Nourish Magazine - Fall 2019

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nourish

AUTUMN 2019

THE NEW INFLUENCERS:

WHY BOOMERS ARE INFLUENCING FOODSERVICE

AUTUMN FEATURE

CHEF MICHAEL BROWN

Culinary Consultant, Sysco Alberta

MEMORIES THROUGH

MEALS

REMEMBRANCE DAY IN THE LIFE OF

Plant Based Hearty Hamburger Soup PAGE 16


Upcoming Healthcare Shows Oct. 1, 2019

Sysco Ontario South Regional Healthcare Show - Foodie Expo

Toronto Congress Centre

Jan. 22, 2020

Sysco BC Regional Healthcare Show

Sheraton Guildford, Surrey

Jan. / Feb 2020

Sysco Grand Montreal Regional Healthcare Show

TBD

Mar. 24, 2020

Sysco Ontario North – National Sales and Healthcare Show

Durham Region

Apr. 1, 2020

Sysco Ontario North – National Sales and Healthcare Show

Sudbury

Apr. 15, 2020

Sysco Ontario North – National Sales and Healthcare Show

Ottawa

Apr. 21, 2020

Sysco Southwest Food Show

Woodstock

Apr. 29, 2020

Sysco Prairies Regional Healthcare Show

Sysco Winnipeg

May, 2020

Sysco Atlantic Regional Healthcare Show

St. John, NB

Jun. 9, 2020

Sysco Alberta Regional Healthcare Show

Sysco Edmonton

BRINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER


THE

d o fo

FUTURE OF

Note from the Editors

With many developing food trends on the horizon, it’s

sometimes difficult to imagine where the future of food is going and how many of these trends will continue. In this issue of Nourish you will learn why Boomers are becoming the new influencers and how their decisions are affecting some of the shifts within foodservice. In

IN THIS ISSUE THE NEW INFLUENCERS: WHY BOOMERS ARE CHANGING FOODSERVICE PAGE 4

MEMORIES THROUGH MEALS PAGE 7

PLANT-BASED EATING: FINDING A HEALTHY BALANCE PAGE 11

CHEF BIO MICHAEL BROWN PAGE 14

REMEMBRANCE DAY IN THE LIFE OF ROGER & SHARON PAGE 18

“Memories Through Meals”, the past meets the present.

BUSTED TURKEY MYTHS

You will learn that understanding the trends of both

PAGE 20

yesterday and today is key when developing your menu to

Q&A – ASK A DIETITIAN, ASK A CHEF

support the needs and tastes of your resident.

PAGE 22

In our Sysco Chef's feature, we are thrilled to bring you the culinary inspirations of Chef Michael Brown, with a focus on plant based eating. He discusses the movement towards finding a healthy balance and becoming more aware of how we can make more nutritious food choices. Is there a story you would like to see featured in Nourish? Email your questions or comments to healthcare.marketing@corp.sysco.ca.

Enjoy!

PUBLISHED BY: SYSCO CANADA 21 FOUR SEASONS PLACE, SUITE 400 TORONTO, ON M9B 6J8 WWW.SYSCO.CA/HEALTHCARE

CHRISTINE ROMANO, Healthcare Marketing Specialist, Sysco Canada

TAMMY JENSEN, Account Executive, Healthcare & Senior Living Sysco Alberta

WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS.  WRITE TO US AT: HEALTHCARE.MARKETING@CORP.SYSCO.CA PRINTED AND BOUND IN CANADA ADVERTISED ITEMS MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT ALL OPERATING COMPANIES


THE NEW INFLUENCERS

the NEW

influencers:

WHY

BOOMERS ARE CHANGING

foodservice DIVAKAR RAJU Corporate Manager Culinary Services Delmanor Inspired Retirement Living www.delmanor.com

While we tend to assume foodies are Instagramming Millennials, there are other important players leading the charge in the evolution of food culture. Boomers are huge influencers, and they lend their clout to different areas as they retire. According to StatCan, 5,000 Canadian Boomers are retiring each week. A boom that once represented birth and an ample workforce now represents 285,000 people retiring annually over the next seven or eight years. Boomers represent a unique generation and are approaching their retirement differently than others who came before them. Many are entering their retirement years with bucket lists, exotic travel destinations, and a 60-is-the-new-40 attitude. To compete in the changing market of retirement living, where it used to be 4  SYSCO NOURISH

simple to get 100 percent occupancy, retirement centres need to provide something that others don’t to maintain a competitive advantage. Boomers living in retirement homes don’t want to alter their lifestyle because of where they live, and they are pushing retirement communities to step up their food game because they have the purchasing power to match their demands. The want for healthy, tasty, unique and entertaining meal choices isn’t changing, and they aren’t afraid to put their money where their mouth is to get it.

The Health of it All

One of the earliest signs of the generational shift is the awareness residents of retirement homes have surrounding common dietary issues including gluten, salt content, and

sugar sensitivities. With this awareness comes generational consumer spending on health. A recent report from Morgan Stanley reveals that Boomers spend 3.4 percent more on healthrelated purchases compared to their parents. It is also expected that this market will increase by 1.04 percent each year between today and 2060 as younger Boomers age.

From Farm to Plate

Wanting to remain young, healthy and vibrant involves taking an active interest in what goes into your body. According to Fona International, “Baby Boomers are more than twice as likely as Millennials to prioritize wanting product labels that provide information they can better understand [what they’re eating].” Residents in retirement living want to know the


THE NEW INFLUENCERS details of what’s in their food, how it’s prepared, whether it’s vegan, dairyfree, grass-fed, free-run or whatever else is relevant to what they’re eating. Whether produce is supporting local farmers can be important for decision making in terms of what goes on their plates and in their mouths. Because of this, retirement communities are beginning to gravitate towards fresh, locally produced products, and some are even growing at onsite gardens to meet the needs of residents.

Food That Isn’t Hard to Swallow

The move toward healthier, more appetizing meals also applies to residents with disabilities such as swallowing disorders. The advent of the smoothie bowl and other photoworthy meals has pushed chefs towards making these meals more innovative and appetizing. Gone are the days of simply grinding up food in a blender to create a smoothie or vitamin rich shake. Food molds can be used to provide the aesthetics of a more traditional dish, but with the needed consistency.

