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NOTES ON THE SUFFOLK LIST OF COLEOPTERA: 11 TEN SPECIES NEW TO THE SUFFOLK LIST WITH SIGNIFICANT RECORDS FROM THE YEAR 2003 DAVID R. NASH This paper discusses ten species of beetle which should be considered “New to Suffolk” for the Index to these Transactions; these species are asterisked. Noteworthy records from 2003 are also reported. All records are my own except where indicated. As in previous papers in this series, records are allocated to vice-county (VC25, East; VC26, West) and National Grid references are provided, with those assigned by me to earlier records being placed in square brackets. The national status for scarce and threatened species is given, following Hyman (1992; 1994); an explanation of these categories is provided in the previous paper in this series ( Nash, 2003a). The national status assigned in early versions of English Nature’s “Recorder” database is provided for all other species. Unless specifically mentioned, there are no Suffolk specimens of any of the species discussed in the Claude Morley/Chester Doughty collection at Ipswich Museum (in the following account simply referred to as the Morley collection). CARABIDAE *Notiophilus quadripunctatus Dejean Nb Last year I recommended the deletion of this ground beetle from the county list but suggested that there was no reason why it should not occur with us (Nash, 2003a). It is gratifying to now be able to reinstate it so quickly. I picked up a specimen running on my concrete driveway at Brantham, VC25 (TM 1134) on 22 June 2003 and found two more under building rubble in an unsurfaced, overspill carpark of a factory on the industrial estate at Cattawade, VC25 (TM 1133) on 13 June 2004. Trechus fulvus Dejean Nb, Bembidion nigropiceum (Marsham) Na BAP and Brachinus crepitans (L.) Nb As part of a study to assess the possible impact of shingle extraction on the fauna of Sudbourne Beach, Orfordness (VC25), twenty specially designed pitfall traps were buried to a depth of ca 50 cm along two transects across the shingle and run from April, 2002 to March, 2003 inclusive. During this study, the three above-named, rarely recorded ground beetles were trapped as follows: T. fulvus – TM 4551, November (2 exx.), August (1ex.); TM 4552, November (4 exx.). B. nigropiceum – TM 4551, one trapped between 16–21 June. B. crepitans – TM 4551, single specimens in July and September.

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Trechus fulvus is a local species which is usually found under stones near high-water mark on rocky and sandy sea-shores. Most of the Trechini are to a greater or lesser extent subterranean in their habits and the capture of specimens of T. fulvus deep in shingle perhaps indicates that the beetle occupies, at least sometimes, a more specialised niche than was previously suspected. It was only known in Suffolk until now from a specimen found by Morley under a board on the beach at the base of the sandy cliff at Dunwich, VC25 [TM 46] on 24 September 1930 (Elliott, 1930). No Suffolk records are shown on the map in Luff’s (1998) “Atlas”. B. nigropiceum is a local species which is confined to southern England and one Welsh locality. It occurs in the same situations as Trechus fulvus, with the two frequently occurring together. Until the Sudbourne capture, it was only known in the county from a single specimen found by Morley (and still extant in his collection) beneath Rumex on Felixstowe beach, VC25 [TM 33] on 4 May 1894 (Morley, 1899). Following the Sudbourne capture, Nigel Cuming found a specimen running on the sandy beach at Walberswick, VC25 (TM 5074) on 14 July 2003 and a second under shingle at Orfordness, VC25 (TM 4550) on 1 July 2004. No records for East Anglia are shown on the species’ map in Luff (1998). The Bombardier Beetle Brachinus crepitans occurs locally across southern England and into Wales. Most recent records are from the coast, although the beetle also occurs inland. Apart from the well-documented explosive defence mechanism exhibited by the adult when disturbed or threatened, the beetle is also of especial interest because its larva is an ectoparasite of the pupae of various other beetles (species of Hydrophilidae, Staphylinidae and perhaps other Carabidae). B. crepitans was added to the Suffolk list (Morley, 1915) on the strength of fourteen examples found near Landguard Fort, Felixstowe [TM 2831] on 20 August 1901 by Morley’s mentor, the distinguished coleopterist E. A. Newbery. Apart from the latter specimens, those from Sudbourne Beach are the only others known to me to have occurred in the county. Bembidion ephippium (Marsham) Na and Tachys scutellaris Stephens Na Morley added both B. ephippium and T. scutellaris to the Suffolk list in his “First Supplement” (1915) informing us that Dr. Nicholson had found both beetles to be quite common “in the Lantern Marshes at Aldeburgh [TM 45] in 1912”. These marshes are actually close to the old wireless station on Orfordness and lie in the parish of Sudbourne. B. ephippium is a local, coastal species found on mud and in litter in saltmarshes with all modern records coming from the east (southern England to Lincolnshire). The map in Luff (1998) shows only one Suffolk record for B. ephippium and the Monks Wood data set shows that the record was sent in by M. Denton who had seen a specimen or specimens which had been found at Walberswick (TM 47) on 17 August 1971. Mike Denton (pers. comm.) was unable to recall who had collected the specimen(s).

