,   and  devise   a  submission   strategy.  Approach  literary  agents  or  traditional  publishers  in   a   professional   way,  researching   what   they  expect   and   how  to   make  the   correct   approach.  If   self-­‐publishing,  work  out   how   much   you   want   to   do   yourself   and   where   you   need   expert   help.

Good luck,   and   enjoy   the   process   however  you  choose  to  publish! Helen   Hart   is   Publishing   Director   at   SilverWood  Books,  a  professional  publishing   services  company  which  helps  self-­‐funding   writers  produce  high  quality  books. www.silverwoodbooks.co.uk Page 10


Volunteer Firefighter (SPV)

Become a Young Firefighter (JSP)

In France,   nearly   200,000   men   and   women   choose   to   live   with   a   daily   commitment   to   serving  others,  in  parallel   with  their  job  or  their   education.

The Young   Firefighters   formation   is   centered   around   relief   to   people,  fight   against   fires  and   the  protection   of   property  and   the   environment.    It  also  includes  information  on  the  operation  of  the   emergency  services  section.

They represent   80%   of   the   total   numbers   of   firefighters  at  national  level  in  France  and  we  must   act   now  so  that   it  continues  for   future  generations.   Every   day,   these   women   and   men   show   their   commitment   and   bravery   for   their   local   area   and  for  the  people  within.    Why  not  You? The  department   is  always  looking  for   new  recruits  and   has  asked   us   to   help   spread   the   word   to  the   English   speaking   community.     The  language  should   not   be  a  reason  why  you  can’t  train   to  be   a   volunteer  Firefighter.    All  that  is  asked  is  that  you  can   communicate   well   enough   to  ‘get   by’  -­‐   the   rest  will   come   with   time   and  what   better   place  to   learn   and  integrate  than  in  such   a  well-­‐supported   role.

How to Become a Voluntary Firefighter? Pass the  assessment  of  the  ability  to  exercise  the  activity  of  SPV Be  aged  at  least  18  years  (except  for  the  old  JSP  SDIS79) Be  at  least  1m  60cm  tall  (tolerance  3cm) Meet   the   requirements   of   medical   fitness   assessed   during   a   medical  examination • Being  the  holder  of  the  Certificate  of  Formation  ‘First  Aid  Civic  1’ • Have  no  criminal  record • Make  a  commitment  for  five  years   For   more  information  contact  your   local   centre  de  secours.    A  full   map   showing   all   centres   is   available   on   the   SDIS79   website:   www.sdis79.fr/organisation-­‐opérationnelle/centres-­‐de-­‐secours/ • • • •

By becoming  a  Young  Firefighter,  young  people   can  live  a  unique   experience,   discover   the   power   of   teamwork   and   most   importantly,   learn   life-­‐saving.   A   JSP   will   learn   about   different   firefighter’s  missions  and  regularly  participate  in  sporting  activities. The  Young   Firefighter   will  acquire   knowledge,  expertise  and  know   that   it   will   be   useful   throughout   life.   They   may   even   go   on   to   become  a  volunteer  or  professional  Firefighter  in  the  future. In  France,  the  training   of  JSP  101  rests  with   Departmental   Unions   Fire  Department  or  Departmental  Association’s  Youth  Fire  Brigade,   affiliated  with  the  National  Federation  of  Firefighters  of  France. In   Deux-­‐Sèvres,   the   Departmental   Association   of   the   Young   Firefighters   Deux-­‐Sèvres   (ADJSP79)   coordinates   the   JSP,   their   training  and  their  supervision. For   more   information   about   becoming   a   JSP,   please  visit   their   website:   www.adjsp79.fr   or   visit   your   local   centre   de   secours.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Church Wall Paintings II

by Howard  Needs

Two months   ago   I   wrote  a  short  article   on   the  wall   paintings   that   can   be  found   in   the  churches   in   France  and   looking  through   it   I   think  it  is  worthwhile  expanding  upon.

Lastly, more   of   my   photos   can   be   seen   in   the   exhibition   room   above   the  Office  de   Tourism  in   Melle  during   October   -­‐   the  title   is   “Couleur  dans  les  Églises”.

In the   Deux-­‐Sèvres   I   have   found   eighteen   churches   with   the   remnants   of   their   old   wall  paintings.     Of   those,  the  following  are   worth   having   a   look   at   -­‐   that   is   to   say  have   the   best   preserved   paintings.

L’Office de  Tourisme  du  Pays  Mellois Contact  :  3  rue  Emilien  Traver,  79500  Melle,  tél.  05  49  29  15  10

• • • • • • •

Bressuire, Chapelle  Saint-­‐Cyprien Geay,  Eglise  Saint-­‐Maixent  (usually  open) L'Absie,  Abbaye  Notre-­‐Dame Loizé,  Église  Saint-­‐  Pierre  (usually  open) Pioussay,  Église  Saint-­‐Martin  (usually  open) St  Clémentin,  Chapelle  Notre-­‐Dame  des  Rosiers St  Gemme,  Chapelle  Saint-­‐Guillaume    (private)

And in  the  Vendée: • Mesnard  la  Barotière,  Église  Saint-­‐Christophe  (usually  open) • Vieux  Pouzauges,  Église  Notre-­‐Dame  (usually  open) • La  Pommeraie-­‐sur-­‐Sèvre,  Église  Saint-­‐  Martin  (usually  open) Unfortunately,   vandalism   and   theft   are   closing   more   and   more   churches   and   I  have   found   that   before   undertaking   a   trip   of   any   distance,  it   is   wise  to  find  out  at   the  local   Mairie   if   the   church   is   open,  and  if  not,  how  the  key  can  be  obtained.

Painting at:  l’église  St  Martin,  Pioussay,  Pays  Mellois

Because the  paintings  were   tutorial,  biblically  and  morally,  it  is  not   surprising  to  find  reccurring  themes  which  were  subject  to  stylistic   constraints  such   that  the  people  of  those   times   could   read  much   more   in   them   than   we   ordinary   folk   can.   Art   historians   can   interpret  the  paintings   and  their  explanations  are  fascinating  -­‐  they   in   fact   can   decode  the  pictures   and  reveal   hidden  information  in   gestures   and   colours,   but   nothing   mystical   or   world   shaking   of   course. Themes  to  be  found  include: • The  three  living  and  the  three  dead • The  seven  deadly  sins • The  “danse  macabre” • Various  hunts  of  Saint  Hubert,  St  Gilles  and  Saint  Eustace • Saint  Michel  and  the  beast • Saint   George   and   Saint   Margaret   of   Antioch   killing   their   respective  dragons • The  three  wise  men • The  slaughter  of  the  innocents.....and  so  on   Saint-­‐Savin-­‐sur-­‐Gartempe  in   the   east  of  the  Vienne   is  also   a  good   place   to  start  not  only  because  it  has  such  a  wonderful  nave  full  of   the  story  of  genesis,  painted   almost  paragraph  by  paragraph,  but   also   because   it   has   such   a   good   Visitors   Centre.   It   includes   a   documentary  film  of  how  the  painting  of  the  nave  could  have  taken   place   and  so  giving  a  good  idea  of  how   the  itinerant  artists  worked   and   the  materials  and  techniques  they  used.     St  Savin  is  the  start  of   the   route   ‘la   vallée   des   fresques’   which   leads   ultimately   to   Montmarillion   -­‐   information  can   easily   be   found  on   the  net  using   that   search  term.     I  haven't   followed  the  route  completely  but  the   following  two  churches,  not  far  from  St  Savin,  are   well  worth   while   visiting: • Vienne,  Jouhet,  Chapelle  Funéraire  Saint-­‐Catherine • Vienne,  Antigny,  L'Église  de  Notre-­‐Dame  (usually  open) Painting  at:  l’église  St  Pierre,  Loizé,  Pays  Mellois.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

PERFIDITAS is  Published! This   month   the   second   in   my   Roma   Nova   thriller   series,   PERFIDITAS,   is   published.   Hooray!   A   year   and   a   half   of   slog   -­‐   researching,  writing,  and  polishing  -­‐   have  led   to   this  moment.    Will  it  be  as   exciting  as  the   launch   of   INCEPTIO?   I   hope   so!   Hard   to   believe   it   was   only   just   over   seven   months   since   we   gathered   at   the   Bar   de   la   Paix   in   Thouars   to   launch   INCEPTIO.     It   was   so   crowded,   I   hardly   had   time   to   speak   to   anybody  properly,  but  the  smiling  faces  said  it   all.   The  French  launch  of  PERFIDITAS The   PERFIDITAS   launch   will   be   on   Sunday   13th   October   at   the   Journée   du   Livre   at   Sainte-­‐Verge,   just   outside   Thouars.   I   was   honoured   to   receive   a   personal   invitation   from   the   organisers.     Somehow  they’d  heard  about  INCEPTIO  and  popped  a  note  in  at   Le   Petit  Cadeau  in  Parthenay  where  I’d   given  a  talk  a  few  weeks  before.     Perhaps   it   was  the  owner   of  Librarie  L’Antidote  in  Parthenay,  which   stocks   INCEPTIO,  who   had   mentioned   me.     The  effect   of   making   connections…  I’ll  have  a  pile  of  lovely  new  books  to   sign   plus  I  might   be  giving  a  talk  -­‐  TBC. So  what’s  PERFIDITAS  about? Like   INCEPTIO,   it’s   a  thriller   set  in  an   alternate   timeline  where   the   mysterious  Roma  Nova  has  battled  its  way  from  a  small  colony  in  the   late  fourth  century  into   a   high  tech,   financial   mini-­‐state  in  the  21st   century.  Located   somewhere   north   of   Italy,   Roma   Nova   runs   on   Roman   Republican   values,   but   is   ruled   by  women.     Stories   with   Romans  are  usually  about  famous  emperors,  epic  battles,  depravity,   intrigue,  wicked  empresses  and  a  lot  of  sandals,  tunics  and   swords.   But   imagine   the   Roman   theme   projected   sixteen   hundred   years   further  forward  into  the  21st  century  and  with  a  more  equal  society.   In   PERFIDITAS  we  catch  up  with  Carina,  the  heroine  of  INCEPTIO,  six   years  later.  She’s  married,  has  children  and  seems  settled  in  her   new,   exciting  career.  But  there’s  betrayal  in  the  air… Captain   Carina   Mitela  of   the   Praetorian   Guard   Special   Forces  is  in   trouble   -­‐   one   colleague  has  tried   to   kill   her   and  another   has   set   a   trap  to  incriminate  her   in  a  conspiracy  to  topple   the   government  of   Roma   Nova.   Founded   sixteen   hundred   years   ago   by   Roman   dissidents   and   ruled   by   women,   Roma   Nova   barely   survived   a   devastating  coup  d’état   thirty  years  ago.  Carina  swears  to  prevent   a   repeat  and  not  merely  for  love  of  country.   Seeking   help   from   a   not   quite   legal   old   friend   could   wreck   her   marriage   to   the   enigmatic  Conrad.  Once   proscribed  and   operating   illegally,   she   risks   being   terminated   by  both   security  services   and   conspirators.  As  she  struggles  to  overcome  the   desperate  odds  and   save  her  beloved  Roma  Nova  and  her  own  life,  she  faces  the  ultimate   betrayal…   Simon   Scarrow,  the   author   of   the   Macro   and   Cato   Eagle   series   of   Roman   historical   novels,  has   joined   with   Jean   Fullerton,  historical   novelist,  and   Sue   Cook,   broadcaster   and   writer,  to   give   me   their   support  and  endorsements.   PERFIDITAS   will  be  available  as  paperback  and   ebook.     I’ll   be   touring  the   Deux-­‐Sèvres   with   Paperback  Jan   from  mid-­‐November,  so  if   you   can’t  make  the  launch,  I‘ll  see  you  then.   For   more   about  Alison’s  Roma   Nova   novels,  and   the  latest  news  visit  her  blog  at:   www.alison-­‐morton.com  or   Facebook  page:  AlisonMortonAuthor.

YOUR Book Reviews... A  huge  “ Thank  You”  to  Mar]n  Hole  for  this  month’s  book  review.

DEVIL’S BROOD by Sharon Kay Penman You have probably seen the road sign shown below in your travels around Deux-Sèvres. The DeuxSèvres, along with the Vendée and Vienne, was part of the Angevin Empire and within the Duchy of Aquitaine. Henry II married Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine, in 1152, inherited the English throne from King Stephen and was succeeded by their sons Richard I and John. All had an enormous impact on the area, and the results of this can be seen from Taillebourg, near Saintes, through Niort and Thouars up to Saumur, in their legacy of churches, castles and fortifications. This book is part of the story of the kings and queens, the routes, the castles, the intrigues, and the people involved. Devil’s Brood is Part 3 of the Eleanor of Aquitaine trilogy by Sharon Penman, being preceded by “When Christ and his Saints slept” and “Time and Chance”. They cover the 12th century part of the medieval period, reflecting the social upheavals, political machinations and general dark times that existed. The books are very well written and researched, and Penman vividly brings to life the reality of a dark, brutal anarchical time that, paradoxically, provided the basis of future more efficient systems of government and justice and relationships of the monarchy with the Church.

She does this with a great deal of skill which brings together historical events and people with a few key fictional characters to provide a colourful and realistic depiction of the period. It is not a period of history that I was familiar with, but I found these books to be absolutely intriguing, thoroughly enjoyable and informative, and very relevant to an area I live in. A great trip back to the 12th century along the well trodden highways and byways of our region!