Variety is the Spice of Life

If you were given the opportunity to go to your favourite restaurant, and order your favourite meal, each day, each week, odds are that over time you’d get sick of the food and end up hating that meal. Boomers are looking to mix things up, and that includes both the food they eat and where they eat it. The senior living dining experience was once marked by vast formal dining rooms with banquet-style seating, white tablecloths, and little palpable difference in atmosphere from one meal to the next. The result was something consistent and pleasant but static, limited and predictable. Then came the Boomers.

Long gone are the days of five o’clock dinner times in the same stale room. The evolution of choice allows Boomers to customize their dining experience to their specific lifestyles without compromise. Trends have increased toward multiple venues for retirement residents to enjoy their food, with communities having a handful of options including fullservice restaurants, casual quickservice marketplaces, pubs, bistros and coffee and ice cream parlours with extended and flexible hours to help keep the dining experience fresh. While there aren’t a lot of communities that are creating outdoor dining areas, those who are able to provide alfresco patio dining may find that they win the favour of residents seeking an experience mirroring the life they aspire to in their retirement, the much sought after Canadian patio experience included.

From the Food Network to the Open Kitchen There was once a notion that healthy food and the food provided in retirement living is boring and bland. But when retirement community chefs start running cooking demonstrations, tastings and workshops, residents get more excited about eating. Open kitchens, for example, allow for residents to watch their food as it’s prepared. The trend toward open kitchens stems from a focus on transparency in food preparation and diners’ devotion to fresh, local ingredients and made-to-order cooking. An open kitchen also creates a more home-like environment for diners.

Technology to Improve the Service Experience

Boomers make up a decidedly technology-friendly generation that

also values good service. By taking advantage of POS systems to provide table-side ordering, not only will the kitchen find out directly what the diner wants, but the wait staff is better able to focus on immediate needs, like refilling wine and water glasses, or grinding that pepper to make sure the meal provided is just right. Paper and electronic based comment cards can help the kitchen and service staff continually improve both the service and quality of food provided.

Brand Loyalty Without Compromise

Marketing companies looking to cash in on the Boomer demographic have realized that this is a generation that values nostalgia, and they’re proud to be loyal to brands they believe in. Whether it’s the jeans they wear, the cars they drive or the fact that they purchase their morning coffee at Starbucks, they support the brands that have earned their trust. If you build them a brand that they love, they’ll want to support it. By creating a destination café that is more than a generic coffee shop, residents will want to go and grab their coffee and will proudly take their guests along when they visit.

VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF LIFE Tourism Industry to a Kitchen Near You

Boring, predictable meal planning is off the table as the chefs must evolve with the trends and the dining expectations of a generation that doesn’t want to be told what to eat and when. The Boomer generation does not expect to alter their habits when they move to a senior living community. AUTUMN 2019  5


THE NEW INFLUENCERS

LEADING THE CHARGE IN THE NEXT GENERATIONS OF CARE While some communities have been eager to adapt and rise to the new opportunities presented by Boomers, others are slower to act. Retirement community operators should follow trends in both food and hospitalityrelated industries and emphasize variety, choice and the casual, and placing less importance on the formal and tightly scheduled.

What’s Next?

According to a recent article in The Financial Post, “Only a small percentage of younger seniors are opting for some type institutional setting, but a tsunami [of demand] is coming when they hit [their] 80s.” As the industry braces itself for the wave of Boomers in need of housing, they must 6  SYSCO NOURISH

focus efforts and resources towards appealing to this target audience. Retiring Boomers are interested in the experience. They want amenities like pools, gym, wifi, great food, and a community connection. Preparing for this is crucial. The industry will need to invest in their future business to keep up with both space available to serve this large influx and unique service demands. Retirement communities like Toronto’s Delmanor has built its vision around meeting these needs and abide by a core mission statement: “To be the retirement living choice of tomorrow; ahead of the curve in a diverse and ever-changing world.” By incorporating multi-level care,

live cooking stations, alfresco dining, POS systems, multiple dining options, food molds, and increasing technology in the kitchens, they are ahead of the curve and anticipating change. Delmanor and other like-minded companies are leading the charge in the next generations of care. Today we have an opportunity to expand our services and become cutting edge providers, but in order to do this we need to better understand, survey and meet the changing demands for our current and upcoming clientele, and provide a space they’ll want to call home. This article was previously published on restobiz.ca. https://www.restobiz.ca/new-influencers-boomerschanging-foodservice/


MEMORIES THROUGH MEALS

Malnutrition in senior living is a complex issue that has a significant impact on health status, recovery time, and overall facility costs. It is reported that 47-62% of older adults in long term care are at risk for malnutrition, while 50-70% of residents leave more than a quarter of each meal uneaten1. Food can be used as a powerful way to stimulate positive memories and emotions to encourage adequate food intake while also improving resident satisfaction and quality of life. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to look into the past to better build today’s menu.

s e i r o m e M THROUGH

MEALS

KRISTINA PARSONS, RD Nutrition Services Consultant National Sales, Healthcare Sysco Canada

CASIDHE GARDINER, RD Nutrition Services Consultant National Sales, Healthcare Sysco Canada AUTUMN 2019  7


MEMORIES THROUGH MEALS

A Look into the Past

During and after World War II, the way in which food was prepared and consumed in the home was rapidly changing. The impact of soldiers returning home along with industrial development led to the increased popularity of activities surrounding food, such as barbecuing, enjoying meals outside, and entertaining guests. At the same time, mealtime was extremely valued in the home. Eating at the table was cherished family time where people would enjoy a version of the following classic dinner combination: STARCHY VEGETABLE GREEN SALAD

PROTEIN DINNER

FRUIT

COOKED GREEN VEGETABLE

Despite these emerging changes to mealtime, rationing was still in effect and eating out remained a luxury after World War II. Home cooked meals were the foundation of a household and served as a vital source of nutrition, comfort and sense of belonging.

Homestyle Cooking Comforts the Soul Certain foods can sometimes be referred to as “comfort foods” if they are related to a positive memory or feeling, for example the feeling of being cared for. One study showed that people who associated happy family memories with specific foods were more likely to crave these items when feeling down.3 Not only do these foods provide a source of emotional comfort, the associated positive feelings may even render the food more satisfying3. Another way to evoke memories of home cooking is through the sense of smell. The olfactory bulb, which is responsible for smell, is linked

PLEASANT AROMAS IN THE DINING AREAS CAN HELP BRING POSITIVE FEELINGS TO THE SURFACE WHILE ALSO POTENTIALLY ENCOURAGING ADEQUATE INTAKE.

