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2020–21 ANNUAL REPORT


CONTENTS VISION, PURPOSE AND STRATEGIC INTENT

3

PRESIDENT’S REPORT

4

CEO’S REPORT

6

FINANCE RISK AND AUDIT CHAIR’S REPORT

8

PROMOTION OF THE PROFESSION

10

ADVOCATING FOR THE PROFESSION

14

DRIVE QUALITY AND STANDARDS

16

FACILITATE AND PROMOTE EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE WITHIN THE PROFESSION

18

FACILITATE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

20

DELIVERING MEMBER VALUE & SUPPORT

24

RECOGNISING AND REWARDING OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN SONOGRAPHY

26

GOVERNANCE 31 DIRECTORS’ REPORT

32

FINANCIALS 42 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

47


The Board also adopted a new Strategic Intent for 2021–2023, setting a clear direction and the priorities for the ASA over the next two years, which was founded on the feedback from our membership. The organisation is committed to promote and advocate for the advancement of the sonography profession, drive the quality and standards of sonography practice, facilitate comprehensive skills and professional development opportunities in ultrasound, as well as innovate and evolve to deliver organisational sustainability, value, and member support.

VISION, PURPOSE AND STRATEGIC INTENT

I

n February, the ASA Board approved a new Vision and Purpose for the Association to align more with our charitable purpose of advancing the health of the public and advancing the education of individuals performing ultrasound.

OUR VISION

A HEALTHIER WORLD THROUGH SONOGRAPHER EXPERTISE

OUR PURPOSE

FOSTERING A SONOGRAPHY PROFESSION THAT DELIVERS HIGH QUALITY ULTRASOUND

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

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A

s I present the Association’s work and finances for the 2020–2021 financial year, I reflect on how this has been another truly turbulent year. Sonographers, like all healthcare workers, have had to navigate the difficult scenario of PPE and COVID-19 risk, and I want to congratulate and thank all our sonographers for this important work.

Ian Schroen, President, ASA

Again this year the ASA has been well-managed throughout these external pressures and has continued to grow, increasing our financial reserves while providing significant resources and educational opportunities to members. I encourage you to review the financial statements, along with the key achievements presented within the annual report, as they do confirm the financial strength of the Association, along with the efforts made to support all members. Thank you to all members of the Association who make up our dynamic and valued sonographer community. This is reflected in achieving a terrific new milestone of over 7000 members. The continued increasing membership highlights the significance and connection the ASA provides to all our members. My thanks also to all our corporate partners who continue to invest in ASA activities despite the continued changes to our online virtual education program and uncertainty around face-to-face engagement.

PRESIDENT’S REPORT The ASA has adapted in many ways to the changed working environment, some of which are obvious to members, such as the focus on health and wellbeing and the increased online activities. This changing dynamic with city lockdowns has placed significant strain on our office team who have continued to provide extensive ongoing education opportunities, along with comprehensive personal wellbeing and COVID-19 information. Thank you to Jodie and the entire office team for your hard work during this time. The Board is ultimately responsible for the health and wellbeing of all our staff, and we recognise the difficult working arrangements that COVID-19 continues to impose.

A huge highlight of the past year was the 27th Annual International Conference held in Brisbane and online as a hybrid meeting. While I missed the face-to-face conference due to the lockdown restrictions, I was amazed again for a second year how well the presentations transfer to the virtual meeting format, and the learning continues. Congratulations and thank you to the convenors, the presenters, volunteers, and especially to the office events team for their dedication and hard work in making this such a success. A special part of the conference was the Awards event, where we were able to award the Pru Pratten Lifetime Achievement Award, along with the Awards of Excellence and recognise the new Fellows of the Association. Congratulations to this year’s Pru Pratten Lifetime Achievement Award winner, Mr Greg Lammers, who was recognised for his outstanding commitment to sonography throughout many years of service. Congratulations also to all award recipients.

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PRESIDENT’S REPORT

The vision statement is the anchor point for our strategic plan and the revised statement well identifies our aspiration of ‘a healthier world through sonographer expertise’. A purpose statement describes the overarching reason that the company exists, how it should conduct itself and the impact it has on whom it is serving, ‘Fostering a sonography profession that delivers high quality ultrasound’

The ASA journal Sonography goes from strength to strength. In May 2021, the ASA was advised the journal had been accepted into the Web of Science Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI). This means that content from Sonography will be indexed by Clarivate and made available via the Web of Science interface. This increases discoverability and allows citation activity to be more closely tracked – an important step towards promotion into the Science Citation Index Expanded. Many thanks to our Editor-in-Chief, Dr Kerry Thoirs. As well, I would like to thank our foundational editor, Ms Glenda McLean, who pioneered and championed the journal for many years before handing over to Kerry. For the ASA Board, this meant another year of virtual Board meetings, along with an online strategy planning day held in February. After a long span of Board consistency throughout the past year, there have been significant changes to its composition.

Longstanding member directors, Mr Steve Macintosh, Ms Erika Cavanagh, and Ms Sarah Colley resigned from the Board at the end of their terms in 2020, having provided many years of wisdom and leadership to the ASA. In early 2021, Mr Silvano Paladino resigned from our Board, again a longstanding independent director who has invested multiple years of service in the Association. Unfortunately, due to COVID-19 restrictions, these directors received a virtual farewell, something that doesn’t celebrate or recognise the value the Association received from their respective work. Through the member elections in 2020, we welcomed Dr Narelle Kennedy, Mr Roger Lee, and Ms Rona Girdler as new member directors. As well, we are fortunate to have Ms Alexandra Bell join the Board as our new independent director this year, and I look forward to working with our new directors. I am personally very thankful that I work within a wellfunctioning board of directors with a diverse range of skills and experience. I would like to thank all our directors for their ongoing volunteering of time and energy, along with their commitment and willingness to invest in the Association. While online Board meetings have challenges, the Board has achieved a great deal in the past 12 months. At the May hybrid conference this year, I announced the new strategic plan for 2021–2023, developed by the Board. This included a new vision and purpose statement.

The vision statement is the anchor point for our strategic plan and the revised statement well identifies our aspiration of ‘a healthier world through sonographer expertise’. A purpose statement describes the overarching reason that the company exists, how it should conduct itself and the impact it has on whom it is serving, ‘Fostering a sonography profession that delivers high quality ultrasound’. This new strategic intent builds from the previous plans and provides clear direction and priorities for the ASA across the next 2 years. Key themes remain a part of our strategy, including our focus on sonographer advocacy through regulation, as well as our ongoing investment in research. A new exciting initiative is our drive to develop knowledge for and by members on new and emerging technologies such as machine learning and artificial intelligence in ultrasound. I am pleased to have received great positive feedback from many of you on the new strategy map. As part of the Board’s key governance role, the Board has undertaken a review and revision of the Association’s constitution and governance charter. These documents have been updated to meet regulatory changes and best practice standards via the Board, as well as external specialists – important changes for fundamental documents of the Association – and thank you to the Board directors involved. As we look to the coming year, I take hope in the increasing vaccination rates across our communities in Australia and New Zealand, where in 2022 our work and personal lives may return to some normality. Sonographers in all clinical areas are really important to patient health and disease management, and this important work continues whether in COVID-19 lockdowns or not. Your Association is well resourced and highly active in supporting our members in so many ways. I look forward to speaking with you again, hopefully face to face.

Ian Schroen President, Australasian Sonographers Association

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O

ver the last year I have seen extraordinary resilience from the sonography profession, as well as the ASA, in adapting to living in a world full of uncertainty, adopting new ways of working, learning, and connecting with people.

Jodie Long, CEO, ASA

I am extremely proud of what the ASA has been able to provide for its over 7100 members in the last 12 months. In a year where holding face-to-face events was extremely difficult, the ASA still delivered 32 face-to-face events to over 1000 members across Australasia. This was in addition to two conferences, one fully virtual in October and a hybrid held in Brisbane in May, which enabled all members to attend regardless of their location or restrictions. We also partnered with Echo Australia to deliver its iconic annual conference to over 400 attendees online in October. Conferences with an online element are here to stay and provide us with the opportunity to offer a wider pool of key speakers. We were fortunate to offer 14 international speakers at the Brisbane Hybrid Conference. The record attendances by members demonstrates the value of online conferences,

with over 2700 attendees to our two conferences.