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I have the following additional modern records for B. ephippium: 19–26 August 2003, 1 ex. in pitfall trap, East Scrape, R.S.P.B. Minsmere Reserve (TM 4766). G. Lyons. 12 September 2003, 3 exx. on saline lagoon edges, R.S.P.B. Havergate Island Reserve (TM 4147). M . Telfer. 25 September 2003, abundant on mud by saline pool, Shingle Street (TM 3743). 21 June 2004, abundant on muddy margins of most saline pools, Orfordness (TM 4449). N. Cuming. Also recorded from Havergate Island in a survey carried out in 1992–3 but without precise date of occurrence (Jones, n. d.) Tachys scutellaris is another local, coastal species and occurs from Norfolk to north Devon. It is associated with muddy conditions in saltmarshes or around brackish water. I have the following modern records for T. scutellaris: 18 September 1997, R.S.P.B. Havergate Island Reserve (TM 4248). R. Key. 19–26 August 2003, 5 exx. in pitfall traps, East Scrape, R.S.P.B. Minsmere Reserve (TM 4766). G. Lyons. 12 September 2003, common on edges of saline lagoons, R.S.P.B. Havergate Island Reserve (TM 4147). M. Telfer. 21 June 2004, abundant on muddy margins of most saline pools, Orfordness (TM 4348). N. Cuming. Also recorded without precise date in the 1992–3 Havergate Island Invertebrate Survey (Jones, n. d.). Morley appears not to have taken B. ephippium in Suffolk and never to have found T. scutellaris. Harpalus serripes (Quensel in Schoenherr) Nb Luff , in his “Atlas” (1998), shows that this very localised ground beetle is now apparently confined to the south coast of England and South Wales but refers to older, inland records northwards into East Anglia although none for Suffolk are shown on the map for the species. H. serripes was first found in the county by E. A. Elliott who discovered it in June, 1903 whilst grubbing at plant roots on the crag cliffs at Felixstowe, VC25 [TM 33] (Morley, 1915). It was next reported in the Suffolk Breck by Horace Donisthorpe who discovered it on 17 May 1920 in some recently dug sand pits at Freckenham, VC26 [TL 67] (Donisthorpe, 1920a). Against serripes in Morley’s own copy of his 1915 “First Supplement” is added “Covehithe sandhills, 26. vii. 1924 (C. M.)”. No specimen of serripes from this date is present in his collection. Elliott in his “Critical Notes” (1936), however, refers to a beetle from that date and locality which that year Morley had re-determined as Harpalus Frolichi (sic). It is highly likely that this was the “serripes” referred to by Morley in his annotation as well as in his diary for 1924 but the specimen is not present in Morley’s series of froelichi. Examination of two Harpalus taken under stones on Covehithe cliff on 10

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September 1935 and standing over serripes in Morley’s collection reveals that both, like the specimen from 1924 referred to above, are also the RDB 2 and BAP species, froelichi . These are now placed over froelichi in the collection and have Morley’s original identification on the back of my determination labels. H. froelichi was discovered new to Britain by Morley and Elliott at Foxhall in May, 1897 and their find was published by E. A. Newbery (1898) together with an appended, lengthy note by Morley on the capture site etc. Newbery, in his paper, drew particular attention to the remarkably short and broad thorax of the species and clearly stated that it could only be confused with serripes and tardus Panzer. It seems rather surprising, therefore, that Morley later confused froelichi and serripes given that, unlike most British coleopterists of the time, he had a long series in his collection; he also had a reference specimen of serripes taken at Deal (det. J. J. Walker) in his collection. To the old Felixstowe and Freckenham captures of serripes can now be added the first modern record for the county – a single male in a pitfall trap run from 21–31 May, 2003 in a disused gravel pit near