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NOTES ON THE SUFFOLK LIST OF COLEOPTERA: 14 FIFTEEN FURTHER SPECIES NEW TO THE LIST WITH ONE DELETION AND SOME RECENT INTERESTING RECORDS DAVID R. NASH This paper continues my up-dating of the Suffolk list of coleoptera and details 15 species new to the county (asterisked) together with one which should be deleted (D). Records are allocated to vice-county and National Grid references are provided, with those assigned by me to old records being placed in square brackets. All records are my own except where indicated; all my Brantham records are referrable to VC25. The national status for most scarce and threatened species is as given by Hyman in his National Review (1992; 1994) although many designations provided there are in need of revision. Nomenclature follows Duff (2008). STAPHYLINIDAE *Hypomedon debilicornis (Wollaston) This little yellow-brown staphylinid was first found in this country in Northamptonshire in August 1989 (Drane, 1994). It occurs in a variety of forms of decaying vegetable matter especially where this is mouldy (e.g. animal bedding and feeds, solidified slurry and straw) and as a result is most frequently found in synanthropic situations around farms and ports. It is a cosmopolitan species with a world distribution suggesting links to trade and appears to have slowly established itself in Europe over the last 150 years. On the continent it appears to usually be parthenogenic with males known only from Africa which has been suggested as its probable area of origin. On 14 September 2005, I sieved a single example from a pile of mouldy wood chips beside Ipswich Golf Course, Purdis Farm,VC25 (TM2034). *Quedius balticus Korge RDB1 Quedius balticus is an extremely localised and rare staphylinid found in fens and broads. Before 1963 it had been confused in this country with the widely distributed and common Q. molochinus (Gravenhorst). (Last, 1963). Hyman (1994) states that the species is only known from Wicken Fen, Cambridgeshire and the Bure Marshes and Upton Broad, Norfolk. In 1988– 1990, however, a major survey of the East Anglian fens had been commissioned and a study of the data from the survey shows that the beetle occurred not only in several other Norfolk localities but in one Suffolk locality as well. The single Suffolk example was captured in a pitfall trap run from 14–29 August 1989 in an unmanaged reedbed subject to frequent flooding at Walberswick, VC25 (TM485740), Andy Foster. EUCNEMIDAE *Hylis olexai (Palm) RDB3 All Eucnemids are considered primary-forest relict species and with the exception of the widespread but local Melasis buprestoides (L.) - until now our only Suffolk species of the family - almost all the rest of our six British species are rare. The family is closely related to the Elateridae (Click beetles) with some genera such as Hylis superficially resembling them in appearance and also having the power of leaping as found in that family.

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Hylis olexai was first recorded in this country from West Kent by Allen (1954) (as Hypocoelus procerulus Mannerheim ) and was subsequently found in Surrey, Hampshire and Sussex. It develops in the rotten wood of deciduous trees (especially beech) and conifers. On 7 July 2006 the late Peter Skidmore found a singleton of H. olexai under conifer bark in Brandon Country Park, VC26 (TL78) - specimen now in The National Museum of Wales, Cardiff, teste H. Mendel. The occurrence of this beetle in the Suffolk Breck away from the south and south east is highly interesting but perhaps not unsurprising given the rare, saproxylic, old woodland indicator species reported by Mendel (1989) from the relatively nearby Icklingham Plains ANOBIIDAE *Dorcatoma dresdensis Herbst Na Our five British Dorcatoma species may be separated into two groups according to their developmental sites with Dorcatoma chrysomelina and flavicornis breeding in fungoidal red-rotten wood (most frequently that of oak) and D. substriata Hummel (=serra Panzer.), dresdensis Herbst and ambjoerni Baranowski developing within various hard, tree fungi. On 9 February 2008 whilst collecting at the base of the railway embankment at Brantham, (TM1235), I came across a dead standing alder with a saucer-sized bracket of Phellinus igniarius (L. ex Fr.) Quél. with Dorcatoma-sized emergence holes and what I took to be anobiid larvae. Having collected the fungus, it was placed in a plastic rearing box. I omitted to check the container with the fungus until the late spring but upon so doing I found many dead examples of a Dorcatoma which, on dissection of males, proved to be dresdensis. The first published records of this beetle in Britain are to be found in Stephens’ “Illustrations” (1830) where the author writes:

Very rare: it has been found in Suffolk, and near London. “Taken in a window, by Mr. Kirby.” – Marsham MSS. “Cobham, 19th August, 1830.” A. Cooper, Esq. In his “Manual” (1839) – an abridged version of the “Illustrations” – Stephens simply shortens the Kirby record to “Barham” indicating that the beetle had occurred in the parish of which the Rev. William Kirby was rector for 68 years (1782–1850). It is quite likely, therefore, that the beetle actually occurred in Barham Rectory. D. dresdensis first began to be queried as a British insect in our catalogues following E. W. Janson’s paper (1861) in which he reported his discovery of Dorcatoma chrysomelina in Surrey in 1849 and suggested that Stephens had misidentified dresdense (sic) and that the name as used by British authors should be relegated in future to a synonym of chrysomelina. He contemptuously refers as follows to the only specimen standing above dresdensis in Stephens’ collection: [It] is a mere fragment on a very suspicious looking pin, sans head, sans legs, in fact sans everything. I must confess that I’m not sure how a pin can look suspicious unless

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Janson is suggesting that, as the beetle was not on a traditional English entomological pin it might be a continental specimen! Janson’s opinion was followed in all British coleoptera literature after 1866. In 1928, however, dresdensis was reinstated on the British list following the rearing in 1925 of examples from Fomes fomentarius (Fr.) collected in Windsor Forest the previous year, as well as the specimen without data in Stephens’ collection which had been re-examined and confirmed as dresdensis by K. G. Blair (Donisthorpe, 1928). *Dorcatoma ambjoerni Baranowski Dorcatoma ambjoerni, a relatively newly recognised species, was described from beetles reared (together with D. substriata and dresdensis from the fungus Inonotus cuticularis (Fr.) Karst. found growing in rot holes in old beech trees on a small island off the west coast of Sweden (Baranowski, 1985). In June, 1990 it was bred from an Inonotus sp. fungus which had been collected from inside a hollow beech in Windsor Park in 1988. (Mendel & Owen, 1991). Dorcatoma substriata had earlier also emerged from this fungus. In June, 1980 Howard Mendel reared an adult from a larva found in a rothole in an elm bordering the Shrubland Estate, Coddenham VC25 (TM1254) on 26 May, 1980 – a record confirming the beetle’s association with areas of ancient pasture woodland and probably also its association with fungi growing in tree cavities. There are unpublished records of single specimens from Essex and Northamptonshire (pers. comm., Tony Drane). The beetle should be considered a RDB species. All the British Dorcatoma are now recorded from Suffolk. CORYLOPHIDAE *Orthoperus aequalis Sharp (= nitidulus Allen) Orthoperids are very tiny beetles (2Â10 mm by less than 0Â70 mm) which are thought to feed on moulds growing on rotting vegetation. Orthoperus aequalis was originally described from this country as a new species (Allen, 1942a), but it was subsequently found that Allen’s species was the aequalis of Sharp who had described the beetle from Hawaii in 1885 (Bowestead,1999). I have the following records: 22 September 1998: one with the common O. corticalis (Redtenbacher) on a sappy plank in a woodpile, Ickworth Park, VC26 (TL8162). 31 October 2003: a singleton on a sawn, sappy plank in the woodyard, Shrubland Estate, Coddenham, VC25 (TM1252) LATRIDIIDAE (D) Corticaria inconspicua Wollaston In my last paper in this series (Nash, 2007) I added this beetle to the county list on the basis of a specimen determined for me in the 1980s by Colin Johnson; I also discussed its similarity to C. alleni Johnson and contrasted the conditions under which each of the beetles normally occurred. Shortly after publication, I was sent a Corticaria for identification by Martin Collier which, upon general facies and its occurrence in a natural habitat, I considered likely