8  SYSCO NOURISH

to the areas of the brain associated with memory and emotion4. For example, the aroma of a freshly baked apple pie may trigger the thought of mom’s homemade pie cooling on the counter of the family home. Using familiar, comforting foods and creating pleasant aromas in the dining areas can help bring positive feelings to the surface while also potentially encouraging adequate intake.

Past Meets Present

Understanding the trends of both yesterday and today is key when developing your menu to support the needs and tastes of your residents. Drastic development of the food industry, combined with globalization, has allowed cuisines from across the globe to be available right here in Canada5. In the past, the availability of products was often limited by regional growing seasons, while local traditions and cuisine dominated what was served at the dinner table. Today however, we have access to a vast range of ingredients with endless potential to create new flavour profiles. For example, try a potato salad made with Greek yogurt dressing or a curried pulled pork sandwich. Experimenting with new ingredients can elevate classic dishes and meet the demands for increased diversity on the menu, harmonizing the past and present. Food is not only about flavour, but also about how it is prepared and where it is consumed. Home cooked meals were a fundamental part of family life after World War II, and so preparing meals from scratch or semiscratch is one strategy to rekindle those memories related to family and belonging. It is also important to consider the ever-changing dietary needs and preferences of residents, and adapt recipes accordingly.


MEMORIES THROUGH MEALS For example, a homemade glutenfree lasagna allows those who do not consume gluten to also enjoy home cooked comfort foods. Accommodating resident needs has a powerful impact on promoting inclusiveness and community. Additionally, an ambiance of togetherness can be enhanced with décor that is reminiscent of the past, such as red checkered tablecloths or vintage centrepieces in dining areas. Carefully considering these aspects of dining can help enrich the overall mealtime experience.

Making Mealtimes Memorable​

When it comes to what is on the plate, acknowledging the significance of the past is an important step to assisting residents enjoy the present and embrace the future. Recognizing the emotional and memorable impact of recipes and ingredients when building a menu can further connect people to the food they are eating. So how do we serve the fond memories of the past at mealtime today? By bringing people together with themed menus to celebrate special events such as Halloween, Remembrance Day, or even a 50s Party with classic mealtime favourites. Don’t forget to add a bit of nostalgia with some music from past eras like Glenn Miller and Elvis Presley. Mealtime is more than just a time to eat. It is a perfect opportunity to foster the feeling of home.

DON’T FORGET TO ADD A BIT OF NOSTALGIA WITH SOME MUSIC FROM PAST ERAS LIKE GLENN MILLER AND ELVIS PRESLEY References: (1)

Norner, B., & Friedrich, E.K. (2018). Nutrition services for older adults in long-term Care, postacute and other settings: Updated position of academy of nutrition and dietetics. eatright.org. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Retrieved from https://www.eatrightpro.org/media/p

(2)

Curtis, et al. (2016). Cost of hospital malnutrition. Clinical Nutrition, Sept 2016.

(3)

Romm, C. (2015). Why comfort foods comfort: A new study looks at the intersection of taste, nostalgia, and loneliness. The Atlantic. Retrieved from https://www.theatlantic.com/ health/archive/2015/04/why-comfort-foodcomforts/389613/

(4)

Sifferlin, A. (2015). The science of why you crave comfort food. Time USA, LLC. Retrieved from http://time.com/3975676/comfort-foodcravings/

(5)

Agriculture and Consumer Protection Department. (2010). Globalization of Food Systems and Nutrition. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Retrieved from http://www.fao.org/ag/agn/nutrition/ urban_globalization_en.stm AUTUMN 2019  9


Seasonal Theme Menus Looking to add more variety and options within your menu cycle? Sysco creates 5 theme day menus for each season of the year!

The Sysco seasonal theme menu packages include: 5 ready to print theme menus for each season Recipes complete with nutritional analysis Order guide of featured produces Ideas on how to bring the theme day menu to life in your homes

All Seasonal Theme Menus are available in Synergy on Demand and can be scheduled during your regular menu cycle! Contact your Sysco representative for more information.


PLANT-BASED EATING

d e s a b t n a PlEATING: althy He CE PRESENTED BY MAPLE LEAF FOODS

G N I FIND A

BALAN

In January 2019, Canadians finally got to see the long-awaited revision to Canada’s Food Guide, and it’s quite a departure from previous versions. Gone is the traditional rainbow model, in favour of a “food guide snaphot”, which is a picture of a balanced plate of food.

One of the biggest departures from the old Food Guide is the new emphasis on including plant-based proteins in the diet. At first, this notion had some pundits worried that meant an exclusion of meat or chicken, but now we know it just means a change in the name for food groups.

AUTUMN 2019  11


PLANT-BASED EATING disease, type 2 diabetes, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, high blood pressure and some types of cancer. It’s important to note that these diets do not exclude poultry or meat altogether – they simply emphasize choosing plant-based foods more often. Eating plant-based foods provides the body with a synergy from healthy fats (including omega 3s), antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and fibre, which seem to work together to protect our health.

The former “meat and alternatives” and “milk and alternatives” food groups have merged into one grouping, collectively known as “protein foods.” While meat, fish, poultry, eggs and milk products are still part of this grouping, Canada’s Food Guide says to “choose protein foods that come from plants more often.” It explains that eating plant-based foods regularly can mean eating more fibre and less saturated fat, which can have a positive effect on health, including a lowered risk of cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Plant-based proteins include beans, lentils, soy, nuts and seeds. To be clear, the new guide is not a call for all Canadians to become vegan. In an all-foods-can-fit environment, the new guidelines simply emphasize plant-based foods, because they are not on the radar of many Canadians. This new direction is intended to help Canadians eat more vegetables, grains and beans, in order to boost fibre and minimize saturated fat in the diet, which is good for overall health. 12  SYSCO NOURISH

In addition to being beneficial for our health, plant-based foods are also good for the planet. Farming cows and chickens to produce meat, milk and eggs uses one-third of the world’s fresh water. And cows raised for beef and milk account for the majority

HELP CANADIANS EAT MORE VEGETABLES, GRAINS AND BEANS, IN ORDER TO BOOST FIBRE AND MINIMIZE SATURATED FAT IN THE DIET, WHICH IS GOOD FOR OVERALL HEALTH Plant-based foods can replace meat in a well-planned diet, as they are a source of protein, iron and zinc (just like meat!) The idea is to go meatless “sometimes” and add variety to the diet. SO MANY BENEFITS Well-researched dietary patterns -like the Mediterranean Diet, DASH Diet and MIND Diet – are all largely focused on plant-based foods. And we know from many years of clinical studies that these diets can help reduce the risk of developing heart

of livestock emissions (almost 60 percent). When you choose plantbased lunch or dinner options once in a while, you cut back on water use and harmful emissions. So really, it’s all about balance. This story was provided by Maple Leaf Foods for commercial purposes.


