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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Welcome! to Issue 30 of

‘The DeuxSèvres Monthly’ magazine.

Yipee! The  Sun-­‐dance  I  did  last  month  has  worked   wonders,  summer  has  finally  arrived  -­‐  as  have  the   holidays  and  holiday-­‐makers. For  both  Rob  and  I,  the  summer  months  are  the   busiest,  so  no  holidays  yet  for  us.    We  are  hoping   for   some   rest   and   relaxation   after   the   Anglo-­‐ French  Trade  Fair  at  the  end  of  September,  but   until   then,  it’s  full  steam   ahead  (steam  being  the   operative   word   when  its  35˚!). All  this  sunshine  is  wonderful,  but  please  don’t   forget  the  suncream.     A   minimum  SPF  of  15  is  recommended,  and  of  course,  something  much   higher  for  children  and  babies. I’m  sure  many  of  you  will  have  family  and  friends  visiting  this  month,  so   have  fun  and  enjoy  the  time  together.....

à plus, Sarah. Tel: 05 49 70 26 21 Email: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Emergency Numbers: 15 SAMU, Medical 17 Gendarmes, Police 18 Pompiers, Fire

112 European emergency 113 Drugs and alcohol

CONTENTS

What’s On.....................................................................................4 Hobbies,  Clubs  &  Associations.....................................................6 Getting  Out  &  About....................................................................7 Take  a  Break...............................................................................17 A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  in  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.................................18 Health,  Beauty  &  Fitness............................................................19 Our  Furry  Friends.......................................................................20 The  Great  Outdoors...................................................................23 French  Life,  Food  &  Drink..........................................................27 Motoring....................................................................................31 French  Adventures.....................................................................34 Communications........................................................................35 Building  &  Renovation...............................................................37 Business,  Finance  &  Property....................................................42

THIS MONTH’S  ADVERTISERS   79  Renovations.....................................................................................................40 A2B  Food  Services............................................................................................... 28 A  La  Bonne  Vie  (Restaurant)................................................................................ 30 Ace  Pneus  (Tyre  Supplier  &  Fitter)...................................................................... 33 Affordable  UK  Designs  (Kitchens  &  UPVC  D/Glazing)......................................... 2 AKE  Petits  Travaux  (Builder)................................................................................ 40 Alan  Pearce  (Plumbing  &  Heating)..................................................................... 38 Andrew  Longman  (Plumber)............................................................................... 37 Angie  Weston  (Mosaic  Workshops).....................................................................7 A.P.S.  Automobiles  (FORD  Garage)...................................................................... 32 ARB  French  Property........................................................................................... 44 Arbrecadabra.com  (Tree  surgery)........................................................................23

...continued.

Bar/Brasserie Vue  du  Chateau............................................................................ 28 Bijoux  en  Fleurs  (Handmade  jewellery).............................................................. 7 Bill  McEvoy  (Plumber  /  Heating  Engineer).......................................................... 37 British  Mobile  Mechanic  (John  Purchase)........................................................... 33 Café  des  Belles  Fleurs.......................................................................................... 30 Caniclôture  (Hidden  fencing)............................................................................ 21 Centre  Régional  ‘Résistance  &  Liberté’............................................................... 11 Chateau  St  Michel  (Holiday  and  Wedding  Venue).............................................. 44 Chez  Remert  Snack.............................................................................................. 27 Chris  Bassett  Construction.................................................................................. 40 Christies  (English  Book  Shop  and  Tea  Room)...................................................... 9 Cleaning  Services  by  Karen.................................................................................. 44 Cottage  Services.................................................................................................. 25 CSB  Construction................................................................................................. 40 Currencies  Direct  (Money  Transfers)................................................................... 42 Cut  46  (Hair  Salon).............................................................................................. 20 DB  Electricité....................................................................................................... 41 David  Cropper  (Stump  Grinding  &  Jungle  Busting)............................................ 23 DJ  Jeff  (Professional  DJ)....................................................................................... 8 D  J  Maintenance  (Handyman)............................................................................ 41 EcoPower  (Solar  Thermal  Trading  Company)...................................................... 44 EJ’s  Mobile  Jet  Washing  Service.......................................................................... 31 Electricien  Anglais  en  France.............................................................................. 41 French  Tuition  (Pascale  Terry)............................................................................. 16 Futuroscope......................................................................................................... 40 Gardening  &  Cleaning  Services  (Dean  Smalley).................................................. 44 George  Rayner  Computers.................................................................................. 36 Give  the  Dog  a  Comb  (Dog  Grooming)............................................................... 21 Glass  2  France...................................................................................................... 2 Hallmark  Electronique  (Electricians  &  Sat.  Engineers)........................................ 41 Heather’s  Pet  Care  Services................................................................................ 21 Home  and  Garden  Care  (John  Etherington)........................................................ 25 Homes  In  France  (Tony  Murdoch)....................................................................... 47 Insink  Plumbing................................................................................................. .. 37 James  Harris  (Plasterer)....................................................................................... 38 John  Snee  Groundworks..................................................................................... 39 John  Spray  Maçonnerie  (Stonemason)............................................................... 40 Jon  Crocker  Photography..................................................................................... 43 Keith  Banks  Pool  Services.................................................................................... 37 La  Deuxieme  Chance  (Annie  Sloan  chalk  paint  supplier).................................... 38 La  Petite  Épicerie  (General  Groceries  &  British  Produce)................................... 28 Leggett  Immobilier.............................................................................................. 46 Les  Ecuries  du  Saumort  (Horse  Riding  School).................................................... 20 Le  Petit  Pillac  (Holiday  Accommodation)............................................................ 44 Les  Jardiniers  du  Poutou...................................................................................... 7 L’Immobilier  de  l’Autize....................................................................................... 46 Man  &  Van  (Keith  McNie).................................................................................... 33 Mad  Hatter’s  Kitchen.......................................................................................... 27 Man  For  Hire........................................................................................................ 23 Mark  Sabestini  Renovation  &  Construction........................................................ 39 MB  Plumbing  &  Building  Services....................................................................... 37 Michael  Hobson  (Painter  &  Decorator)............................................................... 38 Michael  William  Hairdressing.............................................................................. 19 ML  Computers..................................................................................................... 36 Motor  Parts  Charente.......................................................................................... 33 Mutuelle  de  Poitiers  Assurances......................................................................... 31 Nathan  Foster  Building  Services.......................................................................... 40 Needa  Hand  Services........................................................................................... 38 Pamela  Irving  (Massage  &  Reflexology).............................................................. 19 Philip  Irving  (Mini  Digger  hire)............................................................................. 39 Polar  Express  (Frozen  Foods).............................................................................. 28 Premier  Autos  (Mechanic).................................................................................. 33 Puy  Rond  Camping.............................................................................................. 10 Restaurant  des  Canards....................................................................................... 27 Rob  Berry  (Plasterer)........................................................................................... 38 Robert  Walker  Plomberie.................................................................................... 37 Ross  Hendry  (Interface  Consulting  &  Engineering)............................................. 35 Sarah  Berry  Online  (Graphics  &  Website  Design)............................................... 36 Satellite  TV  (Nigel  Gubb)...................................................................................... 36 sarl  Down  to  Earth  (Groundwork  &  Construction)............................................. 39 Sawmill  -­‐  Alain  Miot............................................................................................. 40 Sentinel  Security  Systems.................................................................................... 44 Siddalls  (Financial  Advisors)................................................................................. 43 Simon  Bienz  (Carpenter  /  Joiner)........................................................................ 40 Simon  The  Tiler.................................................................................................... 37 Spectrum  IFA  Group  (Amanda  Johnson)............................................................. 42 Steve  Enderby...................................................................................................... 38 Sue  Burgess  (French  Courses  &  Translation)....................................................... 16 The  English  Mechanic  &  Son  -­‐  Tony  Eyre............................................................ 33 The  Market.......................................................................................................... 9 Total  Renovation  Services  (Michael  Dominey)................................................... 38 Tracey  Bowring  (Hairdressing  &  Nails)................................................................ 19 Val  Assist.............................................................................................................. 16 Vendée  Carriers................................................................................................... 33 Vendée  Pools....................................................................................................... 45

© Sarah  Berry   2013.     All   rights  reserved.    Material   may   not   be   reproduced  without  permission.    While   care   is   taken  to  ensure  that  articles  and  features  are  accurate,  Sarah   Berry   accepts  no  liability   for   reader  dissatisfaction.     The   opinions  expressed   and  experiences   shared  are   given  by  individual   authors  and  do  not  necessarily  represent  the   views  or  opinions  of  the  publisher.    Please  ensure  you  verify  that  the  company  you  are  dealing  with  is  a  registered  trading  company  in  France  and/or  elsewhere. <<The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly>>  est  édité  par  Sarah  Berry,   La  Bartière,   79130,   Secondigny.   Tél:   05  49  70   26  21.    Directeur  de  la  publication  et  rédacteur  en  chef:  Sarah  Berry.   Crédits  photos:  Sarah  Berry,   Clkr   et   morgeufile.com.  Impression:  Raynaud  Imprimeurs,  zone  industrielle,  BP13,  79160,  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize.    Dépôt  légal:  aôut  2013  -­‐  Tirage:  5000  exemplaires.    Siret:  515  249  738  00011  ISSN:  2115-­‐4848

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

What’s On... August 2013 1st August  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Chef  Boutonne See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 3rd  August  -­‐  Karaoke  Night At  Bar/Brasserie  Vue  du  Chateau,  Bressuire.    Please  see  advert   on  P.28   for  details. 4th  August  -­‐  Saxophone  concert  ‘Sax  en  Fête’ At  Logis  de  la  Chausée,  Gourgé  at  5pm.  See  full  details  on  P.8. 5th  August  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Limalonges See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 7th  August  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Aigre See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 8th  August  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Champniers See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 9th  August  -­‐  Cockney  Themed  Night At  A  La  Bonne  Vie,  Le  Beugnon,  7.30pm.  See  advert  on  P.30  for  info. 9th-­‐10th  August  -­‐  Mad  Hatter’s  Music  Festival A  fab   weekend   event   at  Mad  Hatter’s   Kitchen,  Caunay.  See   advert   on  P.8  for  details. 11th  August  -­‐  Jazz  Concert  &  Craft  Market At  Chateau  of  Cherveux.  Entry  fee  12€   (5€  for  Under  12s)  includes   a   free  guided   tour  of  the  Chateau.    The  market  opens  at  2.30pm,  visits   start  at  3.00pm  and   the  concert  in  the  courtyard   begins  at  4.30pm.     Ample  free   parking,  no  need   to  reserve.    Contact   Jim  Hutchison  on   05  49  06  16  48. 13th  August  -­‐  Picnic  ride  at  La  Chapelle  Thireuil With  Les  Ecuries  du  Saumort  -­‐  please  reserve  a  place  on  05  49  05  30  75. 14th  August  -­‐  Kiddies  Craft  Morning At  The  Market,  Luché-­‐sur-­‐Brioux.    For  details  see  advert  on  P.9 15th  August  -­‐  Village  Family  Fun  Day At   Loubillé,  79110   from   12   noon.     For   more   info,   please   email:   frenchvillagediaries@gmail.com. 16th  August  -­‐  Pie  night   At   Bar/Brasserie   Vue   du   Chateau,   Bressuire,   with   music   from   Guitarist/Sitarist  Didier  Ramdine.  See  advert  on  P.28. 16th  August  -­‐  Music/Bistro  Night At   Mad   Hatter’s   Kitchen,  Caunay.   With   A  Vee   &  Andy  Em.     See   advert  on  P.27. 18th  August  -­‐  Disco  Night  with  DJ  Jeff At   Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux   at  8pm.     See  advert   on  P30   for   details. 21st  &  25th  August  -­‐  Les  Murs  ont  des  Oreilles See  full  details  on  P.5  “Walls  Have  Ears”. 24th  August  -­‐  Live  Music  Night  with  Daddy  Mass At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux  at  8pm.    Please  see  advert  on  P30. 30th  August  -­‐  Traditional  Folk  Dancing  Evening At   the   pigeonnier   de   Pouzay   (Béceleuf),   free   entry,  all   welcome.     For  details  please  call  06  81  23  55  19. 30th  August  -­‐  Jazz  &  Blues  Evening At  A  La  Bonne  Vie,  Le  Beugnon,  7.30pm.  See  advert  on  P.30  for  info. 30th  August-­‐6th  September  -­‐  Expat  Camping  Rally At  Puy  Rond  camping,  Cornet  79300.  See  advert  on  P10  for  details.   31st  August  &  1st  September  -­‐  Walks  of  Discovery Chance   for  Artists  to  come  together   and  paint   local   sights.  See  full   details  on  P.10.

Monthly services  at  the  English  speaking  Church  in  Deux-­‐Sèvres Jassay The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,     has  a   Home   Group   Service   at   Jassay  commencing  at   11.00am     every  2nd  Sunday  in  the  month.   It   is   held  at   the   home  of  Ann   White,  where   a   warm  welcome   awaits   everyone  for   a   time   of   worship  and  fellowship. Chef-Boutonne Church  Services  on  the  1st  Sunday  of  each  month  at  10.30am   at   The  Little  Stone  Church  in  Chef-­‐Boutonne.    After  each  service  tea   or  coffee  is  served   and   an  opportunity  to   meet   other  people  in   the  area. Parthenay Church  Services  on  the  4th   Sunday  of   each  month   at  10.30am  in   the  Presbytery  Rooms,  rue  de  la  Citadelle,  Parthenay,  opposite  St   Croix   Church.   After   each   service,   tea   or   coffee   is   served   and   everyone  is  invited  to  a  'bring  and  share'  lunch. For   further   informabon   about   locabon   of   churches   and   about   what   else   is   happening   near   you,   please   take   a   look   at   our   website   www.church-­‐in-­‐france.com   or   contact   us   at   office.goodshepherd@orange.fr

The Filling  Station  ~  Poitou-­‐Charentes The   Filling   Station   is   a   network   of   local   Christians   of   all   denominations  who  meet  together  regularly  for  spiritual  renewal  &   evangelism  purposes.    ALL  WELCOME. Please   see   our   website   for   details   of   meetings   and   spring   programmes  www.thefillingstation.org.uk  or  locally  contact   05  49  87  18  58  or  email:michael.willis@sfr.fr

What’s Coming Up...

7th September  -­‐    les  Jardiniers  du  Poitou  5th  Annual  Produce  Show Find  full  details  on  P.7 8th  September  -­‐  Fun  Dog  Show  at  St  Pardoux,  79310.  (See  ad  on  P.9) 21st  September  -­‐  The  DSM  Anglo-­‐French  Trade  Fair See  advert   on  P.2   for   details.     Some  Trade  stands   still   available.   Please  call  Sarah  for  information:  05  49  70  26  21. 21st  September  -­‐  Hope  Association  Party  in  the  Park In   aid  of  the  Winky  (blind   kittens)  Fund,  12.00pm  -­‐  12   am  at   the   Salle  Polyvalente,  16450  St   Laurent   de   Ceris.  For   details  call  Verity   Lineham  on  05  45  20  79  31. 29th  September  -­‐  Annual  Book  Fayre With  Art  &  Craft   stalls  +  fish  &  chips,  contact  paperbackjan@gmail.com   for  details  or  if  you  would  like  a  place.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

                                                                         

Looking for   Authentic,   Fresh   Products  from  Our  Region?  

Paperback Jan Books  in  English

1st Aug:     Brasserie  Vue  du  Chateau,  Bressuire  79300.  10am  -­‐  12pm 1st  Aug:     Bar  le  Palais,  St  Aubin  le  Cloud  79450.  2pm  -­‐  5pm   2nd  Aug:   Bar  de  la  Paix,  Thouars  79100.    12pm  -­‐  2pm 2nd  Aug     Le  Tipsy  Bar,  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize  79160.  4pm  -­‐  6pm 3rd  Aug:   Cafe  Le  Chauray,  St  Maixent  l’Ecole  79400.  10am  -­‐  1pm 4th  Aug:     Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux  79160.  2pm  -­‐  4pm 7th  Aug:     Café  Cour  de  Miracle,  Vouvant  85120.  2.30pm  -­‐  4.30pm 8th  Aug:     Pause!  Cafe,  L’Absie  79240.    2pm-­‐  5pm 9th  Aug:     Jan’s  home,  La  Ferrière-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  79390.  11am  -­‐  4pm 28th  Aug:    Jan’s  home,  La  Ferrière-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  79390.  1pm  -­‐  6pm   29th  Aug:  Le  Relais  des  2  Moulins,  Clessé  79350.    4pm  -­‐  6pm 30th  Aug:  Le  P’tit  Bar  Boucard,  Ménigoute.    4pm  -­‐  6pm For  more  info  contact  Jan  on: 06  08  30  73  29  or  email:  paperbackjan@gmail.com

Mr T’s Friterie

Open 6.30

-9pm

With regular venues at:

                           F    oire         16170  (27th  month) • Aulnay    17470    (from  6pm)  •          Rouillac   • St  Hilaire  de  Villefranche  17770 • Gourville  16170                   • St  Jean  d’Angély  17400 • Loulay  17330 • Matha 17160

+ Bignac Campsite - 6th & 20th August + Aulnay Saveurs Nocturne - 2nd August

+ See www.frying2nite.com  for  details  or  call  06  02  22  44  74

Reel Fish & Chips Traditional English style Fish & Chips

2nd Aug Village Hall, Tigne 18H30 - 21H00 7th Aug The Canteen, Etusson 18H30 - 21H30 9th Aug Bar Tabac, Bouille-Loretz 18H30 - 21H00 10th Aug Bar Vue du Chateau, Bressuire 18H30 - 21H00 21st Aug The Canteen, Etusson 18H30 - 21H00 22nd Aug Bar Tabac, St Martin de Sanzay 18H30 - 21H00 23rd Aug Bar Tabac, Genneton 18H30 - 21H00 Tel: 06 04 14 23 94 or visit: www.reelfishandchips.net

Open Fish 4 Chip Fish, Chips & mushy peas!

6-8pm

Mondays: Bar Tilleuls, Champniers (near Civray) Tuesdays: Sauzé-Vaussais (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Wednesdays: Chef Boutonne (near Chateau) Thursdays: Sauzé-Vaussais - Lunchtime & Evening. (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Fridays: Mansle (Car park of Simply Supermarket) Tel: 06 37 53 56 20 or visit : www.mobilefishandchipsfrance.com

The Thursday  weekly  market  of  La   Mothe   St-­‐Héray  fulfills  all  these  functions.   In   addition   this   summer,  a  novelty.     On   the   1st   Thursday  of   July,   August,   September   and   October,   the   market   will   run   throughout  the   day.  Local   residents  and  residents   of   nearby   villages  and  tourists  can  take  advantage  of  this  opportunity  to   find  products  that  will   delight  the  taste  buds  and  other  small   pleasures.  Do  not  miss  this  opportunity! Information  :  05.49.05.01.41.