Are you a bit of a Bookworm? If you  are  an  avid  reader  and  would  like  to   share  your  books  with  us  -­‐  we  would  love  to  publish  your  book   reviews  here.   Please  send  to  us  by  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or  alternatively  complete  the  ‘Written   Contributions’  form  on   our  website.    www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr. Reviews  should  ideally  be  150-­‐200  words  long.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY More from  local   writer  Alison  Morton...     Please  see  back  issues  of   ‘The  DSM’  if  you  would  like  to  see  previous  articles.

Your Writing Space Writing is   deeply   personal,   as   well   as   individual,   so   you   need   a   place   to   work   in   that’s   comfortable,   light   and   not   subject   to   interruptions.     Must-­‐haves   for   the   writing  environment   include   a   computer   with   appropriate   software   and   Internet   connection,   a   supportive   chair   and   some   bench   or   desk   space   for   notes   and   reference  books.   Yes,  I  still   use  some  print  books  such  as  a  complex  thesaurus,  style   guides   and   a   Latin   grammar!   But   mostly,   I   use   the   Internet   for   dictionaries  and   basic  thesaurus  as  the  first  place  for  looking  things   up.    Obviously,  when   researching  anything  online,  you  have  to  be   extra  careful  to  assess  the  source  of  the  information  on  the  screen   and   cross-­‐check  everything,  but   it’s   quick  and   instant.     For   more   profound  or  academic  research,  then  it’s  the  specialist  libraries  or   even  the  British  Library  if  all  else  fails. Libraries  can  be  good   places   to  write  as   long  as  you  can  get  to   one   without   too  long  a  journey  eating  into  your  writing  time  and   they   have   a  quiet  room.    Wherever   it  is,  it’s  best  not  to  have  a  window   that   looks   out   on   to   an  interesting  view   –  too  distracting.     Nor   a   nook  under   the   stairs  where   everybody  passes  by   with   a   cheery   “How’s  it  going?”  every  ten  minutes. Virginia  Wolf   maintained  you  had  to  have  a  room  of  your   own  to   write  in.    Thomas   Mann   preferred  writing  in  a  wicker   chair   by  the   sea.     Corinne  Gerson  wrote  novels  under  the  hair   dryer  in  a  beauty   shop.     William  Thackeray  chose   to   write  in  hotel  rooms.  And  Jack   Kerouac   wrote   the   novel   Doctor   Sax   in   a   toilet   in   William   Burroughs'   apartment.  JK   Rowling  wrote   her   first   Harry  Potter   in   cafés. Ernest  Hemingway  said   simply,  "The  best  place  to  write  is  in  your   head."

twenty minutes  of  free-­‐writing  at   your   worst  time   of  day  is  better   than  no  writing.  And  write  daily! I   mentioned   a   connection   to   the   Internet   earlier;  this   gives  you   access  to   the   world’s  knowledge,  but   while   emailing  people   and   talking   on   Facebook  and   Twitter   can   be  fun,  you   need  to   ensure   that   you're  not   chatting  and  surfing  online  at  the  expense  of  your   writing.    As   you  may  know,  messing  around   on  the  Internet  can  be   absorbing.    But  it’s   the  biggest  time-­‐suck  known  and  if   you’re  not   disciplined  you  can  forget  to  get  on  with  the  writing. Happy  writing! Alison  Morton  writes  alternate  history  thrillers,  blogs  about   wriCng  and  Romans  at  hEp://alison-­‐morton.com/blog/  

Toby’s Tails by Susan Keefe About the  Book See   the   world   through   the   eyes  of  a  delightful  sheepdog   named   Toby,   who   just   happens   to   live   in   the   beautiful  French  countryside.   Toby’s   Tails   relates   the   first   year   in   the   life   of   author   Susan   Keefe’s   Border   Collie,   starting   on   the   French   farm   where  he  was  born. His  life  changes  forever  when   Toby   is   adopted.   He   bonds   with   his   new   family,   their   goat,   Molly,   and   Lucky,   the   old   Golden   Retriever   who   becomes  Toby’s  mentor. “ We   h a v e   a   n a u g h t y   sheepdog   too  and  our  nine-­‐ year-­‐old  farming-­‐crazy  grandson  loved   this  book;  he  was  totally   absorbed  by  Toby’s  story.”  -­‐    Anne  Loader,  Léonie  Press.

How to  write  in  that  place You’ll   probably  find  it  easier  to  establish  a  regular  writing  schedule   if  you  can  write  during  your   most  energetic  time  of  day.    If  you  tend   to  procrastinate,  try  getting  up  an   hour   earlier   each  day  to  write.     The   advantage  of  morning  writing  is  that   you  are   fresh   from   the   night's   sleep.    Also,  once  you’ve  written  the  number  of  words  you   promised   yourself   to   write,   you’re   free   from   guilt   about   procrastinating   all  day.     Not  everyone's   body  clock  is   the  same,  of   course.     You  may  prefer  to   write  in  the  evening;  that’s  fine   so  long   as  you  can  produce  meaningful  work.

“The author  has   created  in  ‘Toby’s  Tails’  an   enchanting  book  to   educate   children   about   the   needs   of   animals   and   the   importance  of  kindness  to  all  living  creatures.  In   this   delightful   story,   Toby   the   lovable   Border   Collie   relates   in   a   lighthearted   manner   the   adventures   of   his   animal   companions,   both   domestic   and   wild,   and   touches   sensitively  and   gently  on   the   occasional   inevitable  small  tragedies   that  are  a  part   of   their   life   cycle.   I   believe   this   is   a   perfect   book   to   inform   and  entertain   younger   readers   about   the   wonders   of   the   animal   kingdom.”   -­‐   Susie   Kelly,   Author. Available   in   Amazon   stores   worldwide,  Barnes  &  Noble  and   most  other  online  bookstores.

When circumstances  prevent  you  from  writing  at  your  best  time  of   day,  however,  don’t  use  this   as   an  excuse  not  to  write  at   all.  Even  

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Combined Services Support Group (CSSG) by Terri Laverick Reaction Theatre   have   finally   decided   to   perform   a   play   called   “Third   Week  in   August”   written   by   Peter   Gordon.     Peter’s   plays   have  had   over   1200   professional   and  amateur  productions  world-­‐ wide.   He   is   well-­‐known   for   his   ‘Inspector   Pratt’   trilogy   of   plays,   together  with  a  number  of  other  comedies.   The  production  will   be  performed  on  the  22nd  and  23rd  November   2013  at  the  Petit  Theatre  in  Secondigny.    But  what’s  it  about? Third  Week  in  August  -­‐  When   Sue  decides  to   try  a  'get   away  from   everybody'  caravan  holiday,  little  does  she  realise  that  she's  booked   into  the  caravan  site  from  hell.  She  is  soon   taken  under  the  wing  of   expert   but   inadequate   caravaner,   Neville  …   that's   when   he's  not   engaged   in   battle  with   his  wife   or   trying  to  cope  with   his  difficult   sister-­‐in-­‐law.    Very  funny  play  which  is  directed  by  Paul  Chandler.

This summer   our   singing   groups   ‘The   Keynotes’   performed   at   a   number   of   events   the   last   of   which   being   the   Deux-­‐Sevres   Gardening  Club’s   Annual   Produce   Show   at   the  Chateau   Logis,   Du   Theil.       Many   compliments  were  received   and  I’m  sure  we   will   be   asked  again   in  2014.    One  of   the   songs  sung  was  entitled  “Sumer  is   a   cumen   in”,   no   not   my  bad  spelling   just   the  song  title,  but  for   us   I’m   afraid   it’s   “Christmas   is   a   coming”   as   we   start   rehearsing   Christmas  songs  and  carols!!

The Art Scene

The Art  Scene  artists  put  on  an  exhibition  during  the  Trade  Fair  in   Secondigny,   which   was   organized   once   again   by   The   DSM’s   very   own  Sarah  Berry. Our  weekly  Friday  morning  art  group  has  now   started.     We  have   a   number   of   new   members   this   year   and   would   like   to   welcome   them  all  and   particularly  Grace  &  Philip,  who  have  come  all  the  way   from  Arizona  in  the  USA.    Just  shows  how  good  our   group  is  doesn’t   it?     But  we  still  have  room   for  a  few  more   if  you  would  like  to  join   us.   Congratulations   to   two   of   our   members   who   have   carried   out   spectacular  deeds  this  summer  to  raise  funds  for  various  charities:-­‐ • Jane  Gawn  cycled  all  the  way  home  to  the  Vendée  from  Paris,  not   my  idea  of  fun  but  at  least  it  was  down  hill  all  the  way! • David   Brennan   did   a   parachute   jump   and   raised   a   staggering   7,000  €  to  build  fencing  and  buy  an  electricity  generator  for  a  dog   refuge  in  Pedrera,  Seville. Very  well  done  both  of  you. Don’t   forget   our  Calendar   is   still   for  sale   at   the   following   four   venues  and  will  remain  so  for  the  rest  of  the  year:  Restaurant   A  La   Bonne   Vie   at   Le   Beugnon, Café   des   Belles   Fleurs   at   Fenioux, Pause!  Cafe  at  L’Absie  and  Cafe  Cour  du  Miracle  at  Vouvant. So  let  me  have  your  news  and  views  and  if  you  want  to  join  any  or   all  of  our  groups,  send  me  an  email. John  Blair:  johnblair@btopenworld.com

I just   think,  “that's  it,  another   one  done”   and   then   realise   that   actually  it  is  time   to  do  it  all  again.     “What?”   I  hear  you  ask,  well   you   are   now   reading  it   -­‐   I  hope.     This  month  I  have  to  write  it   even   earlier  as  I  am  off  on  a  trip  to  a  brewery  and  then  on  to  the   furthest  reaches  of  northern  France,  for  a  short  holiday. September  has  been  a  very  busy  month   for  the  team  from  CSSG,   we  attended  four  events  and  raised  considerable  funds  for  SSAFA     France,   not   all   the   amounts   are   in   yet,  as   I  have   to   write   this   article  prior   to   the   two   final   events.     Namely  ‘The   DSM  Trade   Fair’   on   21st   September   and   ‘The   Big   Book   Fayre’   on   29th   September. At  the  first  event,  the  Gardening  Club  Produce  Show  at  the  Logis   de   Theil,   our   Tombola   Table   did   a   roaring   trade,   and   you   very   kindly  donated  the  sum  of  77€.     Also   many  winners  re-­‐donated   their   prizes,  which  was   much   appreciated.     All   in  all   we  had   a   lovely  day  there.     The   weather  was   kind   and  the  entertainment   by   the   Keynotes   Choir   was   enjoyed   by   all,   as   were   the   refreshments  organised  by  the  club  members.    Hopefully  we  shall   be  at  the  Chateau  again  next  year. Our   second   event   was   the   Dog  Show   in   St  Pardoux  and   on   this   occasion,  our  members,  John  and  Pauline  Tonks,  very  kindly  ran   a   Brocante  stand  and  raised  10€. Ticket   sales  for   the   Beer   Fest   are   going  well,  so   please   ensure   that  you  get  yours  in   plenty  of  time.     The   beer   (we  have   been  to   the   brewery  and   tasted   it!)   is  being   readied   for   collection,   the   sausages  are  in  my  freezer  and  the  chips  have  been  sourced.    The   ladies   and   gentlemen   of   Aidez   are   ready  with   their   tea/coffee   pots  and  cakes,  and  the  choir  is  limbered   up  with  drinking  songs   at  the  ready;     Three  Plus  One  are  ready  to  go,  so  all  we  need   now   are  you  there  on  the  day. Our   money  raising   ventures   cannot   be   done   without   the   hard   work   put   in   by   our   team   of   volunteers,   and   may   I   and   our   committee  take  this  opportunity  to  thank  them  for   their   sterling   work,  we  could  not  do  it  without  them.     To  you,  our  readers  and  friends,  thank  you  for  your  support. If   you   wish   to   join   us   our   email   address   is   as   follows,   cssgroup@outlook.com   or   come   to   one   of   our   bi-­‐monthly   meetings,  where  you  will  be  warmly  welcomed.    Details  can   be   sought   via   the   email   address   or   at   any   event   our   members   attend.

For a  full  list  of  our  advertising  rates,   please  phone  05  49  70  26  21    for  an   advertising  pack  or  download  from  our   website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr Contact  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny.

Tel: 05  49  70  26  21 Email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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Bon, bon, du bon et du bien by Sue  Burgess

The French   word  bon   literally  means  "good"  and   it   is  also  used  in   many  idiomatic  expressions.    

Vocabulary /  Vocabulaire  : à  bon  chat  bon  rat  ...................

tit for  tat

à la  bonne  franquette...............

informally, pot  luck

à quoi  bon?  ..............................

what’s the  use?