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to be alleni. Accordingly, I removed my series of this from the cabinet together with my two specimens standing over inconspicua viz. the Suffolk beetle which I had not previously examined critically, as well as a reference specimen given to me recently by Colin Johnson captured in Manchester Museum. To my surprise, the Suffolk inconspicua appeared to me to be alleni. Accordingly, I sent it back to Colin who agreed. There are two possibilities as to how the original misidentification occurred. Either I had mislabelled the collecting tube in the field indicating erroneously that the beetle had been taken under synanthropic conditions misleading Colin which would point to it being inconspicua or else the beetle had flown into the barn from the surrounding woodland where alleni is known to occur. DASYTIDAE *Dasytes virens (Marsh) (= puncticollis Reitter) Nb. Our Dasytes species are soft bodied beetles with long, thick hairing. Although all of them probably develop in rotten wood where their larvae are carnivorous they are not woodland insects per se and may be found by sweeping and beating in grassy places such as hedgerows and scrub or at rest on flowers. Until very recently, nomenclatural confusion and the close similarity of D. virens to D. plumbeus (Muller) has meant that records of the two species were generally unreliable. Both these difficulties now appear to have been satisfactorily resolved in a new, not formally published key which I have received. Although published records unsupported by specimens cannot be accepted, old material can now be determined with confidence, underlining once again, the importance of the retention of voucher specimens. I have the following records: 6 June 1970, one swept under conifers on wood edge, Shrubland Estate, Coddenham, VC25 (TM1253) 15 June 1980, a female on hogweed umbel near Three Hills, Mildenhall Warren, VC26 (TL7474), Peter Hodge. KATERETIDAE *Brachypterolus antirrhini (Murray) Beetles of the genus Brachypterolus closely resemble the well-known pollen beetles (Meligethes spp.) so abhorred by flower gardeners. Of our four Brachypterolus species, the pair which feed on toadflaxes (Linaria spp.) are considered natives viz. pulicarius (L.) and linariae (S.), whilst the other two which feed on the non-native, garden snapdragon Antirrhinum majus (L.) – antirrhini (Murray) and vestitus (Kiesenwetter) – are treated as established importations first reported from this country in 1926 and 1929 respectively. Both Antirrhinum-feeding species occur in parks and gardens as well as on railway lines, waste ground etc. where the food plant has established itself from garden escapes. They are both rare although they can occur in numbers when found. At the end of May 2009 having decided that if I was ever to encounter these extremely localised and rarely encountered meligethines, the most fruitful way might be to attract them into my garden here in Brantham (TM1134), I planted a dozen non-flowering Antirrhinum plug plants bought from the garden centre at Capel St Mary (TM0937). The plants were examined