Local Markets • • Tuesdays: • • • Wednesdays: • Thursdays: • • Fridays: • • Saturdays: • • • • • • Sundays: Mondays:

Benet 85490 Lencloître (1st Monday in month) 86140 Lezay 79120 Coulonges-sur-l’Autize 79160 Thouars 79100 Parthenay 79200 Sauzé-Vaussais 79190 Niort 79000 Thouars 79100 Melle 79500 Chef-Boutonne 79110 Airvault 79600 Niort 79000 Coulon 79510 Saint-Maixent-l’École 79400 Neuville-de-Poitou 86170

Photo: Lisa Roberts

                                                                                             

“Walls Have Ears" Classical Music Festival The 11th  edition  of  the  Classical  Music  Festival   Les  Murs  ont  des   Oreilles  will  take  place  between  the  21st  and  25th  August.    The   festival  aims  to  present   classical  works  in  a  slightly  more  informal   and   private   setting,   often   in   private   houses   or   places   where   concerts  are  not  usually  held. The  artists  are  of  a  high  quality  and  the  concerts  are  very  popular   so  booking  is  advised  (05  49  64  73  10  or  05  49  64  82  45).     Tickets   are   10€   full   price,   and   9€   reduced   rate   (students,   unemployed).    Free  for  the  under  14s.     A  three  concert  pass  is  available  for  23€  or  4  concerts  for  30€. • Wednesday  21st   August,  8.30pm   at   Cuvier   Hall,   Museum   of   Airvault:    "Offenbach  et  la  diva  Hortense" • Thursday  22nd  August,  8.30pm  at  Chillou  Church:   “Bach,  Biber,  Geminiani  Baroque  Sonatas” • Friday  23rd  August,  8.30pm  at  Marnes  Church: Brahms  "Spring  Sextet" • Saturday  24th  August,  8.30pm  at  Assais  Church: "Septet  op.20"    Beethoven” • Sunday  25th  August  5pm  at  St  Loup  sur  Thouet  Church: "Les   Claviers   Réunis",   organ   and   trumpet,   Mozart   piano   quartet,    Bach  5th  Brandenburg  Concerto.

The National Holidays, Religious and Feast Days 2013 Thursday 15th  August....... Friday  1st  November......... Monday  11th  November... Wednesday  25th  December.

Assumpbon of  Mary (Assomp&on) All  Saint’s  Day (Toussaint) Armisbce  Day  (Armis&ce  1918) Christmas  Day  (Noël)

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Hobbies, Clubs & Associations... Book Club  Thouars.    Do  you  enjoy  reading  a  cracking  good  story?   And  talking  to  others  about  it?  Do  you  live  in  north  79,  south  49   or  north  86?  Come  along  to  our  book  club..... Contact  Alison  Morton  at  info@bookclubthouars.fr  for  more  details.

Cycling Group Do  you  enjoy  cycling?     I  am  a  keen  cyclist  and  looking   for   others   to   meet   up   with   me   for   outings   once   or   twice  a  week.    Purely  for  leisure  and  very  informal  with   a  coffee  stop  en  route.  I  live  at  Pamplie,  near  Secondigny. Contact:    steve.coupland@hotmail.com    /  05  49  28  24  06

Zumba & Line Dance (bilingual)

Now taking  registrations  for   2013/2014   season.  FREE  first   class.     Classes   at   Bressure;   Salle   de   gym   Coeur  d’O,   and   Breuil-­‐Chausée;  la  Broglienne Contact  Caroline  at  www.wingyboots.com  or  call  05  49  74  13  17

Open Door Lending Library Over 7000 fiction and non-fiction books and DVDs Open Tuesday and Friday mornings from 10am to midday at 18 rue Pierre Pestureau, Civray (86400) Individual membership 6€, family membership 10€ www.opendoor-civray.com

Book Group....meeting 2nd Thursday of the Alone in  France? We  are  a  group  of  people  living  alone   in  the   L'Absie  area  who  meet   regularly  for  coffee  and  lunches.    We   meet   on  the  1st  and  3rd  Tuesdays  at  11am   for  coffee  at  the  Pause  cafe  in   L'Absie.    Our  lunches  are  at  different  venues  each  month.  There's  a   warm  welcome  if  you'd  like  to  join  us.   More  details  from  Frank  05  49  69  80  47.

Franglais Thouars The   Thouars   ‘Franglais’   group   meets   every   Wednesday   from   19.30h   to   21.00h,   in   the   Association’s   centre   at   7   rue   Anne   Desrays,  Thouars,  for  conversation  in  English  and  French. We   welcome   those   of   all   nationalities   who   would   like   to   participate.  Either  come  along  to  see  us  one  evening,  or  contact  us   at:  Mobile:    06  52  21  92  34  ~  Email:    jcbed@orange.fr

Association Meridien Green We are   an   Anglo-­‐French   group   which   was   founded   in   2001   for   mutual   understanding   of   each   other's   language   and   culture.   We   meet   twice   weekly   in   the   Salle   des   Associations   in   St   Coutant,   79120.     The   best   way   to   find   out   more   is   to   visit   our   website   -­‐   www.meridiengreen.asso.fr  or  contact  Maureen  Dalby:   05  49  29  94  50.  The  name   of  our  group  comes  from   the  fact  that  St   Coutant  is  on  the  Greenwich  Meridian! Le   Tallud   Boules   en   bois   are   offering   sessions   every   Wednesday   from   16h   to  18h   from  April  through  to  September   2013  at   the  parc   de   Loisirs,   Le   Tallud.    Everyone  is  welcome  to   come   and   play   or   learn   the   game   of   boules   en   bois.   We  have  all  the  equipment,  just   turn   up   for   half   an   hour   or   more   for   a   bit   of   exercise   and   socialising.   Details   from   Rosemary   Williamson   rw.williamson@orange.fr

The Harmonics Singing   Group.   Based   in   the   Salle  

d'Annexe behind  the  mairie  in  Civray.  We  meet  each  Wednesday  from   2.00pm   to  4.00pm.   No   experience   necessary   just   a   willingness   and   commitment   to   learn.   We   sing   all   sorts   of   music   and   in   several   languages,  whatever   the  music  dictates.  We   are   a  small   and  friendly   group  who  would  love  to  meet  you. Contact:  Dolly  Ait  Boualou:  05  45  22  89  32  or  sylvia.murray@wanadoo.fr

Through the Lens Group Local photography group meets on the last Monday in each month to chat about all things photography! New members welcome. For further information contact: Ian Gawn: 02 51 00 84 52 or Brian Preece: 05 49 72 09 94

month from 3pm at Christies Tea Room & Bookshop, Gençay, 86160. Take a look at the Book Group page on the website: www.chezchristies.com for more information.

Craft Café  Creatif

Do you   enjoy   knitting   or   sewing,   crochet   or   papercraft,   but   prefer  to  do   it   in  the  company  of  others,  over  a  cup  of  tea  and  a   piece  of  cake?  if  so,  why  not  come  and  join  us  in   L'Absie  for  an   enjoyable   afternoon   with   like   minded   people.   For   further   details   contact   Margaret   on   02   51   69   50   32   or   email   knight.margaret@orange.fr  

2nd Sunday Motorcycle Club www.2ndsundayclub.fr If you would like to attend our coffee mornings please contact us via the website........New members always welcome!

Rubber Bridge:would any of you bridge players out there in the Deux-Sèvres, be interested in making up an occasional 4? Email David Rowe: djfrowe@hotmail.com or' phone 05 49 63 26 57.

Les Amis Solitaires We are  a  group  of  people   living  alone  in  France.    We  meet  up   for   coffee  mornings  from  11am. Every  2nd  &  4th  Thursday,  The  Lemon  Tree,  Sauzé  Vaussais. Every  3rd  Thursday  in  Ruffec.      More  details  from  Gwen  on  05  49  87  91  79  ~  email  gwanshep@gmail.com A R E  Y O U A M O D E L R A I L W A Y ENTHUSIAST? If so, join a group of likeminded modellers who meet on a monthly basis to visit members' layouts and swap information. We are based on the DeuxSevres/Vendee border but also have members in the Vienne and Charente. If you are interested please contact Gerry Riley for more information on 05 49 63 34 01. Secondigny Running Club... Put the bounce back in your step. Join our friendly and supportive running group. All abilities welcome. Email Kelly for more details: kellyencezelle@hotmail.co.uk

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Getting Out & About... Les Jardiniers Du Poitou by Terri  Laverick Les  Jardiniers  du   Poitou   Gardening  club   meetings   are   held   every   month  in   the  Salles  des  Fetes  in  Verruyes  (79310),  and  usually  have   between   forty  to  fifty  attending   members  each  month.    We  are   a   friendly  group   of   people,  some   very  experienced   gardeners,  and   some,  like  me,  mere  beginners  (although,  honesty  compels  me  to   say  that  I  have  been  a  “beginner”  for  many  years!).

If you   fancy   joining   the   gardening   club,   come   along   to   the   Produce  Show  or  alternatively,  we  have  our  next  meeting  on  24th   October.    You  will  receive  a  warm  welcome.    

The club   was   formed   in   the   beginning  of  2009  and   has  grown  in   strength  since,   and   we   have  members  from  all   around  the  region.     We  have  been  on  visits  to  nurseries,  garden   shows,  had  talks  from   local   experts   and   also   from   members   of   the   club.     One   of   our   favourite   visits   is   the   annual   Mushroom  Hunt   at   a  local   chateau.     The   July  meeting  covered   a  talk  on   pests  and   diseases,  a  talk  on   growing  asparagus  (from  a   novice   gardener),  and   another   of  our   members,  who  has  a  deep  interest  in  the  local  weather,  gave  a  talk   on  the   information  he  has  collated   over   the  past  ten   years  which   showed   that   our   perceptions   of   previous  years   were   not   always   correct.    Some  years  were  not   as  good  as  we   thought   and  others   were  far  better. Last  year  our  annual  Produce  Show  moved  to  the  Chateau  Le  Theil,   79450  near  St-­‐Aubin-­‐le-­‐Cloud.    It  was  a  great  success   and  we  shall   be  there  again   this  year   on   7th   September  where  once   again  we   will   be   entertained   by   the   Keynotes   Choir.     The   produce   show   committee   have   completed   most   of   their   organisational   work   and   now   await   the   day   with   bated   breath,  hoping  that  there  will  be  plenty  of   items  of  produce  on  show  and   lots  of   visitors   to   gaze   in   amazement   at   the   size,  quality  and  quantity  of  exhibits. Future   events   planned   are   a   trip   to   the   Chateau   Villandry   to   see   their   magnificent   gardens  and  then  a  little  later,   our   annual   Christmas   picnic-­‐ style   lunch,   with   probably   a   Christmas   type   gardening   presentation   to   round   the   day   off.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Donʼt forget to mention ʻThe DSMʼ when responding to an advert!

Saxophone Concert in

Gourgé

The 2013   summer   programme   of   La   Chaussée   des   Arts   will   feature   the   accomplished   Saxophone/Piano   duo   HARAR   with   Paul   Lacombe   (Saxophones)   and   Thomas   Amilien  (Piano). Their   concert   SAX  EN  FÊTE   will   take  place  Sunday   4th  August  at  the  Logis  de  la  Chaussé,  79200  Gourgé,   starting  at  5.00  p.m. Paul   Lacombe,  a  native   of   Ethiopia,  spent   his   youth   in   Parthenay   where  he  was   introduced  to   the   Saxophone   at   the   age  of   11  at  the   École  de  Musique.     At  the  age  of  17,  he  had  already  completed  the   first  part   of   his  studies  at  the  Conservatoire  de  Poitiers.      He  moved   to   Montpellier  where   he   worked  with  David   Vincent   and   then  to   Versailles   where   he   received   his   first   prize  with   special   mention.   2006   found   him   at   the   Conservatoire   Supérieur   de   Musique   de   Paris   where  he  graduated  with  a  Diplôme  Supérieur   de  Musique  in   2009. Paul-­‐Fathi   works  solo,   with   orchestras,  and  in  a  variety  of  eclectic   jazz   and   modern   music   groups.     He  is  reputed   to  be  one  of   the   world´s   best   soprano   saxophone   players,   his   technical   skills   are   unique.     He   teaches   saxophone  at   several   conservatoires   in   the   Paris  area,  has  been  invited  to  play  in  more  than  20  countries  and   actively   supports   UNICEF´s   work   for   the   cultural   education   of   children  around  the  world.

piano accompaniment   at   the   Conservatoire   in   Créteil   and   has   specialized   on   lyrical   themes.     He   regularly   accompanies   Valéria   Altavar  and  Elise  Dabrowsky  in  a  repertoire  of  Lieder  and  Opera.  He   is  co-­‐founder  of  the  Compagnie  des  Rugissants,  a  group  working  on   interpreting   selected   monumental   lyrical   works   from   the   20th   Century  to  the  present.     As  part  of  this  activity  he   directed  his  first   Opera  ‘Von  Heute  auf  Morgen’  by  A.  Schoenberg.    The  productions   include   the   use   of   videos   to   study   new   lyrical   forms.     He   was   musical   director   of   the   film  Surgir   by  Grégoire   Letouvet.     He  wrote   Séquences   parallèles     for   3   singers,   piano,   a   dancer   and   a   video   installation   for   the   Festival   Poitevin   de   Création   Contemporaine   -­‐   Le   souffle  de  Equinoxe. The   HARAR  duo  was   formed  by  Paul  Lacombe  and  Thomas  Amilien   after   they   had   met   as   students   in   Poitiers.   HARAR   studies,   interprets   and   reinterprets   saxophone  music   from   the   early   19th   Century  to  the  present  time. The  programme  of  SAX  en  FÊTE  features  an  overview  of  Saxophone   music   including   early   European   pieces   requiring   exceptional   technique,  Argentinean  tunes  and  exquisite  Spanish  melodies. We  are  looking  forward  to  a  fascinating   eve n i n g   w i t h   t wo   exc e pt i o n a l   musicians   with  local   roots   and  world-­‐ wide  fame. ADMISSION  12,00  € Reservations  are  recommended: Tel  05  49  63  91  31

Thomas Amilien   started   studying  music   in   Poitiers  but   soon  went   on   to   the   CRR   in   Paris   to   specialize   in   Piano   accompaniment,   orchestration  and   composition.     There,  he  also  studied   orchestra   direction  with  Alain  Sabouret  and  Philipe  Nahon.    Thomas  teaches  

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Church Wall Paintings

personages and   their   actions  rather   than  stand  alone   works   of   art.     However,  that  being  said,  they  are  works  of  art  in  their  own  right.

by Howard  Needs Information  about  church  wall  paintings  can  be  found  in  part   on   the   internet,  in  specialized  books  and  sometimes  a  good  dissertation  can   be   found   in   churches.     I  started  to  take   an  interest   in   them  about   four   years  ago  when  we  happened  to  visit  two  churches  in  the  Indre   whilst   on   a  trip   more   devoted   to  George   Sand.     The   churches  in   question   at   Nohant-­‐Vic   and   Gargilesse   house   two   well   preserved   collections   of   paintings   and   on   examining   my  photos   at   home   I   started  to  search   for  more  information  and  so  became  involved  with   these  paintings  ,  Peintures  Murales,  as  an  amateur  photographer.

Also these  days  most   of  the   churches  of  that   time  have  lost   their   paintings   due   to   age   or   enthusiastic   renovations   by   new   brooms   sweeping   clean.     One  can  find   everything   from  dubious  scraps   of   paintings  on   walls   to   collections  covering  more   than   half  the  wall   surface  of  the  church.    All  are  faded,  all  are  damaged  to  a  greater  or   lesser  extent,  practically  all  have  been  restored.     However,   my  own   reaction  when  entering  a   church  and  allowing  my  eyes  to  adjust  to   the   lighting   is   being  so   thankful   to   the   people   who   have   funded   restorative  work  and   to   the  skill  of  the  restorers  and  their  patience   and  love  of  old  things.

Really there  are  two  types  of  paintings,  ‘fresques’  are  executed  using   a  moist  fresh  lime  based  substrate  and  natural  mineral   pigments  and   the   later   ‘peintures   murales’   which   have   more   in   common   with   normal  paintings,  using  a  dry  substrate  and   a  mixture  of  mineral  and   other   pigments.   The   fresques   are   more   durable   due   to   the   absorption  of  the  pigments  by  the  substrate  but  have  to  be  right  first   time. Churches  from  the  10th  century  and  earlier   through  to  perhaps   the   16th   century   used   the   paintings   as   theological   instruction   and   reminders   for   an   an-­‐alphabet   population.     The   walls   were   covered   with   scenes   from  the   bible  and  the  lives  of   the  saints,   covered   inside   and   sometimes   also  outside,  particularly  in  the   porch  or  entrance. If   you   have   in   mind   the   wonderful  frescos   of  the  Italian   c h u r c h e s   y o u   w i l l   b e   disappointed   because  what   we   have   here   are   the   works   of   itinerant   country   artists   who   were  more  adept   at   producing   the   stylized   representations   required  by  the  local  clergy  and   containing   all   sorts  of   clues   as   t o   t h e   i d e n t i t y   o f   t h e  

I am  a   photographer   and  I  take   and  print  photos   because  I  like   to   reproduce   what   I,   with   my   eye,  see;  the  form  and  patterns   of   colours   and   objects.     With   the  fresques  one  might  say  that   I  am  reproducing  the  artistry  of   another,   however,   there   is   a   personal  expression   in  the  work   where  the   precise  choice   of   details   and  the   manner   of  processing   and  printing  will   put   an  emphasis   on   that   which  the  photographer   sees  with  his  internal   visualization.     What  I  have  chosen  to  do  is  to   restore   or   emphasize   the   contrast   and   colour   and   using   existing   lighting  and  long  exposures  to  get  details  of  the  wall  surface  and  its   blemishes.    This  doesn't  result  in  the  best  quality  photograph   but  I   hope   I   show   something   of   what   the   artist   produced   all   those   hundreds  of  years  ago,  not  from  a  theological  point  of  view  but  from   a  human  point  of   view  -­‐  how  did  they  view  the  world,  what  did  they   wear,  what  tools  did  they  use,  did  they  have  a  sense  of  humour? Photos   that   I   have   taken   of   wall   paintings   here   in   France   are   currently  being  shown  in  the  Château  de  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l'Autize  until   mid   September   and   can   be  seen   as   part   of   a  guided   tour   of   the   Château  and  its  museum  which  is  conducted  in  French  and  English. Please   contact   the   Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize   tourist   office   for  times   and  details  on  05  49  06  10  72. www.ville-­‐coulonges-­‐sur-­‐lautize.fr/loffice_de_tourisme.html

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

News from  the  Pays  de  Gâtine!  