Bon is  an  adjective  which   has  four  forms;  bon  masculine  singular,   bonne   feminine   singular,   bons   masculine   plural   and   bonnes   feminine  plural,  depending  on  the  word  being  described.

ah bon?.....................................

oh yeah?  I  see

In general   the   adjective  bon   is  placed  IN   FRONT  of   the  word  it   is   describing  rather  than  after.     The  majority  of  adjectives  in   French   are  placed  after  the  word  they  describe.

avoir un  bon  fromage  ..............

to have  a  cushy  job

bon appétit...............................

enjoy your  meal

So in  the   masculine  singular  form  we  can  find  Bon  voyage  (have   a   good   trip),   Bon   Appétit   (have   a   good   meal/enjoy!),   Bon   anniversaire   (have  a  good  birthday)   and  Bon  courage!  (good   luck,   because   you   have   something  difficult   or   a   challenge  up  ahead   of   you).   The   feminine  singular  form  is  found   in  Bonne  chance  (good  luck  as   in  a  superstition  or  a  game)  and  Bonne  journée  (have  a  good  day).     The  feminine  plural  bonnes  can  be  found  in  the  expression  bonnes   vacances  (have  a  good  holiday). If   you   arrive   de  bonne   heure   you   are  in   good  time,   i.e.   you   are   early,  but  are  you  de  bonne  humeur  (in  a  good  mood)?   You  say  bonsoir  when  you  meet  someone   in   the   evening,  bonne   soirée  when  you  want  to  wish  them  a  nice  evening  and  bonne  nuit   when  you  are  going  off  to  bed.

avoir bonne  mine  ..................... to  look  healthy

bon après-­‐midi  ......................... have  a  nice  afternoon bon  chien  chasse  de  race  ......... Like  father,  like  son bon  débarras!  ..........................

Good riddance!

un bon  de  caisse  ......................

cash voucher

un bon  de  commande  .............

order form

un bon  de  livraison  ..................

delivery slip

un bon  de  réduction  ................

coupon

bon gré  mal  gré  ........................ (whether  you)  like  it  or  not bon  marché  ..............................

inexpensive, cheap

Bon is   an  adjective   and  as   such  should  describe  a  noun.     La  tarte   est   bonne  (the  pie   is   good),  votre   travail   est   bon   (your   work   is   good).   Bien  on  the  other   hand   is  an  adverb  and  should  describe   the  way   something  is  done.    Votre  travail   est   bien   fait   (your   work  is   well   done),   la  tarte  est   bien  cuite  (the  pie  is  well   cooked).    Therefore   c'est  bien   is  it's  well  (done)  and  C'est  bon   is  it's  good   (to  describe   something  you  are  eating  or  drinking  for  example).

! n o b t C’es

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THE THE DEUX-SÈVRES DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY MONTHLY

Official Translations are Vital for French Administration FRANCE is  a  country  renowned  for   its   paperwork  –  but   living  here   can  go  much  more  smoothly  if  you  can  provide  the  right  documents   for  all  your  administrative  purposes  in  the  right  language:  French.   No  matter  how  confident  you  are  speaking  or  reading  the  language,   it   is  not   always  possible   to   translate  documents  yourself.   A  sworn   translation   is   essential   for   important   literature   such   as   birth   certificates,  driving  licences,  property  documents  and  contracts.  

Karen is  based   in  Amiens,  but  the  distance   from  the  Dordogne  is  no   obstacle:  the  documents  can  be  provided  by  post  or  email.           For  more  information  or  a  quote,  contact  Karen  Renel-­‐King.  

In these  cases,   there   is   no  substitute  for   an  official  translator.    Not   everyone  is  qualified  to  provide  a  sworn  translation  and  that  is  where   Karen  Renel-­‐King  steps  in.     A  bilingual,  fully  qualified  translator,  she  is   regularly  called  upon   by  English-­‐speakers  who  need  documents  for   their   notaire,  mairie,  préfecture  or  social  security  office  -­‐  and  in  many   cases  she  can  provide  results  within  24  hours.   Whether   it   involves   setting   up   a   business,   getting   planning   permission,  inheritance  matters,  marrying  or   getting  pacsed,   Karen   has  the  specialist   skills   and   experience   to   help  by  providing  sworn   translations  of  the  official  documents  required.   Sworn   translations   by   Karen   leave   no   room   for   error   or   misunderstandings,  and   being  able  to  provide   the  authorities   with   official  translations  will  make  the  process  quicker  and  more  efficient.   Karen  arrived  in  France  from  America  in   1964  and  understands  first-­‐ hand  the  struggles  many  English  speakers  come  up  against.   She  has   a  qualification  in  translation   and   interpreting  from  the  Sorbonne  in   Paris,  plus  experience  working  as  a  sworn  translator  since  1985.     Whatever  your  particular   situation,  seeking  help  from  a  company  run   by   a   bilingual   professional   who   lives   in   France   and   speaks   your   language  as  their  mother  tongue  is  ideal.  

Please mention ‘The DSM’ when responding to an advert Annual Subscription  Costs:  28€  within  France,  18€  UK  addresses. (Unfortunately  the  cheaper  ‘printed  papers’  rate  cannot  be  applied   to  addresses  within  France,  only  when  sending  abroad)   Please tick:

‘The Deux-Sèvres Monthly’

‘The Vendée Monthly’

Full Name: Postal  Address: Postcode:

Country:

Tel: Email: Please make  cheques  payable  to  SARAH  BERRY.

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Take a Break... DSM Easy  Crossword Across: 8.   Not  tense  or  taut  (5) 9.   A  feeling  of  deep  regret  (7) 10.   Lured  into  temptation  (7) 11.   Show  a  response  (5) 12.   Recall  from  memory  (8) 13.   Violent  young  criminal  (4) 15.  Sensation  of  discomfort  (4) 17.   A  region  of  central  France  (8) 21.   Church  passageway  (5) 22.   In  no  respect;  to  no  degree  (7) 24  .  The  range  within  which  a  voice  can     be  heard  (7) 25.   A  violent  weather  condition  (5)

DSM Toughie  Crossword Across: 1.   Go   well   on   the   first   course   of     activating  component  (7,5) 7.   Ordains  a  new  way  to  make  progress    (7) 9.   Tories  win  Grimsby,  concealing  a  trend     in  votes  cast  (5) 10.   Coveting   neighbour’s   vine   initially     we  hear  (4) 11.   Small  theatre   company  gets  increase     of  500  for  repeated  performance  (8) 12.   The  French,  torn  about,  give  in  (6) 14.   Informer   on   the   inside   of   the     financial  insNtuNon?  (6) 17.   A  number  leave  modelling  to  organise     a  sure-­‐fire  source  of  income  (4,4) 19.   Palindromically,   what  was  I  ere  I  saw     Elba?  (4) 22.   Sound  idea  about  how   one   loosened     the  knots  (5) 23.   Fishing   boat   delivered   from   back   of     lorry  after  WI  exchange  (7) 24.   Red   who   France   cast   out   from     here  (12)

Quiz-tastic!

Down: 1. Paste  (4) 2.   The  lower  part  (6) 3.   A  greeting  or  reception  (7) 4.   Headgear  for  a  horse  (6) 5.   Clever  (5) 6.   Decorative  pin  worn  by  a  woman  (6) 7.   A  seven-­‐sided  polygon  (8) 12.   Put  something  back;  substituted  (8) 14.   A  struggle  between  rivals  (7) 16.   Put  into  something  (6) 18.   Cause  to  combust  (6) 19.   Any  member  of  a  ship’s  crew     (6) 20.   A  city  in  north  central  India  (5) 23.   Willing  to  face  danger  (4)

Down: 1. How   big   does   a   container   for   ecstasy     get?  (5) 2.   A  right  adversary  makes  an  entrance  (7) 3. The  amphibian  pulled,  so  they  say  (4) 4.   Watch  former   pupil  taking   on  garbled     verse  (7) 5.   Well   known   gravy   mix   used   to   make     little  items  for  those  who  are  late  (5) 6.   Bungled   raid   going   after   silver   in     Morocco  (6) 8.   Get   out   of   this   and   you   may   be   on     your  own  (4) 12.   Casserole   is   not   included   after     magazine  published  by  students  (6) 13.   Confused   comedian   out   east   is   not     settling  down  (7) 15.   Oddly,   able   to   change   oil   mixture   but     then  made  a  bloomer  (7) 16.   Sign  attestation  to  limit  little  creature  (4) 18.   Left   before   a   bum   deal   and   got   the     wooden  spoon  (5) 20.   Went   wrong   when   posh   car   slipped     into  Scottish  river  backwards  (5) 21.   At   first,   looked   around   in   river   for     burrow  (4)

With thanks  to  M.Morris

Monthly quiz  by  Roland  Scoa.....how  many  can  you  get?

1) Name  the  80s  &  90s  rock  band  fronted  by  Gene  Simmons? 2)  Which  TV  series  revolved  around  the  Boswell  family?

8) What  family  name  is   shared  by  the  following  people  -­‐  Stephen;   actor,   writer   and   TV  presenter:   Elizabeth,   19th   century  reformer:   and  Joseph,  18th  and  19th  century  chocolate  manufacturer?

3) Which  operating  system  is  used  on  PCs?

9)  Where  are  the  Tourist  Trophy  races  held?

4) What  nationality  was  Pope  John  Paul  2nd?

10) Whose   record   releases   include   ‘Light   my  Fire’,   ‘Hello,   I   Love   you’,  and  ‘Riders  on  the  Storm’?

5) Which   radio  programme,  presented   by  Alastair   Cooke,  ran  from   March  1946  until  February  2004? 6)  Which  group   had  hits   in  the  70s  with  ‘Knock  3  Times’  and  ‘Tie   a   Yellow  Ribbon’? 7)  Which  actor  played  Richard  Sharpe  in  the  TV  series  Sharpe?

11)   The  white  cliffs  of  Dover  are  mostly  formed  of  which  common   substance?   12)  Which  character  was  presenter  of  ‘ The  Muppet  Show’?  Copyright  RJS  2013. Page 19


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Health, Beauty & Fitness...

2013 Beauty Recommendations...

For our  first   year  of  working  together  we  have  managed  a  fantastic   bridal  season  of   19  weddings  with  happy  brides,  photo  shoots  for   venues,  radio   broadcast  and  lots  of  events  in  between  with  plenty   more  to  come.

Small Colour Advert only 34€

Hi Everyone, We  cant   believe  another   year   has  flown  by  already  and  this   is  our   12th   article   for   ‘The   Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly’   so   we   thought   we   would  give  you  a  little  run  down  of  our  year  so  far.

Individually our   work   has   gone   from   strength   to   strength   with   mobile  hairdressing,  nails  and  mini  makeovers. We  have  really  enjoyed  writing  our   articles  for  this  magazine  which   has   kept   us   all   up   to   date   with   new   trends   and   hair   &   beauty   recommendations. Looking  ahead  for   next   year   the  bridal   trends  and  general   themes   has   been   inspired   by   the   film   release   of   ‘The   Great   Gatsby’.   Vintage  is  still  here  so  I  will  be  hoping  to  share  with  you  some  easy   creations   for   styles   from   the   1920s   and   1940s.     I  for   one   love   theses  styles  and   even  though  they  are   a  trend,  I  feel   they  are   a   timeless  look. For  Make  Up  this  upcoming  year,  it  is  still  in   the  peaches  and  nude   colours  for   bridal   but   the   latest   on   New   York   Fashion   week  has   been  a  hit   with   Midnight   Blue  and   Golds  for   the  eyes  with   bright   bubblegum  pink  lips  and   an  introduction   to   petal   and  berry  stain   matt  lipstick. Thank  you  to  all  who   have  read  our  articles  and   we  look  forward  to   keeping  you  all  up  to  date  for  another  year.

Emma & Samantha xx

CONTRIBUTIONS.... We are always looking for new contributions for consideration in future issues. Do you have an experience to share? Are you a tradesman with a Top Tip? or perhaps an avid reader who would like to contribute a book review? Whatever it may be, either long or short, we would love to hear from you.

Charente Hair  &  Make  Up Tel:  05  45  31  56  93  /  06  50  04  37  30   www.charentehairandbridal.com

You can call Sarah on 05 49 70 26 21 with any ideas, or send them on an email to: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

Our Furry Friends...

Tina Hatcher

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY Phoenix Association  rescue  and  re-­‐home  animals   in  need,  Please  visit:  www.phoenixasso.com  

FRANKIE - 5 months Old.

"Hello, my   name   is   Frankie.   I'm   whispering  as  I  write  this  as  I  am  a   little  shy  and  cautious.   I  don't  know  how  it   happened,  but   I  was  homeless  when   I  was  tiny.  I   cried   at   a   holiday   home   and   the   holiday-­‐makers   felt   sorry   for   me   and  took  me  to  Phoenix.

Equine Rescue France

We are always looking for new members and we are in need of donations so we may continue to help equines in France. Please support the ERF.

Please contact Equine Rescue France via their website www.equinerescuefrance.org

HOOF (Horse Orientated Open Forum)

HOOF is  open  to  anyone  with  an  equine  interest.     You  do  not  need  to  own  a  horse!    We  meet  about  once  a  month   for  talks,  visits  etc.    Interested? Contact Jo Rowe on: 05 49 64 30 59

Most people  who  come  and  visit  us   don't  notice  me  as  in  a  crowd,  I  hang  around  the  edges.   My  foster   mum  really  loves  me   and   I   give  her   lots   of  cuddles   right   back.  I   could   play  for   hours   and  hours,   but   in   our   foster   home  there  is  only  one  mummy  to  go   around.     So  please   can  I   come  and  live  with  you  and  have  lots  of  toys  of  my  very  own?" Frankie is in Issac, Dordogne. Contact Lynda on 05 54 81 30 44 or email lapuille@gmail.com

MAYDAY MES AMIS Mayday Mes Amis has  been  formed  to  help  animals  in  need  in   l'Absie  and  the  surrounding  area.   For  more  information  please  email:  jill.zub@sky.com.