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daily and on 2 June I collected eight Brachypterolus antirrhini (det. genitalia) from the developing, still green flower spikes of yellow flowered plants. Further specimens were observed over the ensuing months until the onset of autumn. These were not collected as I wished to try to establish a breeding population and discover how long the colony might persist if the original host plants and self-sown offspring remained. In his monograph on the British meligethine beetles, Kirk-Spriggs (1996) reported antirrhini from just six counties – Devon, Dorset, Hampshire, Surrey, Berkshire and Bedfordshire. Given the rapid appearance of such a significant population, I incline to the view that these beetles had been introduced with the compost of my plug plants rather than that they had colonised my plants from nearby gardens. CHRYSOMELIDAE *Longitarsus absynthii Kutschera Na This little flea beetle is one of a number of species which I have delayed adding formally to our list until I had more than the original single record. As almost 25 years have elapsed since the first record its addition is now long overdue! L. absynthii is a coastal species found on estuarine riverbanks, saltmarshes, cliffs and rough ground near the sea. It is scarce, but possibly under-recorded, and known only from south-east England (Cox, 2007). It feeds chiefly on sea wormwood Seriphidium maritimum (L.) and mugworts (Artemesia spp.). I have the following records: 2 July 1983, two swept on Orford Beach, VC25 (TM 3945). 10 September 2007, two swept on Havergate Island, VC25 (TM4147 and TM4046), Nigel Cuming. *Longitarsus fowleri Allen Na Allen (1967) described Longitarsus fowleri as a new species and resolved the complex nomenclatural tangle associated with the name Longitarsus abdominalis Duftschmidt - the species name which Fowler (1890) had incorrectly assigned to specimens taken by J. A. Power in 1862 despite his own description showing that the Power specimens represented a hitherto unknown species – hence Allen’s dedication of the specific name of the beetle to that great coleopterist. The beetle occurs on wild teasel (Dipsacus fullonum L.) where the larvae probably feed externally on, or inside, the roots. The map in Cox’s “Atlas” (2007) shows that L. fowleri is sparsely distributed in southern England but with no records from East Anglia. On 23 May 2009, Andrew Duff found several on young teasels at Lakenheath Fen RSPB Reserve, VC26 (TL7286). CURCULIONIDAE *Pachyrhinus lethierryi (Desbrochers) The bright green weevil Pachyrhinus lethierryi occurs naturally on cupressaceous trees in southern France, Corsica and Sardinia. Recent records of the beetle from Germany and other parts of France (including Boulogne) indicate that the beetle has begun to colonise farther afield helped, no doubt, by the horticultural trade.

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The first British specimens were discovered on Lawson’s cypress (Chamaecyparis leylandii ) in Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire in 2003 and it was subsequently recorded in and around the London area, including S. Essex, occurring on leylandii and other cupressaceous trees e.g. Thuja and Juniperus spp. (Plant, Morris & Heal, 2006). These authors report negative search results for Caernarvonshire, Wales, Monmouthshire, Lincolnshire, S. Hampshire and N. Essex. On 14 May 2009 I decided to look for the weevil in Brantham and almost immediately found it in some numbers on ca 10-year old C. leylandii in a garden at the top of my lane (TM1134). I searched host trees without success in another four gardens in the surrounding ½ km area. The only other published record of which I am aware is for Warwickshire (Lane, 2009) although I know of unpublished 2009 first records from N. Essex and Norfolk. Given the popularity of its host plants with gardeners, I am confident that its spread will be dramatically rapid. I would be very interested to see any green weevils around 3Â5–4Â5 mm in length found in numbers exclusively on leylandii or the beetle’s other hosts. There are several superficially similar green weevils within the genera Polydrusus and Phyllobius which occur commonly on broadleaf trees and shrubs in this country but these would only occur, if at all, in ones or twos as casual strays on leylandii. *Polydrusus pilosus Gredler Polydrusus pilosus is a brown or green weevil closely related to the very common P. cervinus (L.) and, in the past, the two weevils have quite often been confused. Both appear to be polyphagous occuring on a variety of trees both deciduous and evergreen. For long there had been a marked scarcity of published records of pilosus – something which usually indicates either a rare, highly localised or little studied beetle or a combination of these descriptors. The painstaking work of Morris & Owen (1999), however, provided a wealth of new data which showed that pilosus was widely distributed in northern Britain. In the course of their work they came across eight correctly identified specimens in the Natural History Museum General Collection labelled “W. Suffolk, Freckenham, C. E. Tottenham, 1935”. With all other known records emanating from northern England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland the authors speculate that perhaps the weevil was introduced into the Breck with the extensive planting of conifers which occurred during the 1920s and 1930s. The absence of further records may indicate that either the beetle no longer occurs in the area or that if it remains to-day it is perhaps being passed over in the field as cervinus by the many visiting coleopterists. Hyman, in his preliminary deliberations had originally considered that pilosus was worthy of Nationally Notable A status, but by the time his National Review appeared in 1992 this had changed to “unclassified”, presumably on the basis of the more recent information and opinions which he received. *Scolytus pygmaeus (Fabricius) The bark beetle Scolytus pygmaeus is another newcomer to our fauna and with a size range of between 1Â5 mm and 2Â5 mm it is, overall, the smallest of the