CEO’S REPORT Sonographers looked to the ASA for support over the last year, and the ASA continued to provide resources to assist sonographer mental health and wellbeing. In addition to this, the ASA also provided regular and timely announcements on changes, guidelines and recommendations that affected a sonographer’s practice. Online learning was in high demand over the last year with over 20,000 online activities undertaken

through our new learning management system. In addition, conference attendees had access to 291 conference recordings for a minimum of three months after the conference, so they didn’t miss a session. Sonographers have always felt professionally invisible and over the last year the ASA has continued to increase awareness of sonographer expertise by running two social media awareness campaigns. In October, the first campaign ran the existing 10 advertisements that were launched last year, and then in May, the second campaign introduced 6 new advertisements. The 6 new advertisements covered three different areas where sonographers have an impact. A total of over two million people were reached through both campaigns. The ASA has continued this year advocating for sonographers to be regulated in Australia to ensure the protection of the public’s health and safety. A submission was provided to the federal health department in April

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CEO’S REPORT

In a year where holding face-to-face events was extremely difficult, the ASA still delivered 32 face-to-face events to over 1000 members across Australasia. This was in addition to two conferences, one fully virtual in October and a hybrid held in Brisbane in May.

after an industry consultation held in October where a draft submission was sent to 111 industry representatives. We have also received 36 letters of support from key medical stakeholders which accompany the submission. We will continue to liaise with the federal health department on this important issue before it is presented to the health ministers for agreement to then refer the submission to the Health Chief Executives Forum for preliminary assessment. Considering the impact of COVID-19, the ASA has still attended 12 political/government meetings, as well as 26 industry meetings, and responded to 16 industry consultations as the voice of sonographers. Evidence-based practice and research is so important for the standing of our profession within the healthcare community. Our scientific journal Sonography increased its article downloads by 85% in 2020 with over 130,000 downloads. The journal continues to thrive and this year was accepted into the Web of Science Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), increasing its impact with a wider audience. As an organisation we have transformed digitally, reducing our printed resources and diversifying how we deliver information to members with both podcasts and videos. Our magazine Soundeffects has changed to a special edition format and is now only available online, and all conference material has also moved to online only. The new ASA website has been a great source of information for members with over 770,000 visits to the ASA website over the past 12 months. In May we launched the ASA App, which will provide members with the ability to receive latest news, register for events, as well as access ASA online all at their fingertips, anywhere, anytime.

I thank you all for your continued support during these very difficult times. The organisation could not achieve all that it has over the last 12 months without the tireless work of the ASA staff.

For the last 12 months, the ASA staff have had to endure predominately working in isolation from home, have dealt with numerous changes, and uncertainty. I am so very proud of the strength and resilience the ASA staff have shown during the last year. Everyone has gone above and beyond for the members, ensuring that they receive the very best support and service. This is reflected in our high Net Promoter Score of 49, compared to an industry benchmark for associations of 35. I thank every one of you for all your efforts over what has been a difficult and tiring year, and I am extremely grateful to have such talented and devoted staff. I am looking forward to being able to get back to delivering our outstanding face-to-face events such as our Travelling Workshops, SIG days and seminars across Australia and New Zealand, as well as an exceptional Melbourne Conference in 2022. We are committed to supporting our over 7000 members, providing them with the very best value, continuing to lead and advocate for them, raising awareness of the expertise of sonographers and how they contribute to creating a healthier world. With the support of our dedicated volunteers, corporate partners, and the ASA staff, I am confident that the ASA will continue to have an impact and be valued by all its members.

The ASA could not continue to deliver value to its members year on year without the support of our

corporate partners and those members who graciously volunteer their time on committees or who impart their knowledge through presentations in various forms. This year has been particularly tough with constant changes and postponements as well as the majority of interactions moved to online platforms.

Jodie Long CEO, Australasian Sonographers Association

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T Julie Toop, Finance Risk and Audit Committee Chair, ASA

he ASA once again delivered a surplus for the 2021 financial year despite the ongoing challenges of operating in a pandemic. The surplus of $918,669 was well over double that of the 2020 financial year and was due in part to a significant reduction in expenses.

Many have contributed to this exceptional result, including our members, corporate partners, the ASA staff and my fellow directors, and I thank everyone for their ongoing support. Whilst there was no annual conference in the 2019/2020 year, in 2021 the ASA was able to hold two successful conferences, one virtual, and the Brisbane Hybrid Conference. The hybrid model proved to be very popular, and based on members’ feedback having the option of attending face to face or virtually, met the needs of many members. Revenue The ASA revenue in 2021 was $4.6m, an increase of 39% on the 2020 financial year. The variance is accounted for in part by the fact that there was no conference held in the 2020 year, whereas two were held in the 2021 year. Other

FINANCE RISK AND AUDIT REPORT contributing factors were the 3.5% increase in membership fees earned, and the revenue recognition of conference sponsorship receipts. Revenue from investments had been budgeted for conservatively given the volatile market; however, the market performed better than expected and investment income was $65,745 over budget. Expenses The ASA has continued to manage its expenditure throughout the year and remained focused on enhancing value to members whilst at the same time reducing overheads wherever possible. Expenses overall were up 23% on the previous year, largely due to the fact that there were no conferences in 2019/2020, whereas two were held in 2021. The COVID restrictions in place for face-to-face events and travel resulted in a significant reduction in staff and Board travel costs, coupled with savings in expenditure for SIG days and Travelling Workshop expenses. IT and website costs increased due to the investment of the new database and learning management system, and the addition of Zoom functionality. In addition, the need to set staff up to work from home resulted in laptop and remote phone system expenses.

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FINANCE RISK AND AUDIT REPORT In the 2021 year, the ASA increased its research grant funding and incurred expenses related to the Sonographer Code of Conduct Review, the Work Health Safety Survey, and the finalisation of the Industry Report that was commenced in 2020. The ASA also funded its major partnership with Radiology Across Borders delivering education and programs in sonography to save lives in developing nations. The ASA also continued allocating funds to the Sonographer Awareness Campaign, which promotes the expertise of sonographers to the general public. Assets and cash reserves The ASA finished the year in a strong financial position, with net assets having grown to $3.38 million as of 30 June 2021. From a financial perspective, there has not been a major adverse impact on the ASA due to COVID-19. This means the ASA is able to continue to deliver valued services to members and continue the work on the recognition and regulation of the profession.

The ASA has continued to manage its expenditure throughout the year and remained focused on enhancing value to members whilst at the same time reducing overheads wherever possible.

Julie Toop Director and Finance Risk and Audit Committee Chair Australasian Sonographers Association

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PROMOTION OF THE PROFESSION Sonographers lack recognition for the importance of their role and are also not commonly known by the public to be the experts in ultrasound. In 2020–21, the ASA continued its promotion of the profession with two Sonographer Awareness Campaigns, including the release of six additional adverts. #proudtobeasonographer #supportingsonographers

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PROMOTION OF THE PROFESSION

Sonographer Awareness Campaigns Following on from the successful campaign in 2019 using social media advertising on Facebook and Instagram, the ASA re-ran the adverts in October 2020 to coincide with Australasian Sonographers Day, which reached over 1.3 million people. In May 2021, we produced six new adverts covering three different areas of the profession and ran a campaign with these reaching over 1 million people. The campaigns reached over 2 million people and are equivalent to only 4 per cent of membership revenue. Sonographers have felt professionally invisible for a long time, which is confirmed by the statistic that only 11% of the general public know that it is a sonographer that performs ultrasound. These campaigns are a crucial step to increasing the recognition of the profession.

Social Media Our Facebook audience continues to strongly connect with recognition content, such as ASA Award Winners and Australasian Sonographers Day. On Twitter, the support for the Sonographer Awareness Campaign was a significant standout. LinkedIn continues to attract solid support from our corporate members. Followers increased on Facebook to over 4000 and LinkedIn to over 3600. Instagram and Twitter have increased their following by 15% and 18% respectively, which increases the impact and voice of the ASA with local, national, and international sonographers.

ASA SONOGRAPHER AWARENESS CAMPAIGNS THIS YEAR HAVE REACHED OVER

2

million people

THE ASA HAS INCREASED ITS FOLLOWERS BY OVER

1000 ACROSS ALL SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS

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PROMOTION OF THE PROFESSION ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

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ADVOCATING FOR THE PROFESSION The ASA is the trusted voice for the sonography profession across Australasia. Through highlighting the issues affecting sonographers, as well as promoting the advancement of the profession, we are able to advocate on behalf of sonographers to governments on issues such as workforce and regulation.

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ADVOCATING FOR THE PROFESSION

Through a submission for regulation in Australia In 2020–21, the ASA worked tirelessly on a submission to the government for the profession to be added to the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme in Australia for the safety and protection of the public. An industry consultation of the draft submission was held in October and sent to 111 industry representatives (a total of 42 organisations). We currently hold 36 industry letters of support for sonographer regulation. The submission was given to the federal health department in April 2021 and the ASA is continuing to work with this department for it to progress to the next stage.

Meetings In a year where health departments and many health organisations had high COVID-19 priorities, the ASA participated in 26 industry meetings and 12 political/ government meetings, all of which were held online to discuss workforce challenges, the safety of sonographers, and regulation.

THE ASA PARTICIPATED IN

38 ADVOCACY MEETINGS

THE ASA RESPONDED TO

16

INDUSTRY CONSULTATIONS LAST YEAR

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DRIVE QUALITY AND STANDARDS It is important for sonography’s professional standing that we continue to enhance the quality and standards of ultrasound. This involves producing and endorsing guidelines and statements, supporting and commissioning evidence-based research through directly funding clinical research, undertaking studies on the state of the profession, as well as publishing the ASA journal Sonography.

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DRIVE QUALITY AND STANDARDS

Funding research The ASA has supported and invested in research that assists in progressing and strengthening the profession through:

Research grants In 2020, the ASA increased its research grant funding to $30,000 to support sonography research projects. In 2020, the recipients were: • A  ssema Lalzad (Host organisation: Monash University) – Bioeffects of Doppler ultrasound on the newborn brain: A pilot study to investigate structural effects in an in vivo rat model • B  ernadette Dellar (Host organisation: Absolute Ultrasound Services) – Is transpubic sonography a reliable assessment of functional voiding in asymptomatic females?