Refuge SPA  de  SAINTES route  des  GAUTHIERS,   17100  SAINTES Tel:  05  46  93  47  65  ~  www.spa.de.saintes.free.fr/

L’Association Galia   is   a   recognized   public   utility   aiding   the   adoption   of   dogs   in   the   shelter   of   Fontenay   Le   Comte.     We   help   dogs   out   of   impound,  found  stray  or   abandoned  to   find   new   families. Refuge  de  l'association  Galia Chemin  des  perchées  (ancienne  déchetterie),  85200  Fontenay  Le  Comte Tel  :  02  51  52  06  19  or  06  28  18  13  72,  association.galia@orange.fr http://association-­‐galia.forumactif.com

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny.

Tel: 05  49  70  26  21  ~  Email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

APPEAL “Look at me, look at me!! My name is Heaven. I am so handsome and only 9 months old. Ok, I’ll be honest, I’m not very good on this lead thingy. I need you to show me and I bounce a bit, but if you know what you’re doing I am the perfect pup for you. My poor foster mum has broken her leg and we can’t cope so please come and get me! Mum was a Lab and dad was a Newfoundland or was it the other way around? Who knows? I love kids and other animals and have been chipped and vaccinated so I am ready for you!”

“Hello, my   name  Is   Hank   and   I   am  15   months  old.    I  need   your   help.    I   love   to  run  and   I  love  to   swim   but   at   the   moment   I   am   stuck  in   a   tiny  courtyard   and   I   am   bored.     I   love  children   and   other   dogs   and   cats   and   love   going  out   in   the  car.     Sadly  my   human   can’t   keep  me  and   I  am   not   really  happy,  so  I  need   you   to   come  and   get   me   please.     I   am   chipped   and   vaccinated   and   have  been   very  well  cared   for.  I  don’t   pull  on  the  lead   and  if  you  tell   me  to  come  back  I  will,  so  I  am  obviously  perfect  for  you!” The   Hope   Association   is  a   non-­‐profit   making  charity   that   raises   funds  to  help  animals  in   need.     Hope   donates  regularly  to   Animal   Rescue  associations  throughout  France.    Hope  raise  funds  through   their   numerous  events  held  throughout  the  year   so   if  you  fancy   becoming  a  volunteer  and  be  a  member  of  'The  Team',  please   email:    linda.burns4hope@gmail.com For   further  information  and  other   cats  and  dogs  for   adoption  go   to  www.hopeassoc.org

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

How Old  is  Old  Enough? According  to  French  legislation  you  are  allowed  to  sell  kittens  once   they  are  8   weeks  old.    But  is  it  a  good  idea  to   separate  young  ones   from  their  mothers  so  soon?

Kittens looking for Forever Homes... Below are two of a seven kitten litter currently in a foster home in Bazoges-en-Pareds. If you might be interested in adopting one of these little balls of fluff, please contact NALA on the details below.

We don't  think  so.    In  the  wild,  a  kitten  only  8  weeks  old   would  not   survive   by  itself.     Although  nominally  weaned,  it  wouldn't  be  able   to   find   its  own   food   and  it   would   be   vulnerable   to   sickness  and   predators.     We  prefer  to  keep  kittens  with  their  (step)mother  and/ or  siblings  until  they  are  at   least   12  weeks  old  or   longer  if  possible.   This   has   many   benefits   for   the   kitten   as   they   pass   through   a   number  of  essential  development  milestones. Socialisation  and  Behaviour As   well  as  providing   nourishment   to   her   kittens  during  their   first   few   weeks,  the   mother   is  also   teaching  them  and   guiding   them.   From   her  they  learn  to  recognise  and  understand   cat  language  so   that   they   can   interact   appropriately   with   other   cats.     She   also   guides  them  as  they  explore  the  world  and  discover  new  things  to   play  with,  eat  or  avoid.

Nos Amis Les Animaux 85480 (NALA 85480). Tel: 07 70  31  54  59

Email: nala85480@hotmail.com www.nosamislesanimaux.com

As they   nurse  less  often  and  eat   food,  the  mother   will  eventually   stop   them   from   nursing   altogether.     This   is   also   an   important   lesson,  as   it   teaches   them  how   to   cope   with   the   frustration   of   being  refused  what  they  want.   If   a  kitten   is   separated   from  its   mother   before   it   has   learnt   this   lesson   then  it   may  develop   behavioural   problems.     We   know   of   one  cat   that  was  orphaned  very  young  who  now,  even  though   an   adult,   suckles   his   owner's  shirt...  while   the  owner   is   wearing   it.     Cute   the   first   time,   but   unpleasantly   soggy   on   subsequent   occasions:  an  adult  cat  contains  a  lot  of  slobber.

Tess, a   sweet   li+le   Teckel   looking   for   a   forever  home.

Probably the  most   important   lesson  that   a  kitten  learns,   at   least   from  the   owner's   perspective,  is   the   correct   use   of  a  litter   tray.     Not  only  doing  their   business  in  the  right  place,  but   also  covering  it   up  afterwards. Health  and  Immunity Kittens   gain   some   initial   immunity   via   the   antibodies   in   their   mother's  milk  which  serves  them  in  good   stead  whilst   their   own   develops.   However,   separating   them   from   their   mother   and   putting   them   in   a   new   environment   is   an   additional   source   of   stress  that   can   make   them  more  likely  to  become  ill.     As  well  as   being   a   risk   to   the   well-­‐being   of   the   kitten,   it's   also   not   very   pleasant  for   the  new  owner   to  have  to  deal   with  a  sick  kitten.     A   change  of  environment  and  food  can  lead  to  diarrhoea  which  can   be   life   threatening   for   a   tiny   kitten   through   dehydration   and   weight  loss.    Coupled   with  a  deficiency  of  litter   tray  skills  that   is   a   thoroughly  unpleasant  prospect  for  all  concerned. NALA's  policy  is  to   keep  kittens  with  their  (step)mother  for  as  long   as   possible  in   a  foster   home.     As   well   as   allowing   the   kitten  to   benefit  from  being  brought  up  by  its  (step)mother,  it  will  also  learn   to   interact   with   people   in   a  positive   way.     Many   of   our   foster   homes   have   other   pets,   and   even   children,   which   exposes   the   kitten  to  different  experiences  in  a  safe  environment.    This  means   that   when   adopted   they  can   adapt   to   their   new  home  with   the   minimum  of  stress. Which  brings  me  to  the  final  reason  why  we  like  to  wait  until  they   are   at   least   twelve   weeks   old.     All   our   cats   are   identified   by   microchip   before   adoption,   not   only   is  this   a   legal   requirement,   but   it's   a   very   good   idea.     But   have   you   seen   the   size   of   the   needle..?

This is  a  lovely  lady   of  only  11  years   young.     Tess   was   adopted   a   year   ago   but   due   to   a   change   of   circumstances   outside   her   control   the  poor  darling  is  now  looking  for  a  new  home. Tess  would  make   an   ideal  companion  for  an   older  person  or   another   dog   as   she   is  a   nice   little   girl   who  gets  on  well   with  dogs  and   cats,   walks  well  on  her  lead  and  enjoys  her  daily  promenades.     Tess  has  a   calm   disposition,   loves  her   cuddles  and  is  house-­‐trained.     She  will  need  a  garden  (not  large  -­‐  but  secure).     A  lot  has  happened  to   this  little  lady  recently  due  to  her  changed  circumstances,  but  we   feel   that  provided  she  has  a  few   days  to  settle   in  with  her  new  family,  and   allowances  are  made  for  her  upheaval,  then  being  a   very  sensible   little   dog  she  will  settle  down  happily. Tess   has   been   micro-­‐chipped   (250268730101996),   neutered,   vaccinated  and  wormed.    There  is  no  adoption  fee   but  a  donation  to   help  other  dogs  like  Tess  would  be  gratefully  appreciated.     If  you  think  you  can  give  Tess  a  good  home,  please  call  Isabelle  on   09  77  48  71  43  or  email:  asso.orfee@laposte.net  for  more  information.     www.association-­‐orfee.forumactif.com/f49-­‐english-­‐corner   Please   note:   Where   possible   Orfee   Assoc.will  conduct  a  home-­‐visit.

Orfee Association   are   always   looking  for  good  foster  families,  if   you   think   you   could   do   this   valuable   work   please   contact   us   now  for  more  details.

Page 23


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

The Great Outdoors...

Bonne Pêche

by Simon Tee

As this   is   my   last   contribution,  I’m  going  to   focus  on  autumn  and  winter   fishing.     There’s   no   need   to   stop   fishing   in   the  cold  spells,  it   is  a  good  time   to   target   different   species   of   fish.     Check  all  your  predator  fishing  gear.     Trebles,   hooks,   wire   traces,   spare   spools   of  wire,  making  new  ones   if   needed.    Sharpen   all   hooks  on   your  spinners  and  plugs   -­‐   it’s   much   easier   to   sharpen   them   in   20°   temperatures  in   your   shed,  than  on  the  bank  in  5°! Pike  and   Zander   are   top   of  the  predator  fishing  list.    You   fish   for   both  in  much  the  same  way,  but   you  can   make   a  slight  adjustment   if  you  want  to  concentrate  on  just  one  species. Pike  are  the  more  aggressive,  and  not  fussy.     So  stinky  dead  bait  or   live  bait  will  work.     Use  treble  hooks  to  give  you  more  chance,  1  for   the  bait  and  2  chances  to  hook  the  fish. Zander  are  much  more  finicky.     They  don’t  like  any  resistance,  and   will   drop  the  bait   immediately  if  they  feel   any.     To  minimise   that   risk,   use  a  foam  ball   on  the  line   as  an  indicator.    I  make  my   own   using   foam   balls  with   2   map   pins   to  trap  the  line.     A   nice   small   roach  would  be  my  bait  choice. Chub  and   perch   are  also  good   to   fish   for   in   colder   spells  as   they   continue  to   feed,  unlike   carp   which  almost   ‘shut   down’.    Fish   for   them  near   snags  in   the   water  and   use   a  dead  or  live  minnow  (or   ball  of  cheese  paste  for  chub). There’s  No  ‘i’  in  Team! If   the   thought   of   sitting  alone   on   a   bank  in   the  colder   weather   doesn’t   appeal,   why  not   consider   ‘team  fishing’?     It’s  one   of   the   fastest  ways  to  learn  how   best  to  fish  new  waters  as  well  as  a  good   excuse  for  a  ‘jolly’.     Meet  up  with   4  or  5  angling  buddies  and  agree   to   the  rules!    The   main   one   being;  don’t  keep   any  secrets  about   how  you  are  fishing,  the  methods  and  bait  that   you  use.     All  try  to   target  different  species  of  fish  in  close  proximity. Say  you  each   have  3   rods  out.     One  on   a  buzzer  for   tench,  carp  or   bream.     One  with  a  dead  or  live  bait  for   pike,  zander   or   big   perch   and  a  feeder  or   float  rod  for  anything  else!    All  located  in  different   areas,  identifying  potential  hotspots. Consider   how  much   you   can   learn   in   a  5   hour   session   this   way,   compared  to  the  number  of  hours   it  would  take  you  on   your   own   to  try  all  those  different  approaches.    It  should   turn   out   to  be   an   entertaining  and   rewarding  day.     You  will  learn   so  much   about  the   water  that   you  will  be  in  an   excellent   position  the  next   time  you   choose  to  fish  there  alone. Well,  I   hope  some   of   the  tips   I  have  given  have  helped  you  catch   more   fish.     Whatever   your   level   of   experience,   contact   me   for   further  information   on   fishing  my  lakes.    I  will   always   give  advice   freely  when  I’m  on  the  bank!