NEW from Maple Leaf Foodservice

NEW!

PLANTBASED

BURGER EVERYTHING YOU CRAVE FROM A TRADITIONAL BURGER, BUT MADE FROM PLANTS! PLANT-BASED OPTIONS FROM MAPLE LEAF! To offer plant-based alternatives to your clients, Maple Leaf has introduced the Lightlife and Field Roast Grains lines, which feature nine innovative products made with fresh whole food ingredients. All of the products make delicious taste a priority, are suitable for vegan or vegetarian diets, are rich in protein, soy-free, gluten-free, and use no artificial flavours.

 TASTE YOU CRAVE  JUICY TEXTURE  MADE FROM PEA PROTEIN  FAMILIAR INGREDIENTS BALANCED NUTRITION  Each 4oz burger contains 20g of protein, 4g of fibre, no cholesterol and only 2.5g of saturated fat

SUPC: 5372192 | Pack Size: 40 x 113g

OUR PLANT-BASED PRODUCT LINE-UP LIGHTLIFE: • Plant-Based Burger • Plant-Based Grounds FIELD ROAST: • Crumbles: Italian & Chipotle Sausage • Sausages: Italian, Apple Sage, Chipotle • Chao Vegan Cheese • Frankfurter

For more information, contact your Sysco Account Executive or Maple Leaf Foodservice Sales Representative. Please visit our website for nutritional and ingredient information on these new products and others ideally suited for the healthcare and retirement markets - www.mapleleafHH.com


CHEF FEATURE

O I B

MICHAEL BROWN

Culinary Consultant Sysco Alberta

It's fall season again. Pumpkin spice is in everything, sweaters are back in fashion, and everyone is baking tasty treats at home. Comfort foods make us feel good, and these simple foods take us back to our childhood. We reminisce over the sweet aromas that waft through the air taking us on that timeless journey, igniting our inner spark, and capturing the moment when we recall our first childhood experience of home baked fresh muffins, or the uplifting warmth of a hearty soup on a cold, damp, chilly day. And yet, we still sometimes struggle to recall what we ate for lunch yesterday! 14  SYSCO NOURISH

THERE IS, A CONSISTENT TREND,ON,BECOMING MORE,AND MORE AWARE OF HOW WE CAN EAT SMARTER,


CHEF FEATURE Growing up I was fortunate to have travelled the world. My father was a doctor in the British Army and we lived abroad. Although I was fascinated with all the cultures in each country, settling in to a new school every three years and having to adapt every time was always a challenge. Fortunately, the cookery class was a subject that I really enjoyed—and I had a modest talent for it—so that made it easier to adjust to my new surroundings. While living in Singapore, I recall being mesmerized while watching chicken satay skewers being fanned with palm leaves over redhot glowing charcoals in the street market, with the prestigious Raffles hotel in the background. Reminiscent of a distant past with the hustle and bustle of the market vendors yelling for attention to buy their goods, I found everything about food to be exhilarating and exciting. I knew I wanted to be a chef!

In 1982, after completing a three year Culinary Diploma in England, I headed over to Munich, Germany to start my first job as a Commis chef Rôtisseur at the 650 room 5-star Sheraton hotel that had been built for the 1972 Olympics. The learning curve was steep with working in a busy, fast-paced kitchen of 70 chefs, having to speak German, and being 700 miles away from my home in England. For the next 30 years I worked all over Europe, giving me the most incredible culinary experiences I could have asked for.

My second dish comes from when I was working on the Island of Bahrain in the Persian Gulf. I remember setting up the daily salad buffet—a popular mainstay with the hotel guests—as I gazed out of the arched panoramic windows. The tranquility of the sparkling turquoise sea was breathtaking as I watched the traditional wooden Dhow fishing vessels gliding effortlessly by under the searing heat of the midday sun.

THE FUTURE, OF FOOD, Over the years, I’ve seen many trends come and go, but in today’s world NEEDS TO BE, there is a consistent trend on becoming SUSTAINABLE, more and more aware of how we can eat smarter with more nutrition in our FUNCTIONAL, diet. Animal protein can be costly, and being able to substitute the AFFORDABLE, main meat protein with AND DESIRABLE. plant-based protein in a recipe is becoming more relevant. From my vantage, I see that the future of food needs to be sustainable, functional, affordable, and desirable. Creating recipes for today’s trend is such a joy, and where my creativity kicks in!

Inspiration for the Three Chosen Recipes

Walking to school through the English country side in Kent, I would look across to the apple orchards with the early morning dew glistening on the bright red apples, each branch just bursting with an abundance of fruit. Quite often I would see one fall, anticipating that first bite as I reached over to pick it up. There was always a flavour explosion of tangy sweetness, tingling my senses into a frenzy of excitement. I love cooking with apples, and this recipe encompasses that memory, adding with it the deliciousness of cinnamon, crunchy oats and sweet golden raisins. A treat to be enjoyed at any time!

CHEF MICHAEL BROWN

This lentil penne salad is rich in colour, taste and texture, the soft cranberries and crunchy pecans complimenting the dish. It is a powerhouse of nutrition! And finally, my third dish brings me to 1989 when the winter season was in full swing at the luxurious Swiss ski resort of St. Moritz. The surrounding beauty of the mountains and glaciers 6000ft up was breathtaking and the fresh powder snow so crisp and inviting. Hearty full-bodied soups were always the “go to” comfort food after an exhilarating day on the slopes. I have adapted this soup recipe from using traditional ground beef to plant-based protein, which is less in fat, and yet, is vibrant in flavour and texture, delivering the same great taste.