Carnets de Croquis

The French  Social  Assistant

On Saturday  31st  August   and  Sunday  1st  September  2013  we  are   proposing  several  guided  “walks  of  discovery”  for  those  interested   in   local   heritage  and   nature,  and  especially  for   artists  who   would   like   to   plant   their   easels   or   open   their   sketchbooks   at   the  most   beautiful  sites  in  the  communes  of  Ardin,  Béceleuf,  Faye-­‐sur-­‐Ardin,   Fenioux,  Puy  Hardy  and  St  Pompain.

by Julia Salvat

The Antennes   Médico-­‐Sociales   (otherwise   known   as   the   AMS),   are   the   offices   where   you   can   make   contact   with   the   social   assistants.  They  have  six   branch  offices  in   the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.    For   the   Gâtine,   the   branch   office  is   in   Parthenay  and   there   are   14   smaller  welcoming  points  dotted  around  the  area  where  you  can   make  an  appointment  to  see  a  social  assistant.   The   AMS   is   responsible   for   helping   anyone   who   has   need   of   assistance  in   sorting   out  matters  of  health,  work,  housing,  home   help,  child   protection   and  aid   for   the  elderly   and   handicapped.   Their   job   (and   that   of   the   social   assistants)   is   to   ‘accompany,   listen,   inform   and   help’   and   they   work   closely   with   various   partners  and  local  offices. As  they  are  involved  with  people  of  all   ages  and   every  aspect   of   life,  they  are   an  important  French  office   to   know   about.  It’s   for   this  reason  the  Pays   de  Gâtine  has  asked  them  to  present  their   work  to  the  English  speakers  of  the  area  on  21st   October  2013  at   10.00am  in  the  Salle  des  Fêtes  de  Viennay.   Via   a   presentation   and   case   studies  of  different   situations   they   will  try  to   provide  a  picture  of  how  their  services  work  in  France   to  guide  and  inform  English  speakers.   Further   information   will   be   sent   out   nearer   the  date  but  in   the   meantime  please  look  at  the  website  www.gatine.org:  Guide  for   Newcomers.  

Lavoirs (where   the   week’s   washing   was   done   communally),   footbridges,  pigeonniers  (you  can  house  several   thousand  pigeons   in  them),  porches,  farms,  river  banks,  copses,  rabbit  warrens  ...  The   valleys   of   l’Autize,   Fenioux,  Saumort   conceal   numerous  treasures   awaiting  creative   eyes  and   hands   to   commit   them  to   canvas  and   paper. This  event   is   free,  it   is   not   a  competition  and   there  are  no  prizes   (but  photos  of  your   works  will  be  used  by  the  communes  in  their   tourist  publicity,  if  you  allow).    All  artists  are  welcome  including  the   young  and  beginners  of  any  age). At   the   end   of   the   afternoon   on   the   Sunday   there   will   be   an   exhibition  of  all  the  works  at  the  Pigeonnier  de  Pouzay  (Béceleuf).   There   will   also   be   a   lunch   (12€)   at   the   Pigeonnier   for   the   artists   at   midday   on   Sunday.   GPS  Pouzay  :  46°  28’  43”  N  -­‐   0°  32’  10”   O. For   Information   and   enrolment,   please   email   gatineautizecommunication@orange.fr   or   call:  05  49  06  81  44  or  06  81  23  55  19

Julia SALVAT,  Pays  de  Gâtine.     Tel:  05  49  64  25  49  ~  Email:  julia.salvat@gatine.org Website:  www.gatine.org

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Fête de la Nature Fours à Chaux

by Dorothy  Hassell

The “Fête  de  la  Nature”  was  held  on  our  doorstep  on   Sunday  26th     May.     At   Benet  (85),  our  neighbour,  Jean-­‐Marie,  offered   his  fields   and   his   orchard   for   the   fête,   organized   by   him   and   the   local   mayor’s  office.    We  were  also  able  to  visit  his  limestone  kiln. In   1860,   the   Vendée   and   the   Deux-­‐Sèvres   was   covered   with   limestone   kilns.     The   new   railway   lines   put   the   coal   from   the   Faymoreau   mine   at   their   disposal.     A   railway   line   came   to   Benet   in   1869,  and   in   1873   a  new   l i m e s t o n e   k i l n   w a s   erected   to   replace   a   smaller   one.     The   new  kiln   was   specifically   made   for   Faymoreau’s   coal.     The   kiln   and   quarry  employed   50   people,  all  skilled  workers.   Its   electrification  was  finished  in  1920  and  it   had  to  be  modified  in   1958  when  Faymoreau’s  coal  mine  could   no   longer  supply  the  coal.     The   coal   had   to   be  brought   from   the   north   of   France,  and   then   from   Poland   and  the  USSR.     As  transport   became  expensive,  the   Benet   kiln   struggled   to   survive  and   was  eventually   shut  down  in   1980.   Jean-­‐Marie  bought  it   in  1982  and  had   it   listed   in   1994.     This   year   was   the   first   time   it   had   been   opened   to   the   public   and   1500  

people came   to   see  it!     The  Fête   de   la   Nature  was   RE ADER quite  a  success  and  included: ’s R EPOR • Guided   visits  of  the   kiln  and  the  quarry,  arranged   T in  both  French  and  English.   M.   Wilcox   showed   us   the   flora,   and   particularly   • the  wild  orchids  growing  in  the  quarry. • M.  Pellerin,  a  geologist,  explained  in   situ   all  the  rock  strata  and   fractures,   and   showed   us   some   beautiful   fossils.   The   old   Faymoreau  mine  is  now  a  museum  and  you  can  see  more  fossils   at  their  current  exhibition. • Beekeepers   brought   the   hives   from   their   grandfathers   and   fathers  and   also   some  contemporary   empty  hives  so   we   could   have  a  look  inside. • Some  truffles   were  buried   in   a  plot  and   some   very   clever   dogs   had  to   retrieve  them  in  less  than  a  minute.  Well  done  Kiva,  Dolly,  

Teeva and  the  others! We  had  tea  and  pain  d’épices,  and  it  was  a  great   day.     We  hope  for   further   open   days   in   the   future.   In   the   meantime   we   have   the   ‘Benet  Medieval’  to  look  forward  to  on  the  15th  of  September!

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

The Lost Roman Military Camp at Aunedonnacum (Aulnay)

by Tony  Barrett

Responding to   the   Gallic   revolts   of   27BC   and   21BC   the   Romans   were  forced  to  build   a  new  major  military  camp  (a  castrum),  at  the   junction  of  the  Roman  road    that   runs  from  Bordeaux  to  Autun  and   another   Roman   road   leading   to   Lyon.   This  crossroads   situated   at   Aunedonnacum,   the   imperial   “frontier”,   where   the   Argenson   ancient  forest   separated  the  former  provinces  of   the  Pictones  and   Santones  and  proves  that  the  unrest  had  shaken  the  whole  region.

A reconstructed artefact of the camp situated on the roundabout just south of Aulnay on the D950

Driving north  from  St.Jean  d’Angely  towards  Poitiers  on   the   D950  it   is   hard  to   believe  as   we   pass   the   church   at   Aulnay   de   Saintonge   that   this  was   near   to   the  site  of   a  very   important   Roman   military   camp  built  nearly  two  thousand  years  ago.

    Only  detected  by  aerial  photography  in  1976,  this camp  is  unique   because  it is   one  of   the   few  Roman  camps   inside  occupied  Gaul   at   the  beginning  of  the  1st   century,  and   the  only  one  whose  overall   plan  is   known  of  throughout  the South   West   and   Central   West   of   France.  

Detected by aerial photography conducted in 1976 by Jacques Dassié.

The installation  of  this  Roman  camp  on  the  outskirts  of  this  ancient   forest  was  not  accidental;  it   also  met  the  strategic  criteria  obvious   to   ensure   the  crossroads   remained  in  the  control   of   the  Romans.     Indeed,   the   primary   function   was   not   to   facilitate   the   transit   of   trade,  but   the  rapid   movement   of  the  Roman  legions  in  times   of   wars,  uprisings  and  other  insurgencies.    That's  why  these  "channels   that   were   controlled   by   the   imperial   administration"   i.e.   "by   military  means". The   military   presence   of   the   Romans   in   the   region   "border"   between   the   two   Celtic   tribes  of  Pictones   and   the   Santones   and   was  assured  by  a  very  large  garrison  then  comprising  of  around  two   thousand  men  (three  Cohorts).  Their  presence  was  exercising  a  real   deterrent  effect   on   the  entire  region,  since  there  were  no   reports   of   rebellion   after   the   revolt   of   the   year   21   AD.   Despite   its   ephemeral   presence,   (less   than   twenty   years)   the   camp   played   both  a  strategic  role  in  military  matters  and   the  role  of  a  crossroads   that  gave  birth  to   the  present  town  of  Aulnay  de  Saintonge,  located   in  the  north-­‐  eastern  department  of  Charente-­‐Maritime. The   castrum  (fort)   of   Aunedonnacum   (Roman  name  of   Aulnay  de   Saintonge)  was  originally  built  in  21  AD  on  the  southern  slope  of   a   hill  overgrown  with  a  huge  hardwood  forest,  the  ancient   Argenson   Forest.     This   remarkable   castrum   was   located   at   a   place   called   “Rocheroux"  a  few  hundred  meters  west  of  the  later  Romanesque   church  St.  Pierre  d'Aulnay   and  the  Office  of  Tourism. The   legionary   camp   is   purely   a   creabon   of   Roman   origin   exclusively   military,   and   extended   over   an   area   of   over   6   hectares.  The  dimensions:   " T h e   c a m p   d r e w   a   rectangle   of   292   meters   (north-­‐south)   to   217.5   meters,   surrounded   by   a   double   ditch  (2.50m  wide)  on   an   area  of   6.35   hectares  and  5.4   hectares   of   inner   surface".     It  was   built   at   the   bme   of   Emperor   Augustus  and  lasted  well  beyond  the  reign  of  Tiberius.     A~er   the   establishment   of   the  Pax  Romana,  which  had   largely  contributed   to  pacify  the   Civitas  Santonum,  which  later   became  the  province   of   Saintonge,  the  military  camp  was   abandoned   about   the   year   43  AD.  during  the  peaceful  reign  of  the  Emperor  Claudius.   To  be  honest,  there  is  little  evidence  of  the  Roman  Camp  today,  just   fields.     The   D221  follows   roughly  the   Via  Principalis   through   the   camp. Footnote:  "Aulnay   de   Saintonge"   is   an   ironic   name,   since  Aulnay   has  never  been  part  of   the  province   of  Saintonge,  but   originally  in   the   Poitou.   It   was   not   until   the   early   nineteenth   century   that   "Saintonge"  was  added,  possibly  a  mistake  by  the  Post  Office.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Combined Services Support Group (CSSG) by Terri Laverick The Reaction   Theatre’s   next   production   is   possibly   going   to   be   called  “What  the  Dickens?”    I  say  possibly  because  we  are  still  very   much  in  the  planning  stages  and  also  considering  the  availability  of   actors,  stage  craft   and   back  stage   people  and   support   functions.     Paul  Chandler,  who   directed   “The  39   Steps”   aided   by  one   or   two     others,  are  working  on  a  production  which  will  be  centered  around   Charles  Dickens  and  the  Christmas  period.     It  will  include   sketches,   music   and   singing  and   will  involve   our   members  in   not   only  the   Theatre  section   but   also  the  Keynotes,   The  Art   Scene,  Costumes   and  Props.  Interested  in  joining  in  the  fun?  Send  me  an  email. We  are  still  selling  the  Reaction  Theatre  Alternative  Calendar  Girls   Calendar   and  it   is  pleasing   to  be   able  to  report  that  we  have   now   sold  over  700  which  will  generate  a   profit   of  over   7,000  euros  for   our   English  and   French   Cancer   Charities.     As  the   calendar   covers   the  remainder  of  2013  and  the  whole  of  2014  it  is  still   a  very  good   buy  and  more  importantly,  for  a  very  important  charity. We  recently   had  a  theatre  group  based  in  Paris   asking  if   we  had   any  props  or   scenery   left  from  our  Calendar   Girls  production   that   we   could   lend   them   and   when   they   heard   we   had   produced   a   calendar  they  asked  for  two  to  be  sent  to  them  express  delivery!     If   you   go   to   the   apple  festival   in   Secondigny   later   this  year   you   might  recognize  our  sunflowers,  which  were  used  in  the  final  scene   of  the  play  on  “Johns  Hill”.     Bits   of  our   scenery  end   up   in   many  different   places,  which   is   a   credit  to   those  of   our   members  who  spend  many  hours  building   and  painting  them.     Our   singing   groups,   The   Keynotes,   completed   two  performances  in  July   and   have   more   booked   for   September.     Margaret,   our   musical   director,   is   extending   our   Friday   afternoon   sessions   with   special   tuition   for   beginners   and   extra  tuition  for   our   more  advanced   singers.     We   have   French   and   English   members   and   sing   songs   in   both   languages,  but   not  at  the  same  time.     Come  to  think  of   it,  yes  we   do  but  that’s  another  story.    If  you  fancy  joining  us  just  send  me  an   email,  don’t  be  shy,  if  I  can  do  it  anyone  can!!

Well, time   seems  to   have  come   round   very  quickly   since  I  last   wrote  for  the  magazine.    The  summer  appears  to  have   arrived   at   long  last  and  the  steady  stream  of  visitors  has  begun   in  earnest,   which  means  it  goes  very  quiet  on  the  meetings  front. Our   one  outing   in  July  was  the  bi-­‐monthly  meeting   which   was   held  at   the  vineyard   of   Pierre  and   Brigitte  Van   Den  Boom  in   Le   Puy   Notre   Dame.     Some   of   us   gathered   at   the   Aire   de   la   Martiniere   just   north   of   Thouars   so   that   we   could   travel   in   convoy  for   those  not  sure   of  the  destination.    No  business  was   discussed,  but  a  committee  meeting  will  shortly  be   organised  to   discuss  progress  on  the  Beer  Fest. On  arrival  of  our  group  of  25,  Pierre  did  a  tour  of  the   vines,  tufa   tunnels  and  wine  making  areas  and  gave   a   talk  on  the  making  of   wine  and   the  history  of  the  vineyard,   this  was   for  the   benefit   of   those  who   had   not   been   before.     It   is   well   worth   a   trip   to   a   vineyard   if  you  enjoy  wine,  and  sampling  the  produce  is  usually   the   best  part   of  the  trip,  although  not   for  the   driver!     After   the   trip  round  the  vineyard,  we    gathered  in  the  Salle  and  were    given   a  taste  of  many  of  the  wines  produced   there.     The  lunch,  a  very   nice  buffet,  was  accompanied   by  wine  and  the  dessert   was  also   served   with  a  pleasant   rosé  wine  which   blended   well  with   the   fruit   salad.     It  gave  us  an   understanding  of  how   the   flavours   of   wine  can  enhance  and  compliment  different  foods.     The  “Beer   Fest”  organisation  is  coming  along  well;  the  beer  has   been   ordered,   several   types   of   sausages  have  been   tested   and   we   now   know   what   sausage  we   shall  be  providing   on   the   day!     The  choir  and  musicians  have  been  booked  and  best  of  all,  tickets   should   be   on   sale   shortly.     Please   remember   to   keep   19th   October  2013   free;  entry  will   be  by  ticket   only,  so   watch   this   space  for  further  information.

Don’t forget   our   Calendar   is   still   for   sale   at   the   following   four   venues  and  will  remain  so  for  the  rest  of  the  year:  Restaurant  A  La   Bonne  Vie  at   Le  Beugnon, Café  des  Belles  Fleurs  at  Fenioux, Pause!   Cafe  at  L’Absie  and  Cafe  Cour  du  Miracle  at  Vouvant. So   let  me  have  your  news  and   views  and  if  you  want  to  join  any  or   all  of  our  groups,  send  me  an  email. John  Blair:  johnblair@btopenworld.com

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny.

Tel: 05  49  70  26  21  ~  Email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

For a  full  list  of  our  advertising  rates,   please  phone  05  49  70  26  21    for  an   advertising  pack  or  download  from  our   website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

ARTicles

by Josie Bounds

Kandinsky’s continued  path   to  the  absolute Wassily Kandinsky Cossacks 1910-11

In Munrau-­‐Steffelsee   1908  we   can   see   how  Kandinsky  begins  to   strip  away  the  representational,  reducing  recognisable  elements  of   the  landscape.     Although  we  can  recognise  this   is  a  painting  of  the   landscape,  the   colour   palette   Kandinsky   uses   here   shows   us   his   heightened   sense   of   colour,   where   he   is   beginning   to   push   the   boundaries,   and   the   colour   patches   give   the   picture   its   special   depth  and  perspective.

Wassily Kandinsky Landscape with Red Spots 1913

This was  an  intense   period  of  time   for  Kandinsky;  Europe  felt  like  it   was   on   the   brink  of   destruction   through   the   constant   changing   political   and   social   ideals.   Pre   First   World   war   paintings   by   Kandinsky   often   conveyed   a   world,   which   was   on   the   verge   of   destruction.   In   Landscape   with   Red   Dots   and   Black   Lines   1913   Kandinsky   is   moving   away   from   any   form   of   figuration   in   his   compositions,  these  paintings  were   Kandinsky’s   response  to  what   was  going  on  around  him. ‘Painting  is  like  a  thundering  collision   of  different   worlds  that   are   destined  in  and  through  conflict  to  create  that  new  world  called  the   work.’  Painting   with   Three   Red   Spots  1914  and   Black  Spots  1921   are  both   characterised  by  a  powerful  sense  of  movement,  created   by  contrasting  light   and  dark  areas   of   colour,  linked   by  diagonals.   Conventional   perspective   has   disappeared.   Instead,   forms   and   colours  are  layered  and  juxtaposed,  interacting  to  create  a  swirling,   three-­‐dimensional  effect. In  1921   Kandinsky  left   Russia,  he   had   fallen  out  of  favour  with  the   Russian  Revolutionary  Artists,  his  paintings  were  rejected  because   they  were  seen  as  too  individualistic  and  bourgeoisie.

Wassily Kandinsky Munrau-Steffelsee 1908

Wassily Kandinsky Black Lines 1913

Wassily Kandinsky Munrau Mountain Landscape 1910

The influence  of  Cezanne  can  be  seen  through  colour  and  form,  like   Cezanne,  Kandinsky  uses  blocks  of   colour   to   reduce  the   painting   into  what  he  would  later  on  describe  as  it’s  very  essence. We   can   see   Kandinsky   moving   away   from   the   representation   towards  a  more  abstracted  image.  For   example,  Munrau  Mountain   Landscape   1910,   Kandinsky   has   simplified   the   mountains   to   triangular   pyramids.   His   use   of   blocks   of   colour   flattens   and   simplifies  the  composition. Cossacks   1910-­‐11   Kandinsky   is   moving   further   away   from   the   representation,   within   the   composition   he   has   simplified   the   shapes,  you  can  still  sense   traces  of   the  landscape,  but   the  overall   effect  of  the  painting  is  abstract.

Wassily Kandinsky Painting with Three Spots 1914

Wassily Kandinsky Black Spots 1921

Find Josie  Bounds  at  Le  Studio,  79240  Le  Busseau www.monpestcoeur.info Page 14


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY More from  local  writer  Alison  Morton...    Please  see  back  issues  of   ‘The  DSM’  if  you  would  like  to  see  previous  articles.

The Next Book

You’ve written   your   book,   edited   it,   sent   it   off   to   your   agent/ publisher   or   published  it   yourself.    It’s  selling   online  and  in  shops   and   the   sales  figures  are  growing  steadily.    You’ve  been  blogging   and   tweeting  and   doing  guest   posts   to   support   your   marketing.     You’re  immersed  in   your   book’s   world;  you   love   your   characters,   you  know  the  places  they  live  intimately  and  you  know  what  drives   them.