Bonne pêche, Simon Simon Tee  is  the  proprietor  of  2  coarse  fishing   lakes  in  Secondigny  (www.francefishinggites.com)

Page Page 24


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

THE AMATEUR GARDENER by Vanda Lawrence

Well, autumn   is   here   again.     After   a   slow   start   we   had   a   lovely   summer  but  now  it's  time  to  knuckle  under  and  get  the  garden  tidied   for  winter.    Shall  we  start  with  the  vegetable  plot? There  is  always  plenty  to  do  in  the  way  of  cropping  and  storing  at   this   time  of  year   but  the  soil  is  still  warm  so  you  can  plant  onions,  shallots   and   garlic  now.  Rhubarb   and   strawberry  plants   are  available   in   the   garden  centres  too.    When  your   peas  and  beans  have  been  picked,   cut   the  plants  off  for   the   compost  heap  but   dig  the  roots  back  into   the  soil   -­‐   they  are  a  natural  fertilizer,  putting  nitrogen   back  into   the   soil.    If  you  grow  winter  spinach  put  cloches  over  the  young  plants  to   protect   them  from   frosts.    Tomatoes  are  about  finished  but  the  last   fruits  need  to  be  picked   before  the  first  frosts.    Green   tomatoes  will   ripen  indoors  so  won't  go  to  waste. Fruit  trees  need  sticky  grease  bands  around  the  base  of  the  trunks  to   protect  against  female  winter   moths  climbing  up  from  soil   level.    This   is   the   last   chance   to   prune   stoned-­‐fruit   trees   (such   as   plums   or   cherries)   while   they   are   in   active   growth,   but   pipped-­‐fruit   trees   (apples,  pears,  crab-­‐apples)  can  be  done  during  mild  spells  in  winter.     It's  much  easier  then  because  the  branches  are  bare  and  you  can  see   what  you  are  doing. Now  for   the  shrubbery  and  flower  beds.     Remove  summer  bedding   now,  so  that  wallflowers,  polyanthus,  forget-­‐me-­‐nots,  winter  pansies   etc   can   be  planted   while   there   is  still   some   warmth  in   the   soil  to   encourage  new  roots.     Do  not  manure  these  beds  at  this  time  of   the   year  because  this  will   encourage  soft,  new  growth  vulnerable  to  frost   damage.     Preferably  add   bone-­‐meal,  a  slow-­‐acting  fertilizer,  which   the  plants  can  make  use  of  in  spring  when  growth  begins  again. When   bees   emerge   from   hibernation   at   the   end   of   winter   they   will   need   plenty   of  flowering  plants  to  work  on   so  'think  bee'   when  choosing   your  winter/spring  bedding  at   the  garden  centre.    Helleborus   'Christmas   Rose'   flowers   during   the   winter   and   into   spring   so   is   great   for   them;     also   Pulmonaria,   Snowdrops,   C ro c u s e s ,   Wa l l f l o w e rs ,   Mahonia,  Sarcococca  and  Honeysuckle. Dahlias  can  be  cut  down  to  6"  once  they  are  blackened  by  frost.    Lift   the  tubers  and   stand  upside-­‐down   to   dry  out   in   a   frost-­‐free  shed.    

Later you  can  store  them  crown-­‐uppermost  in  boxes  of  slightly  damp   peat.    Keep  crowns  above  the  peat  and  dust  with   flowers  of  sulphur.     Check   every  couple   of   weeks   and   if   you   notice   they  are   looking   shrivelled  just   plump  them  up  again  by  dropping  them  into  a  bucket   of  tepid  water  overnight. Shrubs  and  climbers   such  as  Chaenomeles,  Honeysuckle,  Clematis,   Rhododendron,  Skimmia,   Wisteria   and   Hydrangea   can   be   layered   any  time  now.    Choose  a  vigorous,  flexible  stem  which  is  long  enough   to  reach  the  soil.    Make  a  slanting  cut  on  the  underside  of  this  stem,   just  below  a  node.    Dip  this  stem-­‐cut   into  rooting  powder  or  gel  and   bury  in   the  soil,  secured   with   a  piece   of   wire  or   heavy  stone  and   water  well.    Test  for  roots  after  about  6  months.     Hardwood   cuttings   from   Forsythia,   Philadelphus   etc   can   be   taken   from   mid-­‐autumn  to  early  winter.     Choose   fully  ripened/hardened   growth   from  this  current   season,  dip   in   hormone  rooting   powder   and  plant  5-­‐6"  deep  into  the  back  of  the  border. If   you   have   bought   a   'fussy'   shrub   or   plant   with   particular   soil   requirements   you   can   do   a   quick,   easy   soil   test   before   planting  -­‐   scoop   some  soil  into  a  container  and  add  ½  cup  vinegar.    If  the   soil   bubbles   or   fizzes  it  is  alkaline.    If   nothing  happens  get  a  fresh   soil   sample  and  mix  with  ½  cup  water   then  add  ½  cup  baking  soda.    If  the   soil   bubbles   or   fizzes   it   is   acidic.     Should   you  need   to   amend   an   alkaline  soil  add  sulphur  or  pine  needles;  to  make  an   acidic   soil  more   alkaline  add  wood-­‐ash  or  lime. Also,  when  buying  new   shrubs  the  plant  label   will   normally  classify   the  plant   as  'hardy',  'half-­‐hardy'  etc.    Here   is  a  list   of   temperature   terms  which  might  be  useful: • Tender   perennial   -­‐   lives   for   several   years  but   will   not   withstand   frosts. • Half-­‐hardy  -­‐  cannot  withstand  temperatures  of  freezing  or  below. • Frost  tender  -­‐  plants  need  at  least  +5˚  C • Frost  hardy  -­‐  can  survive  temperatures  as  low  as  -­‐5˚  C • Fully  hardy  -­‐  can  survive  temperatures  down  to  -­‐15˚  C (Varieties   within   each   species   might   differ   slightly   so   check  your   gardening  encyclopedia  or  dear  old  'Google'). Lastly,  if  you  have  a  pond,  now   is   the   time  to   remove   any  rotting   vegetation.    This  produces  methane   and  could  be   fatal  to  fish  and   other   pond  life,  especially  if  the   pond   freezes   over.    If   you  net  your   pond   to   stop  leaves  falling  into  the  water  please  be  sure  that  the  net   is   fixed   securely   around   the   edges   to   stop   small   animals   getting   underneath  and  finding  themselves  trapped  in  the  water. Well,  I'm   worn   out  just  typing  this  lot  so  'bon  courage  mes  amis'  ....     until next month.  

Page 25


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY We thought  we  heard  a  cheep  coming  from  one  of  the    eggs.    We   took  the  egg  and   sure  enough  it  was  still  alive.     We  decided   to  get   the  chick  out  of  the  shell  which  is  not  always   a  good  idea  as  there   is   often   a   reason   for   its   failure   to   hatch.   We   got   the   chick   and   carefully  placed   it   in   the  nest   but   mum   rejected  it;  It  was  getting   cold  so   we   took  it  inside  and  warmed  it  up,  popping  it   back  in  the   nest  when   it  was  warm  and  dry  just  like  the  other   two.  Thankfully     she  didn’t  notice  an  extra  one  and   the  babies  snuggled  under   her   wings.    All  are  doing  well.  

Life on the Farm...

by Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.

So is  that  it,  summer’s  over?   The   mornings   and   evening   are   a   touch   chilly   but   we   are   well   stocked   for   the   coming   autumn   and   winter.   With   the   very   productive  garden  we   have  a  freezer  full  of  fruit  and  vegetables  as   well  as     chutneys,    jams,  pickles,  soups,  chilli  sauce  and  marinades   to   have   with   some   home   grown   pork   ribs...   mmmm.   For   the   animals   for   the  winter   we  have   stored   lots  of   monster   squashes   and  courgettes. The   pigs   have   really  been   spoilt.     They   have   been   well   fed   on   windfall   apples,   pears,   mirabelles   and   plums,   plus   last   years     walnuts,   whey,   bread,   hazelnuts,   courgettes,   squashes   and   cucumbers  (we   have  always  been   told   pigs   don’t   eat   cucumbers   but  ours  do!)  as  well   as  any  of  our  spare  milk.     The  other  animals   have   also   had   a   treat   of   maize.   With   the   farmer’s   consent   we     collected   up   all   the   cobs  that   had   fallen   on   the   ground  after   the   field  nearby  had  been  harvested.  The  goats,  chickens    and  rabbits   all  love  them. This  month’s  arrivals   are   7   guinea  fowl   by   a   broody  hen   and   10   baby  rabbits  from  Dot.    She  does  have  the  cutest  looking  babies.  If     anyone  is   thinking  of  a  good   alternative  to  chicken,  then  rabbit   is   worth  considering.     Very  little  fat,  low   in  cholesterol  and  great  in   a   slow   cooked  casserole  with  a   few   dumplings  and   easy  to   raise   at   home.  12-­‐14  weeks  from  birth  to   a  size  ready  for   the  pot  -­‐  about   1.25  kilos. Talking  of   rabbits,  our  friends  have  bought  a  new  buck.  Apparently   it’s  grumpy  and    grey  and  they  have  called  it  after  me....  charming! Our   guinea  fowl   also   went  broody,  but   the  problem  was  she   was   out   in   the   open   hiding  in   some   apple  crates.     We   tried   several   times   to   move   her,   even   under   cover   of   darkness,  but   she  went   crazy  and  started  attacking  us.    It  was  recommended  to  us  that  we   should  wait  until  one  keet  hatched   and  then  it   would  be  easier  to   move  her  -­‐   that  didn’t  work  either.     She  had   hatched  two   when  I   donned   some   leather   gloves  and   went  in.     I  grabbed   the  guinea   fowl  while  Jenny  grabbed  the   two  babies  and   the  unhatched   eggs.    

The only   thing   we   haven’t   had   a   glut   of   lately  is   eggs.   Despite   having  more  layers  (some  we  bought  from  a  friend’s  smallholding   and  some  we  swapped  for  some  garden  produce)  there  is  a  serious   lack   of  eggs.    We  thought  perhaps  we  had  a   problem  and  treated   them  for  fleas  and  mites,  and   will  worm  them.    Hopefully  they  will   be  back  on  track  soon. One  of  the  goats  is  now   in   the  freezer   and  we   have  had  the  first   goat   curry  or   should  I  say  curried   goat?  With   our   fresh   milk  we   have  had  a  go  at  making  some  cheese.    The  first   attempt  was  not   very  successful  after  the  recipe  said  to  heat  the  milk  to  80˚C  which   apparently   is   a   typing   error   and   should   be   30˚C.   The   second   attempt  was  much  better,  except  there  were  a  few  problems  along   the   way.   We   had   no   lemons  (so  we  used  limes)   and   we   didn’t   add   the   rennet   to   cooled   boiled   water,  Jen   just   chucked   it   in   (no   surprise   there   then).     We   added   some   more  in   the   correct   way   and   left   it   overnight   to   separate  or  whatever  the   technical   term   is.   The   result   was   a   nice   mild   soft  cheese.   Just   a   word   of   warning   -­‐   with   the   nights   drawing   in   and   the   temperature   dropping,   the   local   foxes   will   start   to   get   hungrier   than   ever.    Your   poultry  pens  will   prove  very  appealing  and  is  the   countryside  equivalent  of  a  fast  food  take  away.     Poultry  and   any   vulnerable  animals  need   to  be  locked  away  before  dark.     If  Mr  Fox   comes  calling  and  is  successful  he  will   probably  come  back  again  -­‐   he  loves  a  free  meal.       That’s  all  for  now.    Stay  warm  and  see  you  soon. Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.  Breeders  of  pigs,  lambs  and  poultry.   La  Gauteliere,  79220,  Pamplie.    Tel:  05  49  28  38  57.

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A-Z of the Communes in the Deux-Sèvres A-Z of the Communes of the Deux-Sèvres. by Sue  Burgess COULONGES-SUR-L’AUTIZE 23   hamlets   and   groups   of   houses   depend   on   the   commune   of   Coulonges  sur  l'Autize.   The   village   of   Tourteron   towards   Saint   Pompain   existed   in   the   Merovingian  period  because  of  it’s  money-­‐making  workshop.  The   first   mention   of   Coulonges   appears   in   978   when   it   was   a   Villa   Ecoloni,  a  simple  agricultural   domain.     This  farm  was  probably   at   the  origin  of  a  community  of   inhabitants.    A  century  later,  the  town   of  Colongia  was  born  around  the  church  and  the  castle.   Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize  is  first  mentioned  in  1207,  when  there  was  a   lordship.    In  the  middle  ages,  the  town  was   called    Coulonges-­‐les-­‐ Royaux   or   Coulonges-­‐le-­‐Royal.   The   lords   of   Coulonges,   the   Madaillan   d’Estissac,   were   distinguished   members   of   the   royal   household  in  the  service   of  the  King,  until   Louis  XI  had  the  castle   knocked  down.  However,  the  Chamberlain  of  Charles   de  Guyenne   replaced  it   with   a  renaissance   style  chateau.  From   the   8th   to   the   18th  September   1469,   during   a   hunting  party,   the   King,  Louis   XI   himself,  stayed   at   Coulonges-­‐les-­‐Royaux   in  the  chateau   of   Magné   which  was  owned  by  the  sire  of  Malicorne. In   1709   after   a  bad  harvest,  times   were  hard.    The  peasants  who   were  armed,  pillaged  the  royal  grain  stores  so  that  the  grain   would   not  be  taken  to  another  region.   Today  the  market  town  of  Coulonges  is  organised  like  a  small  town.     There  are  three  different  parts.    The  medieval  part,  which  is  a  little   bit   outside   the   centre,  can   be   found   around  the   church   and   the   chateau.     It  is  characterised   by  the  way  it  is  organised  in  concentric   fashion  with  its  winding  streets  where  some  details  show  that   this   part   of   the  town   dates  from  the   medieval   period.     There   was   a   second  period  of  urbanisation  in   the  16th  century  with  the  building   of  the  renaissance  chateau   and  the  fitting  out  of  its   surroundings   around  a  large  square.    The  19th  century  was  a  prosperous  period.     This  thriving  economy  and  the  exploitation  of   the   lime  kilns  can  be   seen   by   the   building  of   large   roads,  the   railway  and   the   market   halls.   The   19th   century  bourgeoise   houses   and   the   villas   dating   from  the  beginning  of  the  20th  century  bring  an  architectural  unity   to  the  market  town.     During  the  first   half  of  the   19th  century,  the  leather   industry  was   one  of  the  main  economic  activities  of   Coulonges   along  with   the   lime  kilns.    In  1812,  the  mayor,  in   a  letter  which   was   addressed  to   the  prefet,  mentions  13   establishments  at   Les  Tanneries,  three  in   les  Crevasses  and  one  in  the  village  of  Tourteron. The  development  of   the  activity  of   lime  kilning  and  the  coming  of   the  railway  meant  that  there  were  about  20  lime  kilns  in  the  canton   of  which  about  ten  belonged  to  the  Des  Houillères  company.      The   area   was   prosperous.     Coal   from   the   mines   at   Saint-­‐Laurs   and   Faymoreau   was   sold   to   feed  the  kilns.     The  lime  was  sold   and   a   considerable  amount  of  transport  was  needed  to  transport  the  coal   and  the  lime.     A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE   • Saint-­‐Etienne  Church The   oldest   part   of  the  church  dates  from   the   12th   century.     The   building,  in  the  shape  of  a  cross,  was  composed  of  a  nave  and  three   spans.     There   is   a  transept   and  a  choir  with  a   semi-­‐circular  apse.    