AUTUMN 2019  15


CHEF FEATURE

Nutrition Facts/Valeur nutritive Nutrition Facts/Valeur nutritive Plant Based Hearty "Burger" Soup(Plante Basé Copieux "Burger" Soupe ) Plant Based Hearty "Burger" Soup(Plante Basé Copieux "Burger" Soupe )

Per 180 mL (180 ml) Per 180 mL (180 ml) Par Par 180 mL (180 ml)

Amount

% Daily value

Amount Daily value Teneur quotidienne Nutrition Facts/Valeur nutritive % valeur Teneur % valeur quotidienne Calories / Calories Plant Based Hearty "Burger" Soup(Plante Basé 130 Copieux "Burger" Soupe ) 130 Calories / Calories 1.5g 2% Fat / Lipides Per 180 mL (180 ml) Amount 1.5g % Daily value 2% Fat / Lipides/ saturés Par Saturated 180 mL (180 ml) Teneur 2g % valeur quotidienne 0g 2g + Trans / trans Saturated / saturés 130 Calories 0g + Trans/ /Calories trans 0mg Cholesterol / Cholestérol 0% 1.5g 2% Fat / Lipides/ Cholestérol 0mg Cholesterol 0% 530mg Sodium / Sodium 2g Saturated / saturés 530mg Sodium / Sodium 11g 0g 4% Carbohydrate + Trans / trans/ Glucides 11g 4% Carbohydrate / Glucides 8% 2g 0mg Cholesterol 0% Fiber / Fibres / Cholestérol 8% 2g Fiber / Fibres Sugars / Sucres 530mg Sodium / Sucres Sodium 2g Sugars / 8g Protein / Protéines 11g 4% Carbohydrate / Glucides 8g ProteinA/ /Protéines 2% 0% Calcium /2g Vitamin Vitamine A Calcium 8% Fiber / Fibres 2% 0% Iron Vitamin A / Vitamine Calcium Calcium 10% 15% Vitamin Vitamine AC / Fer/2g SugarsC/ /Sucres 10% 15% Vitamin C / Vitamine C Iron / Fer ProteinBroth / Protéines Vegetable (Water; Base, Vegetable Dry G-F RS); Sauce,8gTomato; Vegetarian Vegetable Broth (Water; Base, Vegetable Dry G-F Sauce, Tomato; Vegetarian 2% 0%RS); Vitamin A Beyond; / Vitamine A Calcium / Calcium Burger Patty Vegetable Mix, Mirepoix Frz; Onions, Fresh Green/Spring; Burger Patty Vegetable Mix,Italian Mirepoix10% Frz; Onions, Fresh Green/Spring; 15% Vitamin C Beyond; / Vitamine C Iron / Fer Paprika; Garlic, Minced; Seasoning, Paprika; Garlic, Minced; Seasoning, Italian Vegetable Broth (Water; Base, Vegetable Dry G-F RS); Sauce, Tomato; Vegetarian Burger Patty Beyond; Vegetable Mix, Mirepoix Frz; Onions, Fresh Green/Spring; Paprika; Garlic, Minced; Seasoning, Italian Contains: Soy, Sulphites Contains: Soy, Sulphites Contains: Soy, Sulphites

Plant Based Hearty Hamburger Soup Serving Size: 180 ml | Yield: 50 1.8 kg 8 L 2 L 1.3 kg 336 g 40 g 40 g 20 g

Beyond Beef Burgers, broken into small pieces vegetable stock marinara tomato sauce vegetable mire poix (carrot, celery, onion), diced ¼" green onion, diced dried Italian seasoning ground paprika powder minced garlic

1. In a large saucepan, lightly brown the Beyond Burger in a little oil for 10 minutes. Drain off any excess oil. 2. Apart from the green onion, add all the other ingredients into the saucepan and cook for 35 minutes. 3. Add the green onion and adjust the seasoning as needed. 4. Serve with fresh baked garlic bread rolls.

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Red Lentil Pasta Salad with Cranberries and Pecans Serving Size: 200 g | Yield: 50 2.7 kg 1.7 kg 672 g 1.7 kg 500 g 500 g 750 ml

dried lentil pasta Fusion Blend (black bean, corn, edamame beans), blanch for 5 minutes green onions, sliced tri-colour peppers, chopped small dice dried cranberries dried pecans, crushed into small pieces vegan mayonnaise


CHEF FEATURE 1. Boil the pasta until cooked then drain. 2. Blanch the Fusion Blend vegetables for 5 minutes, refresh in iced water, drain. 3. Place the pasta and vegetables in a bowl, add the cranberries, peppers, pecans and mix. Nutrition Facts/Valeur nutritive Nutrition Facts/Valeur nutritive

Salad w/Fruit&Nuts(Lentille Pâtes Salade avec fruits et noix ) 4. Lentil StirPasta in mayonnaise and season to taste needed. Lentil Pasta Salad w/Fruit&Nuts(Lentille Pâtes Salade avec as fruits et noix ) Per 250 mL (250 ml) Par Per 250 mL (250 ml) Par 250 mL (250 ml)

Amount

% Daily value

Teneur

% valeur quotidienne

Teneur quotidienne Amount Daily value Nutrition Facts/Valeur nutritive % valeur

430 avec fruits et noix ) Calories / Calories Lentil Pasta Salad w/Fruit&Nuts(Lentille Pâtes Salade 430 Calories / Calories 19g 29% Fat / Lipides Per 250 mL (250 ml) Amount 19g % Daily value 29% Fat / Lipides / saturés Par Saturated 250 mL (250 ml) Teneur 2g % valeur quotidienne + Trans / trans Saturated / saturés

0g 2g 430 0g 5mg 2% 19g 29% 5mg 2% 180mg 2g 180mg 54g 0g 18% 54g 18% 24% 6g 5mg 2% 24% Fiber / Fibres 6g Sugars / Sucres 9g 180mg Sodium Sodium Sugars // Sucres 9g 14g Protein / Protéines 54g Carbohydrate / Glucides 18% Protein Vitamin A/ /Protéines Vitamine A / Calcium 4% 0% Calcium14g 24% Fiber / Fibres 6g Vitamin A / Vitamine A Calcium Calcium 4% 0% 6% Iron / Fer/9g 25% Vitamin Vitamine C SugarsC/ /Sucres 6% Iron / Fer 25% Vitamin C / Vitamine C 14g Protein / Protéines Pasta, Penne Lentil Dry; Vegetable Mix, Fusion; Mayonnaise, Vegan; Peppers, Green Pasta, Penne Lentil Dry; Vegetable Mix, Fusion; Mayonnaise, Peppers, & Red Diced; Fresh Cranberries, Dried/Vegan; Sweetened; Nuts,Green Vitamin A /Onions, Vitamine A Green/Spring; Calcium Calcium 4% 0% & Vitamin Red Diced; Fresh Pecan Halves 6% Iron Dried 25% C /Onions, Vitamine C Green/Spring; Cranberries, / Fer Sweetened; Nuts,