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four European members of the genus which occur most commonly, but not exclusively, on elm (Ulmus spp.). All are carriers of Dutch Elm Disease. In June 2000 the first specimens of pygmaeus were found on old regrowth elm at Darenth, West Kent and in 2002 it was recorded from Middlesex, South Essex,West Kent and East Kent (Heal, 2003). On 26 July 2009 I found a small Scolytid drowned in rainwater in my wheelbarrow at Brantham (TM1134) and, following its identification a few weeks later as S. pygmaeus, I tapped sucker growth of ivy-covered elms in my lane on August 24 and obtained an additional male and female. Having informed Martin Collier of my find, he subsequently extracted a dead example from borings on suckering elms near his house at Syleham, VC25 (TM2179). As this Scolytus chooses to utilise smaller branches than the others of the genus, its spread on our suckering elms could be rapid. *Euophryum rufum (Broun) The weevils of this genus are lignicoles indigenous to New Zealand. Euophryum rufum appears to occur almost, if not, exclusively under synanthropic conditions e.g.in warehouses, flour mills, on dried fruit and in damp floorboards. It seems to be rarely recorded perhaps because it is usually of no significant economic importance. The first known British examples were taken in Westcliffe, Essex in 1934 (Buck, 1948). In August 2004 a single dead example was found in a gift pack of homemade soap and bubblebath bought from a shop in Peasenhall, VC25 (TM3569), Martin Collier. *Euophryum confine (Broun) The above capture prompts me to place on record as a Suffolk beetle, E. confine, the other species of the genus established in Britain but not previously recorded in these transactions. E. confine was first found breeding in a willow in the Lea Valley Marshes, Hertfordshire in 1940.It was at first misidentified as Pentarthrum huttoni (Wollaston) (Allen, 1942b) and then correctly recognised (Allen, 1944). Since that time it has become very common and widespread in this country in damp, rotten timber of all kinds both in the the open and inside buildings as well. The two earliest Suffolk captures of which I am aware are as follows: 4–11 June 1960: in numbers in damp timber at base of a wooden garage, Ipswich, VC25 (TM1845), Cliff Barham. 31 March 1961: several in a fallen ash branch in a hedge near The Grove, Ipswich, VC25 (TM1646). Other interesting recent records Lyctus planicollis (Le Conte) (BOSTRICHIDAE) 9 April 2008: several brought into Ipswich Museum for identification. They had been found by Mr. M. Webb emerging in numbers from a wicker laundry basket inside his house at Capel St Mary, VC25 (TM0938) (det. DRN). Interestingly, Mr. Webb tells me that there was no noticeable dust being produced by the emerging beetles which contrasts markedly with the situation appertaining to our commonest established Lyctus viz. linearis (Goeze) which throws out little piles of dust-like powder from its emergence holes – hence