Item For Sale? B/W advert only 15€ incl. photograph.

Time to  throw  all  that  away,  unless  you’re  writing  a  series.    Time  to   write   the  next   book,  or   if  you’ve  started,   to   crack  on  with  it.    But   just   before  you  do,  consider   two  things:  fear   of  success  and  using   lessons  learnt.   Fear  of  success If  your  first  book  was  successful  –   good  reviews,  satisfactory  sales,   fame  –   you   may  hesitate  to  start  tapping  on  the  keyboard   again.   You’re  nervous  to  follow  it  up,  nervous  you  can’t  write  something   as  good,  nervous  of   your   readers’  expectations.    You  worry   you’ll   be  revealed  as  a  one-­‐book  wonder.     This  isn’t  quite  writer’s  block,   it’s  more  a  case  of  “success  block.” You’re  more  worried  about  how   successful   your  second  novel  will   be   than   of   actually   finishing   it.     You’re   more   haunted   by   the   success  of  your   past   work  than  focused   on   your  current   or   future   work.   Most   writers   produce  at   least  one  duff   book.  Well,   not   duff,  but   one  a  little   duller,  less  stylish,  less  enticing  for   the  reader.     But  the   next  one  may  be  a  diamond.    The  more  books  you  write,  the  better   you   get   and   the   more   likely   you   are   to   produce   attractive   and   exciting  books. Using  lessons  learnt Writing  a  second   book  is  different  from  the  first  in   some  ways  and   exactly  the  same   in   others.     The   most   immediate  lesson   comes   from  comments,  notes  and  amendments   from   the   editor  of  your   first   book.     I   ran   more   checks   for   consistency   in   character   behaviour   and   timeframes  in   my  second   book   as   a   result.     My   critique   partner   had   checked   the   first   book   carefully   for   overwriting   and   so   I   was   very   aware   of   that   particular   danger   when   writing  the  second.     And   another   plus   -­‐   sometimes  I  had   taken   my  editor’s   comments  personally  on   the   first   manuscript,   but   this  time   I  was  much   more  objective.  We  were  on  the  same   team  and  had  a  common  goal. The   other   big  advantage   is   that   you   know   what   the   process   is.   However   you’re   published,   you   know   what’s   coming   and   can   prepare  in  advance. The   positive  side  of  the  fear   of   success  is   that  thanks  to   readers’   willingness  to   write  reviews  you   have  an  idea  of   what  they  like  and   want.  Many  have   been  kind  enough  to  discuss  in  detail   what   they   liked  about  INCEPTIO  and  what   they  would  like   different  in   future   books.    Gold  dust  for  any  author!   You  have  absolutely  no  idea  if  your  second  novel  will  be  as  unique,   more  resonant,  or   just   downright   better  than  the  first.    Will  it   sell   more  copies,  touch   more  lives   or   get  more   stars  on  Amazon  and   Goodreads?     But   if   it   continues   to   exist   only  in   your   head,  then   you’ll  never  know... Happy  writing!

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny.

Tel: 05  49  70  26  21  ~  Email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Cookery for Self-Caterers The recently  revised  French  Holiday   Cookery   Book   is   aimed   at   British   self-­‐catering   holiday-­‐makers   going   to   France.     The   book   is   split   into   sections   for  no   cooking,  cooking  on   one   hob,  cooking  on   two   hobs  and   desserts.    There  is   a  useful  glossary   at   the  back  and   all   ingredients   are   translated   into   French   with   more   comprehensive   information  on   fish   and  shellfish. The  book  is  the  brainchild  of  travel   photographer   Liz   Garnett   who   has   spent   20   years   travelling   regularly   to  France  as  well  as  two  years  living   in  Calais.     “The   book   came   about   because   I   either   camp   or   go   self-­‐catering   when  I  travel  around  France.    I  have   always  taken  piles  of  cookery  books   and   wanted   to   create   the  ultimate   cookery   book   for   when   I   am   travelling  in  France.    All  the  recipes   are  simple  and  the  book  easily  fits   into   a   handbag  and   all   ingredients   are  translated   into   French”  said  Liz   Garnett.

Above: Author Liz Garnett

So what   are  you  waiting  for?     French   Holiday  Cookery  is  available   from  www.lulu.com  and  will  soon  be  available  from  Amazon.

Alison Morton  writes  alternate  history  thrillers,  blogs  about   wriZng  and  Romans  at  h\p://alison-­‐morton.com/blog/  

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Congés: the word of the month by Sue  Burgess

Probably the  most  common  use  of  the  word  congé  (plural  congés)   is  holiday,  vacation,  leave. In   August   you  will  see   the  sign   Congés   annuels   (annual   holidays)   on  the  doors  of  many  shops  and  other  establishments. “Quand   seras-­‐tu   en   congé?”   (When   will   you   be   on   holiday/ vacation?)   “Lundi  est  mon  jour  de  congé”  (Monday  is  my  day  off.)   “Pierre  sera  en  congés  pendant   deux  semaines”  (Pierre  will  be  on   holiday   for   two   weeks.)   “Je   serai   en   congé   la   semaine   prochaine”  (I'll  be  on  holiday  next  week). Congés  payés  are  paid  holidays.     In  France  every  salaried   worker   has   the   right   to   paid   holiday   whatever   type   of   contract   he  may   have.     There  is  just  one  condition  -­‐  the  worker   must  have  worked  in   the  company  for  one  month.     The  worker  accumulates  2  and  a  half   days   of   holiday  per   month.     The   year,   as   far   as   paid   holiday   is   concerned,  runs   from   the   1st   June   to   the   31st   May  and   so   you   need  to  work  in   the  company  for   the  whole   of  this  period  to  have   the   right  to  the  full  number  of  days.      So   12  months  of  work  give   the  right   to   12  x  2.5  days  (working  days  are  Monday  to   Saturday,   Sunday  is  not  counted  and  neither   is  1st  May)  or  30  days,  and  so  5   weeks. Unpaid  leave  is   congé  sans  solde.  Sick  leave  is  congé  maladie  and   of   course  we  can  also  find  congé  maternité  or  congé   paternité  or   even  congé  parental.

Vocabulary /  Vocabulaire  : congé  annuel....................................

annual holiday

congé formation...............................

study leave

congé maladie..................................

sick leave

congé maternité...............................

maternity leave

congé parental..................................

parental leave

congé paternité................................

paternity leave

congé sabbatique.............................

sabbatical leave

congé sans  solde............................... unpaid  leave être  en  congé  parental.....................

to be  on  parental  leave

être en  maladie,  en  congé  maladie...

to be  on  sick  leave   informal  be  off  sick

jour de  congé  ...................................

day off

prendre congé  .................................. take  leave prendre  un  jour  de  congé  ................

take a  day  off

The word  congé  also   means  notice.  Donner  son   congé  means  to   hand  in  one”s  notice. “J'ai   donné  mon   congé  la   semaine  dernière”   (I  gave   (handed   in)   my   notice   last   week).     Congédiable   (adjective)   means   due   for   discharge,  able  to  be  dismissed;  congédier  is  to  dismiss. If   you  are   out   for   the  evening,   when   you  are   tired,  you   can  also   prendre  congé  de   quelqu'un  (to  take  one's  leave  of  someone).  “Il   est  tard,  nous  allons  prendre  congé”  (It's  late,  we're  going  to  go). And  so   with  that,  je  prends  congé  de  vous  jusqu'au  mois  prochain   (I'll  leave  you  until  next  month).

Please mention ʻThe DSMʼ when responding to an advert Page 16


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Take a Break... DSM Easy  Crossword Across: 8.   Synthebc  silk-­‐like  fabric  (5) 9.   Narrow  band  of  rubber  used  to  hold     things  together  (7) 10.   Make  steady  progress  (7) 11.   Overwhelming  feeling  of  fear  (5) 12.   Provide  with  sufficient  finance  (8) 13.   Item  of  footwear  (4) 15.  Newborn  human  (4) 17.   Summer  bedding  plant  (8) 21.   Spanish  title  or  address  for  a  man  (5) 22.   Precisely  accurate  (7) 24  .  Area  disputed  between  Pakistan     and  India  (7) 25.   Precise  (5)

DSM Toughie  Crossword Across: 1.   All   going   well   when   Fanny   up   and     died  disastrously  (4,3,5) 7.   Copper  put  out  badly  in  A  and  E  gets     newsreader’s  assistance  (7) 9.   Bend  respectfully,  they  say,  if  you  want     to  get  a  large  branch  (5) 10.   Badly  made  dairy  product  from  the  Low     Countries  (4) 11.   Grabbed  a  handful  of  eggs  before  the     newspaperman  (8) 12.   PS.  Replacement  extracting  promise     from  downhill  runner  (6) 14.   Going   on   about   Viagra   tediously     inside  got  on  my  nerves  (6) 17.   Being  willing,  struck  an  attitude  after     hissing  character  returned  (8) 19.   Got   nothing  from  period  of  inactivity,     but  reached  final  leg  (4) 22.   Sweet   containing   energy   for   relative     development  (5) 23.   Guides  emerging   from   wild  storm   in     North  East  (7) 24.   Demonstration   of   one   pair’s   tent     construction  (12)

Quiz-tastic!

Down: 1. Ensnare  (4) 2.   Wealthy  or  powerful  businessman  (6) 3.   Supply  the  motivation  for  (7) 4.   Type  of  fuel  (6) 5.   Glad  (5) 6.   Offensively  unpleasant  smell  (6) 7.   Frozen  dessert  (8) 12.   Russian  peasant  woman’s  headscarf  (8) 14.   Horse  shoer  (7) 16.   Expel,  drive  away  (6) 18.   Person   with   special   knowledge   or     ability  who  performs  skillfully  (6) 19.   Permanently  large  area  of  frozen  land  (6) 20.   An  act  punishable  by  law  (5) 23.   Short  ballorina’s  skirt  (4)

Down: 1. Fit  up  a  side  embroiled  in  notoriety  (5) 2.   Common  eccentric  can’t  sue  in  this     fashion  (7) 3. Bar   charts  can   be   a  device   to  provide     support  (4) 4.   Rarebit   better   with   new   recipe?   I’ll     be  the  judge  of  that!  (7) 5.   Sounds  like  Homer’s  usual  complaint       -­‐  needs  a  raise?  (5) 6.   Died   unexpectedly   after   church,   and     was  told  off!  (6) 8.   Once   upon   a   time,   units   used   were     windless  water  suppliers  (4) 12.   Pressure   mounts   on   journalist   before     worker  can  become  a  bore  (6) 13.   A   number   of   those   in   the   woods  are     creeps  (7) 15.   A  kind  of  toil  employed   about  the  last     message  in  the  Middle  East  (7) 16.   Joint  or  border?  The  same  difference    (4) 18.   This   pea   resembles   a   container   for   a     weapon  (5) 20.   Large   number   out   of  bounds  in  trouble     with  ship’s  officer  (5) 21.   First  family  member  to  be   converted  to     ancient  culture?  (4)

With thanks  to  M.Morris

New monthly  quiz  by  Roland  Sco].....how  many  can  you  get?

1) Which  musician  presents  the  TV  programme  “Later  With...”?

8)  Which  part  was  played  by  Lois  Maxwell  in  the  James  Bond  films?

2) Which  folk  singer  and   comedian  began  his  career  at  The  Boggery   in  Birmingham?

9)  Which  Shakespeare  character   is  the   son  of  King  Priam  and  the   lover  of  Cressida?

3) Which   drug,   used   to   treat   heart   disease,   is   prepared   from   foxgloves?

10) What  is  Lysergic  Acid  Diethylamide  more  commonly  known  as?

4) In  the  TV  series  “ The  Likely  Lads”,  who  played  Bob? 5)  Which  film  star   was  known  as   “the   man  with  a  thousand  faces”,   and  was  the  first  to  portray  ‘ The  Phantom  of  the  Opera’  on  screen? 6)   Which   British   actor   appeared   in   “Kind   Hearts   and   Coronets”,   “Star  Wars”  and  “ Tinker  Taylor  Soldier  Spy”? 7)   Who   collaborated   with   Jim   Henson   in   the   creation   of   The   Muppet  Show?

11)  What  is  Leslie  Grantham’s  most  famous  TV  role?   12)  Who  sang  with  E.L.O  on  their  only  No.  1  British  hit  “Xanadu”? As  always,  assuming  you  have  12   correct  answers,  each  answer  or   part   of  an  answer  has  a  connection.  Award  yourself  an   extra   point   if  you  can  spot  it.  Copyright  RJS  2013. Find  the  answers  on  our  website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr Page 17


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

A-Z of the Communes in the Deux-Sèvres A-Z of the Communes of the Deux-Sèvres. by Sue  Burgess CLUSSAIS LA POMMERAIE Situated   in   the   heart   of   the   Poitou-­‐Charentes   in   the   canton   of   Sauzé-­‐Vaussais,  the  commune  of  Clussais  la  Pommeraie  is  half  way   between   Poitiers,   Niort   and   Angoulême.   There   were   600   inhabitants  in  2010. The   church   is   situated   in   Clussais   and   there   was  certainly   a   first   church  here  in  the  10th  century.    The  first  church  was  certainly  built   by  the  monks   of  the   abbey  of   St   Junier   de  Nouaillé-­‐Maupertius.   The  present  church  dates  from  the  12th  or  13th  century  and  legend   has   it   that  this  church  was  built   by  the  Fairy  Melusine  during  the   night.     According   to   the   legend,  the   inhabitants  of  la   Pommeraie   had  begun  to  build  a  church  but  Melusine  preferred  Clussais.  Every   night   she   took   the   stones   from  the  Pommeraie  in  her  apron   and   left   them  at   Clussais.    One   night  her   apron  tore  and   she  dropped   the   stones   which   formed   ‘le   Montail’,  a  mound   of  red   earth  still   visible  near  Clussais. After   the   revolution,   the   church   was   in   a   pitiful   state.   Some   restoration  work  was   done  in  the  19th  century  and  the  bell  tower   was  made  safe  in  1841.   The  edifice   is  notable   because  of   its  strange  proportions.     The  bell   tower   porch,  with  its  two  bells,   dominates  the   long  nave   with   its   large  buttresses.  

COMBRAND Combrand is  situated  in  the  North  East  of  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres,  near  to   the  towns  of  Cerizay  (5km),  Mauleon  (10km)  and  Bressuire  (18km).     Combrand   has   a  very  dynamic   economy  with  more  than   250  jobs   particularly  in  the  wood  industry.    There  were  1141  inhabitants  in   2010.   The   first   traces   of   human   life   in   Combrand   go   back   to   the   Paleolithic  and   Neolithic  eras.     Hunting  tools  and  everyday  articles   have  been  found   in   the  area  and  particularly  in  the  village  of  Puy   Gazard.   The  name  Combrand  appears   in  a  series  of  12th   century  charters.   The   first   church,  of   which   some   ruins   remain,   was   built   at   this   period.    The  chateau  of  la  Patellière  dates  from  the  15th  century.    In   1794,   during   the   first   Vendée   war,  General   Marigny,   one   of   the   Vendée  leaders,  was   shot  to  death   in  the  Logis  de  la  Girardière  of   Combrand.    His  grave  can  be  seen  in   the  cemetery  of  the  commune   today.     The   chateau  of  Soulier   was   owned  by  Charles   le   Roux,  artist   and   MP  for  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres  during  the  19th  century. A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE • The  Church  of  Saint-­‐Jean • The   Château   de   La   Pastellière,   (15th   century),  listed   historical   monument.  It   was   used   as  a  military  hospital   for   the   wounded   Vendéens  during  the  first  Vendée  war  in  1793.  

The rows  of  seats   are   not   all  of  the  same  length.  They  get  shorter   as  you  go  towards  the  choir  and  this  gives  you   the  impression   that   the  nave  is  even  longer.   The   marsh  of  Clussais-­‐la-­‐Pommeraie   is   a  remarkable  ensemble   of   wet   fields   and  prairies   which   are  situated  in   a   dip   where  ditches   drain   water  towards  the  Bouleure,  a  tributary  of  the  river  Dive.    The   marsh  is  rich   with   flora  and   fauna   and   many  endangered   species   can   be  found   here   (tree   frog,   crested   newt,   the  copper-­‐coloured   butterfly  of  the  marshes,  the  Gentian  and  the  shrike).   A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE • Notre-­‐Dame   de   Clussais   church.   The   long   nave   and  the  round  apse. • The   Château   de   La  Girardière   where   Marigny  was   shot.  He   is   buried  in  the  cemetery  where  there  is  a  monument.   Right: The nave (photo by JP Berthonneau)

    • On   the   edge   of   the   commune   practically   in   Caunay,   the   miraculous   fountain  of  Fontadam

   

More ‘A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  of  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.’ next  month...

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

Health, Beauty & Fitness...

Are the Old Ways the Best? ‘The Marie   Antoinette   Diet:   Eat   Cake   and   Still  Lose  Weight’  written  by  Karen  Wheeler   is  based   on   the   eating   habits   of   the   18th-­‐ century  French   Queen   and   generations  of   French  women  since. The   author,   a   cake-­‐loving   former   fashion   and   beauty   editor,  gained   10kg   (1st   8lb)   while  living  in  France  and  was  determined   to  lose  it  for   health  reasons.    A  light-­‐bulb   moment   occurred   while   reading   a   biography  of  Marie  Antoinette. The   French  Queen  liked  sweet  things  and   ate   cake  for  breakfast,  but  seems  to  have   known   instinctively  what   scientific   studies   have   recently   shown:  for  example,  it  is  not  what  you  eat,  but  when  you  eat  it. Inspired  by  Marie  Antoinette’s  eating  habits,  and  using  a  recipe  for   the  health-­‐boosting  bone  broth  that   the  Queen  ate  for  dinner   every   evening,  the  author   created  a  diet  that  allowed  her   to  lose  10kg  in  10   weeks   –   while   eating   normally   most   of   the   time.     A   recipe   for   painless   and   delicious   weight   loss,   it   is   peppered   with   interesting   snippets   of   French   history   and   served   up   with   a   lot   of   modern   science  and  useful  health  tips.  Discover: • The  benefits  of  a  12-­‐hour  night  fast • Why  diets  that  ban  dessert  are  doomed  to  failure • What  we  can  learn  from  the  18th-­‐century  diet • How  to  kill  cravings  for  junk  food • The  (deeply  unfashionable)  meat  that  can  help  weight  loss • The   fats  that   you  should  be  eating  (they’re  not   the  ones   that  you   might  think)   • Nutritious  and  slimming  soups  for  every  season Karen  Wheeler:  Karen  Wheeler  wrote  for  the  Financial  Times  How  To   Spend  It  magazine  for  over   a  decade  and  is  a  former  fashion  editor  of   The  Mail  on  Sunday.  She  also  edited  the  health  and  beauty  section  of   The   London   Magazine   for   five   years.   She   is   the   author   of   three   bestselling  travel  memoirs  about  her  life  in  rural  France. Dr.  Mabel   Blades:  Dr.  Mabel  Blades  BSC  RD  is   a  registered  dietician   and  nutritionist  and  a  member  of  the  British  Dietetic  Association.  She   is  the  former   editor  of  Nutrition  and  Food   Science  and   has  written   numerous   papers   and   articles  as   well   as  a   book  on   nutrition   and   health. For  more  information  or  review  copies:  Tel   07815  609597  or  email   Lucy@sweetpeapublishing.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

2013 Beauty Recommendations... Samantha’s Tips to Using the Correct Eyeshadow Colour for Your Eye Colour

• For blue   eyes   stick   with   brown,   rose,   lavender   and   neutral  shades.  For  special  occasions  blue-­‐eyed  women   can  try  metallics,  both  silver  and  gold  work  well  plus  icy   pink  and   turquoise.  When   creating  these  looks  always   start  with  a  neutral  ivory  base   shadow  and  bring  darker  shadow  into  the  outer   corner. • Gorgeous   green   eyes   look   amazing  using   shades   like   lavender,   plum   or   lilac.   Gold   and   copper   are  fantastic   for   highlighting  green   eyes.     Brown  or   dark  green  eyeshadow   with   flecks  of  gold  are  also  terrific  choices. • For  medium  brown  eyes  you  can  truly  wear  almost  any  eye  colour;  green,  violet  or  bronzed   colours  are  my  personal  favorite  for  medium  brown  eyes. • Dark  brown  eyes  look  incredible  with  charcoal,  plum  and  forest  green  and  also  dark  brown   shades. A  tip  for  all  eye  colours  is  to  use  your  chosen  darker  shade  as  an  eyeliner  by  gently  sweeping  it   under  the  bottom  lashes  line. Samantha's  recommended  product  is  Mac  eyeliner  brush  266.  