The impact of COVID-19 on the Australasian sonographic community The ASA is financially supporting the University of South Australia (UniSA) in undertaking a research project on ‘What is the impact of COVID-19 on the Australasian sonographic community captured at three time points during the pandemic?’ Survey One data was captured during May 2020 and was presented at the ASA Virtual Conference 2020. Three publications were produced and published in the Sonography journal, covering the changes in scan numbers and sonographer work hours, changes to sonographic examination protocols and access to personal protective equipment, as well as sonographer professional, personal, and social wellbeing.

Sonographer code of conduct UniSA has been commissioned to review and update the ASA Code of Conduct for Sonographers to ensure it is up to date and aligns with the other codes of conduct sonographers in Australia and New Zealand are required to adhere to.

MSK injections research project ASA has invested over the last two years in new research that progresses and strengthens the profession by funding research into the ‘Evaluation of sonographer administered ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal injections’ undertaken by UniSA. The research project has finished, with the results to be published in the Sonography journal in 2022.

GUIDELINES, STATEMENTS

1

NEW GUIDELINE (RELEASED WITH ASUM)

2

CLINICAL STATEMENTS REVIEWED AND UPDATED

2

GUIDELINES ENDORSED (both ASE)

1

POSITION STATEMENT

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FACILITATE AND PROMOTE EVIDENCEBASED PRACTICE WITHIN THE PROFESSION

It is important for sonography’s professional standing that we continue to enhance the quality and standards of ultrasound. This involves producing and endorsing guidelines and statements, supporting and commissioning evidence-based research through directly funding clinical research, undertaking studies on the state of the profession, as well as publishing the ASA journal Sonography.

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The ASA’s international peer reviewed journal has published articles on all aspects of sonography from authors around the world. Article downloads increased by 85% in 2020. This compares with an increase of 77% across all Wiley journals in the radiology and imaging group. There were over 130,000 downloads of articles from Sonography in 2020; downloads almost doubled from 2019. The countries where most full article downloads occurred from the Wiley Online Library were USA (34%), Canada (20%), Australia (15%), UK (11%), India (8%), New Zealand (5%). In May 2021, Sonography was notified of acceptance into the Web of Science Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI). The content from Sonography will be indexed by Clarivate and article/citation data will be made available via the Web of Science interface. This increases discoverability and allows citation activity to be more closely tracked. This is the first step towards promotion into the Science Citation Index Expanded, where the journal would receive an Impact Factor.

FACILITATE AND PROMOTE EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE

Sonography journal

ARTICLE DOWNLOADS INCREASED BY

85 %

IN 2020

THERE WERE OVER

130K

DOWNLOADS OF ARTICLES FROM SONOGRAPHY IN 2020

Sonography was notified of acceptance into the Web of Science Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI).

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FACILITATE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES Throughout the year, the ASA continued to provide the largest selection of sonographer CPD opportunities in Australasia. In a year when delivering faceto-face events was difficult, the ASA still delivered 32 face-to-face events, as well as a significant amount of high quality CPD through online activities such as webinars, CPD tests and two conferences.

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Broad range of opportunities for sonographers to advance their professional knowledge

Conferences In October, the ASA delivered its first virtual conference, with three rooms and seven streams across two days to over 1000 attendees. It was enthusiastically embraced by members, with many calling for virtual conferences to be continued in the post COVID-19 era. Attendees also had the ability to watch the 103 lectures on demand until the end of December, allowing them to not miss any of the great content.

1700 OVER

ATTENDEES BRISBANE HYBRID

‘It has been great’ ‘Hats off to this virtual event’ ‘Great job, thank you team’ ‘Congratulations and well done’ 2020 VIRTUAL CONFERENCE FEEDBACK

In May, the ASA delivered the ASA2021 Brisbane Hybrid Conference, a hybrid event that allowed for all lecture rooms and the ASA Awards Evening to be streamed online to a record number of over 1700 attendees. A hybrid is essentially running two conferences in one, and it also required significant contingencies due to the sudden COVID-19 restrictions that were put in place. A hybrid enabled us to deliver content from 14 international speakers, as well as over 140 local speakers who delivered over 150 lectures across three rooms, and a fourth room on Saturday, and over 80 workshops with up to 6 that ran concurrently.

‘Great hybrid conference and thanks to all organisers’ ‘Good work, guys, on a great conference’ ‘It’s amazing and I am very proud of ASA’ ‘It is a SUCCESS!’

1000

OVER

ATTENDEES VIRTUAL CONFERENCE

19

INTERNATIONAL SPEAKERS

ASA2021 BRISBANE HYBRID CONFERENCE FEEDBACK

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Online learning The ASA’s new learning management system, which was implemented in June 2020, has provided an easy-tonavigate platform for members over the last 12 months. Over 20,000 online activities were undertaken, from watching our vast number of webinars, including those in collaboration with the British Medical Ultrasound Society, to CPD tests. In addition, we had 291 conference recordings available for a minimum of three months post conference, enabling all attendees to view any session they might have missed. For some light relief, we also hosted an online trivia night to celebrate Australasian Sonographers Day on October 27.

Face-to-face events In a difficult year with lockdowns, border restrictions and social distancing requirements, the ASA still delivered 32 face-to-face events to over 1000 members.

TOTAL CONFERENCE RECORDINGS:

291 20K

ASA ONLINE CPD ACTIVITIES

First SIG Day

MELBOURNE MARCH 2021

Cardiac Seminar MELBOURNE

10 20

TRAVELLING WORKSHOPS

32

BRANCH MEETINGS

FACE-TO-FACE EVENTS TO OVER 1000 MEMBERS

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Collaborated with ECHO AUSTRALIA The iconic cardiac event in Australia, ECHO Australia Conference was unable to proceed as a face-to-face event in 2020, but with the ASA partnering with them, they were able to deliver a full two-day event to over 400 attendees, including steaming live from The Prince Charles Hospital.

Advance the education of those performing ultrasound, particularly in less developed communities, for improved health outcomes Through our major partnership with Radiology Across Borders, the ASA has supported a number of programs, notably the VITAL project which, due to the inability to travel and do site visits, was delivered online through multiple online conferences. The first online conference in April covered breast cancer detection, obstetrics and gynaecology, with 397 sites attending from 51 nations and 833 sites registering globally for the abdominal online conference in June. In addition, a mentoring program was set up providing one-to-one clinical support, pairing sonographer volunteers with colleagues in developing nations to provide personalised and practical support and learning.

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DELIVERING MEMBER VALUE & SUPPORT The ASA has continued to deliver value and support to its 7182 members and 42 corporate partners by keeping them informed and looking after their mental health, especially via digital channels, providing exceptional service and listening to their needs for now and the future.

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The ASA App was launched in May, providing members with the capability to receive the latest news, to register for events and access ASA online anywhere, anytime, at their fingertips. The ASA is committed to providing access to online content, moving away from printed resources, including shifting Soundeffects to be available online only, and in addition to this, all conference information is available online and on the conference app. This year we introduced podcasts, with a podcast by the ASA President, Ian Schroen, as well as a number of videos by the CEO, Jodie Long, to expand the way we deliver information. Soundeffects also transformed into a special edition format, making sure everything that was previously published in the magazine can now be found online through the ASA website.

VALUE & SUPPORT

The ASA is digitally transforming

770K OVER

VISITS TO THE ASA WEBSITE

Corporate partnerships Throughout a difficult year, our corporate partners have stood with us. Forty-two partners have continued their financial commitment with us, and numerous partners have supported ASA events throughout the year, continuing to invest in supporting the professional development of sonographers. A biennial industry report on sonographer employment and salary conditions was released to our corporate partners in November 2020, which the industry relies on for best practice and benchmarking. The ASA is extremely grateful to all our partners for offering their continued support to the ASA during these very difficult times.

PARTNERS

Feedback The biennial membership survey was conducted in November 2020, with a record number of responses. Satisfaction with activities and services provided by the ASA remains high, and the ASA Net Promoter Score (NPS) is at a high of 49%, which is a 3% increase from two years ago and well above industry standard.

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RECOGNISING AND REWARDING

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN SONOGRAPHY Last year we were unable to appropriately recognise sonographers’ amazing achievements; however, this year we had the opportunity to showcase the best of the profession, and celebrate their phenomenal achievements not only in person, but online at our first-ever Awards Evening during the ASA2021 Brisbane Hybrid Conference.

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RECOGNISING AND REWARDING

Fellowships Fellowship is the highest grade of membership for most professional associations. It is a significant professional achievement, and all ASA Fellows have made invaluable contributions not only to the ASA but to the sonography profession. The ASA thanks all Fellows for their hours of dedication and effort over the years. This year, the ASA inducted a special group of prominent members into our Fellows honour roll.