Calories + Trans/ /Calories trans Cholesterol / Cholestérol Fat / Lipides/ Cholestérol Cholesterol Sodium / Sodium Saturated / saturés Sodium + Trans/ Sodium / trans/ Glucides Carbohydrate Carbohydrate / Glucides Fiber / Fibres / Cholestérol Cholesterol

Pecan Halves Pasta, Penne Lentil Dry; Vegetable Mix, Fusion; Mayonnaise, Vegan; Peppers, Green & Red Diced; Onions, Fresh Green/Spring; Cranberries, Dried Sweetened; Nuts, Pecan Halves Contains: Peanuts, Sulphites, TreeNuts Contains: Peanuts, Sulphites, TreeNuts Contains: Peanuts, Sulphites, TreeNuts

16 g ground cinnamon 8 g salt 200 g fresh eggs, beaten together 500 ml milk 250 ml canola oil 800 g green tart apples, chopped small dice 200 g golden raisins Topping 120 g all-purpose flour, sifted 120 g oats 120 g brown sugar 8 g cinnamon 60 g butter, chilled

1. In a bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. 2. Add milk and canola oil to the dry ingredients. Mix until combined. 3. Fold in the apples and raisins and mix muffin batter together. 4. To make topping, place all ingredients into a bowl and rub together to form a crumble. 5. Place muffin cups into a muffin pan and fill each one ¾ full with muffin batter. 6. Sprinkle the topping evenly on each. 7. Bake in the oven at 375ºF for 15/20 minutes until cooked. 8. Remove fromNutrition the oven and allow to cool in the pan Facts/Valeur nutritive Nutrition Facts/Valeur&nutritive Apple & Sultana Muffin(Pomme Sultane Muffin ) for 5 minutes. Serve warm. Apple & Sultana Muffin(Pomme & Sultane Muffin ) Per 1 Each (58 g) Par Per 1 Unité Each (58 g) Par 1 Unité (58 g)

Amount

% Daily value

Teneur % valeur quotidienne Amount Daily value Nutrition Facts/Valeur nutritive Teneur % valeur quotidienne Calories /Apple Calories & Sultana Muffin(Pomme & 180 Sultane Muffin ) 180 Calories / Calories 6g Fat / Lipides Per 1 Each (58 g) Amount 6g % Daily value Fat Lipides Par Saturated 1/ Unité (58 /g)saturés Teneur 1g % valeur quotidienne

+ Trans / trans Saturated / saturés

0g 1g 180 0g 20mg 6g 20mg 230mg 1g 230mg 28g 0g 28g 1g 20mg Fiber / Fibres 1g Sugars / Sucres 12g 230mg Sodium Sodium Sugars // Sucres 12g 3g Protein / Protéines 28g Carbohydrate / Glucides Protein Vitamin A/ /Protéines Vitamine A Calcium /3g Calcium 0% Fiber / Fibres Vitamin A / Vitamine /1g Calcium 0% Calcium 0% Vitamin Vitamine AC Iron / Fer SugarsC/ /Sucres 12g 0% Iron / Fer Vitamin C / Vitamine C 3g Protein / Protéines Flour, All Purpose; Apple, Granny Smith; Sugar, Granulated; Oil, Canola; Egg, Flour, All Purpose; Smith; Sugar, Granulated; Oil, Canola; Shell Medium; Sugar,Apple, Brown; Flour, All Purpose; Unsalted; Oats, Steel Egg, Cut; Vitamin A / Vitamine A Granny Calcium / Calcium 0%Butter, Shell Medium; Sugar, Brown; Flour, All Purpose; Oats, Steel Cut; Baking Soda; Table; Cinnamon, Ground 0%Butter, Vitamin C /Salt, Vitamine C Iron /Unsalted; Fer

Calories + Trans/ /Calories trans Cholesterol / Cholestérol Fat / Lipides/ Cholestérol Cholesterol Sodium / Sodium Saturated / saturés Sodium + Trans/ Sodium / trans/ Glucides Carbohydrate Carbohydrate / Glucides Fiber / Fibres / Cholestérol Cholesterol

Scrumptious Apple and Sultana Muffins

Baking Soda; Salt, Table; Cinnamon, Ground Flour, All Purpose; Apple, Granny Smith; Sugar, Granulated; Oil, Canola; Egg, Shell Medium; Sugar, Brown; Flour, All Purpose; Butter, Unsalted; Oats, Steel Cut; Baking Soda; Salt, Table; Cinnamon, Ground Contains: Eggs, Wheat Contains: Eggs, Wheat

9% 9% 7% 9% 7% 9% 9% 4% 7% 4% 9% 0% 4% 0% 8% 8% 0% 8%

Contains: Eggs, Wheat

Serving Size: 2 oz | Yield: 50 840 g 380 g 32 g

all-purpose flour, sifted white sugar baking soda AUTUMN 2019  17


ROGER & SHARON

REMEMBRANCE

DAY IN THE LIFE OF

TAMMY JENSEN Account Executive, Healthcare & Senior Living Sysco Alberta

The Meadow Valley Community Centre was jam packed with many of its citizens and visitors from surrounding towns, with only standing room at the back for the Remembrance Day ceremony. This made Roger nervous since he was asked to say a few words on behalf of his grandfather that fought in World War I. Standing at the podium in his dark gray suit, blue tie, and sporting a red poppy on his left lapel, he decided to focus directly on Sharon who was sitting in the middle of the sixth row, just behind the cadets. She gave him a knowing nod and a little wink to make him smile. Roger began… “It is a privilege to be part of the ceremony today as we remember those that have fought for our freedom and honour those that have fallen asleep in death. My maternal grandfather, Frederick L. Hillier, was one such person. He was born in 1898 and was just eighteen years old 18  SYSCO NOURISH

when he was sent to fight overseas in the trenches of Northern France. He survived the horrors of the war, came home to Canada, and started a family. He rarely talked about the war, saying only that ‘the smile of a child is worth fighting for, and in them future peace exists’. It took until I had a child of my own before I understood what that meant. When my grandfather passed away at the age of ninety-six, we found this poem he wrote in an old trunk amongst his medals, uniform, and a pair of very, very, worn-out boots.”