Emma’s Summer Hairstyles for Kids

Fabulous hair   isn’t  always  just   for  adults.  For   the  summer   holidays  why   not  let   your  child  try  out  a  new  style.    A  great  hairstyle  always  starts  with   a   great   haircut,   so   find   a  stylist   that   understands   how   to   work  with   children

•For Girls   a   cute   classic   Bob   French   style   is   beautiful   and   easy   to   manage.  Ask  for   the   bob   to   be   layered   just   slightly  on   the   tips.  This   should  help  the  ends  roll  under  easily  on  their  own,  but  by  using  a  round  brush  when  drying   can  create  a  full  shiny  bob  with  bounce. • For  Girls  with  long  hair  take  a  peak  at   www.princesshairstyles.com  to  follow   step  by  step   guides  of  different  ideas  in  braiding  and  hair  up-­‐styles  for  princesses. • For  Boys,  long  hair  is  all   the  rage  these  days,  having  a  messy  textured  look  with  a  sleek  side   fringe.    But  also  in  at  the  moment,  and  a  favorite  of  my  son’s,  is  James  Arthur’s  influence  the   quiff:     hair  is  short  around  the  back  and  sides  using  a  number   2   or  3,  then   the  long  hair  on   top  blow-­‐dried  backwards,  trained  into  a  quiff  using  a  pomade  or  wax.  Teenagers  could  add   a  chunky  highlight  to  the  front  to  complete  the  trend. Before  the  kids  go   back  I  highly  recommend  investing   in  a  leave-­‐in  conditioner  spray  with   Tea  tree  oil,  in  order  to  prevent  nits. Charente  Hair  &  Make  Up Tel:  05  45  31  56  93  /  06  50  04  37  30  ~  www.charentehairandbridal.com

Our Furry Friends... HOOF (Horse Orientated Open Forum)

HOOF is  open  to  anyone  with  an  equine  interest.     You  do  not  need  to  own  a  horse!    We  meet  about  once  a  month   for  talks,  visits  etc.    Interested? Contact Jo Rowe on: 05 49 64 30 59

Equine Rescue France

We are always looking for new members and we are in need of donations so we may continue to help equines in France. Please support the ERF.

Please contact Equine Rescue France via their website www.equinerescuefrance.org

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

MAYDAY MES AMIS Mayday Mes Amis has  been  formed  to  help  animals  in  need  in   l'Absie  and  the  surrounding  area.   For  more  information  please  email:  jill.zub@sky.com. HELP  REQUIRED!    Hope  Association  is  looking  for  dry  storage  with   easy  access   for  their   ever   increasing   number   of   book  donations,   preferably  within  10kms  of  Sauze  Vaussais,  Clussais  La  Pommeraie   and   Lezay.   Please   contact   soomog4hope@gmail.com.   www.hopeassoc.org.

Phoenix Associason,   who   rescue   and   re-­‐ home   animals   in   need,   has   a   new   website.   Please  visit:   www.phoenixasso.com   and   find   out   what  you  can  do  to  help  animals  in   need   in  south  west  France!

Adoption Appeal: TOY.  A  One  and  a  half  Year  Old  Boxer  x  Labrador  Boy Funny  that  Toy  should  be  called  Toy,  as  all  he  wants  to  do  is  play! He'll  never   be   able  to   t e l l   u s   w h a t   h a p p e n e d ,   b u t   somewhere   in   his   past,   he   must   have   sadly  had  a   swipe   to   the   head,  which   has   left   him  blind   in   one   eye  and   deaf  on  that   side. Has   it   affected   his   looks   or   his  behaviour?  Oh  not  a  jot!  (the  only  treatment  he  requires  are   eye  drops  and  eye  cleaning).  Toy  would  absolutely  adore  another   lively  dog   to   play  with  -­‐   all   he  wants  to   do  is  have  fun,  fun   fun!   Toy  is  very  friendly  with  cats  too.  Children,  of  course,  are  great  as   far  as  he's  concerned! If  you  are  interested  in  adopting  Toy  please  call  Jackie  &  Andy  on   05  53  52  06  23  or  email  Jackie.Axford@gmail.com More  photos  and  videos  of  Toy  are  on  the  Phoenix  website

Farah, a  beautiful  3yr  old  Doberman Farah  is  a  big  gentle  girl  and  very  different   now   to   when   she  was   first   brought   into   dog   psychologist   and   trainer   Julie   Stansbridge.  Several   sleepless   nights  later   and   Farah  has  recovered  from  the   stress  of  not  being  wanted   by  her   owner   and   finding   herself   far   away  from  her  old  home.

This lovely  mature  female  needs   an   owner   who   adores   and   understands   the   breed,  and   has   the  time   to   spend   with   her,  she   hates   to   be   left   alone   or   shut   away.     Farah   has   no   particular   problems   and   is   not   an   aggressive   dog,  but   she   would  be  better   suited  to  living  with  another  older  bitch  and  not   a   male.     Farah   has   been   sterilized,   micro-­‐chipped   (250268500337577)   and   primo   vaccinated   and   there   will   be   an   adoption  fee.     She  can   be  vaccinated  for  rabies  to  obtain  her   full   Passport   should   this   be   required,   when   she   has   her   booster   vaccination. This  is   an  opportunity  to  own  a  specialist  breed  by  someone  who   is   experienced.   Kindness   and   understanding   are   essential   and   where  possible  a  home  visit  will   be  required.  Julie  Stansbridge  will   also  be  happy  to  talk  to  any  interested  parties  about  Farah. If   you   think   you   can   give   Farah   a   good   home,   please   call   I s a b e l l e   n o w   o n   0 9   7 7   4 8   7 1   4 3   o r   e m a i l   a s s o . o r f e e @ l a p o s t e . n e t   f o r   m o r e   i n f o r m a b o n .     www.associason-­‐orfee.forumacsf.com/f49-­‐english-­‐corner  

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

No Good Deed Goes Unpunished! A few   years   ago   a  cat   had  a  litter   of   kittens   in   a  barn   in   a   small   hamlet.  She  and   the  kittens  were  “adopted”  by  its  owner  and   his   neighbours.   Some   of   the   kittens   became   house   cats   while   the   mother   and   some  others  enjoyed  the   freedom  of  the  barn,   whilst   still  permitting  their  human  subjects  to  bring  them  food. Over  the  years  the  population  expanded  until  one  day  the  people   decided  that  something  had  to  be  done  and  so   they  contacted   one   of  our   volunteers.  To   cut   a  long  story  short,  they  caught   the  cats   and  took  them  to  one  of  our   friendly  vets,  where  NALA  had  them   sterilised   and   identified.   One   of   the   inhabitants   of   the   hamlet   looked  after  them  until   they  had  recovered  from  the  operation  and   then  released  them.     Job  done,  end  of   story  except......  the  hamlet   invited   the   volunteer   to   dinner   to   thank   her   and   there   she   was   approached  by  someone  who  told  her  of  an  urgent  situation... A  few  winters  ago  an  octogenarian  who  had  some  cats  of  her   own   discovered   some   very   young   kittens   deposited   in   her   garden.   Clearly  they  had  been  dumped  there  by  someone  who  was   relying   on  the  lady's  good   nature  to  take  care   of   them.    She  couldn't   just   leave  them  to  die,  so  she  took  them  in  and  raised  them.  She  didn't   have   the   financial   means  to   sterilise   them   and   she   found   other   kittens  in   her  garden   in  subsequent   years.    Little  by  little  her  feline   population  grew  until  she  had  over  thirty. Sometimes   her   cats   (and   those   of   her   neighbours)   disappeared,   were  poisoned,  were  found  dead  or  returned  home  with  appalling   injuries.     Some  of  the  neighbours  were  unhappy  about  the  number   of  cats   and  made  complaints  to  the   mayor.     However,  no  solution   was   found   and   drastic   measures   were   being   envisaged   for   the   following  Friday,  which   is  when,  just  by  chance,  someone  from  that   town  met  our  volunteer   at  that   dinner.    Once  the  urgency   of   the   situation  was  explained  to  her,  our   volunteer   contacted   us  and  we   met  with  this  person  to  see  if  there  was  anything  that  we  could  do. As   a   result   of   our   meeting   we   went   to   see  the   octogenarian   to   discuss  the  situation  and   see   if   we  could   find   a  solution  that   was   acceptable  to  her.    She  agreed  that  we  could  take  away  some  of  the   cats   to   be  adopted   so   that   she  would   be  left   with  five,   sterilised   and   identified.    This  happened   during  the  weekend,  so  we  had  to   wait   until   Monday  before   we  could  go   any  further.    First  thing  on   Monday,   we   contacted   the   legal   department   of   the   national   association  30  Millions  d'Amis  where  a  very  helpful  lady  answered   our  questions  and   gave  us  advice.     She  also  contacted  the  Mayor  of   the  town  to  discuss  the  matter  and  reported  back  to  us. We   then   arranged   an   appointment   with   the   Mayor,   which   took   place  on  the  Wednesday.     In  the  meantime  we  made  an  appeal  for   help   on   our   website   and   Facebook   page.   Through   this   we   discovered   that   another   local   association   l'Ecole   du   Chat   Libre   Caillerot   was   also   involved   and   had   already   found   other   associations,  adoptants  or  foster  homes  for  many  of  the  cats. On  Wednesday  we  met  with  the  Mayor  and  explained  our  proposal   to  capture  and  place  the  majority  of  the  cats,  leaving  the  lady  with   five   sterilised   and   identified   cats.   We   also   arranged   with   her   neighbours  that   they  would  keep  an  eye  on   the   situation  in  case  of   further  difficulties.  This  proposal  would   solve  the  problem  without   any   unnecessary   expense   for   the   town.   The   Mayor   found   our   proposal  acceptable,  so  the  cat  exodus  began. By  the   end  of  Wednesday  over   twenty  cats  had  been  caught   and   taken   away   to   the   associations,   the   foster   homes   or   to   vets   for   sterilisation   or   treatment.   As   a   result   the   Mayor   cancelled   his   intended  actions. Over   the  next   few   days   most   of   the   other   cats   were  caught   and   hopefully  there  will  be  no  more  problems  in  the  future.

Thanks go  to  all  the  volunteers  who  helped  catch  the  cats  and  also   to   the   people  who   were  willing  to   adopt   a  cat   or   act   as   a  foster   family.  This   nationwide  mobilisation  that   saw  cats  being  reserved   from  as  far  away  as  Nice  and  Paris  shows  the  power  of  social  media   such  as  Facebook  in  bringing  people  together  to  solve  a  problem.   On   a  more  sombre  note,  it's  necessary  to  look  at  the  causes  of  this   problem  and  see  what  lessons  we  can  learn.  Firstly,  people  should   not   abandon   animals   in   the   gardens   of   animal   friendly   people   hoping   that   they  will   be   looked  after.  Not   only  is   abandoning   an   animal  illegal,  but  an   animal  is  its  owner's  responsibility  and  part  of   that   responsibility  is   dealing  with   the  consequences  of  unwanted   reproduction.     If  you  don't   want  your  cat  to  have  babies  then  get  it   sterilised:  it's  less   worry  for   you  and   it's  better   for   your   animal's   health. Secondly,  the  private   individual   should  not   have   to   deal   with   the   problem  of  stray  or  abandoned  animals:  this  is  the  responsibility  of   the  Mayor.  They  should  have  a  contract  with  a  fourrière  and  should   publish   at  the  town  hall  the  procedures  to  follow  if  one  finds  a  stray   animal. Most   importantly,  harming  or   killing  pets  is   illegal  and   punished  by   a  prison  sentence  or  a  fine.  We  are  carrying  out  a  survey  to  find  out   how  many  pets  have  disappeared  or  been  injured  or  killed   in   the   town.    If  it  proves  necessary  we  shall  inform  the  gendarme Nos Amis Les Animaux 85480 (NALA 85480). Tel: 07  70  31  54  59

Email: nala85480@hotmail.com www.nosamislesanimaux.com

APPEAL Banjo is   16   months   old   and   a  very   sweet   dog   weighing   just   over   13   kilos.   He   is   fine   with   other   dogs,   cats   and   good   with   well   behaved   children.   He   is   house-­‐trained   and   loves   cuddles.   This   little   dog   will   make  a  perfect,  loyal   family  pet.  He   has   the   enthusiasm   of   youth   and   enjoys   exercise.   He   would   benefit   Banjo from   a   family   used   to   dogs   and   willing   to   put   in   the   work   and   training   necessary   for   all   youngsters.   Currently   being   fostered   in   Niort   (79).   There   is   an   adoption   fee  of   120€   which   includes  the  first   primo   vaccination   (not   rabies  yet),   neutering  and   worming.   If   you’re   interested   in   adopting  Banjo,  please  contact   Isabelle  now  on  09  77  48  71  43  or   email  asso.orfee@laposte.net  for  more  information. For   more  dogs  and  particularly   kittens  for   adoption,  please  go  to   www.hopeassoc.org   After  a  successful  May  2013  Book  Sale  the  Hope  Association  has   been  able  to  make  donations  to  the  following  organisations:  SPA   Limoges,   Levriers   and   Co.,   Poor   Paws,   Felin   pour   l’autre   and   L’ecole  du   chat  libre  de  Poitiers.    Donations  are  also  on  their  way   to   the  following:  Association  Orfee  and  Twilight  Maison  Retraite   pour  Chiens. Thank  you   to  everyone  who   volunteered  and  helped  at   the  event   and   also  to  the  public  who  support  the  Hope  Association.  These   donations  will  make  a  difference  to  many  animals  lives. Page 22


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

The Great Outdoors...

Bonne Pêche

by Simon Tee

Today my   topic   is   “using   the   right   tools   for   the   job”.     Balancing  your   equipment   allows   all   the  individual   parts   to   work  to  their   maximum   efficiency   and   you,   the   angler,  to   get   more   pleasure   out   of   your  hobby. Choose  a  rod  with   the   right  level   of   sensitivity  and   thickness  for  your  target  fish.    The  line  weight  is  the   maximum   amount   of   force   the   line   can   take   without   snapping   (bear  in  mind  that  heavier  line  is  more  visible  to  the  fish). Reels  are  a  lengthy  topic,  but  simply  a  spinning  reel   is  easier   to  use   whereas   a  bait-­‐caster  is  more   accurate,  works  with  heavier   lines,   but   can   leave   you   with   a   mess   of   line   if   you   don’t   master   the   technique.     With   all   reels   you   set   drag;   that   is   the   amount   of   resistance  a  fish  feels  when  it  pulls  on  the  line. If  you  fish  for  small  fish,  under   about  5lb,  you   should   use  a  feeder   rod  or  a  float   rod.    These  rods  are  thinner  and  more  sensitive,  ideal   as  you  are  relying  on  the  rod  to  detect  the  bite.     Use  a  feeder  rod   for   fishing   on   the   bottom;   it   has   a   highly   sensitive   tip,   the   movement   of   which   indicates   the   bite.     Feeder   rods   come   with   different   sized   fluorescent   tips,   the   heavier   is   used   for   fishing  in   moving  water.     A   float   rod   is   generally   longer,   aiding   with   distance   as   you   are   casting  out   a   very  lightweight   float,  which   of  course   is   your   bite   indicator.     I  would   suggest   a  rod   length   of   about   12   or   13ft   for   roach  and  rudd  fishing  and  using  line  of  about  2-­‐6lbs.

Carp rods  are  a  thicker  diameter  (a  higher   test   curve).     The  higher   the  test  curve,  the  further   you  can  cast  out  (good  for   big  waters)   and   the  bigger   the  fish  you   can  handle.     When   carp   fishing  you   don’t  need   such  a  sensitive  rod   as  it’s  the  setup  of  the  reel  and  bite   alarm  that  tells  you  when  you  have  hooked  a  fish.     Use  a  fixed  spool  bait-­‐runner  reel  so  that  you  can   free  spool  (allow   the   fish  to   take  the   bait   and   travel   with  it   long  enough   to  get   a   good  hook  set). Next  month  I’ll  talk  about  terminal  tackle  –   what   goes   on   the   end   of  your  rod  and  line. Meanwhile,  now  that   the   sun  has   finally  emerged,   fishing   during   the  day  will   only  benefit  your   suntan.    Target   early  morning,   sun   rise  or   the  last  few  hours  as   the  sun   starts  to   set.     Feed  the  swim   patiently,  stepping  up   the   bait   as   the   fish   move   in.     And   don’t   forget  to  fish  the  margins,  no-­‐matter  how  shallow.     When  the  bites   seem   to   stop,  it   could   be  because  a  large  fish   has   moved  in  –  be   prepared  for  the  fight.

Bonne pêche, Simon Simon Tee  is  the  proprietor  of  2  coarse  fishing   lakes  in  Secondigny  (www.francefishinggites.com)

Small Colour advert only 34€

For either  rod  I  would  suggest  you  use  a  fixed  spool   reel  with  a  rear   drag   system   (this   puts   only   a   small   amount   of   pressure   on   the   spool,   and   once  the  fish   bites  you   can  either   turn   the   handle  or   engage  the  main  drag).