Erika Cavanagh

Chris Edwards

Michelle Fenech

Jill Muirhead

Janet Mulholland

Donna Napier

Quanson Sirlyn

Samantha Ward

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Awards of Excellence The ASA Awards of Excellence rewards a sonographer’s achievement in sonography and recognises excellence, best practice and contributions to sonography. On behalf of the ASA and the sonography profession we are extremely grateful to all recipients for their outstanding contributions. They are an inspiration and the shining lights of our profession. Our most outstanding sonographers over the past two years:

Sonographer of the Year NSW

Rayshelle Finch

Researcher of the Year

Lisa Hackett

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Sonographer of the Year Victoria

Sara Kernick

Tutor of the Year

Paula Kinnane

Employer of the Year

Hunter Imaging Group

Sonographer of the Year Queensland

Tristen Reddan


RECOGNISING AND REWARDING Sonographer of the Year Western Australia

Sonographer of the Year New Zealand

Sonographer of the Year South Australia

The Sue Caitcheon Memorial Award ASA Volunteer of the Year

Leanne Lamborn

Catrina Panuccio

Steve Mackintosh

Lino Piotto

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The Pru Pratten Lifetime Achievement Award

Greg Lammers

The Pru Pratten Lifetime Achievement Award recognises a member’s significant contribution to the profession and the ASA over their entire career. They are a beacon for other sonographers to look up to and what future sonographers aspire to. This year’s recipient was Greg Lammers. Greg is not only an asset to those in our profession, but he is an asset to healthcare professionals, nationally and internationally, who benefit from his expert knowledge, skills and abilities. Greg was recognised for his achievements, dedication and contribution to the sonography profession for over 30 years. He has had a long history with the ASA. Not only was he recognised for his years of service to branch committees, special interest groups and program committees, Greg is also a Fellow and a previous ASA president.

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His dedication to sharing his knowledge with sonographers is outstanding, having published numerous papers on sonography, as well as delivering over 130 presentations to sonographers and healthcare professionals. Greg has been a mentor to many sonographers, as well as training the next generation, and he has held several positions as a lead sonographer, tutor, university lecturer and DMU examiner (at one stage overseeing 15 students and 50 qualified sonographers). The ASA, on behalf of its members and the profession, congratulates Greg on this incredible achievement and thanks him for his continued service over the years to the ASA and sonography profession.


GOVERNANCE

GOVERNANCE Directors provide the organisation with guidance and support and are the guardians of the organisation’s vision and mission. The Board and the ASA are also supported by the Sonographer Policy and Advisory Committee, Education Advisory Committee, Special Interest Groups, Branches, Sonography Editorial Board, Conference Program Committees and the Fellowship Panel.

Board Committees

SIG Research

Governance Committee

Chair Daniel Rae

Chair Ian Schroen

Finance Risk and Audit Committee Chair Julie Toop

Advisory Committees Sonographer Policy and Advisory Committee Chair Anthony Wald

Education Advisory Committee Chair Frauke Lever

ASA Fellowship Panel Chair Jessie Childs

Sonography Journal Editorial Board

Chair Afrooz Najafzadeh

SIG Vascular

SIG Women’s Health Chair Nayana Parange

SIG Sonographer Health and Wellbeing Chair Bernie Mason

Branch Committees Alice Springs

Chair Ashtyn Lee

Auckland-Waikato Chair Scott Allen

Australian Capital Territory Chair Teri Carmody

Central West NSW

Chair Jacqueline Spurway

Editor-in-Chief Kerry Thoirs

Darling Downs

Annual Conference Program Committee

Kristine Lawless

Special Interest Groups

Chairs Haidee Janetzki,

Far North Queensland Chair Sarah Robb

Gippsland

Chair Tania Waixel

Gold Coast

SIG General

Chair Anna-Maria Galea

SIG Cardiac

Chair Kristy Thomas

SIG Musculoskeletal

Chair Lauren Dwight

SIG Paediatric

Chair Ainslie Heinke

Chair Jane Keating Chair Nikolas Wang Chair Deborah Carmody

Goulburn Valley Illawarra Mackay

Mid Central NZ

Melissa Westwood, Deb Mackintosh, Amanda Radic

Mid North Coast NSW Chair Janelle Vignes

Moreton Bay

Chair Chris Edwards

Newcastle

Chair Greg O’Connor

New South Wales

Secretary Sarah Skillen

Northern Territory Chair Chloe Lipp

Queensland

Chair Chris Gilmore

Riverina

Chair Simone Francis

South Australia

Chair Sandhya Maranna

South West Western Australia Chair Natalie Clements

Sunshine Coast

Chair Jacinta Sporton

Tasmania

Emma Brodribb, Kathryn O’Driscoll, Zara Ramm

Victoria

Chair Lynne Johnson

Wellington

Chair Paula Carryer

Western Australia Chair Gail Crawford

Chair Cain Brockley

ASA 21 | ASAANNUAL ANNUALREPORT REPORT 2020– 2020–21

31


DIRECTORS’ REPORT The Directors present their report, together with the financial statements, on the company for the year ended 30 June 2021.

| ASA 32 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020– 21 2020 ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2019– ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21


DIRECTORS’ REPORT

Directors The following persons were directors of the company during the financial year and up to the date of this report, unless otherwise stated:

Ian Schroen

Anthony Wald

Jennifer Alphonse

BAppSc (Medical Radiations), Dip Medical Ultrasound (Vasc), M Medical Ultrasound

B Tech Cardiac, AMS GradDip Mgt GradDip ClinEd

PhD, Grad.Dip.App.Sc. Medical Ultrasound, B.App.Sc (Medical Radiation Science) Nuclear Medicine, Ass.Dip Nuclear Medicine, AFASA

Ian’s career to date has been diverse and challenging, centred around ultrasound. Ian first gained a passion for vascular ultrasound during the 1990s and after a number of years in clinical ultrasound, he moved to a corporate role.

Anthony qualified as a cardiac sonographer in South Africa. Since relocating to Melbourne almost 20 years ago he has spent the majority of his career in public health care.

Well known for his work at Philips Healthcare, Ian returned to clinical ultrasound and completed the Masters of Medical Ultrasound. Engaged in clinical ultrasound, research and teaching opportunities and has a passion for all aspects of ultrasound. Ian presents regularly in various forums across a range of clinical and nonclinical topics. He is currently site supervisor and senior sonographer within IMED Victoria. Special Responsibilities • President and Board Chair • Chair, Governance Committee • M  ember, Finance Risk and Audit Committee

He was the chief cardiac physiologist for MonashHeart from 2004 until 2015, when he moved to his current role as a sonographer educator for the point of care program at Monash Health. He is currently finishing his Masters in Clinical Education with a research topic investigating the experiences of clinicians who undergo training in point of care ultrasound. Special Responsibilities • Vice President (appointed 21 November 2020)

Jennifer is an accredited medical sonographer, specialising in obstetric and gynaecological (O&G) ultrasound at a tertiary private O&G practice in Sydney. Having completed her PhD in 2015, Jennifer holds an Adjunct Lecturer appointment at UNSW with extensive experience in research and is co-author on 18 scientific publications and is a regular reviewer for multiple local and international journals. In August 2020 Jennifer was appointed as a Senior Lecturer with CQ University having been a casual external marker since 2017. Jennifer has completed her Foundations of Directorship with the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Jennifer has been a member of the ASA Board of Directors since 2015, was elected President in February 2017 before stepping down in November 2019. Special Responsibilities • V  ice President (until 21 November 2020) • M  ember, Finance Risk and Audit Committee

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

| 33


Alexandra Bell

Erika Cavanagh

Sarah Colley

BSc Economics and Accounting with Law Fellow Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales Member of Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand

M Medical Sonography, GradDipAppSc Medical Ultrasound, GradCert Health Professional Education, BAppSc Medical Radiation Technology (Medical Imaging Technology)

Dip Medical Sonography, Cert Nuclear Medicine

(appointed 29 May 2021)

Alexandra is a Chartered Accountant and currently the Deputy Chief Financial Officer of Challenger, a large ASX listed investment manager with assets under management of $100 billion. Alexandra leads a high performing team of 75 finance professional to deliver high quality reporting and decision support for the business. Alexandra has over 20 years’ experience in financial services with senior finance roles at Westpac, AXA and KPMG. Alexandra is a long-standing mentor of the UNSW Finance graduate programme and a Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

34 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

(resigned 17 October 2020)

Erika is a staff sonographer at the Mater Centre for Maternal Fetal Medicine. Prior to this she was an Advanced Sonographer at Gold Coast University Hospital Maternal Fetal Medicine and was the Chief Sonographer at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney for nine years. Erika has a keen interest in sonographer education and advanced practice, and in 2016 completed a Masters of Sonography. She is currently a PhD candidate at QUT Mater Medical Research Institute. Erika had been a member of the ASA Board of Directors since 2014 and was the Vice President 2017/18.