ROGER & SHARON Roger looked at Sharon, took a breath, and began the poem…

Peace Will Exist1 In the still of the night the crickets are what I hear. They are a reminder of home and what I hold dear. As the sun begins to rise the birds sing a song. They each have a chorus and I want hum along.

Peace exists. The day is nigh and my shift is about to begin. I pick up my rifle much to my chagrin. The war has been long and has made me tired. My gun is loaded and ready, but not yet fired.

Peace still exists.

My mate of two years is beside me in this trench. We wait and wait, and wonder if anything makes sense. The screaming crackle of lead is upon us now, and nothing is still. My friend lay blood-soaked and lifeless, and I fire at will.

Peace ceases to exist.

The long, loud hours pass, and soon the quiet comes. I reach in his pocket to see the picture of his sons. The children have hope and smiles so bright. Chirping crickets keep me company through the night.

A FUTURE THAT WILL BRING US ALL CONTINUED PEACE Roger took out a tissue from his suit pocket and dabbed his moistened eyes. He continued, “May we always fight for our children, and may they always bring us peace. Today is a day of remembrance as we look to the past with somber hearts and minds, but it is also a day of hope as we look to the future. A future that will bring us all continued peace. Let’s let that be the focal point of

our conversations today as we enjoy the lovely feast the ladies from Happy Valley Home have generously put on.” As Roger left the stage the attendees applauded. He took his seat next to Sharon where she gently squeezed his hand, and whispered, “Your grandfather would be so proud.”

Peace WILL exist. References: 1

Peace Will Exist, © Tammy Rébéré, 2019 AUTUMN 2019  19


BUSTED TURKEY MYTHS

BUSTED

TURKEY MYTHS PRESENTED BY OLYMEL

When we suggest turkey for a menu, we always hear objections based on myths: turkey is dry and the dark meat is too fat. Other objections are related to the challenges preparing turkey poses such as thawing, cooking and cleaning, or a lack of inspiration for occasions outside the holidays. And finally, objections about the way turkeys are raised: hormones and cages.

Now, let’s talk turkey. MYTH: turkey is dry NO… and YES.

To fully cook the thighs of a whole bird, you must slightly overcook the breast, resulting in overcooked and dried-out meat. Olymel roasts are ready to cook in the bag. The bag will retain all natural juices and flavour. Their consistent shape will cook quickly and evenly and the meat will be moist and flavourful. 20  SYSCO NOURISH

MYTH: white meat is better for you True. Per portion of 100 g, dark

meat has 8 g of fat versus the 3 g of the very lean white meat. However, its fat content is still much lower than most meats: beef (13 g), pork (15 g) and salmon (8 g).

MYTH: turkey is for the holidays Eating turkey remains a tradition during the holidays. However, more and more consumers are enjoying turkey outside the holidays because it is healthier protein option. Its neutral flavour can suit virtually any recipe. make a healthy snack out of ground turkey meatballs.


BUSTED TURKEY MYTHS

MYTH: turkeys are injected with growth hormones FALSE. Like all other turkeys,

our turkeys are raised without hormones. No hormones are approved for use in turkeys. Since 2016, Olymel has offered turkeys raised without antibiotics and gradually will increase the number of processed products made with meat from animals raised without antibiotics.

MYTH: turkeys are cooped up in cages NOT at all. Turkeys are

raised in barns that provide a safe, comfortable home with plenty of space to move around. Barns – which are specially designed just for turkeys – keep predators away, help farmers control germs and prevent diseases from infecting the birds, and allow maximum comfort. Turkeys stay cool in the summer, warm in the winter, and dry during inclement weather. Turkeys are not raised in cages. If you’re not sure how to prepare turkey, which cuts or products are best suited for your operations or just need inspiration; reach out to your Account Manager he can put you in contact with your local Olymel specialist who can provide information, recipes and everything you need to know about turkey.

So go ahead, put turkey on your menu today! AUTUMN 2019  21


WHITE/DARK MEAT TURKEY BREAST ROAST (in net/raw) # 495655

Trust turkey for the Holidays

ROASTED COOKED TURKEY BREAST (low sodium) # 990127

BONELESS, SEASONED TURKEY BREAST (raw) # 155903

OVEN ROASTED COOKED TURKEY BREAST (fresh) # 3151783

olymelfoodservice.com


Q&A

&

KRISTINA PARSONS Nutrition Services Consultant National Sales, Healthcare Sysco Canada

k s A AD

I T I T IE

A N!

QA k s A

MICHAEL BROWN Culinary Consultant Sysco Alberta

A

! F E CH

What do you think are the food trends of the future? I think future food trends will revolve around sustainable eating, including an increase in plant-based proteins, eating local and choosing sustainably sourced foods. Already we are seeing this shift in the new Canada’s Food Guide, which incorporates guidelines that consider how our eating patterns can impact the environment. I think we are becoming more aware of where our food comes from, and are prioritizing the importance of eating for a healthy body as well as a healthy planet.

What do you think are the food trends of the future? Insects will become more main stream as protein supplements as consumers include more plant based meals into their diets. Insects will become more fashionable and on-trend in bars and restaurants as snacks and small appetizers. Consumers will want to explore different flavours and textures and enjoy the buzz! These may become the new “caviar” with inflated prices to make them extravagant and sought after.

What are your favourite past food trends? My favourite past food trend is the avocado toast movement. I think it became so popular because it is versatile, simple and allows people to get creative (just check out Instagram!) No two avocado toasts are the same – you can personalize it to your tastes. Whether you are vegan, gluten-free or someone who enjoys gourmet food, there is an avocado toast recipe out there for you!

What are your favourite past food trends? I enjoyed so many! Sliders were my favourite. They were very popular as people love to see mini versions of their favourite food items and they can have a variety on one platter. Deep fried battered ice cream was also pretty neat, as it amazed everyone. How can you deep fry ice cream? Another favourite was cupcakes. Everyone was making mini cakes of pure indulgence in every bite! AUTUMN 2019  23


Add some magic to

YOUR PATIENT MEALS.