Barham, VC26 (TM 1351). HISTERIDAE Saprinus virescens (Paykull) Insufficiently known RDB K Hyman and Parsons (1992) in their “National Review” reported the metallic green Saprinus virescens as formerly widely distributed and recorded in southern England with scattered records to Yorkshire but with only one post1970 record (Cardiganshire). They stated that the beetle occurred as a predator of the larvae of chrysomelid beetles of the genus Phaedon in damp places. Allen (1972), however, in an important note on the ecology of the species, drew attention to the fact that Saprinus virescens possessed two widely differing types of habitat, occurring not only as a predator of the larvae of certain Chrysomelidae (especially Phaedon species) but also as a saprophile. He also pointed out that, on the continent, the beetle was known as a predator of the larvae of both Phaedon and Gastrophysa species. Saprinus virescens was added to the Suffolk list by Morley (1899) who swept a single specimen (still extant in his collection), from a hedge bottom at Belstead, VC 25 [TM 14] on 17 May 1897. The only other Suffolk record known to me is that of Chester Doughty who found one specimen (still extant at Ipswich Museum) at Gorleston VC25 [TG 50] on 28 August 1925 (Doughty, 1929). I am unaware of any other captures in the county. On 3 April 1969 I found a specimen hibernating under the bark of a rotten alder trunk on marshy ground in the old gravel workings beside Bramford Common,VC25 (TM 1247) not far from a large pond and a stream flowing into the nearby River Gipping. After an gap of some thirty years, I grubbed my second specimen under ruderal weeds – including Knotgrass (Polygonum aviculare L.) – on the edge of a sandy field at Foxhall, VC25 (TM 2244) on 22 August 2003. It was accompanied by larvae and adults of the common chrysomelid Gastrophysa polygoni (L.).

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Hodge and Hance (2000) reported the sweeping of a single specimen of S. virescens with many G. polygoni from Knotweed in Cambridgeshire in July, 1999 but were cautious about accepting the association between the histerid and the chrysomelid as there was a substantial area of wetland nearby from where the histerid might have flown. As there is no wetland close to the Foxhall site and the beetle was grubbed rather than swept, the capture provides strong evidence that S. virescens is, indeed, predatory on Gasrophysa polygoni in this country. (See also Nash, in prep.) PTILIIDAE *Ptenidium gressneri Erichson Notable This tiny beetle lives in ancient broad-leaved woodland and pasture woodland. It occurs under bark and in wood mould and is especially found in damp cavities inside old broad-leaved trees. I took a single specimen on a sappy, freshly cut oak plank in the woodyard on the Shrubland Estate, Coddenham, VC25 (TM 1252) on 31 October 2003. The only previous record for the county of which I am aware is that of the late Dr. Roy Crowson who recorded it from Belvedere Wood, Brandon, VC26 (TL 88) some time before 1979 (pers. comm. C. Johnson). Crowson lived in Scotland so was unlikely to have been collecting regularly in the county. It is known that he was in Suffolk in April, 1960 and August, 1975 producing coleoptera lists for Staverton Park and Thicks for each of those visits. It is likely that the specimen dates from around that period. The species is unrepresented in the Morley collection. STAPHYLINIDAE *Pseudopsis sulcata Newman Notable This highly distinctive, widely distributed but local and uncommon little staphylinid, occurs in straw refuse, manure heaps etc. I have recently found the species on two occasions in West Suffolk by sieving old straw as follows: 16 June, 1999, arable field near the River Brett, Layham (TM 0338); 7 June 2003, farmyard of Milden Hall (TL 9446). Morley never met with the species. *Bledius bicornis Germar ( = dama Motschulsky) Na Bledius bicornis is a widespread but very local species which is found