(resigned 17 October 2020)

Sarah is a general sonographer with extensive experience in the ultrasound industry and also in education and training. She is currently working on a casual basis teaching in emergency at RPAH. Sarah was involved in the establishment of the postgraduate ultrasound qualification at Sydney University in 1990, where she returned in an Honorary Associate position teaching ultrasound to medical students until 2015. In addition, she has served as the Secretary of the Diploma of Medical Ultrasound Examination Board (1987–1990). Sarah had been a member of the ASA Board of Directors since 2013 and was the ASA’s Vice President in 2014/15. Special Responsibilities • M  ember, Finance Risk and Audit Committee


DIRECTORS’ REPORT Michele Dowling

Rona Girdler

Kelly Griffiths

GradDipAppSc Medical Ultrasound, BAppSc Diagnostic Radiography, Dip Radiography, Therapy

BAppSc (MRT) DiagRad DMU General Ultrasound Dip Share Trading & Investment

Australian legal practitioner, LLB Hons, BA, GradDip Intellectual Property Laws

Michele is currently a senior sonographer at a Private Imaging Group in Sydney, having begun her career in London as a radiation therapy radiographer, and then as a diagnostic radiographer in Sydney, Australia.

Rona is a general sonographer with more than 17 years of experience having worked in the ultrasound field both clinically and administratively, along with experience in corporate finance in the disruptive area of blockchain and the not-for-profit membership sector.

She has extensive clinical management experience as a group practice Chief Sonographer, managing a large team of sonographers and students across nine locations. Michele has been a member of the ASA Board of Directors since November 2016. Special Responsibilities • M  ember, Governance Committee

(appointed 17 October 2020)

Currently focused on developing customer and user experiences utilising human centred design, Rona’s current project is working with a behavioural economist and blockchain strategist within the field of enterprise blockchain solutions. Rona also works as a freelancer to the alternative therapy sector creating strategic engagement opportunities for SME’s and is completing her Graduate Certificate in Customer Success Management at RMIT. Prior to this Rona was the Chief Sonographer at Royal North Shore Hospital (2006-2015) and part time Acting Assistant Chief (2014-2015). During this time, she also served on the ASA NSW committee (2011-2013) and on the ASA convening committee for the Special Interest Group Symposium held in Sydney (2010).

Kelly is a Partner and Deputy Head of the Disputes and Investigations practice of Gadens, a leading Australian law firm. Prior to this role, Kelly was Head of Government Affairs and Policy and Chief Legal Counsel for GSK, one of the world’s largest biopharmaceutical companies, in Australia and New Zealand. Kelly has also formerly worked for top tier law firms and in enforcement at the Australian Securities and Investments Commission. Kelly advises companies operating in highly regulated industries, with particular expertise in the healthcare and life sciences sectors. Kelly has served as a non-executive director on two not-for-profit boards; Youth Empowerment against HIV/Aids Ltd (including as company secretary) and Ranters Theatre Inc. Kelly was appointed to the ASA Board in 2018. Special Responsibilities • Member, Governance Committee

Special Responsibilities • Interim member, Finance Risk and Audit Committee

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

| 35


Narelle Kennedy

Roger Lee

Stephen Mackintosh

Doctor of Philosophy (Medicine) Graduate Diploma of Applied Science (Medical Ultrasonography) Bachelor of Applied Science Medical Radiation Technology (conversion) Diploma of Applied Science Medical Radiation Technology (Diagnostic Radiography)

GradDip in Medical Ultrasound Bachelor of Radiography and Medical Imaging Certificate in Leadership and Management

BAppSc (Medical Radiations), Dip Medical Ultrasound, PG Dip HlthSc (MRI), PG Cert HlthSc (Clinical Research) MHSc

Roger is a Tutor Sonographer with over 10 years of clinical experience in both public and private sectors in Australia and abroad. He has a special interest in MSK imaging with a passion to expand the MSK skillset of general sonographers through presentations at several conferences and workshops.

Stephen is a general sonographer and MRI technologist working for Pacific Radiology in Palmerston North, New Zealand. He has particular interests in musculoskeletal imaging and clinical education. Stephen is the first New Zealand member to be appointed as an ASA Director and has strongly supported the ASA’s expansion into New Zealand. In addition, he has been on the convening committees for the Special Interest Group Symposiums held in Wellington (2013) and Queenstown (2016).

(appointed 17 October 2020)

Narelle is a Research Sonographer specialising in Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the Maternal Fetal Medicine Department at Nepean Hospital and as had over 25 years’ experience working in ultrasound in both private and public sector in both clinical and administrative positions. She completed her Philosophy Doctorate in 2018 completing her original research on obesity in pregnancy. She has extensive experience in research and is a member of the editorial board for Sonography and has reviewed manuscripts for several international journals. She continues her research as an affiliate of the University of Sydney with an honorary position of Research Fellow. Narelle is also a casual academic at Central Queensland University, mentoring and marking into two Sonography research subjects since 2018. In April 2021 she joined the ASA Sonography Policy and Advisory Committee.

36 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

(appointed 17 October 2020)

Special Responsibilities • Interim member, Finance Risk and Audit Committee

(resigned 17 October 2020)

Stephen had been a member of the ASA Board of Directors since 2014 and was the ASA’s Vice President in 2016/17. Special Responsibilities • M  ember, Finance Risk and Audit Committee


DIRECTORS’ REPORT Silvano Palladino (resigned 26 March 2021)

BSc (Med Sc), Dip Mgt, MHlthMgt, Fellowship of the Australian Society for Microbiology, Fellowship of the Faculty of Science (Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia), GAICD Silvano is a qualified medical scientist with experience in laboratory medicine and laboratory management. He was previously the Executive Director of PathWest Laboratory and an adjunct associate professor with the University of Western Australia’s Faculty of Medicine. Silvano has a strong interest in the professional and workforce matters affecting the health sector. He has worked with various national professional bodies such as the National Coalition of Public Pathology Providers and the Workforce Advisory Subcommittee of the Pathology Agreement Advisory Committee (PAAC) in promoting those issues to federal and state governments. He is also a Foundation Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia’s Faculty of Science, and was a member of the Faculty’s Foundation Committee. Silvano was appointed to the ASA Board in 2015. Special Responsibilities • Chair, Finance Risk and Audit Committee

Julie Toop Australian Legal Practitioner Notary Public LLB, GradDip Notarial Studies Julie is currently the Lead for the COVID deferral response for Retail Products at ANZ. She has over 14 years experience in the financial services sector, having worked in a variety of both legal and business roles in the Commercial and Retail segments throughout her time at ANZ. Julie has considerable expertise in the health sector, having set up ANZ’s specialised Health segment in Business Bank in 2014.

The following persons held the position of company secretary during the reporting period:

Tanya Tran

Experience: General Manager, Finance & Operations of Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd since January 2020

Julie is a Notary Public and lawyer who has spent many years in private practice, including over 11 at top tier law firm Allens Linklaters. Julie has sat on a number of not for profit boards, and is presently the Chair of the Ovarian Cancer Research Foundation. Julie was appointed to the ASA Board in 2018.

Special Responsibilities • Interim Chair, Finance Risk and Audit Committee • Member, Finance Risk and Audit Committee

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

| 37


OBJECTIVES OF THE AUSTRALASIAN SONOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION Principle activities The purpose of the Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd is to foster a sonography profession that delivers high quality ultrasound with a vision of creating a healthier world through sonographer expertise. The company is a not-forprofit organisation, and is a registered charity working to advance the health of the public and to advance the education for those performing ultrasound. The principal activities of the company during the reporting period included advocating for the profession to become regulated for the health and safety of the public, to increase recognition of sonographers being experts in ultrasound as well as focussing on increasing sonographers’ professional development opportunities and supporting evidence-based research which will help to deliver better health care outcomes. No significant changes in the nature of the entity’s activity occurred during the financial year.

Strategic Intent and Short-term Objectives A strategic plan was set for the period 2018 - 2020 with a new strategic plan set for 2021-2023 which was developed with four similar strategic objectives to be addressed: • P  romote and advocate for the advancement of the sonography profession by positioning the sonographer as the expert and principal provider of diagnostic medical ultrasound, advocating and influencing the transition of the profession to the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme in Australia for the safety and protection of the public, taking the lead in establishing a sustainable future workforce supply and clinical placement pathways in Australia and New Zealand so that all patients can have access to sonographer performed ultrasound and ensuring sonographers are part of the conversation involving new and emerging technologies. • D  rive the quality and standards of sonography practice by contributing to high quality professional practice through the development of recommendations for sonography, facilitating and promoting evidence-based practice within the profession, supporting and investing in research that assists in progressing and strengthening the profession as well as contributing to safe, appropriate, effective, and equitable care for all people from socially, culturally, and linguistically diverse, and disadvantaged backgrounds. • F  acilitate comprehensive skills and professional development opportunities in ultrasound by providing a broad range of opportunities for sonographers to advance their professional knowledge, digital literacy, and careers as well as collaborating with key stakeholders to increase other

38 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21


DIRECTOR’S REPORT professions knowledge of ultrasound and advancing the education of those performing ultrasound particularly in less developed communities for improved health outcomes. • Innovate and evolve to deliver organisational sustainability, value, and member support by recognising and reward outstanding achievement in sonography, delivering and communicating practical and tangible value to members throughout their career, digitally transforming to provide members with a personalised, valuable, and useful experience, prioritising membership growth within the sonography profession, locally and internationally as well as actively growing our partnerships with aligned corporate partners that deliver value to members.

Long-term Objectives

services and the future supply of sonographers in the workforce; • facilitating professional development opportunities through conferences, meetings, workshops and online activities; • o  ffering a broad range of opportunities for sonographers to advance their professional knowledge; • a  dvancing the education of those performing ultrasound and other people involved in sonography, including in less developed communities for improved health outcomes; and • u  ndertaking other actions or activities necessary, incidental or conducive to advance these objects.