The size  of  the  nave  was  doubled  in   the   15th  century  and  the  apse   was  replaced   by  a  span.     The   inside  of  the  church   is  rather   sober.     The  chapiteaux  of  the  columns  are  sculpted  with  designs   of  plants   and  leaves.    The  church  is  a  listed  historical  monument. • The  Renaissance  Chateau An   11th   century   castle   existed   in   the   medieval   market   town   near   the   church.     However,  it   was   destroyed  in   1465   as  the   King   needed   to   reduce   the  number   of   fortresses   in   the   region   to   protect   himself   against   a   revolt.     The   rebuilding   began   in   the   16th   century   with   a   square   pavillion   which   was   placed   at   the   intersection   of   the   two   present   wings.  It   was   finished  in  1568.  The  building  is  a  listed  historical  monument. (photo:  www.ville-­‐coulonges-­‐sur-­‐lautize.fr) • The  Indoor  Market The  old  market  halls,  which   were  acquired   by  the  town   council  in   1821,  were  destroyed  and  replaced  by  a  new  stone  building  in  Neo-­‐ classical  style.    The  halls  were  meant  for  the  butchers  and  there  is   an  inscription   on   the  gable  end   of  the  main  wall  -­‐  “Sous  le  règne  de   NAPOLEON   III,   LOWASY   de   LONIVILLE   étant   préfet,   PLASSIART,   MAIRE,  cette  halle   fut  bâtie.  1857.”    (“This  market  hall  was  built  in   1857,  during  the  reign   of   Napoleon  III,  Lowasy  de  Lonivelle  was  the   prefet   and   Plassiart   the   mayor”).     Because   of   the   economic   development  of  the  town,  the  town  council  voted  for  a  new  market   in   1888.    The  construction   with   metal   beams   is   the  work  of   the   architect   Mongeaud.   The   wrought   iron   parts   were   made   by   Michelin  in  Paris  and  Lemaire  in  Niort.    The  indoor  market  has  the   advantages   of   Baltard   style   market   halls.     The   metal   structure   means   that   the   inside   space   is   wide   open   and   the   glass   work   means  that  there  is  a  lot  of  light.     The  building  is  a  listed  historical   monument   and  one  of  only  five  of  its  type  still  existing  in  the  Deux-­‐ Sèvres. • The  Tall  Chimney Near  Pilorges,  the  chimney  is  one  of  the  last  remaining   vestiges  of   the  lime  kilning  activity.         • The  Wash-­‐houses The   wash-­‐houses   were   an   essential  part  of   family   and   village  life.   There  are   several  on  the  commune.         Other  places  of  interest • The  museum  of  barrel   making   and   wheelwrights.    The  only  one   in  Deux-­‐Sèvres.    The  museum  is  in  the  chateau. • The  old  Roman  road  linking  Angers  to  Saintes.

More ‘A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  of  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.’ next  month...

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Life, Food & Drink... French Village Diaries

by Jacqueline  Brown.

We seem  to  have  left  the   extreme   heat   of   summer   behind   us   and   there  is  a  glimpse  of  autumn  colour   in   the   hedgerows,   but   what   a   brilliant  summer   it   has  been.  With   great   weather   and   even   better   harvests   I’ve   got   no   complaints,   especially  as   the   summer   storms   left  us  reasonably  untouched   with   only  a  bit  of  tree  damage. On   a  recent   wet  Sunday  morning,  the   first   day  of  rain  we   had   for   weeks,  we  saw  our  French   neighbours  acting  rather  strangely.    They   are   both  well   into  their   seventies  and   still  to  be   found   cycling   the   lanes  around  the  village,  so  our  first  thoughts  as  we  watched  them   stopping,  dismounting,  cycling,  then  stopping  again,  was  that  there   was   a   problem.   As   we   got   closer   we   noticed   they  were   actually   collecting  the  huge  snails  that   had   appeared   after   the  rain.  They   explained  they  had  gathered  about  250  snails  that  would  now  spend   the  next  month  or  two  in  a  cage  with  no  food  or  water,  before  being   ready  to  cook.    Monsieur   did   add  that  a  little  grilled  bread  and   red   wine  would   do  them  no  harm,  but   I’m  never  too   sure  if  he  is  pulling   my  leg  or  not.    I  am  not  adverse  to  a  little  bit  of  hedgerow  foraging,   but  at  this  time  of  year  it  is  normally  only  for  blackberries  and  sloes   (for   sloe  gin),  but   maybe  I  should  add   snails  too,  especially  when   Madame  values  their  haul  at  around  60€. They  assure   me  their   snails   are   delicious   and   something  both   of   them  have   enjoyed   since  their   childhood,   although   they  never  eat   them  in  restaurants.    The   main  reasons  for  this  were  price,  quality   and  being   wary  of   frozen   imports,  but  they  also  agreed   that  snails   should   be   enjoyed   at   home   so   you   can   make   as  much   mess  and   noise   (sucking  the  shells)   as  you  like,  without  worrying   about   what   you   look   like.   As   snails   are   something   new   to   me,   they   have   promised   me  a  taste   when   this   current   batch   is  ready  to   eat   this   winter.    They  were  happy  to  share  their  recipe  with  me  too. They  sauté  a  grey  shallot   in  butter  until  soft,  then  add  some  pork   rillettes   for   flavour,   an  onion,  peeled   but   left   whole  and  studded   with   a  handful   of   cloves,   garlic,   thyme,   two   bay  leaves   and   the   snails   (ready   to   cook,   not   fresh   from   the   garden).  These  are  then  seasoned  with  salt   and   pepper   and   simmered   in   white   wine.    If  you  are  in  a  rush,  which   is  not   recommended   by  Madame,   you   can   put  them  on  to  cook  at  8am  and  they   will  be  ready  for   lunchtime  however,   she   prefers   the   slow-­‐cooked   method.  On   day   one,   cook  for   at   least   three   hours  and   then   leave   to   cool.   This   allows   the   snails   to   infuse   all  the  flavours.     Repeat  on   day   two.     On   day   three,  reheat   and  eat.  It  may  be  free  food,  but  it   is   quite   a   lengthy   process   from   foraging   to   eating.  I  promise  to   let   you   know   how   they   taste   when   I   get  my  sample! For  recipes  please  email  me  at  frenchvillagediaries@gmail.com   or  visit  www.frenchvillagediaries.com  

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

A Franc Confession

by John  Sherwin.

I haven’t  always  been  unfashionable.     Once  upon   a   time,   I   pestered   my   parents   for   Ben   Sherman   shirts  and  a  crombie.    Past  the  age  of  scrounging,   I   took   to   flares   and   granddad   shirts,   then   onto   suits  with   shoulder   pads,  then   black  everything.   Ch-­‐ch-­‐ch-­‐ch-­‐changes,  as  the  man  said.     You  had   to   be   up   with   the   times,   or   you   were   ch-­‐ch-­‐ chopped  liver. To  a  great  degree,  the  same  could  be  said  for  wine  trends,  or  fads  if   you   prefer.     Everyone   was   giving  wine   and   cheese   parties   with   spectacularly  inappropriate  pairings  -­‐   and  the  choice  of  vino   and   comestibles  wasn’t  up  to  much  either.    How  we  squealed  with  glee   and   gorgeous   anticipation   when   the   “Le   Beaujolais   Nouveau   est   Arrivé”   sign  went   up   in  the  local  wine  shop.     How  we  adored  our   oaked  Cab  Sav  and  Chardonnay.  How  wrong  we  were. After  all  that  misplaced   hullabaloo,  isn’t  it  good  to  get  just   a  little   older  and   wiser?    Isn’t   it   good   to   get   down-­‐home  and  righteous?   Isn’t   it   good   to   confess   that   I   have   grown   immensely   fond   of   Cabernet   Franc?   What!   The  country  cousin   of   sophisticated   Cab   Sav?  Well  yes. Cabernet   Franc   is   often   considered   to   be   the   ‘other’   variety   of   Cabernet.     It’s  the  one  that   is  blended   with   Cabernet   Sauvignon   and   Merlot   when   these   two   alone   can’t   give   of  their   best.     But   before   you   dismiss   it   out   of   hand,   consider   that   the   wines   of   Chateau  Cheval   Blanc  in  St  Emilion,  whose  bottles  sell  at  prices  akin   to  Lafite,  are  made  up  of  two  thirds  Cabernet  Franc. Cabernet  Franc   is  the  archetypal  red  wine  grape  of  the  middle  Loire   valley.  The   best   examples   of   the   grape   (anywhere   in   the   world)   come  from  the  areas  of  Chinon,  Bourgueil,  St  Nicolas  de  Bourgueil,   and   Saumur-­‐Champigny.   The   aroma   is   often   described   as   herbaceous,   weedy,   farmyard,   pencil   shavings.     A   little   more   specific:   green   pepper,   raspberry,  tobacco,  violet.     The   colour   is   lighter   than   Cab   Sav  and   the  taste   less  tannic,  more   juicy,  fruity,   with  an  attractive  acidity.     They  are  wines  to  be   drunk  and  enjoyed   young. The  wine  writer   Willie  Gluckstern,  who  once  so   astutely  described   the   over-­‐oaking  of  Cab   Sav  and   Chardonnay  as   ‘the  MSG  of  wine’,   reckons   a   ‘well-­‐made   Saumur-­‐Champigny   [substitute   any   other   Loire   Cab   Franc]   with   its  medium  weight,   ripe,   piquant   fruit   and   delicate  herbal   finish,  must  be  the  best   red   wine   for   food’.     Add   ‘best   value  for  money’  and  you’re  really  getting   to   the  point.     You   will  find  excellent  bottles  at  your  local  supermarket  from  €3  to  €6. Good  food   matching  is  key  to  get   the  most   out   of   your   bottle(s).   Your  wine  is  a  weird   and  wonderful  mix  of  elegant,  silky,  farmyard,   high-­‐falutin’   and   down-­‐home.   Think   game,   duck,   marbled   beef,   charcuterie,  toasted  walnuts,  Anjou  pear  and  blue  cheese  crumble:   in  other  words,  think  autumn. And   if  you  really  want  to  continue  to  be  a  fashionista,  what   could   be   more   chic   than   a   Parisian   bistro?     And   what   is   every   classic   bistro’s   wine  of   choice  for   a  whole  range   of   dishes  such   as  roast   chicken  or  steak-­‐frites?  Answer  on  a  postcard,  but  no  prizes…

John Sherwin, French Wine Tours. Tel: 02 51 66 13 05 Email: johnsherwin@orange.fr ~ www.french-wine-tours.com Page 30


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Motoring... Magnificent Seven

by Helen  Tait-­‐Wright

With the  autumn  sun  still  warm  enough  for  open  top  motoring  as  I   write,  this   month  I  am  drawn   to   an   instantly  recognisable  British   sportscar,  and   its  derivatives,   as  popular   today  as   it   was   when   it   was  launched  56  years  ago......  the  Lotus  Seven. Designed  by  the  great   Colin   Chapman,  the  Lotus   Seven  embodies   his  ethos  of  ‘performance  through   lightness’  better  than  any  other   road-­‐going   car   that   Lotus   produced.   With   a   background   in   engineering   and   a   passion   for   motor   racing,   Chapman   founded   Lotus  cars  in  1952.    Although  he  had  already  produced  other  cars,  it   was  with  the  Lotus  Seven   that   he   found   public  recognition.    The   original  model   was  highly  successful,  due  to  its  attraction  as  a  road-­‐ legal  car  that  could  be  used  for  Clubman  racing. The  original   car  wasn’t   fast   by  today’s  standards;  it   did  0-­‐60  in  just   over  16  seconds   and  ran   out   of   steam  around  80mph.     That   was   pretty   good   in   1957,   and   combined   with   the   lightweight   Seven’s   nimble   handling  made  for   a   highly   effective   clubman’s  racer,   the   factory  prototype  taking  victory  in  it’s  very  first  race.

As well   as  the  Caterham  models   on   the  market   today,  there   are   a   host   of  other   Seven  replicas,  often  known   as  Se7en’s,   allowing   the   concept   to  be  accessible  to  all.    Some  of  the  best  known  Marques  are   Westfield,  Tiger,  Dax   and   Robin   Hood   Engineering,  and  most   offer   the   option  of  factory  built  or  build   your   own.  The   kit  car  approach   harks  back  to  the  60’s  when  there  was   no  purchase  tax  to  pay  if   the   car  was  supplied  in  parts,  and  indeed  Chapman  himself  supplied  cars   in  that  manner  too.   If  imitation  is  the  sincerest  form  of  flattery,  Colin   Chapman  would   be   pretty   chuffed   to   see   how   many   copies   of   his   Seven   are   now   available. But  whether   you   buy  Caterham  or  Lotus,  factory-­‐built   or   kit,  you’ll   have  a  hoot  every  time  you  get  behind  the  wheel.    