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the common name for the genus and its allies of Powder Post Beetles. This is the first Suffolk record which I have for this relatively rarely recorded imported beetle which originates from North America and which has been distributed worldwide by commerce. Ptinus sexpunctatus Panzer (ANOBIIDAE) 10 May 2009: two disturbed from cardboard nesting tubes with colony of Red Mason Bee (Osmia rufa L.) on wall of house, Reydon near Southwold, VC25 (TM5077), Alan Cornish; det. DRN. Alan is to be congratulated upon spotting these little beetles and for taking the trouble to send me one because of its unusual appearance and circumstances of occurrence. It would be good if more society members followed his example. The Ptinidae are omnivorous scavengers and P. sexpunctatus occurs infrequently and usually as odd individuals in various synanthropic situations including ordinary dwellings where it may develop in old birds’ nests in unused chimneys etc. The species has been found previously in the nests of bees although I have never found it in this situation myself. For example, in May 1996, Howard Mendel reared one from a dead Wisteria in Ipswich (TM1545) which was home to a colony of bees. Ischnodes sanguinicollis (Panzer) (ELATERIDAE) 8 June 2008: a singleton of this rare click beetle was found crawling up an aspen trunk near a pile of logs in a garden at Syleham VC25 (TM2147), Martin Collier. Details of the five previous Suffolk records (from Coddenham and Rendlesham) are provided in Nash (1989). Luperomorpha xanthodera (Fairmaire) (CHRYSOMELIDAE) 10 May 2009: one on a Rhododendron flower, The Place for Plants Garden Centre, East Bergholt, VC25 (TM0834). It is unlikely that its occurrence on the plant was other than casual (Howard Mendel, pers. comm.). Following the discovery of populations of this Chinese flea beetle in a number of garden centres in Britain in 2003, there have been few additional records reported. The East Bergholt locality is around 4 km as the crow flies from where I found the beetle two years earlier (Nash, 2007); I could not locate further examples there in 2008 or 2009. Heal (2006) also reports the beetle disappearing after a season or two in Kent. This may indicate that it is having difficulty establishing breeding populations which can survive our winters; it could, of course be that plant quarantine measures against pests are proving effective in eliminating it or that coleopterists are not bothering to publish their captures. At present, L. xanthodera appears to be of no significant economic importance. Acknowledgements I thank: Clifford Barham, Martin Collier, Nigel Cuming, Andrew Duff, Andy Foster, Peter Hodge and Howard Mendel for allowing me to include their unpublished records; Stan Bowstead for naming Orthoperus aequalis; Tony Drane for helpful discussion re. Dorcatoma ambjoerni etc.; Lord de Saumarez and Stuart Warrington (National Trust) for allowing access to Shrubland and Ickworth Estates respectively; and finally, Alan Cornish for sending his specimen of Ptinus for naming.