Key Performance Measures

• p  romoting and advocating for the advancement of the sonography profession;

Each year Key Performance Indicators are set cross the business based on the strategic intent and the short-term goals of the organisation. Individual performance plans are agreed to by each staff member with clear performance and behavioural targets outlined in July, a half yearly review performed in December and a final appraisal performed at the end of the financial year.

• s upporting and disseminating research that contributes to the sonography profession’s body of knowledge;

Operating Results

• p  ositioning sonographers as the experts and principal providers of diagnostic medical ultrasound;

The surplus of the company for the reporting period after provision for income tax and before other comprehensive income was:

The company’s long-term objectives are to continue to operate as the professional association furthering; the sonography profession, the interests of all sonographers and the health outcomes for their patients across Australasia by:

• c  ontributing to the quality and standards of sonography practice by developing recommendations for sonographers and the sonography industry; • e  ngaging with Government and other health care providers to improve the quality and accessibility of sonography

2021 $

2020 $

918,669

328,583

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

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Meetings of directors

Likely Developments

The number of meetings of the company’s Board of Directors (‘the Board’) and of each Board committee held during the year ended 30 June 2021, and the number of meetings attended by each director were:

Likely developments in the operations of the company and the expected results of those operations in future financial years have not been included in this report as the inclusion of such information is likely to result in unreasonable prejudice to the company.

Board

Finance Committee

Environmental Regulation

Attended

Held

Attended

Held

Jennifer Alphonse

5

6

2

2

Alexandra Bell

-

-

Erika Cavanagh

2

2 1

1

Members’ Guarantee

1

1

At the end of the reporting period Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd had 7,182 members.

Sarah Colley

2

2

Michele Dowling

5

6

Rona Girdler

4

4

Kelly Griffiths

5

6

Narelle Kennedy

4

4

Roger Lee

4

4

1

1

Stephen Mackintosh

2

2

1

1

Silvano Palladino

3

4

1

1

Ian Schroen

6

6

2

2

2

2

Julie Toop

6

6

Anthony Wald

6

6

Held: represents the number of meetings held during the time the director held office or was a member of the relevant committee.

Significant Changes in the State of Affairs In the opinion of the directors there were no significant changes in the state of affairs of the company that occurred during the financial year under review not otherwise disclosed in this report or the financial statements.

The company is not subject to any significant environmental regulation.

Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd is a company limited by guarantee. In the event of, and for the purpose of winding up of the company, the amount capable of being called up from each member and any person or association who ceased to be a member in the year prior to the winding up, is limited to $20, subject to the provisions of the company’s constitution. At 30 June 2021 the collective liability of members was $144,660 (30 June 2020: $136,360).

Auditor’s independence declaration A copy of the auditor’s independence declaration as required under section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Not-forprofits Commission Act 2012 is set out on page 41. This report is made in accordance with a resolution of directors, pursuant to section 298(2)(a) of the Corporations Act 2001. On behalf of the directors

Matters Subsequent to the End of the Financial Period There are no matters or circumstances that have arisen since the end of the financial period that have significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of the company, the results of those operations or the state of affairs of the company, in future years.

40 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

Ian Schroen Director 11 September 2021 Melbourne


DIRECTORS’ REPORT

Auditor’s independence declaration

AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION TO THE DIRECTORS OF AUSTRALASIAN SONOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION LTD In accordance with the requirements of section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, during the year ended 30 June 2021 there have been: (i) no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements as set out in the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 in relation to the audit; and (ii) no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

DFK Kidsons Partnership

Robert Wernli Melbourne Partner 11 September 2021

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

| 41


FINANCIALS The financial statements cover Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd as an individual entity. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars, which is Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd’s functional and presentation currency. Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd is a not-for-profit unlisted public company limited by guarantee. The financial statements were authorised for issue, in accordance with a resolution of directors, upon the date of signing this report. The directors have the power to amend and reissue the financial statements.

42 ANNUAL REPORT REPORT 2020–21 2020– 21 42 || ASA ANNUAL


FINANCIALS

STATEMENT OF PROFIT OR LOSS AND OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2021 Notes

Revenue

3

2021

2020

$

$

4,617,333

3,320,661

1,523,181

1,433,351

Events and meeting expenses

798,898

373,029

Members insurance

391,594

370,705

Printing and stationery

132,191

135,229

16,023

21,671

154,313

75,502

47,566

52,081

Expenses Employee benefits expense

Office expenses Finance cost on lease liability IT and Website Other office expenses Depreciation and amortisation Depreciation of plant and equipment

7

45,152

49,968

Depreciation of right of use building asset

8

100,491

100,492

Amortisation of intangible asset

9

70,240

7,410

108,190

69,000

Accounting, financial advisor, and legal expenses

88,764

45,949

Subscriptions

66,026

61,370

Bank and merchant fees

40,745

31,580

115,290

164,741

3,698,664

2,992,078

918,669

328,583

918,669

328,583

Grants and sponsorship

Other expenses Total expenses Surplus for the year Other comprehensive income/(loss) for the year Total comprehensive income/(loss) for the year

The above statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

| 43


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT 30 JUNE 2021 ASSETS

Notes

2021 $

2020 $

Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents

4

3,222,717

3,508,561

Trade and other receivables

5

24,736

4,950

Financial assets

6

2,082,715

1,404,063

Prepayments Total Current Assets

65,940

111,313

5,396,108

5,028,887

Non-Current Assets Financial assets

6

169,063

166,746

Property, plant and equipment

7

101,384

139,581

Right of use assets

8

192,609

293,100

Intangible assets

9

264,271

243,001

727,327

842,428

6,123,435

5,871,315

241,728

355,853

Total Non-Current Assets Total Assets

LIABILITIES

Current liabilities Trade and other payables

10

Provisions

11

106,761

102,657

2,082,111

2,522,509

121,403

108,858

2,552,003

3,089,877

61,521

67,796

Lease liabilities

121,268

243,668

Total Non-Current Liabilities

182,789

311,464

Total liabilities

2,734,792

3,401,341

Net Assets

3,388,643

2,469,974

3,178,643

2,259,974

210,000

210,000

3,388,643

2,469,974

Income received in advance Lease liabilities Total Current Liabilities Non-current Liabilities Provisions

11

EQUITY

Accumulated surplus Members indemnity insurance reserve Total Equity

12

The above statement of financial position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes

44 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21


FINANCIALS

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2021 Accumulated Surplus $

Balance at 1 July 2019

Reserves $

Total Equity $

2,151,755

2,151,755

Opening balance adjustment on adoption of AASB 16

(10,364)

(10,364)

Surplus for the year

328,583

328,583

(210,000)

210,000

Balance at 30 June 2020

2,259,974

210,000

2,469,974

Balance at 1 July 2020

2,259,974

210,000

2,469,974

918,669

918,669

3,178,643

210,000

3,388,643

Members indemnity insurance reserve

Surplus for the year Balance at 30 June 2021

The above statement of changes in equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

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STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2020 Cash flows from Operating Activities

Note

Receipts from operations Dividends received Interest received Payments to suppliers and employees Net GST paid

Net cash provided by operating activities

17

2021 $

2020 $

4,458,425

4,186,250

56,470

55,553

6,200

30,544

(3,784,442)

(2,997,743)

(202,830)

(199,160)

533,823

1,075,444

453,892

812,854

Cash flows from Investing Activities Proceeds from investments Payments for investments Payments for property, plant and equipment Payments for intangible assets

(1,065,239)

(93,816)

(6,955)

(26,528)

(91,510)

(226,901)

Net cash (used in) / provided by investing activities

(709,812)

465,609

Payment of lease liabilities

(109,855)

(99,364)

Net cash used in financing activities

(109,855)

(99,364)

Net (decrease) / increase in cash and cash equivalents held

(285,844)

1,441,689

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

4

The above statement of cash flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes

46 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

3,508,561

2,066,872

3,222,717

3,508,561


Note 1. Significant accounting policies The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the financial statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated. New, revised or amending Accounting Standards and Interpretations adopted The company has adopted all of the new or amended Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (‘AASB’) that are mandatory for the current reporting period. Any new or amended Accounting Standards or Interpretations that are not yet mandatory have not been early adopted. Basis of preparation These general purpose financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (‘AASB’), the Australian Charities and Notfor-profits Commission Act 2012 and the Corporations Act 2001, as appropriate for not-for-profit oriented entities. Historical cost convention The financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention. Critical accounting estimates The preparation of the financial statements requires the use of certain critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgement in the process of applying the company’s accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to the financial statements, are disclosed in note 2. Revenue recognition The company recognises revenue as follows: Revenue from contracts with customers (member subscriptions, sponsorship income, event revenue, advertising income, education registrations) Revenue is recognised at an amount that reflects the consideration to which the company is expected to be entitled in exchange for transferring goods or services to a customer. For each contract with a customer, the company: identifies the contract with a customer; identifies the performance obligations in the contract; determines the transaction price which takes into account estimates of variable consideration and the time value of money; allocates the transaction price to the separate performance obligations on the basis of the relative stand-alone selling price of each distinct good or service to be delivered; and recognises revenue when or as each performance obligation is satisfied in a manner that depicts the transfer to the customer of the goods or services promised.