Enjoy!

Contact Helen  at:  helen@stodel.org.

Inevitably the  demands  of   competition   soon  called   for  more,  and   the   car   was   tweaked   and   modified   until   1961   when   the   “Super   Seven”   version   was   given   a   Cosworth   engineered   Ford   engine   which  propelled  the  car  to  60mph  in  less  than  8  seconds;   only  the   fastest  Ferraris,  Jags  and  Mercs  could  match  it. Already  a  star  on  track,  in  1965  the  Seven  became  a  star  on  TV  too   when  Patrick  McGoohan  drove  one  in  his  cult  series  The  Prisoner. The  Seven’s  success  continued  into   the   70’s,  but  by  1973   Lotus  was   firmly   established   as   the  leading  and   most   innovative   Formula   1   constructor,  and  the  Seven  didn’t  fit  the  glamorous  image  and  up-­‐ market  direction  Chapman  had  planned  for  his  company.     However,   there   was   still   a   demand   for   the   Seven’s   raw   driving   thrills,   so   rather   than   kill   it   off   Chapman   sold   the   production   rights   to   Caterham   Cars,   who   by   then   had   become   the   Seven’s   sole   distributor. Caterham  adopted  the  ‘if   it  ain’t   broke  don’t   fix  it’  approach,  and   the   car   continued   to   be   successful.   So   successful   in   fact   that   in   1976  the   RAC  banned  the  Seven   from  racing   in  the  UK  because  it   won  too   much,  leading  Caterham  boss  Graham   Nearn  to  produce   T-­‐shirts  bearing  the  slogan  ‘ Too  fast  to  race’. By  the  mid  80’s,  Caterham  were  refining  and  developing  the  Seven   concept,  while  retaining  its  classic  look,   and  the  Seven  took  to  the   track  once  more  for  its  own  single  make  race  series.  

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Understanding, Using and Extended WiFi at Home Extending the   range  of   a   WiFi   service  in   your   home  should   start   with  positioning  your   router   in   the   correct   place,   ideally   it   should  be  in  the  centre  of  the  property.   The   router   should   also   be   at   desk   height  or  higher  and  not  concealed  in  a   cupboard   or   tucked   away   in   a   window   sill,  as  these  positions  will  weaken  the  signal.  

where you  want  to  receive  the  network  signal.    This  device  maybe  a   WiFi  one  or   a  cable  one.    If  you  chose  to  use  the  cable  variety  you   will   need   to   connect   your   PC   via  another   Network   cable.   These   systems   vary   in  price  starting  for   the  non-­‐wireless   one  at   around   £38  and  rising  to  £138  for  the  fastest,  best  quality  WiFi  ones. The   WiFi   and   cable   repeater/extender   will   allow   you   to   use   the   existing  parameters  of   your   router   such  as  the   SSID   (Name   of   the   Device/network)  and   the  Password;  alternatively  you  may  set-­‐up   a   totally  different  Network  Name  and  password. In   any  event   you   should  always  secure  your   WiFi  service.     As  the  

If you   live   in   a   three   story   house   the   best   place   for   maximum   coverage  would  be  on  the  middle  floor  in  the  middle  of  your  home. This   month   we   will   consider   extending   the   WiFi   using   two   methods,  one  using  the  mains  power  around  your   home    known  as   Power   Line   Adapters,   and   with   a   Wireless   repeater   or   Wireless   Access   Point.   In   my   opinion   the   Wireless   repeater/access   point   method   is   the   simplest   way  of   extending  your   WiFi   network  and   the  cost  for  these  devices  start  at  around  £25.00.   Wireless  repeaters/extenders  work   in   two  ways,  they  can  connect   by  either   WiFi   or   Cable   to   your   router.     If   you   are   using  a  cable   between   your  WiFi  Extender   and  router  you   can  position  the  WiFi   extender   in   the   centre  of   the   area  you   want   the  WiFi   signal.     If   however   you  are  using  the  Extender   as  a  wholly  wireless   device,  it   will   need  to   be   placed   at   the  extent   of   the   range   of   the   existing   router.     Think   of   the   ripples   in   a   pond,   the   extender   would   be   placed  where  the  ripples   get   weaker  and  the  router's  signal  starts   to  "drop-­‐off".   Another  method  of  extending  your   network  around  your   home  is   to  use  existing  cables.     Clever   manufacturers  have  devised  a  system   that  carries  the  Network  Data  over  the  mains  power  supply  around   your  property.     Called  "Power  line"  adapters,  these  systems   permit   extending  your   network  both  wired   and  WiFi  all  around  your  home.   Usually   purchased   in   pairs,   the   first   one   connects   to   the   mains   power   supply   beside   your   router.     A  network   cable   is   taken   from   the   back  of  the  router   to  the   power  line  adapter.     This   carries  the   network  data   from   the   router   to   the   power   line   adapter   and   the   adapter   enables  the   transmission   of   the   network   data   over   the   mains   power   supply.   The   second   device   is   placed   in   the   room  

subscriber you   are   responsible   for   what   is   downloaded   on   your   WiFi,  so   if  someone  unknown   to  you   downloads   material   that   is   subject   to  copyright   you   may  be  liable.     Until   July  2013,  HADOPI   monitored  downloads  in  France  and  would  contact  you   if  you  were   found  to  be  infringing   anyone's  copyright.    However,  the    HADOPI   law   was   revoked   on   10   July   2013   by   the   French   Government   because  the  punitive  penalties  imposed  on  copyright   infringers  was   considered  to  be  disproportionate.     I  have  been  watching  the  press   to  see  what,  if  anything,  will  replace  the  legislation  and  nothing  has   been  put  forward  as  yet.    Do  rest  assured   that  your  internet  activity   is  recorded   by  your   ISP  and  will  be  available  for  the  authorities  to   monitor  when  they  are  ready  to.    Please  ensure  that  you   keep  your   WiFi/Network  secure  and  that  you  know  who  is  using  it  and   when,   if  you  do  permit  access  to  others. Next  month  I  shall   review  options  to  provide  a  WiFi   connection  to   buildings  on  your  property.    For  example  extending  your   network   to  a  summerhouse,  Gîte  or  office  workshop.   Ross   Hendry   is   the   proprietor   of  Interface   Consulting  and  Engineering,   who   has   over   42   years   experience   in   Communications,   Computer   Technology   and   Direct   Marketing.   (See   advert   below   for   more   information).

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Business, Finance & Property...

IT WILL HAPPEN TO US ALL...So Why Not Talk About It! For my  first   article  in  ‘The  Deux   Sèvres  Monthly’,  it  is   probably  not   the  best   subject   to   choose,  but  it   is   probably  the  most   important.     So,  what  are  the  formalities  after  death  in  France?

Who Establishes a Death?

It is  always  a  doctor   who   declares  someone  dead   and   provides   a   medical   death   certificate   (certificat   de  deces).     In   case   of   violent   death   (suicide   or   car   crash   for   example)   it   is   the   police   or   gendarmerie  who  do  this.

Where do you Declare the Death?

• Death at  home.     In  case  of  a  death  at  home,  it  is  a  family  member   who   does  the  declaration   of   death   as  they  have  the  IDs   of   the   deceased,  but  in  most   cases  the   undertakers  (pompes  funebres)   will  do  it  for  you. • Death  in  hospital  or  retirement  home.    In  case  of  death  in  hospital   or  any  institution,  they  will  do  it  for  you.

What Delay?

It has  to  be  done  within  24  hours  of  establishing  the  death   by   the   doctor  (outside  weekend  and  bank  holidays).

Where?

At the  mairie  in  the  village  where  the  death  occurred  or   the  mairie   where  the  deceased  lived.

What Documents are Required? • An ID  of  the  deceased. • Your  ID. • The  medical  death  certificate.

Following that,  the  mairie  establishes  an  Acte   de  deces  which  is  an   official  death  certificate.    This  is  free  and  you  will  need  lots  of  copies   of  it.

Burial and Cremation

The burial   or  cremation  must   be  done  between  24  hours  and  6  days   maximum.    You  can  be   buried   in   the  commune  where  you   live  or   have  lived  in  the  past.    Cremations  are  done  in   the   crematorium  of   your  department.    The  undertakers  do  all  the  formalities  for  you.

Cost

• Funeral: the  average  cost  is  around  3000  euros. • Tax   and   notaire   fees.     You  have  up  to   6   months  to  declare   the   death  to  the  local   tax  office.     That  does  not  mean   you  will  have  to   pay  some  taxes.    In  the  declaration,  you  mention  the  amount  you   inherit.    The  percentage  of  tax   you  will  have  to  pay  will  depend  on   your   relationship   with   the   deceased   (no   tax   between   spouse,   allowance  of  100000€  per  children,  then  20%  tax,  etc).

with roughly  the  same  amount  each  otherwise  the  survivor  will  not   be  able  to  access  it. Banks  are   authorised   by  law  to  pay  the  undertakers  from   the  bank   account  of  the  deceased  (providing  there  is  enough  money  in  it).     The   notaire   will   pay  the   death   duties   (inheritance   tax,  if   any,  and   notaire  fees)  out   of  the  assets  of  the   deceased.     So  he  will   pay  the   inheritors   their   share,   minus   the   fees   and  tax.     Note   that   if   they   inherit  a  house  and  need  to  sell  it  to  pay  the  tax  and  fees,  they  could   have  penalties  to  pay  as  you  only  have   6  months  from  the  death  to   pay  them! Funeral  cover.    If   you  don't   have  any  savings,  you  can  subscribe  to   a   funeral   cover.     You   can   be   insured   between   3000€   and   10000€   without   a   health   questionnaire.     There   is   an   exclusion   of   death   through   disease   or   suicide   for   the   first   year   (in   this   case,   the   insurance  company  pays  back  the  amount  you  have  paid  in).    You  are   insured  for  death  by  accident  straight  away.     It   is  not   like  a  normal   insurance   whereby  if   you   stop   paying  your   premium   you   stop   being   insured.     You   receive   a   statement   every   year  showing  3  lines.    The  first  one  shows  how  much  you  are  insured   for   and  it  follows   inflation.     The   second   shows  how   much   you  are   insured  for   if  you  stop   paying  the   premium.     The  last  shows  how   much   is  available   if   you   want   to   shut   down  the  policy   completely.     That  means  that  if  you  are  still   alive  after   10  or   15   years,  you  can   afford   to   stop  paying  the  premium   as   you   will   have   enough   cover   already.     As  an   example,   a   person   born   in   1947   and   insured   for   3000€  would  pay  around  20€  per  month   with  my  company  and  we   offer  a  10%  discount  for  couple  subscription. Assurance   Vie.     These   are   not   a  life   insurance,  they   are   savings   accounts  with  advantages.     It  is  one  of  the  most  popular  accounts  in   France,   as   you   can   name   the   beneficiary.     Therefore,   the   beneficiaries   have  access  to  this  money  on  the  death  of  the  owner   and  not  6  months  after!     It   also   gives  an  allowance  of  152500€  to   each  beneficiary  (on   top  of  the  other  allowance  via  notaire)  as  long   as  you  put  the  money  in  before  you  are  70  years  old.     Otherwise  it  is   an  allowance  of  30500€  for  the  policy  and  not  per  beneficiary. Please  feel  free  to  contact  me  for  any  further   information  on  all  the   above  or  even  for  a  free  quote  on   a  funeral  cover  (all  I  need  is  your   birthdate   and   how   much   you   want   to   be   insured   for),   or   an   Assurance  Vie.     I  can  also  calculate  the  amount  of  death  duties  and/ or  notaire  fees  your  loved  one  could  have  to  pay.    Yes,  this  is  FREE.

It is  the  job  of  the  notaire  to  do  that  for  you   and  he  will  take  fees  for   doing  it  which  will  be  around  2-­‐3%  of  the  assets  which  belonged  to   the  deceased. No  declaration  is  needed  if  the  assets  of  the  deceased  are  less  than   3000€  or  50000€,  and  it  is  the  spouse  or  children  who  inherit.

How are the Costs Paid and Calculated?

Assets of  the  deceased.    It  is  important   to   note  that  any  bank/saving   accounts  that  are   in  the  name   of  the   deceased  will  be  blocked  until   the  notaire  finishes  his  work  (usually  takes  up  to  6  months).     If  you   are  married  and   have   a   common  bank  account,  do  make  sure  it   is   under   Mr   OU   Mme.     All   the   other   accounts,  other   than   current   accounts,  are  in  individual  names,  so   make  sure  you  have   one  each  

BH Assurances 22 rue Jean Jaures, 16700 Ruffec Contact Isabelle Want: Tel: 05 45 31 01 61 Mob: 06 17 30 39 11 Email: isabelle.want@bh-assurances

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Ask Amanda.

“I have just bought a house and plan to be a resident in France. What does this mean in terms of my UK pension and any investments I hold?”