CONTRIBUTIONS.... We are always looking for new contributions for consideration in future issues. Do you have an experience to share? Are you a tradesman with a Top Tip? or perhaps an avid reader who would like to contribute a book review? Whatever it may be, either long or short, we would love to hear from you. You can call Sarah on 05 49 70 26 21 with any ideas, or send them on an email to: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

THE AMATEUR GARDENER

by Vanda Lawrence

At last   summer   is   here   -­‐   beautiful   sunny  days,   balmy   evenings,   fresh  produce  from  the   vegetable  plot  and  beautiful   flowers  in  the   flower   garden.     Apart   from  generally  keeping  the  weeds   in   check   and  dead-­‐heading,  all  our  hard  work  earlier  in  the  year  has  paid  off.     Our   most   important   task   in  the  garden   now  is  keeping  everything   watered.    I  like  to  use  this  time  to  look  at  the  garden  as  a  whole  and   decide   which   plants   are   not   well-­‐sited,  maybe   because   they  are   growing  too   tall  or  too  straggly,  which  plants  are  just  past  their  best   and   need  removing  and  what   new  plants  would  be  a  good  addition   to  each  particular  flower  bed. I   usually   choose   fragrant   plants,   be   it   in   flowers   or   foliage,  but   these   days   my   criteria   also   includes   being   bee-­‐friendly.     These   insects  need  all   the  help  we   can  give  them  to  increase  their  ever-­‐ dwindling  numbers.    There   are  about   20,000   different   species   of   bees  in  the  world  and   all   of  them  are  under  threat  at  the  moment,   mainly  because  of  pesticides. Bees   live  in  colonies   with   three   types   of   bee  in   each   colony:   the   queen,  the  worker  bee   and  the  drone.     Worker  bees  are  all  female   as,  of  course,  is  the  queen.    All  drones  are  male  and  their  only  job  is   to   mate  with  the  queen.    Her  only  job  is  to  lay  eggs.     Worker   bees   do  exactly  that   -­‐  clean   the   hive,  collect  pollen   and  nectar  to  keep   the  colony  fed,  and  look  after  the  offspring. Bumble  Bees  often  nest  in  the  ground  or  in  attics  under   roof-­‐beams.     If   you   are   interested   there   is   an   identification  chart  and  photos  of  all  the  common  species   on-­‐line   at   http://bumblebeeconservation.org/about-­‐bees/ identification/.    Also,  if  you  spend  time  in  the  UK  you  might   like  to  take  part  in  their  Bee  Watch  survey. Carpenter   Bees  are  solitary.     They   build   nests  for  themselves  and   only  feed   their   own  young.    They  are  so-­‐called  because  they  bore   through  soft   woods  to   lay  their  eggs.    These  wood   tunnels  can  be   up  to   10'  long  and   can  have  several  'rooms'  where   the  bees  store   their  eggs  and  food.

Honey Bees  on  the  other  hand  like  large  communities   and   their   colonies  can   live  for   several  years   because   they   huddle  together,  eating  honey  to  survive  the  winter  months.     The  Honey  Bee  queen  begins  laying  eggs   in  mid-­‐late  winter,  as  the   days  begin  to  get  longer.     She  rarely  leaves  the  hive  after  the  mating   period  during  which   she  makes  several  flights   to  mate  with  drones.     The  queen  lays  one  egg  into  each  cell  built  by  the  worker  bees.    The   egg  hatches  into  a  larva  which  is  then  fed   by  'nurse'  bees  (these  are   worker   bees  whose   specific   job  is  to   maintain  the  interior   of   the   colony).    After   about  a  week  they  seal  the  larva  into  its  cell  to  begin   the   pupal  stage  and   another   week   later  it  will  emerge  as  an   adult   bee.     Bees   produce  honey  by  collecting  nectar  from  flowers.    Nectar   is   a   clear  liquid,  80%   of  which  is  water  with  complex   sugars.     The  bees   store  the  nectar  in   a  second  stomach   then  return  to  the  hive  where   the   'workers'   remove   the   nectar.     Within   their   digestive   system   worker   bees   break   up   the   complex   sugars   to   simple   sugars   and   store  in  the  honeycomb  cells. Most  herbs  will   attract  bees  and  we  all   know  the  pleasure  of  sitting   near  the  fragrant  lavender  bed  listening  to  the  lazy  buzzing  of  bees   moving  from  flower  to  flower  collecting  nectar.    Echinaceas  are  also   a  good  choice;  not  only  are  they  bee-­‐friendly  but  they  are  beautiful   flowers   with   a   lovely   fragrance   and   their   young  petals   look  and   taste  lovely  in  summer  salads.     Echinacea  tincture  is  also  very  good   for  colds. Another   useful   bee-­‐friendly   addition   to   the   flower   bed   is   the   perennial,   Helenium,  also   know   as   'Sneezeweed'   because   in  past   times   its   dried   leaves   were  used  to   make   snuff.     These   days  it   is   known  to  produce  high  amounts  of  pollen,  which  could  be  another   reason  for   its  common   name.     Helenium  attracts  bees,  butterflies   and  hoverflies  with  its  abundant   supply  of  nectar.     It  is   a  good  ploy   to  encourage  hoverflies  into  your  garden  because,  even  though  the   adults  are   in  competition  with  bees   for  pollen  and  nectar,  hoverfly   larvae   eat   greenfly  -­‐   as   many  as   50   per   day!!     That's   not   to   be   sneezed  at!    (...    sorry,  couldn't  resist  that  one). So   now,  if  I  sit  by  the  lavender  bed  and  send  up  a  few   zzz's  do  you   think  my  other-­‐half  will  think  it's  the  bees?    Bye  for  now    ....    

Photo Below: The early bumblebee (Bombus pratorum) is one of the smaller bumblebees. It can be found throughout Europe, except for the Iberian peninsula. The specimen in the picture is a fully grown worker (female) – measuring 14 mm from head to abdomen. It is landing on an Echinacea purpurea flower. Source: Wikipeadia Commons © Bernie.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

CHARITY PARACHUTE JUMP!

WHY?    

WHEN?     WHERE?

To raise   funds   for   Pepis   Dog   Refuge,   Pedrera,  Seville.     Tuesday  23rd  July  2013. La  Rochelle  and  Ile  de  Ré.

Since Pepi’s   Dog   Refuge   opened   in   Seville,   Jane   and   Alan   have   helped   hundreds  of  dogs.     They  have  spent   their   life   savings  on   caring   for   them;   the   sick,   the   injured,   vaccinations,   castrations,   rehomings...the  list  is  endless.    They  never  have  a  day  off. In  the  past  year  Jane  and  Alan   have  had  more  than  their  fair  share   of  bad   luck.    First  of  all   a  Parvo   outbreak,  a  canine  killer   disease,     then   someone   threw  poisoned  meat   into  the   kennels  and  several   dogs   became   ill  and   some  died.     Severe  rain  in  September   2012   caused  the  first  mud  slide  straight  through  the  kennels.     A  second   one  hit   the  property  in  November  2012  and  Alan  became  ill  at  the   beginning   of   2013.     Since   then,   their   car   has   died   and   their   electricity   generator   packed   up.     In   May   2013   Jane   suffered   horrendous  pain  and  was  admitted   to  hospital.    The  last  straw  was   the  loss  of  their  home.    The  house  is  subsiding  after   the   numerous   mud   slides,   and   they   have   been   warned   to   move   out   as   it   is   dangerous! The  cost  of  running  Pepi’s  Dog  Refuge  is  enormous  and  no  financial   help   from   the   government   is   offered.     All   funding  is   by   way   of   fundraising  and  donations.

On Your Bikes...

The Le   Mans   24   hour   Velo   Race   is   fast   approaching,  held  at  the  Le  Mans  Bugatti   Circuit  on   24/25th  August. “Les  Templiers”,  a  team  of  eight  English   &  French   cyclists  from  the   Civray   area   are   raising   sponsorship   from   private   donations   towards   research   and   awareness   of   testicular   cancer,   and   have   corporate   assistance   to   help   fund   partial   event   costs   (cycling   attire).   Each   team   member   has   paid   their   own   entry   fee   and   equipment  costs.

David Brennan  has   chosen   to  help   Jane  &  Alan  by   taking  part  in   a   tandem  parachute   jump.     His   aim:   to   raise  6,000€.     It   will   cost   5,000€  to  fence  an  area  of   land   where  the  refuge  can   relocate  to   and  it   will  cost  a  further  1,000€   to  buy  a  new  electricity  generator.     Without   the  use  of  the  generator  it’s  impossible  to  use  power  tools   and  there  is  not   sufficient  electricity  for  the  day-­‐to-­‐day  running  of   the  Refuge.    Currently  Jane  and  Alan  only  have  a  small  generator   which  powers  some  lighting  at  night. David   is  hoping   for   your   sponsorship   -­‐  any  amount   will   help   this   Refuge  and  the  dogs  it  cares  for.     He   would   love  to  hear  from  you.     If   you   run  a  business,  why  not   sponsor   David  and   get   some  free   publicity! Sponsor  David  via  Paypal  -­‐    david.brennan@sfr.fr Here’s  the  website,  view  the  video  –  thrilling  stuff! www.parachutisme.net

If you  would  like   to  sponsor   ‘Les  Templiers’,  you  can  do   so  via  the     link  below  and  all  donations  will  be  very  gratefully  received. https://www.justgiving.com/LesTempliers24HR

Page 25


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Life on the Farm...

Now that  the  summer   fruits   are  in  abundance  we  have   decided  to   start  a  ‘Rumtopf’.    Basically  this  is  a  way  of   preserving  soft  fruit  for   the   winter.    You  need   a   large  pot  with  a  lid  -­‐  you  can  buy  specific   pots  for  this  and  we  managed  to  pick  up   two  at  a  vide  grenier.     Any   soft   fruit   can  be  used   and   it   was  traditional   to  do  this   in   order   of   the  seasons  i.e.  strawberries,  currants  raspberries  etc.     Then  add   sugar   (half  the  weight   of  the  fruit)  and   finally,   the   interesting  bit,   cover   it  all   with  dark  rum.   The   pot   doesn’t  need  to  be  filled  all  in   one  go   but  added  to  as  the  summer   progresses.     The  lid  needs  to   be  a  good   fit.    Leave  the   full  pot  for   a  few  months  to   be   used  over   winter  -­‐  I  can’t  wait. by  Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.

Well, after   a   long   wait   it   appears   that   summer   has   arrived.   Beautiful   clear  skies,  nice  and  hot  and  dry.    It  affects   everyone  in   a   positive  way;  happy  smiling  faces,  the  animals  love  lying  in  the  sun,   but   we   keep   a   careful   watch   on   the   pigs   as   they   are   prone   to   sunburn,  especially  the  pink  skinned   variety.     The  vegetable  garden   has   come   into   full   production   with  tomatoes,  cucumbers,  French   and   runner   beans  to   name   but   a  few.   Finally   we   must   mention   those  damn  weeds.     I  wish  I  could  produce  vegetables  that  were  so   prolific. We   had  a  batch  of  Guinea  fowl   and  chicken   eggs  in   the  incubator   but  sadly  nothing  hatched.    We  checked  the  eggs  afterwards  only   to  find  that  most  had  fully  formed  chicks  in  them.     We  suspect   that   there   is   a   problem   with   the   humidity  control   so  we   need   to  get  it   checked  out.    It   is   so   disappointing   when   that  happens.     The   latest   batch   of   meat   birds  (chickens)   have  come   back   from   the   abattoir.     Some   of   them   coming   in   at   over  3  kilos.     We  are  so   pleased   with  them  that  we  have  invested   in   some   9   month   old   breeding   stock   so   we   can   produce   our   own   eggs   rather   than   buy  them   in.     Next  to  go  in  the  incubator  is  more   Guinea   fowl   eggs   now   we   have   found  where  she  is  laying.    (We   will   use   a   different   incubator   this  time).

We are  trying  to  wean   the  last   of  the  lambs  in  preparation  for   the   ewes  to  go  back  with  the  ram.     It  is  proving  a  difficult   job  as  there  is   nothing   more   determined   than   a   lamb   that   wants   its   mother’s   milk.     They   have  been   over   and  under   fences,  and  this  morning  I   found   one   that   had  gone   through   the  fence  and   was  wearing   it.     Time  to  beef  up  the  defences  I  think! By  the  time  you   read  this   all   of   our   hay   will   have   been   cut   and   bailed  ready  for  winter.  It  appears  to  be  a  good  year   for  hay  so  it   should  keep  the  prices  down  for   those  of  you  who   need  to  buy  it.   Last  year   we   split   the  hay  50/50  with  the  farmer   who  cuts  it,  but   ended  up  buying  most  of  his  share  back.    So  this  year  we   will  keep   it  all  and  pay  him  for  cutting  and  bailing  it. The  gosling  with  the  funny  foot  is  doing  well  and  getting  around  as   if  there  was  nothing  wrong  in  the  first  place. Watering   is   now  taking  up   a   lot   of   our   day   with   the   polytunnel     needing   water   three   times   a   day  and   the   pigs   needing   a   daily   shower,  as  well  as  copious  amounts  of  water  both  to  drink  and  for   their  wallow.   We   had   a   picnic   for   the   Chasse   guys   -­‐   25   people   in   total.   We   cooked  a  whole   pig  in  the  ground,  South  Pacific  style.     A  great   day   was  had  by  all,  which  included  French   horns   and  trumpets,  gifts  of   flowers  and  wine  and  two  chickens  (live)! The   day  ended  with  a  shooting  competition  -­‐  only  air  rifles  but  still   an   interesting  combination  after  a  few  glasses  of  wine.    Jenny  came   out  top  lady  and  got  a  bulls  eye  or   the  mouche   as  the  French   say.   She  beat  most  of  the  men  (thankfully  not   me)  as  well.    The  wine   obviously  steadied  her  hand  -­‐   I’d  better  watch  my  step  now   I  know   she’s  such  a  good  shot! See  you  next  month.

Peter &  Jenny  Sebborn.  Breeders  of  pigs,  lambs  and  poultry.   La  Gauteliere,  79220,  Pamplie.    Tel:  05  49  28  38  57.

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Page 26


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Life, Food & Drink... French Village Diaries

by Jacqueline  Brown.

I’d like   to  start   this  month’s  piece   by  saying  “ Thank  You”   to  all  of  you   who   contacted   me   with   helpful   hints   to   try  when   making  scones   that   actually  rise.    I’ve  had  a   busy   few   weeks,   but   I   will   be   trying   them   again   soon,   so   fingers   crossed.   This  year  I   have  found   that  most   things   in   the  garden   and   orchard   have  been  a  little  late  to   get  going,  but  boy  have  they  made  up  for   it  in  quantity  and  quality  when  they  do.     The   cherry  harvest   was  fantastic  and  an   added  bonus  to  it  being  late  meant   that   for   the   first   time   in   our   nine   years   in   France  my  parents  were  able  to  eat  our   own  fresh  cherries.    If  I’m   honest   they   did  much   more  than  just  eat  them,  they   helped   with   the   picking,   washing,   stoning,  preserving  AND  eating  of  them.     They   were   also   very   useful   with   the   broad   bean  shelling,  but  as  my  Grandad   was  an  allotment  man  many  years  ago  I   think   they   had   a   bit   of   experience,   despite   the   ‘Grow   Your   Own’   bug   skipping  their  generation.   The   raspberries  definitely  seem  to  have  benefited   from  the  rains   earlier  in   the  season  as  this  has  been   the  best  crop,  both  in  terms   of   size   and   quantity   of   fruit   and   they  are   delicious   -­‐   especially   when  eaten  in   the  potager.    It  won’t  be  long  now  before  the  pears   and   plums   start   to   ripen   and   as  some   of   the  plum  trees   are   so   laden  with  fruit,  (the  branches  are  touching  the  ground)  I’m  going   to   be   busy.     Drying  this   years   cherries   was  very  successful,   so   I   think  I  will  try  doing  the  same  with  stoned  plums  too. The  courgettes  also  timed   their   arrival  with   Mum  and   Dad’s   visit,   but  as  they  don’t  quite  share  my  passion  for   them,  I  quickly  found   them  taking  over   the   kitchen   (the   courgettes,  not   the   parents).   Adrian  and   I  then  spent  a  few   days  away,  so   returned  to  find   the   potager  was   also  bursting  with  courgettes  and  squash,  putting  me   in  a  state   of  courgette  nirvana.  I  have   yet  to  make   a  start   on   the   chutney  and  relish   making,  but   I  have  established  an  early  morning   routine  of  soup  making  and  baking  before  it  gets  too  hot.     I’m  also   not   ashamed   to   admit   to   serving   up   courgette   omelette   for   breakfast,  griddled   courgette  salad   for   lunch   and   roasted   garden   veggies   (including  courgette)   with   couscous   for   dinner.   You   can’t   beat  meals  freshly  harvested  from  the  garden. I   am   again   helping   to   organise   our   village   family   fun   day   this   summer.   As   usual   this   will   be  held   from   12   o’clock  on   the   15th   August  in  the  park  behind  the  church   in  Loubille  79110,  just   south   of  Chef  Boutonne.    Please  bring  your  own  picnic  to  be  eaten  on  the   village   trestle   tables   set  out   in   the   shade   of  the  trees.  Games  to   amuse   young   and   old   will   be   supplied;   badminton,  table   tennis,   cricket   and   pétanque.   This   is   a   free   event   and   everyone   is   welcome.   If   you   would   like   more   information   please   email   frenchvillagediaries@gmail.com   For  recipes  please  email  me  at  frenchvillagediaries@gmail.com   or  visit  www.frenchvillagediaries.com  

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

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Tel: 05  49  70  26  21  ~  Email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

A Village of Dance & Fishing

Our Chickens...

The village  of  Vix,   located  just   off   the  D938  between  Fontenay-­‐le-­‐ Comte  and  Marans,  is  a  lively  place  in  the  Summer  months.    Proud  of   their   heritage,   the   inhabitants  share  their   love   of  folk  dancing  and   fishing  with  many  visitors  each  year.

I'm going  to  tell  you  a  story  about  our  chickens.    It  started  at  the  end   of  April  2013  when  Daniel  and  I,  together  with  our   neighbours,  Mick   &  Vanda  bought  some  chickens.

Established for  25  years,  the  village  has   its  own  traditional  Vendéen   Folk   Dance   group.   With   a   mix   of   men,   women   and   children   all   wearing  rustic  costume,  the  village  hosts  public  events  four   times   a   year  following  the  theme  of  a  traditional  local  marriage.

We chose  four  black  Marandaise  hens  and  four   common  red  hens,   both  breeds  reputedly  good  layers.     They  have  each   been  given   a   coloured  leg  ring  for  identification  and  have  been   'baptised':-­‐   Mick   &  Vanda’s  hens,  Eeny  is  red,  Meeny  is  green,  Miny  is  blue  and  Mo  is   yellow.    For  our   hens  it  is  yellow  for  Lily,  green  for  Rosa,  Prune  wears   blue  and  Cerise  has  the  red  bracelet.