Variable consideration within the transaction price, if any, reflects concessions provided to the customer such as discounts, rebates and refunds, any potential bonuses receivable from the customer and any other contingent events. Such estimates are determined using either the ‘expected value’ or ‘most likely amount’ method. The measurement of variable consideration is subject to a constraining principle whereby revenue will only be recognised to the extent that it is highly probable that a significant reversal in the amount of cumulative revenue recognised will not occur. The measurement constraint continues until the uncertainty associated with the variable consideration is subsequently resolved. Amounts received that are subject to the constraining principle are recognised as a refund liability. Interest Interest revenue is recognised as interest accrues using the effective interest method, which for floating rate financial assets is the rate inherent in the instrument. Dividend revenue Dividend revenue is recognised when the right to receive a dividend has been established. Other revenue Other revenue is recognised when it is received or when the right to receive payment is established. Income tax As the company is a charitable institution in terms of subsection 50-5 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997, as amended, it is exempt from paying income tax. Current and non-current classification Assets and liabilities are presented in the statement of financial position based on current and non-current classification. An asset is classified as current when: it is either expected to be realised or intended to be sold or consumed in the company’s normal operating cycle; it is held primarily for the purpose of trading; it is expected to be realised within 12 months after the reporting period; or the asset is cash or cash equivalent unless restricted from being exchanged or used to settle a liability for at least 12 months after the reporting period. All other assets are classified as noncurrent. A liability is classified as current when: it is either expected to be settled in the company’s normal operating cycle; it is held primarily for the purpose of trading; it is due to be settled within 12 months after the reporting period; or there is no unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting period. All other liabilities are classified as non-current.

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

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NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS

Note 1. Significant accounting policies


Note 1. Significant accounting policies

Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand, deposits held at call with financial institutions, other short-term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. Trade and other receivables Other receivables are recognised at amortised cost, less any allowance for expected credit losses. Financial Assets The company classifies its financial assets between current and non current assets based on the purpose for which the assets were acquired. Management determines the classification of its financial assets at initial recognition. The company assesses at each balance sheet date whether a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. All financial assets except those measured at fair value through profit or loss are subject to annual review for impairment. Impairment of financial assets At the end of each reporting period the company assesses whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. All financial assets, except those measured at fair value through the Statement of Profit or loss and other comprehensive Income, are subject to annual review for impairment. In order to determine an appropriate fair value as at 30 June 2021 for its portfolio of financial assets, the company used the market value of investments held. Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss Equity instruments (managed investment portfolio) that are held for trading as well as derivative instruments are classified as fair value through profit or loss. Other financial assets are required to be measured at fair value through profit or loss unless they are measured at amortised cost or fair value through other comprehensive income as explained above. Property, plant and equipment Plant and equipment is stated at historical cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment. Historical cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the items. Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis to write off the net cost of each item of property, plant and equipment (excluding land) over their expected useful lives as follows: Office equipment Leasehold improvements

3 – 5 years 5 years

The residual values, useful lives and depreciation methods are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at each reporting date.

48 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when there is no future economic benefit to the company. Gains and losses between the carrying amount and the disposal proceeds are taken to the statement of profit or loss. Right of use assets A right-of-use asset is recognised at the commencement date of a lease. The right-of-use asset is measured at cost, which comprises the initial amount of the lease liability, adjusted for, as applicable, any lease payments made at or before the commencement date net of any lease incentives received, any initial direct costs incurred, and, except where included in the cost of inventories, an estimate of costs expected to be incurred for dismantling and removing the underlying asset, and restoring the site or asset. Right-of-use assets are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the unexpired period of the lease or the estimated useful life of the asset, whichever is the shorter. Where the Company expects to obtain ownership of the leased asset at the end of the lease term, the depreciation is over its estimated useful life. Right-of use assets are subject to impairment or adjusted for any remeasurement of lease liabilities. Intangible assets Membership database and website The membership database and website are initially recognised at cost. These assets have a finite life and are carried at cost less any accumulated amortisation and impairment losses. The membership database and website are amortised on a straight line basis over 5 years. The asset is assessed annually for impairment. Impairment of non-financial assets Non-financial assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recognised for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. Recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs of disposal and value-in-use. The value-in-use is the present value of the estimated future cash flows relating to the asset using a pre-tax discount rate specific to the asset or cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs. Assets that do not have independent cash flows are grouped together to form a cash-generating unit.


Trade and other payables These amounts represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the company prior to the end of the financial year and which are unpaid. Due to their short-term nature they are measured at amortised cost and are not discounted. The amounts are unsecured and are usually paid within 30 days of recognition. Employee benefits Short-term employee benefits Liabilities for wages and salaries, including non-monetary benefits, annual leave and long service leave expected to be settled wholly within 12 months of the reporting date are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Other long-term employee benefits The liability for annual leave and long service leave not expected to be settled within 12 months of the reporting date are measured at the present value of expected future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date using the projected unit credit method. Consideration is given to expected future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service. Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on national government bonds with terms to maturity and currency that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows. Defined contribution superannuation expense Contributions to defined contribution superannuation plans are expensed in the period in which they are incurred. Lease liabilities A lease liability is recognised at the commencement date of a lease. The lease liability is initially recognised at the present value of the lease payments to be made over the term of the lease, discounted using the interest rate implicit in the lease or, if that rate cannot be readily determined, the Company’s incremental borrowing rate. Lease payments comprise of fixed payments less any lease incentives receivable, variable lease payments that depend on an index or a rate, amounts expected to be paid under residual value guarantees, exercise price of a purchase option when the exercise of the option is reasonably certain to occur, and any anticipated termination penalties. The variable lease payments that do not depend on an index or a rate are expensed in the period in which they are incurred.

Lease liabilities are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. The carrying amounts are remeasured if there is a change in the following: future lease payments arising from a change in an index or a rate used; residual guarantee; lease term; certainty of a purchase option and termination penalties. When a lease liability is remeasured, an adjustment is made to the corresponding right-of use asset, or to profit or loss if the carrying amount of the right-of-use asset is fully written down. Fair value measurement When an asset or liability, financial or non-financial, is measured at fair value for recognition or disclosure purposes, the fair value is based on the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date; and assumes that the transaction will take place either: in the principal market; or in the absence of a principal market, in the most advantageous market. Fair value is measured using the assumptions that market participants would use when pricing the asset or liability, assuming they act in their economic best interests. For non-financial assets, the fair value measurement is based on its highest and best use. Valuation techniques that are appropriate in the circumstances and for which sufficient data are available to measure fair value, are used, maximising the use of relevant observable inputs and minimising the use of unobservable inputs. Goods and Services Tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of associated GST, unless the GST incurred is not recoverable from the tax authority. In this case it is recognised as part of the cost of the acquisition of the asset or as part of the expense. Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the tax authority is included in other receivables or other payables in the statement of financial position. Cash flows are presented on a gross basis. The GST components of cash flows arising from investing or financing activities which are recoverable from, or payable to the tax authority, are presented as operating cash flows. Commitments and contingencies are disclosed net of the amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the tax authority.

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

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NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS

Note 1. Significant accounting policies


Note 2. Critical accounting judgements, estimates and assumptions

Note 2. Critical accounting judgements, estimates and assumptions The preparation of the financial statements requires management to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts in the financial statements. Management continually evaluates its judgements and estimates in relation to assets, liabilities, contingent liabilities, revenue and expenses. Management bases its judgements, estimates and assumptions on historical experience and on other various factors, including expectations of future events, management believes to be reasonable under the circumstances. The resulting accounting judgements and estimates will seldom equal the related actual results. The judgements, estimates and assumptions that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities (refer to the respective notes) within the next financial year are discussed below. Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic Judgement has been exercised in considering the impacts that the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has had, or may have, on the company based on known information. This consideration extends to the nature of the products and services offered, customers, supply chain, staffing and geographic regions in which the company operates. Other than as addressed in specific notes, there does not currently appear to be either any significant impact upon the financial statements or any significant uncertainties with respect to events or conditions which may impact the company unfavourably as at the reporting date or subsequently as a result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Estimation of useful lives of assets The company determines the estimated useful lives and related depreciation and amortisation charges for its property, plant and equipment and finite life intangible assets. The useful lives could change significantly as a result of technical innovations or some other event. The depreciation and amortisation charge will increase where the useful lives are less than previously estimated lives, or technically obsolete or non-strategic assets that have been abandoned or sold will be written off or written down.

50 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

Impairment of non-financial assets other than goodwill and other indefinite life intangible assets The company assesses impairment of non-financial assets other than goodwill and other indefinite life intangible assets at each reporting date by evaluating conditions specific to the company and to the particular asset that may lead to impairment. If an impairment trigger exists, the recoverable amount of the asset is determined. This involves fair value less costs of disposal or value-in-use calculations, which incorporate a number of key estimates and assumptions. Employee benefits provision As discussed in note 1, the liability for employee benefits expected to be settled more than 12 months from the reporting date are recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated future cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at the reporting date. In determining the present value of the liability, estimates of attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation have been taken into account.