I was  recently  speaking  to   an   estate   agent   who   has   seen   a   large   increase   in   the   number  of   British  and   Irish  people  looking  at  houses,   with  plans  to  move  to  France  to  live.    When   I  sit  down  with  new   arrivals  they  are   very  interested  in  how  regulations  differ  in  France   to  those  they  have  left  behind.    Here  are  several  key  differences.

Investments

It is  worth  reviewing  any  investments  held  to  ensure  that  they  are   as  tax  efficient  as  possible  under  French  legislation.       As  an  example   the  French   authorities  do  not   recognise  UK  Trusts.    Yet   there  are   facilities   for   investing   in  France   which  can  be  tax  efficient,  protect   you   from   inheritance   tax,   and   are   portable,   should   you   need   to   move  back  to  the  UK  in  the  future.

UK Private  Pensions

Moving to  France  can   open   up  several   options  not  available   to  UK   residents,   regarding   private   and   company   pensions.     A   QROPS   (Qualified   Recognised   Overseas   Pension   Scheme)   can   provide   additional   benefits   to   expats.     These   are   not   appropriate   for   everybody  but  it  is  worth  exploring  your  personal  circumstances.

Inheritance Tax  Planning

As mentioned  in  more  depth   in  the  August   edition   of   ‘The  Deux-­‐ Sèvres  Monthly’   magazine,  rules  and   regulations   in  France  differ   greatly   from   those   in   the   UK   and   Ireland   when   it   comes   to   inheritance   tax.   Individual   allowances   and   tax   rates   differ   significantly  and   understanding  your   inheritance   tax   liability   is   an   important  aspect  of  financial  planning. Whether   you   are  new  to  France  or  have  been  here  some  time  and   want  to  ensure  your  finances  are  in  order,  I  will  be  happy  to  help.  If   you  want  to   know  more  about  these  areas  you  can  either   drop   in  to  the  Café  des  belles   Fleurs  in   Fenioux  where   I   hold  a  financial   surgery  on   a  Thursday  morning,  come  and  see  me  at  Open  Door  in   Civray  last   Tuesday   morning  in   the   Month   or   you  can   arrange  to   see   me   for   a   free   financial   review   by   getting   in   touch   on   the   contacts  below.  

Amanda Johnson,  The  Spectrum  IFA  Group.  Tel:  05  49  98  97  46 Email:  amanda.johnson@spectrum-­‐ifa.com

www.spectrum-­‐ifa.com/amanda-­‐johnson

Money Talk...

by Philip Ryan

Le Tour  de  Finance Are  you   interested  in   finding  out  how  to  make  the  most  of  your   money  in  France?   Do   you   have   pressing   questions   about   making   international   payments,  pensions,  tax,  wealth  or  the  healthcare  system?   Why   not   take   the   time   and   come   to   a  local   event,  bring   some   friends  and  make  it  a  great  day  out? Le  Tour  de  Finance  is     the    financial  forum  for  British   expats  which   will   help   you   with   a   range   of   different   financial   products   and   services.     Just  as  Le  Tour  de   France  takes  a  route  throughout   the   regions  of  France,  so   too   does  Le  Tour   de  Finance.    We  want  to   reach   expats  where  you  live   so   that  you  can  seek  advice  particular   to   your   local   area.     Tax  advice,  pensions,  mortgages,   healthcare,   schools,   business  advice   and  making  the   most   of   your   assets  are   just  some   of   the  subjects  that   expats   need   to   know   more  about.     Le  Tour  de  Finance  is  the   ideal  opportunity  to  find  answers  to  the   most  pressing  questions  facing  British  people  living  in  France. The   forum  will  bring  together  key  players  who  assist  British  expats   settling   or   already   living   in   France.   It   will   also   be   an   ideal   opportunity   to   socialise   by   enjoying   a   free   Buffet   lunch   and   meeting  people  in  similar  circumstances  in  your  neighbourhood. Le  Tour  de  Finance  will  be  at   Bouvet  Ladubay,  Saint  Hilaire-­‐Saint   Florent,  49400,  Saumur  on  Friday  4th  October. The  event  starts  at  09.30  with  a  welcome  café  and  ends  at  14:30. Enjoy   brief   presentations   from   experts   on   a   range   of   topics   including;  finance,  money  transfer,   health,  tax,  legal   changes  and   advice  on  property  rental FREE   BUFFET   LUNCH   and   chance   to   talk   to   the   speakers   and   network    with  fellow  expats... Register   now   on  www.letourdefinance.com  and  book  your  place,     limited  availability.

Sue Cook,  Currencies  Direct Tel:  06  89  99  28  89  ~  Email:  sue.c@currenciesdirect.com

or “Ask Amanda” at finance@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

USEFUL FRENCH  VOCABULARY  -­‐  FINANCIAL agio  (m)  -­‐  bank  charge ancien  solde  (f)  -­‐  previous  balance assurance  (f)  -­‐  insurance assurance-­‐vie  (f)  -­‐  life  insurance assuré    -­‐  insured s’assurer  -­‐  verb  -­‐  to  take  out  insurance   assureur  (m)  -­‐  insurer   bancaire  -­‐  banking banque  (f)  -­‐  bank

chèque (m)  -­‐  cheque chèque  de  banque  (m)  -­‐  banker’s  draft chèque  sans  provision  (m)  -­‐  bounced  cheque chèquier  (m)  -­‐  cheque  book code  confidentiel  (m)  -­‐  PIN  number code  guichet  (m)  -­‐  branch  code compte  (m)  -­‐  account compte  à  terme  (m)  -­‐  deposit  account compte  bancaire  (m)  bank  account compte  courant  (m)  -­‐  current  account compte  d’épargne  (m)  -­‐  savings  account crédit  hypothécaire  (m)  -­‐  mortgage crédit  relais  (m)  -­‐  bridging  loan découvert  (m)  -­‐  overdraft dépôt  (m)  -­‐  deposit endosser  -­‐  verb  -­‐  to  endorse  a  cheque impôt  (m)  -­‐  tax monnaie  (f)  -­‐  coins/change prélèvement  (m)  -­‐  direct  debit prêt  personnel  (m)  -­‐  personal  loan reçu  (m)  -­‐  receipt rejeter  un  chèque  -­‐  verb  -­‐  to  bounce  a  cheque relevé  de  compte  (m)  -­‐  bank  statement remise  (f)  -­‐  remittance retrait  d’argent  (m)  -­‐  withdrawal  of  money solde  (f)  -­‐  account  balance taxe  foncière  (f)  -­‐  property  tax taxe  habitation  (f)  -­‐  habitation  tax virement  (m)  -­‐  bank  transfer

CONTRIBUTIONS.... We are always looking for new contributions for consideration in future issues. Do you have an experience to share? Are you a tradesman with a Top Tip? or perhaps an avid reader who would like to contribute a book review? Whatever it may be, either long or short, we would love to hear from you. You can call Sarah on 05 49 70 26 21 with any ideas, or send them on an email to: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Advance Tax Payment on Interest and Dividends By Brad Warden, Partner, Blevins Franks

If French tax was not complicated enough, the new rules on interest and dividends taxation make it even more so. The flat tax rates that used to apply to interest and dividend income (and capital gains on the sale of shares) were abolished from this year. You will now pay tax according to your income tax bracket. However, you may still need to pay an advance tax - Prélèvement Obligatoire Non Libératoire - when you receive interest and dividends, and this is at the old fixed rates of 24% and 21% respectively. This is not necessarily the final tax due. You will pay any balance when you submit your income tax return. You are obliged to pay this advance tax every month you receive interest or dividends. Where the paying agent is in France, they will deduct it at source along with the 15.5% social charges. If outside France, you must submit form 2778-SD for interest and 2778-DIVSD for dividends, with the tax due, by the 15th of the following month, or try and give the financial institution a mandate to file and pay the tax on your behalf. The latter option only applies within the European Economic Area (so not to the Channel Islands or Isle of Man. Late payments are subject to a 10% fine.

If your household’s income for the penultimate year was below a set reference income, you can avoid the advance payment by submitting a waiver request to your financial institution. For 2013 income it had to be submitted before 31st March. In future the deadline is 30th November of the previous year. The reference income for interest is €50,000 for couples (filing jointly) and €25,000 for single taxpayers, and €75,000/€50,000 for dividends. This is an extra tax headache for many expatriates in France. You could consider moving your savings and investments into alternative structures which would avoid all this hassle and are generally more tax efficient. Social charges on UK income Another area of complexity is the issue of tax and social charges on UK source income. Different French tax offices take different views. The position of the Direction de la Legislation Fiscale is that where a French resident receives a UK government service pension and/or UK rental income, provided that this has been declared to the UK tax authorities they should receive a credit for the French income tax and social charges. With any tax related issue, you should seek professional, personalised advice. Summarised tax information is based upon our understanding of

current laws and practices which may change. Individuals should take personalised advice. To keep in touch with the latest developments in the offshore world, check out the latest news on our website www.blevinsfranks.com.

m

se s

ar

in

21 new French finance acts in 5 years. Need help protecting your wealth? We need to talk. Has your wealth or estate planning been affected by these tax changes? How tax efficient are your assets? Our seminars will discuss these changes and also look at the impact of increased cross-border exchange of financial information. For further information visit... www.blevinsfranks.com NIORT Monday 14 October, Château du Griffier, 10 for 10.30am until 12 noon DOUÉ LA FONTAINE near Saumur Tuesday 15 October, Hotel La Saulaie, 10 for 10.30am until 12 noon

S01-fr

05 49 75 07 24

bradley.warden@blevinsfranks.com

Blevins Franks Financial Management Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the UK, reference number 179731. Where advice is provided overseas, via the Insurance Mediation Directive from Malta, the regulatory system differs in some respects from that of the UK. Blevins Franks Tax Limited’s advisers only give taxation advice and are fully qualified.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny.

Tel: 05  49  70  26  21  ~  Email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

For a  full  list  of  our  advertising  rates,   please  phone  05  49  70  26  21    for  an   advertising  pack  or  download  from  our   website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Autumn Markets

by Trevor  Leggett,  Chief  Executive

What’s new on the Market in the Deux-Sèvres this Autumn? It looks   as  though  that  fabulous  summer  is  well  and  truly  behind   us   now  as  the  farmers  get  ready  for   the  vendange  and  thoughts  turn   towards  putting  the  heating  back  on  and  closing  the  swimming  pool   down. Here  at  Leggett  Immobilier   we  have  been  busy  taking  on  houses  for   sale   and   preparing   marketing   plans   aimed   at   both   local   and   international   buyers.     A  quick  trawl  through  our   website  will  reveal   that  we  are  rapidly  closing  in  on  the  10,000  properties  for  sale  across   France   mark,  with   over   2,500  of  these  being  in  Poitou   Charentes,   some  of  them  undoubtedly  being   owned   by  readers   of   the  super   The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly! This  month   we  thought  that   we  would   look  at   a  sample  of  houses   that  have   either   just   come  on   the  market  or  have  been  reduced  in   price  to   make   them   stand   out   to  buyers.     We  have   included   the   reference   numbers   so   that   you   can   find   them   on   our   website   www.leggettfrance.com. As  an   example,  we  have   taken  on  a  beautiful   detached  farmhouse   with  four  bedrooms  and  a  swimming  pool  which  sits  within  3,115m2   of   gardens   and   is   surrounded   by  farmland   close   to   the   village   of   L’Absie.     The   property   has  been   well   renovated   and   offers   lovely   family   accommodation   for   €318,000.     With   more   and   more   international  families  choosing  Poitou   Charentes   over  other  regions   of  France  this  is  exactly  the  kind  of  property  we   like  to  have  within   our  portfolio  (ref  34811MB79,  photo  below). End

Alternatively, we   have   just   agreed   on   a   price   reduction   of   over   €75,000   on   a   four   bed   family  house   with   6,649m2   of   land  that   is   within   14km’s  of  the  bustling  town  of  Niort.    On  the  market  now  for   €240,750  this  is  a  property  that  comes  with  a  pool  and  stable  boxes   and   with   the   price   reduction   now   in   place  it   could   well   prove   an   attractive  proposition  for  both  locals  and  UK  buyers  (ref  33060CT79). Finally,  why  not   take  a  look  at  the  360  degree   virtual  tour   we  have   created   for   a  detached,  stone,  longère  on  the  outskirts  of  Coulon  in   the  heart   of   the   Marais  Poitevin.     On  the  market   for   €265,000  it   comes  with   five   bedrooms,   two  bathrooms   and   an   abundance   of   charm.  There  is  a  walled  and  gated  entrance  to  the  pretty  gardens  of   2,989m2   with  several   stone  outbuildings  attached  to  the  property   (ref  30459GCB79). As  regular  readers  of  this  column  will   know,  Poitou  Charentes  was  the   only  region  in  France  to  see  an  increase  in  the  number  of  international   buyers  last  year,  so  we  are  hopeful  that  our   marketing  efforts  will  pay   dividends.     This  month  alone  we  will  be  exhibiting  client  properties  at   exhibitions  in  London,  Birmingham,  Brussels  and  Bordeaux  -­‐  there  are   not  many  local  agents  in  France  that  can  say  that! Leggett  Immobilier  is  one  of  the  leading  estate  agents  in  France.   You  can  access  all  their  local  property  listings  and  articles  at www.frenchestateagents.com/poitou-­‐charentes-­‐property. Page 46


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The DSM October 2013  

English language magazine for the Deux-Sevres and surrounding areas in France.

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