in saltmarshes and on river banks, dyke edges and sandy places by the coast. As with almost all members of the genus, B. bicornis forms colonies whose members inhabit burrows in sand or mud where they probably feed on algae or detritus. I have recently seen a specimen (det. M. Telfer) taken in a pitfall trap set by Graeme Lyons close to the water’s edge of a sandy spit on the East Scrape, Minsmere R.S.P.B. Reserve, VC25 (TM 4766) and run from 19–26 August, 2003. As the beetle is known from North Essex and East Norfolk its occurrence with us was not unexpected. Morley only has a donated non-Suffolk pair in his collection.

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*Myrmecocephalus concinnus (Erichson) Vagrant Jones (2001) has recently summarised the relatively few British records of this distinctive, introduced, cosmopolitan species which occurs with imported goods and in the wild. Donisthorpe (1944) added it to the British list on the basis of specimens found by sweeping and searching in vegetable refuse at Lampton, Middlesex. The majority of subsequent records emanate from southern England and East Anglia; however, I found it by sieving saltmarsh debris in Lancashire in 1989 (Nash, 2002). In the open in this country, M. concinnus has been reported from a variety of decaying plant material as well as from a red-rotten oak and a bracket fungus. On 25 October 2003, a few specimens were found by Martin Collier and myself on sappy, cut oak planks in the woodyard at Shrubland Park, Coddenham, VC25 (TM 1252) and I found others there on 31 October. I do not consider M. concinnus a vagrant species as designated in English Nature’s “Recorder” database, but rather a very localised but now naturalised species which also occurs regularly as an importation. Not surprisingly, given the date of its addition to the British list and the fact that Morley no longer appeared at that time to be in regular correspondence with Donisthorpe, the species is not represented in his collection. *Atheta harwoodi Williams Local Atheta harwoodi is an uncommon little aleocharine which has been reported on several occasions from birds’ nests e.g. owl (Williams, 1930), pigeon (Donisthorpe, 1947), carrion crow (Spittle, 1947), as well as from various kinds of decaying plant material. I took a single specimen at a sap run on a lightning-struck oak at Glemham Park, Little Glemham VC25 (TM 3459) on 17 July 2003. As an account of this tree and its sap-run has appeared elsewhere in our publications prior to my identification of the beetles found there (Nash, 2003b) it would seem of interest to document the other beetles which occurred with Atheta harwoodi. These were the staphylinids Quedius nigrocaeruleus Fauvel, Thamiraea cinnamomma Gravenhorst, Aleochara sparsa Heer and Atheta nigricornis (Thomson) as well as large numbers of the sap-feeding nitidulids Soronia grisea L. and Epuraea unicolor (Olivier). As Atheta harwoodi was only described as a species in 1930 it is not particularly surprising that there are no specimens in the Morley collection. ANOBIIDAE Caenocara bovistae (Hoffmann) RDB 3 Caenocara bovistae is a rare species which, as its name implies, breeds in puffballs. It was placed on the Suffolk list (Morley, 1915) following the capture of a single specimen at Brandon, VC26 [TL 78] by the London-based coleopterist F. Jennings whilst on a 3-day visit there during late August, 1903 (Jennings, 1904). In September, 1920, Horace Donisthorpe found several on the outside of puffballs at Freckenham, VC26 [TL 67] (Donisthorpe, 1920b) and he later reared 26 specimens from some of the puffballs which he had taken home