Guests are  seated  in  the   atmospheric  and  lovely   Grange  du   Grand   Montnommé,  a  300  year  old  large  rustic  barn  decorated  with  objects   from  days  gone  by.     The  meal   of  locally  produced  fare  is   served  by   the  dancers  whilst  the  musicians  take  to  the   stage   for   singing  and   entertainment.   The  guests  are  invited  onto  the  stage  after   dinner   if   they  have  a  talent   for   entertainment,  so   bring  your   mouth   organ,   fiddle  or  best  singing  voices! Payment   for   this  soiree   is  au  bidon,  but  a  price  of  €18  per   head  for   adults  and  €10  for  children  over  the  age  of  5  is  suggested.    The  bidon   is  passed  around  towards  the  end   of  the  evening  and  guests  pay  the   suggested  price,  plus  a  little  extra  if  they  feel  the  evening  has  been   worth  it.    The   evening  starts  at  7.15pm  and  has   a  varied   finish  time,   usually  around  1am.  Places  are  limited  so  best  to  reserve  in  advance.   Wheelchair  users  can  be  accommodated,  but  please  mention  this  on   booking. In   addition   to   the  dance   group,  this   lively  village  also  has  a   group   of   local   experienced   fishermen,   who   still  teach  and   keep  alive  the  traditional  ways  of  net  catching  the  fish  that   live  in  the  rivers  and  canals  surrounding  Vix. Join   them  every  Wednesday  from  15h   to  22.30h   at  La   Grange  du  Grand  Montnommé  for  a  short   film  and  then   you   will   be   accompanied   to   the   local   river   bank   to   board  traditional  fishing  boats  for  a  guided  tour  of  how   the  forefathers  of  the  locals  caught   their   supper.    It’s  a   wonderful   chance   to   see   the   flora   and   fauna   of   the   Marais,  from  the  peace  and  tranquility  of  a  boat  gently  moving  along   the  waterway.

by Dany Soulard

They peck  grain   and  granules,   are  very  fond   of  salads  and   bread,   cackle   all   day  long   and   sleep   comfortably   together   at   night   in   a   roomy,  locked  shed  to  avoid  nocturnal  visitors. They   also   lay   eggs   of   course,   although   not   regularly   as   yet   because  they  are  still   young.    The   eggs   of   the   Marandaise   hens   are   dark   speckled   brown   while   the   eggs   of   the   red   hens   are   larger,   cream  coloured. The egg of a Marandaise hen After  all  the  bad  weather  of  the  last   few   months,   summer   has   finally   arrived   with   very   high   temperatures.    The   chickens  are  doing  well   and  enjoying  their  new   habitat,   but   early   one   July  morning,   beautiful   Cerise   was   found   dead;     Rosa  and   Mo   were  a  little  tired-­‐looking  but   went   out   into   their   run   with   the   others.     The   following   morning   Mo   couldn’t   descend  from  the  perch  -­‐  she  was  very  poorly. Mick,  Daniel  and  I  took  her   to  the  Vet  who  diagnosed  an  attack  of   red  mites.    These  tiny  insects  have  been   feeding  on  the  hens'  blood   and  have  caused   anaemia.    Unfortunately  it  was  too  much  for  Mo   who  died  at  the  Vet's  surgery.

A meal   in   the   barn   follows,   again,   consisting   of   local   fare   and   hopefully   some  fish!    Children   are  welcome  and  life  jackets  will   be   provided. The  tariff   for   the  fishing  experience  on  its  own  is  €5  per  person.   For   the  fishing  including  the  meal  ,  the  cost  is  €15  per  adult  and  €10  per   child  over  5  years.   For   more   information   and   reservations   in   English   contact:-­‐   Julie  Briggs  02  51  51  56  79  or  juliebriggs85@orange.fr In  French  contact:-­‐  Mme  Pousseau  02  51  00  61  26.

Dates for  your  Diaries...

• Dancing Spectacular  Fridays:  2nd/16th/30th  August.   • Fishing  every  Wednesday  until  28th  August.  From  3pm.

Hens Eeny, Mo and Cerise

The red  mites  are  a  nuisance  and  to  stop  any  further  infestation   the   coop  had  to  be  thoroughly  cleaned  and  treated.    So  on  return  to  the   hen-­‐house  there  followed  a  full-­‐scale  cleaning  operation:  burning  of   all   the   straw,   complete   removal   of   all   the   contents   of   the   coop   followed  by  top  to  bottom  pressure  washing  and  then  disinfecting   everywhere  and  everything. For   the   chickens   themselves   the   Vet   prescribed   medication   to   destroy  any  remaining  parasites  together  with  a  disinfecting  powder   for  their  bodies;  also  a  course  of  vitamins  to  deal  with  the  anaemia.     They  are  of  course  under  close  supervision  all  day. They  are  much  better  now  but  our  girls  are  probably  so   shocked  by   all  the  confusion  to  their  household,  they  are  on  strike  -­‐  they  have   not  laid  a  single  egg  since  the  events! Follow-­‐ups  to  this  story  will  come  in  future  issues...

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Let’s Get Out of These Wet Clothes and Into a by John  Sherwin. Dry Martini If   the   only  thing   the   recent   appalling   weather   has   achieved,  it   has  kept  me  inside  improving  my  drink-­‐ mixing  abilities  -­‐  or   more   accurately   minimising  my   inabilities.    You’d  think,  wouldn’t  you,  that  there’s  not   much   to   mixing  a  drink?  Think  again,  my  dears,  as   much  thought   should   be  applied   for   a  successful  outcome.    Let  me  share  with  you   the  results  of  my  recent  research.   I’ve  always  fancied  the  idea  of  a  Mint  Julep.     Ah,  the  deep  south  of   crinolines  and  Rhett  Butler.    From   the  memory  of  rather  too  many   films,   it   seems   that   to   fully   enjoy   a   Mint   Julep   you   have   to   be   world-­‐weary,  smoke  cigars,  wear   a   white  suit   and  sweat  a  lot.     The   white   suit   is   always  the   problem  for   me  as   it   brings  to  mind   that   holier-­‐than-­‐thou,   more-­‐in-­‐sorrow-­‐than-­‐in-­‐anger,   ex-­‐MP.   Anyway.   Dissolve   a   tablespoon   of   sugar   in   double   the   amount   of   warm   water.    Add  ten  or  so  small,  fresh  mint  leaves  and  leave  to  infuse  for   an  hour.    Add  a  double  of  bourbon  whiskey,  stir  a  lot,  remove  mint   leaves,  add  lots  of  ice,  and  new  mint  leaves  to  garnish. If  the   Bloody   Mary  made  its  name  as  a  morning  pick-­‐me-­‐up,  then   logically  it   should  be  able  to  serve  such  a   purpose  at   any  time   of   the   day,   not   just  the   evil   sparrow   hours.    The  following  should  be   useful  measures  when   you   have   a  few  friends  round.     Half   bottle   vodka;   two   pints   tomato   juice;   two   tablespoons   tomato   ketchup   (stay  with   me  now);  four   tablespoons   each   of   lemon  and   orange   juice;  tablespoon  Worcester  sauce;  teaspoon   celery  salt  (optional).   You  have   to   put   the   vodka,  ketchup,   Worcester   sauce   and   celery   salt   into   a   container   and   stir   like   a   demon   until   the   ketchup   emulsifies,  then  add  in  everything  else  with  lots  of  ice. In  case  you  think  this  is  getting  a  tad  (how  much  is  a  tad?)  alcohol-­‐ heavy,  then   let   me   turn   briefly  to   one  of  the   most   delightful   non-­‐ alcoholic   concoctions   I  know,  the  Gunner.    This  came  into   being  in   colonial  India,  but  was  best  known  as  the  Hong  Kong  ‘cocktail’  after   a   vigorous  game  of  hockey  or  cricket.    A  simple  50:50  mix  of  ginger  ale   and   ginger  beer,  a  good  dash  of  Angostura  bitters,  (some  use   a  little   lime  juice  too,  up  to  you),  lots  of  ice.    The  main  ingredients  of  beer   and  ale  might   be  a   problem  to  find.  Ask  any  mates  driving   over  to   come  stocked   up,   or   call   Claranne’s   Pantry  on   06  33  24  90  92. So,   to   the   classic   Dry   Martini.   Five   measures   (at   least)   gin   to   one   Martini   Rossi   dry   to   be   stirred   vigorously   in   a   jug   half-­‐ filled   with   ice.   Serve   in   classic   Martini   glasses   (or   smallish   wine   glasses)   which   you   have   previously   filled  with   water  and  left  in  the   fridge  for   a   couple   of   hours.     Discarding   the   water   before  doing  anything  else,  donut. And   when   the  wet  and  cold  and  dreariness  come   again,   as   come   they   must,   you’ll   hear   me   muttering   to   myself,   paraphrasing   the   great   Marlon  -­‐  I  could  have  had  class.  I  could  have  been  a   bartender.  Da-­‐dah.

John Sherwin, French Wine Tours. Tel: 02 51 66 13 05 Email: johnsherwin@orange.fr ~ www.french-wine-tours.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Motoring... Stunning 29 year old Redhead

by Helen  Tait-­‐Wright

With 80s   night  approaching  at  the  Bar/Brasserie  Vue  du  Chateau  in   Bressuire   as  I  write,  there  have  been  some  interesting  posts  on  LIFT   about  people’s  memories  of  that  time. One   of   these  threads  was  about   posters,   and  some  of  the   popular   posters  of  the  time  were  images  of  the  most  iconic  80s  Supercars  .....   the   Porsche   911   Turbo,   Lamborghini   Countach   and   the   Ferrari   Testarossa.     I  had   them  all  on  my  bedroom  wall,  red  cars   on  a  black   background,  and  although  it  is  the  Porsche  that  has  always  been   my   favorite,  it  is  the  Testarossa  that  we  have  owned.  

most notably  the  arcade  games  OutRun,  and  in  the  TV  series  Miami   Vice,  as  Sonny  Crockett's  undercover  car  from  season   three.     The  car   has   subsequently  become  synonymous  with  1980s  "yuppies"  and  is   an  icon  of  1980s  retro  culture. Ours  has  now  gone  to  a  new  home,  but  we  enjoyed  the  experience! Contact  Helen  at:  helen@stodel.org.

The Testarossa   went  into  production  in   1984.  The  Testarossa   name,   which   means  "red  head"  in  Italian,  comes  from  the  red-­‐painted  cam   covers  on  the  flat  12  engine. The  striking  wedge-­‐like  body  shape  is  instantly  recognisable,  and  was   a  departure  from  the  previous  more  curvaceous  Ferrari   shapes.    This   was  a   result   of  engineering  and  wind-­‐tunnel  testing   to   improve   the   handling.   The   big  side  air   intakes,  or  strakes  as  they  are  known,  were  needed   to  cool  the  rear  mounted  side  radiators,  as  well  as  providing  a  strong   design   statement   and   make   the   Testarossa   a   massive   78   inches   (nearly  2m)  wide  at  the  rear  (trust  me  when  I  tell   you  that  this  is  not   practical  on  French  country  roads!). The   rear   mid-­‐engine,   rear   wheel   drive   layout   keeps  the  centre   of   gravity   in   the   middle   of   the   car   giving   increased   stability   and   cornering  ability,   and   I   can   also   tell   you   that   as   a   result,   this   is   a   superb  track  car.   Plastic   bumpers,  steel  doors   and   an   aluminium  body  also  keep   the   body  weight  down,  enhancing  the  acceleration,  and  0  -­‐   60  is  quoted   as  5.2  seconds.   With   the   4.9   litre   engine   out   of   the   way   behind   the   passenger   compartment,  luggage   space  is   limited   in   the   front,  although,  we   know  from  experience  that  a  2  foot  digger  bucket  fits  in  perfectly!!!! The   Testarossa   was   the   definition   of   ‘Supercar’   in   its   era,   the   innovative   benchmark  against   which   all   contemporary   sports   cars   were  measured.    In  1992  production  of  the  Testarossa  ceased  after   almost  7200  units  were  sold  making  it   one  of  the  most   popular  and   most  easily  identifiable  Ferrari  models  ever. So,  what  was  it   like  to  own  a  Testarossa?    Two  words  spring  to  mind  -­‐   frustrating,  and  exciting!   Frustrating   because   you   were   never   sure   if   everything   was  going  to   work  or   not,   and  inevitably  it   would   let  you   down   at  the  most  embarrassing  moments  -­‐   memories  of   having  to   push   it   off   a   ferry,   or   away   from   petrol   pumps   spring   to   mind   .....   and   exciting   because  when   it  was  working  it   was   a   real  head-­‐turner,  the  performance  was   awesome   and   the   engine   noise   in   a   class  of  its  own. For   a   supercar,  it   was  relatively  easy  to   work  on,   and  Chris   did   most  of  the  maintenance  himself   (tyres   cost   a   fortune!).   As   Ferrari's   range-­‐topper   during   the   1980s,  the  car   made   appearances   in   numerous  video  games,   Page Page 31


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Perpetual Motion; The Royal Enfield Bullet

by Roger Meek

The British   motorcycle  industry  has  a  long  and  convoluted   history   stretching  back  into  the  19th  century.    Much  has  been  written  about   the   successes   and   failures   of   what   was   for   a   time,   the   world’s   foremost  producer  of  motorcycles.    A  recent  publication  ‘The  Strange   Death  of  the  British  Motorcycle  Industry’  by  Steve  Koerner   (Crucible   Books  ISBN   978-­‐1905472-­‐03-­‐02),   a   re-­‐working  of   the  authors   PhD   thesis,  provides  perhaps  the  most   detailed   insight  to  date  into   the   collapse   and   concludes   that   the   principal   cause   was   company   managements’  ignoring  data  showing  that  post-­‐WW2  world  demand   was  for  small  go-­‐to-­‐work  motorcycles.    Instead  they  pursued  a  policy   of  producing  mostly  large  comparatively  expensive  models  for   what   was  a  declining  world  market.     In  a  sense  there  is  nothing  really  new   here.   It   was   already   known   that   the   Japanese   manufacturers’   approach   to   producing   motorcycles   was   based   on   ‘what   people   wanted’  whilst   the  British  factories’   attitude  was  `what  do  we  want   to  make’.     First  to  go  were  most  of  the  smaller  factories,  who  either   became  insolvent   or   were  taken  over   by  one   of   the  two   industry   giants,  BSA   or   Matchless  (AMC).  By  the  mid-­‐1970s  most,   including   the  industry  giants,  had  disappeared.   Ironically,   today,   Triumph   is   the   largest   UK   owned   motor   vehicle   manufacturer,   annually   producing   around   80,000   high   quality   motorcycles   using   the   most   up-­‐to-­‐date   technology.   The   new   Triumphs  are  all  modern  designs,  even  the  latest  Triumph  Bonneville   only   looks   like   the   old   version.     However,  until   very  recently   you   could   still   buy   a   new   (old)   British   motorcycle,   not   one   made   in   England  (although  not  all  modern  Triumphs  are  either)  but  in   India  -­‐   the  Royal  Enfield  Bullet,  which  was  available  in  both  350   and  500cc   form.     The   Bullet   was   first   produced   in   the   early   1930s   but   not   associated  with  the  name  until  1949.    It  is  a  motorcycle  with  an  odd   and   convoluted   history.   Representatives   from   the   Indian   Government   travelled   to   England   in   the   early   1950s   to   purchase   motorcycles  for  the  Indian  military.    After  visiting  the  various  British   factories   they   decided  on   the  350cc   Bullet,  built   at   Royal   Enfield’s   factory  at   Redditch.    Apparently  the   order  was  so   large  that  Royal   Enfield  set  up  a  factory  in  India  in  partnership  with  Madras  Motors  to   assemble  the   Bullet  under   licence,  although  by  1957-­‐58  Enfield  had   sold  the  tooling  and  manufacturing  rights  to  the  Indian  factory.    After   the  demise  of  Royal  Enfield  in  England  in  the  early  1970s,  the  Indian   factory  just   kept  on  making  the   Bullet  and   has   continued  to  do   so   until  the  present  day,  albeit  with  a  recently  revised  engine.   Indian  made  Bullets  were  initially  exported   back   to   the  UK   in   1977   with   the   original   350cc   single   cylinder   motor   and   1930s   designed   Albion   4-­‐speed   gearbox.     The   factory   has   since   operated   a   programme  of  continual   improvements,  especially  to   the   electrics,  

improving reliability.  Later   the   5 0 0 c c   m o d e l   w a s   a l s o   imported,  which  has  a  top  speed   of   around   80mph,   rather   more   than  the  350’s  70mph.    The  chassis   was  originally  designed   by  Royal  Enfield   for   competing   in   low   speed   trials   events   and   hence   has   good   low   as   well   as   high   speed   stability   and,  coupled  to   the   engines   ability   to   plonk  along  at   low   speeds,  makes  for   relaxed   riding.     More  recent   upgrades   include   a   new  English  designed  5-­‐speed   gearbox  and   electric  start.    However,   the   latest   major   change   was   a   consequence   of   EU   emission   legislations  that  required  a  new  engine  design  that  pass  the  emission   tests.    Apparently  it  was  not  possible  to  modify  the  old  motor. Only  the  500cc  Bullet   is  available  in  France  and   with  limited   model   specifications  (what   do  we  want  to   sell?).       A  much  greater   model   range  is   available  in  the  UK,  including  café  racers,  trials  versions  and   replicas   of   military   motorcycles,  where   they   are   also   substantially   cheaper  (www.haywards.co.uk).    The  Royal   Enfield  Bullet   now  holds   the  unique  position  of  having  the  longest  continuous  production  run   of  any  motorcycle  in  history  with  worldwide  sales  at  record  levels.    So   for   the   time  being  at   least,   the   future   of   the  Bullet,  an   evocative   motorcycle  that  rekindles  memories  of  Britain  in  the  1950s  and  ‘60s,   shows  no  sign  fading  into  history.  

Above: Examples of Royal Enfield Bullets with the original Redditch designed engines. The 2005 bike (left) has the 500cc engine with electric start and latest 5-speed gearbox. The 350cc version is a 1989 model with original Albion 4-speed gearbox and unique patented neutral finder.

Roger can  be  contacted  via  his  website:  www.rogermeekherpetology.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Adventures... Life in Rural France

While sitting  in  a  stranger’s  house,  after  washing  and   feeding  an  old   lady  with   no   teeth,  cleaning  up  cat  vomit,  clearing  litter   trays  and   lightly  toasting   a   piece  of   bread   for   a  bird,  I  think   back   to  times   gone  past... My  day   used  to   consist   of  waking  at   5am   and   getting   the   children   up,   driving   them   to   a  friend’s   house  for   onward   transportation   to   school.     Then   2   hours   travelling   to   London.     When   there,   I   would   be   organising   work   schedules,   production,   order   creation,   outwork   and   keeping   all   the   clients   happy.      I  held   meetings   and  spent  all  day  rushing  around.      I   then   spent   2   hours   driving   home,   picking   up   the   children,   making   dinner  and  then  bed,  ready  to  do  it  all  again  the  next  day. Now  my  days  consist   of   walking  dogs,  cleaning  up  poo,  talking  to   parrots,  getting  chickens  up  before  it's  light,  cooking  boiled  eggs  for   Great  Danes,  keeping  wild  cats  out,  keeping  guest  cats  in,  staying  in   cold   houses,   creaky   houses,   big   houses,   grand   houses,   spotless   houses,  at  home  houses.    Knocked  over  by  goats,  chased  by  sheep   and  finding  chickens  who  have  forgotten  where  their  home  is.    