Hormel Foods Sales, LLC, Austin, MN 55912 1-800-523-4635 www.HormelHealthLabs.com ©Hormel Foods, LLC

HORMEL HEALTH LABS

offers GREAT TASTING SOLUTIONS with MAGIC CUP™ DESSERT

HORMEL HEALTH LABSABRACADABRA… MAGIC CUPTM Dessert is

offers GREAT TASTINGappearing soon. MAGIC CUP Dessert has a great taste and safe consistency that will make SOLUTIONS with TM

it a patient favorite. It is nutrient dense,

MAGIC CUP™ DESSERT delivering 290 calories and 9 grams of protein per serving. It is easy to serve and swallow in

• 290 CALORIES per serving (118 ml)

a thickened consistency that meets IDDSI Level 4 guidelines. Serve your patients ice TM

• 9 GRAMS OF PROTEIN per serving (118 ml)

ABRACADABRA… MAGIC CUP

Dessert is

TM creamappearing again for a snack, dessert or anytime. soon. MAGIC CUP Dessert has a

great taste and safe consistency that will make

• Vanilla and Wild Berry flavours

it a patient favorite. It is nutrient dense, delivering 290 calories and 9 grams of protein

• IDDSI Level 4 guidelines

per serving. It is easy to serve and swallow in

MAGIC CUP™ DESSERT VANILLA

• Great intervention for dysphagia and malnutrition

DISTRIBUTOR CODE

a thickened consistency that meets IDDSI

PRODUCT CODE

PACK SIZE

CASE YIELD

SHELF LIFE

KOSHER

LACTOSE FREE

80394

48/ 118ml

48

1 yr fzn

No

No

Level 4 guidelines. Serve your patients ice

GLUTEN CALORIES FAT SODIUM CARB. FREE cream (peragain serving) (mg) or anytime. (grams) for a(grams) snack, dessert Yes

290

11

140

PROTEIN (grams)

37

9

Ingredients: Skim milk, glucose-fructose, water, palm oil, thickening blend (modified cornstarch, gelatine, mono and diglycerides, polysorbate 80, MAGIC CUP™ DESSERT VANILLA carrageenan, cellulose gum, xanthan gum), milk protein concentrate, maltodextrin, natural and artificial flavours, caramel colour, tricalcium phosphate, molasses, whey protein concentrate. DISTRIBUTOR PRODUCT PACK CASE SHELF LACTOSE GLUTEN CALORIES FAT SODIUM CARB. PROTEIN CODE CODE SIZE YIELD LIFE KOSHER FREE FREE (per serving) (grams) (mg) (grams) (grams) Contains : milk.

• Serve frozen as an ice cream or chilled as a pudding

80394

48/ 118ml

48

1 yr fzn

No

No

Yes

MAGIC CUPTM DESSERT VANILLA

290

11

140

37

9

MAGIC CUPTM DESSERT WILD BERRY

FOR SALES SUPPORT TODD.STEVENS@BRANDIGNITION.CA

DISTRIBUTOR

PRODUCT

PACK

CASE

SHELF

LACTOSE

GLUTEN

CALORIES

FAT

SODIUM

CARB.

PROTEIN

PROTEIN (grams)

9

48 1 yr fznCODE No 37 FREE9 5152914 48 1 yr(grams) fzn No CODE Yes SIZE 290 YIELD 11 LIFE 140 KOSHER FREE (per serving) 80395 (grams) 48/118ml (grams) Ingredients: Skim milk, glucose-fructose, No water, palm oil, thickening blend (modified cornstarch, gelatine, mono and (mg) diglycerides, polysorbate 80,No 48/ 118ml concentrate, 48 1 yr fzn No No Yes artificial 290 flavours, 11 beet 140 37 carrageenan, cellulose gum, xanthan gum), 80395 milk protein maltodextrin, natural and juice blend (beet9 juice, citric acid, potassium sorbate), tricalcium phosphate, whey proteinwater, concentrate. Ingredients: Skim milk, glucose-fructose, palm oil, thickening blend (modified cornstarch, gelatine, mono and diglycerides, polysorbate 80, Contains : milk. carrageenan, cellulose gum, xanthan gum), milk protein concentrate, maltodextrin, natural and artificial flavours, beet juice blend (beet juice, citric

CARB. (grams)

PROTEIN (grams)

SODIUM (mg)

37

FAT (grams)

CARB. (grams)

140

CALORIES (per serving)

SODIUM (mg)

LACTOSE FREE

11

KOSHER

FAT (grams)

SHELF LIFE

290

CASE YIELD

CALORIES (per serving)

Yes

PACK SIZE

GLUTEN FREE

PRODUCT CODE

DISTRIBUTIR CODE

BERRY No

PROTEIN (grams)

CARB. (grams)

LACTOSE FREE

SODIUM (mg)

KOSHER

FAT (grams)

CALORIES (per serving)

GLUTEN FREE

LACTOSE FREE

KOSHER

molasses, whey protein concentrate. PACK CASE SHELF Contains : milk. SIZE YIELD LIFE

CUP™ DESSERT WILD 48/ MAGIC 118ml 48 1 yr fzn No

GLUTEN FREE

5152925 80394 48/118ml

80395

SHELF LIFE

PRODUCT CODE

CASE YIELD

PACK SIZE

DISTRIBUTOR CODE

PRODUCT CODE

DISTRIBUTIR CODE

Ingredients: Skim milk, glucose-fructose, water, palm oil, thickening blend (modified cornstarch, gelatine, mono and diglycerides, polysorbate 80, MAGIC CUP™ DESSERT WILD carrageenan, cellulose gum, xanthan BERRY gum), milk protein concentrate, maltodextrin, natural and artificial flavours, caramel colour, tricalcium phosphate,

Yes

290

11

140

37

9

acid, potassium sorbate), tricalcium phosphate, whey protein concentrate. Contains : milk.

FOR CLINICAL SUPPORT SUPPORT@INTOGREAT.CA

Hormel Foods Sales, LLC, Austin, MN 55912

Please contact Hormel Health Labs

sales support Please contact Hormel Health Labs at support@intogreat.ca sales support at support@intogreat.ca

SUPPORTEUR PLATINE

SUPPORTEUR PLATINE

Hormel Foods Sales, LLC, Austin, MN 55912

1-800-523-4635 Hormel Foods Sales, LLC, Austin, MN 55912 1-800-523-4635 www.HormelHealthLabs.com 1-800-523-4635 ©Hormel Foods, LLC www.HormelHealthLabs.com www.HormelHealthLabs.com ©Hormel Food Sales, LLC ©Hormel Foods, LLC