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(Donisthorpe in litt. to Morley, 1 October, 1921). (Donisthorpe would almost certainly have been hoping to breed out further examples of Caenocara affinis Mulsant, which he originally misidentified as C. subglobosa Mulsant & Rey, one of the very rarest British beetles and known in Britain to this day from just a handful of examples which he reared from Lycoperdon perlatum Pers. ( = gemmatum Batsch) collected at Barton Mills on 9 September 1917 (Donisthorpe, 1918). To the above early records can now be added the following more recent ones: 3 June 1982, one beaten from young, self-sown pine, Icklingham Plains, VC26 (TL 7573) (C. Johnson). 12 September 1998, several adults on Bovista plumbea Pers. ex Pers. infested with the larvae at Sizewell VC25 (TM 4764) and also a week or so later on puffballs at nearby Thorpeness (TM 4658) (N. Cuming). 20 August 1999, one on Calvatia utriformis (Bull. ex Pers.) ( = Lycoperdon caelatum Bull. ex Pers.) Martlesham Heath, VC25 (TM 2446) (H. Mendel). 25 September 2003, one by general sweeping, Shingle Street VC25 (TM 3743). LATRIDIIDAE *Cartodere (Aridius) norvegica Strand Naturalised Cartodere norvegica was added to the British List following the discovery of specimens by H. W. Forster on the mouldy parts of a recently burnt old beech in Epping Forest in the spring of 1950 (Allen, 1952). A specimen was subsequently taken on a beech log in Windsor Forest by W. O. Steel (pers. comm. A. A. Allen), but Steel appears not to have formally published his record and the specimen is not in the collection of the Natural History Museum, London which received some of his collection (pers. comm. Max Barclay). Only one other specimen of the beetle appears to have occurred in the wild in this country – a single specimen was taken by Tom Eccles on 28 September, 1980 at Stockton’s Wood, near Garston docks, Liverpool (SJ 423828) from under the fermenting and sappy bark of a mature ash tree scorched and killed by a recent nearby fire (pers. comm. T. Eccles). On 25 October 2003, Martin Collier and I each collected a sample of the latridiids which were abundant beneath sappy, somewhat mouldy oak planks piled in the woodyard at Shrubland Park, Coddenham, VC25 (TM 1252). In Martin’s sample were 3 examples of C. norvegicus. Realising that the timber would soon be sold or processed and any beetles on it destroyed, I revisited the yard on 31 October and secured a good series of norvegica and a few C. constricta. In Pope’s British “Checklist” (1977), norvegica is shown as a synonym of australicus (Belon). Recently however, Rücker (1995) has studied the types of both these species and concluded that norvegica and australica are distinct species; use of his key to separate them shows the Suffolk beetles to be norvegica. Recently, whilst negotiating the loan of the series from The Natural History Museum to check their identity it was discovered that the six

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specimens had been labelled by Enid Peacock in the early 1970s as satelles Blackburn, with norvegica and australica relegated to synonymy (pers. comm. Max Barclay). As far as I am aware, this opinion was never published. I have communicated this information to Wolfgang Rücker and he is currently trying to locate the type materialof satelles for study. *Corticaria fulva (Comolli) Unknown In this country, the cosmopolitan Corticaria fulva is an uncommon, usually synanthropic species which, like all latridiids, feeds on moulds. Hinton (1941) cites British records from granaries, warehouses, cellars and a herbarium. Interestingly, he comments that he found the species breeding in numbers on mouldy bread in two London houses; given the publication date of this work one wonders whether this had occurred because of wartime food economies or just poor hygiene! On 16 September 1997 I was surprised to find two examples of C. fulva by dissecting and sieving an old straw bale beside a copse on the track to Jimmy’s Lane, Brantham, VC25 (TM 1134). Subsequent enquiries revealed that the bale had been stored in an old barn at Brantham Hall before being placed in the open. It is likely that there was a population of C. fulva in this barn and that individuals entered the bale whilst it was under cover. Morley