So while  everything  was   available  at  the  touch  of  a  button  I   never   really  appreciated  it   until  now.      There  is  nothing  you  can  rely  on  to   work  here   and  just  a  hint  of  a  storm  and  the   power  sulks.      Taking   the  rubbish  out   now   means  a  15   minute  walk  to   the   end   of   the   road  several  times.   Putting  the  heating  on  means  chopping  the  wood,  bringing  it  in  and   lighting  the  fire.   Getting   ready   for   winter   means   banging   nails   in   and   hanging   blankets   at   doors   and   entrances,   duct   taping   up   holes.     Double   glazing  means  sticking  plastic  up  at  the  window  and  laying  duvets   on  the  floor  in  the  loft.   The   luxury  of  having   hot   running  water  is  beyond   utopia  and   the   immense    happiness  at  having  a  20  year  old  car   that  starts  first  turn   of  the  key  makes  life  worthwhile.      I  have  definitely  realised  the  real   value   of  life  and  any  materialistic  tendencies  have  fizzled  away  into   the  distance. Life   in   rural   France   is   definitely   different,   interesting,   eventful,   stressful  and  hard  -­‐  but  that's  just  life  on  the  funny  farm.

There are   houses   with   well   water,   tap   water   and   bottled   water.   Electricity  is  a  hit  or   miss  thing.    The  lights  dip  when  the  kettle  goes   on  and  putting  on  more  than  one  appliance  trips  the  whole  system. I've  swapped  my  suit  for  a  waterproof  coat,  court  shoes  for  wellies,   briefcase   for   a   wheelbarrow.     Doing   my  hair   now   means  teasing   straw  and  hay  out  of  it,  running  my  fingers  through  it  and   forcing  it   into  a  scrunchie.     Making  my  face  up  means   smiling.     Having  a  nice   soak   means  taking   the  dogs  for  a  walk  in   the   rain,   and  holding   a   meeting  consists  of  me  giving  the  chickens  a  good   talking  to  when   trudging  around  in  the  dark  with  a  torch  gathering  them  up.   A   dual-­‐flush   system   now   means   pressing   the   button   twice   and   watching  the  trickle  of  water  reluctantly  make  its  way  out   and  try   lamely  to  make  its  way  down  the  hole,  anything  more  than  a  wee   doesn't   usually  make  it.     I  spend   many  hours  driving  around   the   french   countryside   in   search   of   places   hidden   deep   in  woodland,   out  of   the  way  spots,  down  tiny  tracks,  some   with  grand  entrances   and  some  with  no  entrance  at  all.      Getting  lost  is  an  everyday  thing   even   with  a  SatNav.     Turn   left  often   leads  you  across  a  field,  take   the   next  right   has   been  the  entrance  to   a  cowshed.    Then  there's   the  fog  which  creeps  across  in  seconds  creating   a  blanket   of  white   making  driving  impossible  above  10kmh....

Heather Rosemary  offers  Pet  &  House  Si…ng  services   (see  advert  on  p.21)  and  keeps  a  blog  of  her  everyday  tales.     To  read  more  ‘Life  on  the  funny  farm’  go  to: hyp://wordsfromthefunnyfarm.blogspot.fr.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Communications... Email Security

Respect your  Friends  and  Family’s  privacy  -­‐  use  the  Bcc  field

7. Email Addresses   are   private   Property,   only   the   owner   of   an   email   address   has   the   right   to   choose   with   whom   they   share   their  address!  

Recently some  of  my  customers   have  been   unfortunate  and   had   their   email   accounts   hacked.     This   is   a   horrible   experience   that   ends   in   the   loss   of   their   recent   email   and   usually  their   address   book/contacts  list.

What is  the  alternasve? If   you   put  everyone'  email  address  in  the  Bcc   field  instead,  all  of   the  risks  detailed   above  would   have  been  eliminated  -­‐    so  what  is   the  Bcc:  field?

The hackers  use   the  email  addresses  they  have  stolen  to  create  all   sorts  of  mischief,  by  sending  out  bogus  emails  (possibly  containing   malware)   seemingly   coming   from   the   victim   of   the   hacking,   promoting   some   product/website   or   giving   a   story,   designed   to   part   their   friends   from   their   cash,   such   as   "we   were   in   a   car   accident/hotel  fire   in   Spain   and   have  lost  everything,   please  send   cash  to"  ..  ..  ..,  I  am  sure  you  know  what  I  mean.

Bcc stands  for  Blind  carbon  copy.    It's  a  field,  just  like  the  To-­‐field  in   your   e-­‐mail   application/service.   The   difference   is   that   the   addresses  you  send  the  e-­‐mail  to   are  hidden  and  can't   be  seen  by   anyone  but  the  original  sender.  

by Ross  Hendry

This sort  of  hacking  can  be  easily  prevented  simply  by  having  a  very   strong  password. However,  hackers  are  able  to  acquire  people’s  email   addresses  far   easier  than  going  to  the  effort  of   hacking  email  accounts.     Because   many   people,   whilst   keeping   in   touch   with   their   friends/family,   send   out  or   forward  amusing  emails,  unfortunately  they  do  this  by   adding  the  email   addresses   of  everyone  to  either  the  'To:'   field  or   the  'cc:'   field,  in   this   way   everyone  is  able  to  see  everyone  else's   email  address  and  may  copy  them. What's  the  harm   in  this?  Well,  when  one  of  these  funny  emails  is   sent   out,  it  could  be   forwarded  to   millions  of   other   people.     You   probably  would’nt  know  1%  of  these  people,  so   how   do  you  know   that   one  of  them  is  not  a  hacker,  or   someone  who  collects   email   addresses  and  sells  them  on? Here  are  7  reasons  not  to  use  the  "to:"  or  "cc:"  field  for  bulk  email: 1.   The   people   on   your   list   don't   want   the   others   to   get   their     address.    They  gave  it  to  you  only.     2.  If   even   just   one  person   of   those   you   e-­‐mailed   gets   an   e-­‐mail     virus,  every   person   on  that   list   is   at   risk   of   getting   it.     E-­‐mail     viruses  check  for  all  addresses  that  person  has  in  his/her  e-­‐mail.     3.    One  of  the  people  you  send  to  might  be  a  spammer,  or  just  send     the  whole  list  to  someone  who  sends  spam.     4.   Someone   among   the   recipients   might   start   sending     advertisements   to   everyone   and   not   even   realize   that   it   is     spamming.     5.    There   is   a   very   high   risk   that   someone  chooses  "Reply  to   all"     and  sends  their  reply  to  everyone  on  the  list.   6.    You  have  breached   people's     privacy     and  put  them  at   risk  of       spam    and    viruses.    

But my  e-­‐mail  application  doesn't  have  a  Bcc-­‐field!     Yes,  it   does.    In  many  applications  the  Bcc-­‐field  is  hidden  and  you   need   to   choose  to   show  it.     It's  usually  very   easy  to   turn  on  and   use.    Just  check  out  the  help  service  of  your  email. When   sending   out   bulk   email,   I   normally   put   my   own   email   address  in  the  To:  field   and  everyone  else's  email  addresses  in  the   Bcc:  field.     If  I  am  actually  forwarding  an   email  from  someone  else,   I  try  to  remove  the  emails  of  those  already  displayed  on  the   one  I   am  forwarding;  or  if   I  cannot  easily  remove  them,  I  simply  copy  the   email  content  only,  and  paste  this  into  a  new  email,  to  send  to  my   contacts. If   you   really  cannot  find  the   Bcc   box   for   your   email   service,   please   contact   me   and   I   will   advise/show   you   where/how   to   find  it  and   if  necessary  turn  it  on.   You   may   email   me   at   this   address  rs.hendry@gmail.com If   you   know  people   who  do  this   regularly,  you  can   direct  them   to   this  website,  it   could   help   them   to  change  their  ways   http://whybcc.com. I  was   asked  to  write  this  article  by  Jan  Smith  (Paperback  Jan)  who   like   me,   tries   to   maintain   the   security   of   her   customers   by   respecting   their   email   addresses.    If   you   have  any  issue   that  you   would  like  me  to  write  about,  please  do  not  hesitate  to  contact   me,   either  by  email  or  telephone  as  I  would  be  pleased  to  discuss  your   idea. Ross  Hendry   is   the   proprietor   of   Interface   Consulting   and  Engineering,   who   has   over   42   years   experience   in  Communications,   Computer   Technology   and  Direct   Marketing.  (See  advert  below  for  more  information).

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ARTISANS &  TRADESMEN... Do  you  have  any  top  tips  you  can   share  with  our  readers?       We  would  love  to  include  them  in  this  section!

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Q: “Is it true that even though I live in France, new legislation is coming which means I can use my UK Will when I die an d w ill pay less inheritance tax as a result?”

Central Bank  divergence  to  drive  currencies  in  2013

A: From   August   17th   2015   European   law   will   allow   British   Nationals   the   option   of   electing  to  use  their  UK  wills  in  France.  The  inheritance  tax  regimes   for  France  and   the  UK  are  quite  different  and  professional  advice   should   be   sought   before   deciding   which   option   is   going   to   be   correct  for  you. Under   the  UK  system  each  person  has  £325,000  of  tax  allowances   before   paying   death   duties   on  their   estate,  whilst   in   France   it   is   100,000  Euros   per  child  per  parent.     Clearly  the  more  children  you   and   your   spouse   have   the   greater   the   allowance   before   paying   death  duties  in  France.    You  also  have  the  tax  advantages  in  France   of   using  an  Assurance  Vie,   where  you  can  leave  additional  money   per  beneficiary  outside  of  your  inheritance  tax  bill. As   you   can   see,   where   you   pay   inheritance   tax   is   not   a   straightforward   decision   and   opting   to   use   a   UK   Will   is   not   necessarily   a   good   idea   for   everybody.   Although   the   new   regulation   is   still   two   years   away,   understanding   how   you   can   maximise   your   inheritance   tax   allowances  now,   coupled   with   an   understanding   of   which   regime   will   suit   your   personal   circumstances   better   after   August   2015,   is   a   sensible   idea   and   getting  the  right  advice  is  very  important.   I   offer   a   free   consultation   in   the   privacy  of   your   own   home   to   discuss  your   circumstances   and   explain  how  to   maximise  your   tax   free  allowances  here  in  France. It   is  very  important   to   manage   your   money  so   that  it  works  hard   for  you,  after  all,  you’ve  worked   hard  to  earn  it  and   have  already   paid   tax  on  it,  so   why  would  you  choose  for  your  loved  ones  to   pay   more  than  they  need  to  when  you  are  gone? Please  call   me  on  the  numbers  below  for  an  appointment  or  more   information,  or   if  you  have  any  questions   that   you   feel   I  may  be   able   to   help  you  with,  please  “Ask   Amanda”  or   use   the  contacts   below  and  I  will  call  you   to  discuss  your  questions  and  arrange  the   most  appropriate  answer.   Amanda  Johnson,  The  Spectrum  IFA  Group.  Tel:  05  49  98  97  46 Email:  amanda.johnson@spectrum-­‐ifa.com or “Ask Amanda” at finance@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

by Sue Cook

For the  first  time  since  the  2008-­‐09  financial   crisis,  monetary  policy  in   America  and  Western  Europe   is   beginning  to  diverge  and  it  will   have   large  ramifications  for   the  Pound  and  Euro.    The  American  Central   Bank,  the  Federal   Reserve,  has  recently  suggested   it   will  scale  back   asset  purchases  as  the  economic  picture  continues  to  improve  over  in   US.     Recent   economic   data   supports   a   picture   of   a   gradual   but   sustained  recovery,  unlike  the  picture  in  Europe  which  remains  one  of   economic   weakness.   The   Fed   has   conditions   attached   to   any   reduction  in  the  current  monthly  $85  billion  per  month  asset  purchase   scheme:  the  unemployment  rate  continuing  to  fall  towards  seven   per   cent,  which  recent   data  suggests   will  happen  in  the   first  quarter   of   2014  at  the  current  pace  of  job  creation.   The   problem   that   both   the   European   Central   Bank   and   Bank   of   England  are  facing  is  a  recovery  much  weaker  in  the  UK  and  Euro  zone   than   the  one  underway  in   America.     Talking  about  tighter   monetary   policy   at   this   point   could   derail   the   meagre   economic   recovery.     Confirming  to  the  markets,  businesses  and  consumers  that   monetary   policy  will  remain  highly  simulative  for   a  good  while  yet  has   become   very  important   to  keep  confidence  levels  on  an  upward  trend.     This   explains  why  both   the  ECB  and   BOE  recently  unveiled  a  new   weapon   in  the  central  bank  armoury  -­‐  forward  guidance.   Forward   guidance   works   by   pre-­‐committing   the   central   bank  to   a   certain  policy  for  a  set   amount  of  time,  a  year  for  example,  or  by  tying   monetary  policy  to  an  economic  outcome  much  like  the  Fed  has  done   with   the   unemployment   rate.   The   rationale  behind   the   move   is   to   make  sure  the  Federal  Reserve  tapering  asset   purchases  does  not  kill   off  growth  on  this  side  of  the  Atlantic. Any  actual  action  by  central  banks  is  likely  to  be   many  months  away,   but  because  markets  are  forward  looking,  policy  decisions  six  months   away  have  an  impact   on  currencies  now  as  market  participants  adjust   behaviour   and   positions   in   anticipation   of   the   move.     Diverging   monetary  policy  in  the  US  on  one  hand,  and  the  UK  and  Euro  zone  on   the  other  means  that  the  Dollar   remains  a  currency  of  strength  and  is   highly   likely   to   continue   to   strengthen   whilst   the   Euro   and   Pound   move  in  the  opposite  direction. If  both  the  Euro  and  Pound  are  set  to  be  weak  in  the  coming  months,   what  does  that  mean  for  the  GBP-­‐EUR  exchange  rate?    That  depends   in  a  large  part  on   the  new  Bank  of   England   Governor  Mark  Carney.     The  market   expects   him  to  be   highly  dovish  in  his  approach,  which   translates   into  a  weaker   currency.   We  will   find   out   more   details   in   August,  but  quite  how  much  Sterling  will  continue  to  fall   rest  squarely   on  his  shoulders.

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Small Colour advert only 34€ Page 44


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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

So Who Bought in PoitouCharentes Last Year?

by Trevor  Leggett,  Chief  Executive

The Leggett   Immobilier   team   were   lucky   enough   to   be   given   a   sneak   preview   into   the   results   of   the   5th   "Investing   &   living   abroad"   research   which   is   published   each   year   by   BNP   Paribas   international   buyers.     It  always   makes  fascinating   reading  as  it   is   the  only  research  of   its  kind  and  it  lets  us  see  how  many  houses  in   France  are  purchased  by  international  buyers  each  year. Although  the  statistics  don't   drill   down   to   differentiate   the  Deux-­‐ Sèvres  from  the  other   departments  within  the  region,  they  do  give   us  an  insight  into  the  Poitou-­‐Charentes  region  as  a  whole. The  overall  picture  across   France   shows  that  in  2012  international   buyers  were  down   by  29%  with  10,663  sales  compared   to  15,073   the   previous  year.    This  is  not  unexpected   given  the   ongoing  crise   financiere   but   what   was   notable   was   that   these   buyers   were   spending   far   more   money   with   an   average   purchase   price   of   €384,000   compared   to   €320,000   two   years   previously.     The   number   of  people  requiring  a  mortgage   also  dropped  from  25%  to   20%   showing   that  many  more   cash   buyers  were   coming  into   the   market.     This   leads   us   to   believe   that   there   are   some   "canny"   buyers   who   see   France  as   a   bit   of   a  safe  haven  and   a  good   long   term   investment   when   you   compare   property   here   to   other   countries,  or   indeed  other  asset  classes  (just  how  much   return  are   you  getting  from  your  bank  account  at  the  moment?). Turning   to   our   region   of   Poitou-­‐Charentes,   the   top   three   international   buyers   of   property   were   the   UK,   Belgium   and   Netherlands,  and  we  were  the  7th  most  popular   region  in  France  -­‐   PACA,  the  Rhone  Alpes  and  then   Paris  won   those  particular  Gold,   Silver  &  Bronze  medals.

End

What was   most   interesting  though   was   that   there   was  only   one   region   in   the   whole   of   France   where   the   number   of   sales   to   international   buyers   actually  went   up   in   2012   -­‐   you   guessed   it,   Poitou-­‐Charentes.     While   PACA  saw  a  31%   reduction,   the   Rhone   Alpes  fell  by  40%   and  Paris  saw  sales  drop  by  4%  we  actually  saw   a   rise  by  4%.    It  just   shows  what  discerning  taste  all   these  overseas   buyers  have! We   saw   350   sales   last   year   compared   to   337   in   2011   with   an   average   purchase   price   of   €145,000,   showing   what   great   value   property  is  here  in  western  France. As   we  said  earlier,  buyers  from   the   UK   led  the  way  and   make   up   78%   of   the   market   followed   by  Belgium   (13%),  the   Netherlands   (5%)   and  Germany   (4%).     The  UK  buyers   actually  jumped  from   a   70%   market   share   from  2011  which  reflects  the  increase   in   sales   we  have  seen  here  at  Leggett  Immobilier. On   a   personal   note   the   overall   research   issued   by   BNP   Paribas   allowed   us   to   accurately   calculate   that   our   market   share   has   jumped   from  5%  to   10%  in   the  last  12  months.     One  in  ten  houses   sold   in   France   last   year   to   buyers   from   the   UK   were   done   so   through  Leggetts  and  this  is  a  statistic  we  are  mightily  proud  of. We  are  actively  recruiting  in  both   Deux-­‐Sèvres,  Charente-­‐Maritime   and   Vendée   and   you   can   see   full   details   on   our   website.   Who   knows,   you   could   even   be   adding   to   the   BNP   Paribas   statistics   yourself  in  2014! Leggett  Immobilier  is  one  of  the  leading  estate  agents  in  France.   You  can  access  all  their  local  property  listings  and  articles  at www.frenchestateagents.com/poitou-­‐charentes-­‐property.

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theme park

Futuroscope is one of the best-loved leisure parks in France and the only one of its kind in Europe. It is the ideal place to relax in, with 60 hectares of tranquil green countryside and 25 original experiences you won’t find anywhere else: films in giant format, thrill-filled attractions, 3D rides with 4D effects, games, live shows, open-air activities, and more… The spectacular theatres inside Futuroscope are gigantic sculptures and their futuristic lines blend in smoothly with the surrounding landscape. Discovery and thrills guaranteed for everyone, young and old!

BERGERAC

Easy access!

-3 €

per person

The voucher is valid for adult, senior citizen (aged 60 and over) and child (aged 5 to 16) for 1 day dated-entry tickets and must be handed in at the Futuroscope ticket booths between the 16th february 2013 and the 5th January 2014* (1 to 5 visitors per voucher). Discount does not apply to packages, group tickets, and undated entry tickets (visa/ season). Offer may not be combined with other offers and backdated. *Please check opening dates on futuroscope.com

By road, by train and plane

futuroscope • com Futuroscope_Creation/Fotolia/Studio Ludo/S LAVAL/Robothespian-© Engineered Arts Limited 2012 - D LAMING, Architecte - Chorégraphies : Mourad Merzouki - CCN Créteil et du Val-de-Marne/Compagnie Käfig. Société du Parc du Futuroscope, capital de 6 504 455€, siège social : BP 2000 - 86130 Jaunay-Clan, RCS de Poitiers B 444 030 902.

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'The Deux-Sevres Monthly' - August 2013  

English language magazine for the Deux-Sevres and surrounding areas in France.