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References Allen, A. A. (1942a). A new species of Orthoperus (Col., Corylophidae) in Britain. Entomologist’s monthly Magazine 78: 89–90. Allen, A. A. (1942b). Pentarthrum huttoni Woll. (Col., Curculionidae) in South-East Herts. Entomologist’s monthly Magazine 78:117. Allen, A. A. (1944). A new British species of Cossonini (Col., Curculionidae) recorded in error as Pentarthrum huttoni Woll. Entomologist’s monthly Magazine 80:120. Allen, A. A. (1954). Hypocoelus procerulus Mannh. (Col. Eucnemidae, Anelastini) in Kent and Surrey: a tribe, genus and species new to Britain. Entomologist’s monthly Magazine 90: 228–230. Allen, A. A. (1967). Two new species of Longitarsus (Latr.) (Col., Chrysomelidae) in Britain. Entomologist’s monthly Magazine 103:75–82. Baranowski, R. (1985). Central and Northern European Dorcatoma (Coleoptera: Anobiidae), with a key and description of a new species. Entomologica scandinavica 16: 203–207. Bowestead, S. (1999). A revision of the Corylophidae (Coleoptera) of the West Palaearctic region. Genèva. Muséum d’histoire naturelle. Buck, F. D. (1948). Pentarthrum huttoni Woll. (Col., Curculionidae) and some imported Cossoninae. Entomologist’s monthly Magazine 84:152–154. Cox, M. (2007). Atlas of the Seed and Leaf Beetles of Britain and Ireland (Coleoptera: Bruchidae, Chrysomelidae, Megalopodidae and Orsodacnidae).Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. Pisces Publications. Oxford. Donisthorpe, H. St J. K. (1928). Dorcatoma dresdensis Hbst. and D. serra Pz., two new British insects. With notes on the other British species of the genus. Entomologist’s monthly Magazine 64:196–199. Drane, A. B. (1994). A belated note on Chloecharis debilicornis (Wollaston) (Staphylinidae) new to Britain. The Coleopterist 3: 2–3. Duff, A. G. (ed.) (2008). Checklist of Beetles of the British Isles, 2008 edition. A. G. Duff.Wells, Somerset. Fowler, W. W. (1890). The Coleoptera of the British Islands IV. Reeve and Co. London. Heal, N. F. (2003). Scolytus pygmaeus (Fabricius,1787) (Scolytidae) – a new arrival to Britain. The Coleopterist 12: 57–60. Heal, N. F. (2006). Luperomorphus xanthodera (Fairmaire) (Chrysomelidae) in Kent. The Coleopterist 15: 104. Hyman, P. S. (revised Parsons, M. S.) (1992). A review of the scarce and threatened Coleoptera of Great Britain. Part 1. U.K. Nature Conservation No. 3. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Peterborough. Hyman, P. S. (revised Parsons, M. S.) (1994). A review of the scarce and threatened Coleoptera of Great Britain. Part 2. U.K. Nature Conservation No. 12. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Peterborough. Janson, E. W. (1861). Coleoptera. New British species noticed in 1860. Entomologist’s Annual VII: 59–81. John van Vorst. London. Kirk-Spriggs, A. H. (1996). Pollen Beetles. Coleoptera: Kateretidae and Nitidulidae: Meligethinae. Handbooks for the. Identification of British Insects 5 part 6a. Royal Entomological Society. London.

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Lane, S. (2009). Pachyrhinus lethierryi (Desbrochers) present in Warwickshire (VC38). Beetle News 1: 2, July 2009:1 Last, H. R. (1963). Notes on Quedius molochinus Gravenhorst (Col. Staphylinidae) with the addition of two species new to the British list. Entomologist’s monthly Magazine 99: 43–45. Mendel, H. (1989). Saproxylic beetles (Coleoptera) of the Icklingham Plains, an area of Suffolk Breckland with a remarkable dead-wood fauna. Transactions of the Suffolk Naturalists’ Society 25: 23–28. Mendel, H. & Owen, J. A. (1991). Dorcatoma ambjoerni Baranowski (Col., Anobiidae), another Windsor speciality? The Coleopterist’s Newsletter 43:12–13. Morris, M. G. & Owen, J. A. (1999). The history, identification, distribution and ecology of Polydrusus pilosus Gredler in the British Isles, with comparative notes on P. cervinus (Linnaeus). The Coleopterist 8: 101–111. Nash, D. R. (1989). Notes on the Suffolk list of Coleoptera: 5. Ischnodes sanguinicollis (Pz.) (Elateridae) in Suffolk. Transactions of the Suffolk Naturalists’ Society 25: 29–30. Nash, D. R. (2007). Notes on the Suffolk list of Coleoptera: 13. Seventeen species new to the Suffolk list, six deletions and recent significant records. Transactions of the Suffolk Naturalists’ Society 43: 75–89. Plant, C. W., Morris, M. G. & Heal, N. F. (2006). Pachyrhinus lethierryi (Desbrochers) (Curculionidae) new to Britain and evidently established in south-east England. The Coleopterist 15: 59–65. Stephens, J. F. (1830). Illustrations of British Entomology. Mandibulata 3. Baldwin and Craddock. London. Stephens, J. F. (1839). A Manual of British Coleoptera or Beetles. Longman et al. London. David Ridley Nash 3 Church Lane Brantham CO11 1PU

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NOTES ON THE SUFFOLK LIST OF COLEOPTERA: 14 FIFTEEN FURTHER SPECIES NEW TO THE LIST  

David Nash

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