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS

Note 3. Revenue / Note 4. Cash and Cash Equivalents / Note 5. Trade and Other Receivables / Note 6. Financial Assets

Note 3. Revenue Member subscriptions

2021 $

2020 $

3,038,616

2,931,455

185,742

76,981

1,102,602

119,305

48,310

57,766

Education registrations

6,736

43,077

Interest income

6,200

30,544

56,470

55,553

1,970

(393)

Net fair value gains/(losses) on investments

69,622

(60,679)

Government cash boost stimulus

50,000

50,000

Sundry income

51,065

17,052

4,617,333

3,320,661

Sponsorship income Event Revenue Advertising income

Dividends and distributions Profit / (loss) on sale of investments

Note 4. Cash and Cash Equivalents

2021 $

2020 $

Current Cash on hand Cash at bank

Note 5. Trade and Other Receivables

500

500

3,222,217

3,508,061

3,222,717

3,508,561

2021 $

2020 $

Current Trade debtors Other receivable

Note 6. Financial Assets

8,972

4,950

15,764

24,736

4,950

2021 $

2020 $

Current Managed investment portfolio Term deposits

1,472,715

1,404,063

610,000

2,082,715

1,404,063

169,063

166,746

Non-current Term deposits restricted *

* Term deposits are restricted assets in the form of bank guarantees held with the Bendigo Bank

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

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Note 7. Property, plant and equipment / Note 8. Right of use assets

2021 $

Note 7. Property, plant and equipment

2020 $

Non-current Leasehold improvements - at cost

162,602

162,602

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(93,999)

(61,479)

68,603

101,123

94,925

87,970

(62,144)

(49,512)

32,781

38,458

101,384

139,581

Office equipment - at cost Less: Accumulated depreciation

Movements in carrying amounts Movement in the carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and the end of the current financial year: Leasehold Improvements $

Balance at 1 July 2020 Additions Depreciation expense Balance at 30 June 2021

Note 8. Right of use assets

Office Equipment $

Total $

101,123

38,458

139,581

6,955

6,955

(32,520)

(12,632)

(45,152)

68,603

32,781

101,384

2021 $

2020 $

Non current Right of use asset – property lease Less: Accumulated depreciation

502,458

502,458

(309,849)

(209,358)

192,609

293,100

Movements in carrying amounts Movement in the carrying amounts of each right of use asset between the beginning and the end of the current financial year: Property Lease $

Total $

Balance at 1 July 2020

293,100

293,100

Depreciation expense

(100,491)

(100,491)

192,609

192,609

Balance at 30 June 2021

52 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21


2021 $

Note 9. Intangible assets

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS

Note 9. Intangible assets / Note 10. Trade and Other Payables / Note 11. Provisions

2020 $

Non-current New Member Database

324,290

232,780

Less: Accumulated amortisation

(60,019)

264,271

232,780

38,243

38,243

(38,243)

(28,022)

10,221

264,271

243,001

Member Database Less: Accumulated amortisation

Total Intangible assets

Movements in carrying amounts Movement in the carrying amounts of each intangible asset between the beginning and the end of the current financial year: New Member Database $

Balance at 1 July 2020

Member Database $

Total $

232,780

10,221

243,001

91,510

91,510

Amortisation expense

(60,019)

(10,221)

(70,240)

Balance at 30 June 2021

264,271

264,271

Additions

Note 10. Trade and Other Payables

2021 $

2020 $

Non-current Trade creditors

21,294

88,585

Accrued expenses

33,882

80,819

146,679

148,830

39,873

37,619

241,728

355,853

Provision for make good - leased premise

42,200

42,200

Provision for Long service leave

19,321

25,596

61,521

67,796

GST payable Other payables

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

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Note 12. Reserves / Note 13. Related parties and related party transactions / Note 14. Contingent liabilities

Note 12. Reserves Members indemnity insurance reserve

2021 $

2020 $

210,000

210,000

In 2020 the Association established a reserve for future potential insurance premium increases. Total Reserves

Movement in reserves Opening balance at start of financial year

210,000

Transfer from accumulated surplus

Closing balance at end of financial year

Note 13. Related parties and related party transactions

210,000

2021 $

2020 $

Directors’ compensation The directors act in an honorary capacity and receive no compensation for their services other than honorarium claims. Short-term benefits – honorarium claims Post-employment benefits Total compensation

4,550

13,548

4,550

13,548

Key management personnel compensation The aggregate compensation made to members of key management personnel (other than directors) of the company is set out below: Aggregate compensation

334,723

302,673

Transactions with related parties Other than amounts paid to key management personnel there were no transactions with related parties during the current and previous financial year. Receivable from and payable to related parties There were no trade receivables from or trade payables to related parties at the current and previous reporting date. Loans to/from related parties There were no loans to or from related parties at the current and previous reporting date.

Note 14. Contingent liabilities The company had no contingent liabilities as at 30 June 2021 and 30 June 2020.

54 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21


Note 15. Commitments

2021 $

2020 $

Other commitments for expenditure Payable – minimum payments -

Not later than 1 year

94,380

103,968

-

Between 1 and 5 years

94,380

188,760

-

Greater than 5 years

188,760

292,728

Note 16. Events subsequent to the end of the financial year The impact of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is ongoing and uncertain. It is not practicable to estimate the potential impact, positive or negative, after the reporting date. The situation is continually developing and is dependent on measures imposed by the Australian Government and other countries, such as maintaining social distancing requirements, quarantine, travel restrictions and any economic stimulus that may be provided. No other matter or circumstances has arisen since 30 June 2021 that has significantly affected, or may significantly affect the company’s operations, the results of those operations, or the company’s state of affairs in future financial years.

Note 17. Reconciliation of result for the year to net cash inflow / (outflow) from operating activities Comprehensive result for the year

2021 $

2020 $

918,669

328,583

Depreciation and amortisation

215,883

157,870

Unrealised (gain) / loss of financial assets

(69,622)

60,679

(19,786)

48,479

45,373

32,798

Increase/(decrease) in payables

(114,125)

(46,389)

Increase/(decrease) in prepaid income

(440,398)

483,549

(2,171)

9,875

533,823

1,075,444

Non-Cash Movements

Movements in assets & liabilities (Increase)/decrease in receivables (Increase)/decrease in prepayments

Increase/(decrease) in provisions Net Cash Inflow in Operating Activities

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

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NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS

Note 15. Commitments / Note 16. Events subsequent to the end of the financial year / Note 17. Reconciliation of result for the year to net cash inflow / (outflow) from operating activities


Directors’ Declaration

In the directors’ opinion: • the attached financial statements and notes comply with the Corporations Act 2001, the Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements, the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, the Corporations Regulations 2001 and other mandatory professional reporting requirements; • there are reasonable grounds to believe that the company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. • the attached financial statements and notes give a true and fair view of the company’s financial position as at 30 June 2021 and of its performance for the financial year ended on that date; and Signed in accordance with a resolution of directors made pursuant to section 295(5)(a) of the Corporations Act 2001. On behalf of the directors

Ian Schroen Director

Julie Toop Director

11 September 2021 Melbourne

11 September 2021 Melbourne

56 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS

Independent Auditor’s Report

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT TO THE MEMBERS OF AUSTRALASIAN SONOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION LTD Opinion We have audited the financial report of Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2020, the statement of comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, and notes to the financial statements, including a summary of significant accounting policies, and the directors’ declaration. In our opinion, the accompanying financial report of Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd, is in accordance with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including: (a) giving a true and fair view of the company’s financial position as at 30 June 2020 and of its financial performance for the year then ended; and (b) complying with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation 2013. Basis for Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the Company in accordance with the auditor independence requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. Responsibilities of the Directors for the Financial Report The directors of the Company are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Australian Charities and Notfor-profits Commission Act 2012 and for such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial report, the directors are responsible for assessing the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the directors either intend to liquidate the Company or to cease operations, or have no realistic alternative but to do so. Those charged with governance are responsible for overseeing the Company’s financial reporting process.

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

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Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report. As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements, we exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. We also: • Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control. • Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control. • Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the directors. • Conclude on the appropriateness of the directors’ use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw attention in our auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial report or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Company to cease to continue as a going concern. • Evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial report, including the disclosures, and whether the financial report represents the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation. We communicate with the directors regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit. We also provide the directors with a statement that we have complied with relevant ethical requirements regarding independence, and to communicate with them all relationships and other matters that may reasonably be thought to bear on our independence, and where applicable, related safeguards.

DFK Kidsons Partnership

Robert Wernli Partner

58 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

Melbourne 11 September 2021


ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

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RADIOLOGY ACROSS BORDERS The ASA is a major partner of Radiology Across Borders (RAB), and together we are working to create a healthier world through sonographer expertise and to advance the education of those performing ultrasound, particularly in less developed communities, for improved health outcomes. Radiology Across Borders believes that if you have the ability to save a life, you have the responsibility to do so, and trains local healthcare staff in developing nations in radiology to detect and treat illnesses which helps save lives.

Level 2, 93–95 Queen Street, Melbourne 3000, Victoria, Australia T +61 3 9552 0000 W www.sonographers.org 60 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

Profile for Australasian Sonographers Association

Annual report 2020-21  

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