never met with the species. TETRATOMIDAE Tetratoma ancora Fabricius Nb Tetratoma ancora was recorded from Suffolk on the authority of W. Garness (sic) who noted it from the neighbourhood of Bungay, stating that it had once been taken by his father (Leedes Fox and Garness, 1858). This well-known collector’s surname was actually Garneys but the typesetter, who would have been working from a handwritten manuscript, presumably read the “y” as another “s”. Morley (1915) established the practice of providing a list of those species confirmed for Suffolk whose existence on his original list (1899) was based on a single historic, and therefore possibly inaccurate, record. A second list of such species appeared in Elliott’s posthumously published “Critical notes on our beetles” (1936). Tetratoma ancora does not feature in either of these lists and is missing, presumably in error, from the list of beetles still awaiting confirmation which concludes Elliot’s paper. The lists in the 1936 paper were almost certainly added by Morley in his role as editor of the Transactions (see Nash, 2003). On 7 September 2003, I beat two specimens of T. ancora from hazel faggots and found another in a fungus on a hornbeam at Milden Long Wood, VC26 (TL 9445). Morley never encountered the beetle. MELANDRYIDAE *Abdera quadrifasciata (Curtis) Na Of the five British species of Abdera, two breed in fungi (affinis Paykull, flexuosa Paykull) and three in rotten twigs and boughs (biflexuosa Curtis, triguttata Gyllenhal and quadrifasciata ).

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Abdera quadrifasciata is a very localised but widely distributed English species which is not represented in the Morley collection. I have the following records: 24 June 1998, many beaten from dead hazel, Holbrook Park, VC25 (TM 1438). 3 July 1998, one on log in woodpile, Horringer Park, Ickworth Estate VC26 (TL 8162). 7 July 2000, one beaten from dead oak bough, Westleton Walks, R.S.P.B. Minsmere Reserve, VC25 (TM 4567). All species, apart from the exclusively Scottish affinis, are now known from the county. CHRYSOMELIDAE *Podagrica fuscipes (Fabricius) Na Podagrica fuscipes , like its commoner relative P. fuscicornis (Linnaeus) is found on Mallows (Malva spp.) and the larvae probably develop in the roots. According to Hyman (1992), the beetle was formerly widespread in southern England but is now possibly declining, with records since 1970 from only East Sussex, East Kent, West Kent and South Essex. On 09 June 2001 I swept a single specimen with huge numbers of fuscicornis (itself a Nb species) from Malva sylvestris L. on the “cliffs” above the River Stour estuary near Chestnut Spinney at Stutton, VC25 (TM 1433) and later, on 26 June 2004, I found fuscipes to be quite common at the site. Quite what factors are operating to cause the apparent recent decline of one of two apparently extremely similar sibling species, both of which feed on the same widely distributed and common foodplants, remain unknown at present and the issue may only be resolved by genetic or ecological studies. I understand that no other Suffolk records have been received for the forthcoming chrysomelid “Atlas” (pers. comm. M. Cox) and there are no specimens of the beetle in the Morley collection. CURCULIONIDAE Ethelcus verrucatus (Gyllenhal) RDB 3 This rare weevil is only known from Cornwall, Devon, Hampshire, Sussex, Kent, Essex and Suffolk. It develops in the tap root of Yellow horned-poppy (Glaucium flavum Crantz) growing on coastal shingle. The beetle may be under-recorded because, unlike most ceutorhynchine weevils which frequently occur on the leaves of their host plants and are therefore easily found by tapping or sweeping, it is rarely discovered except when hiding in the food plant’s dead basal leaves or when the plant is dug up – the latter practice being eschewed by most coleopterists. E. verrucatus was added to the Suffolk List by Morley (1935a) who writes that he found it sparingly on 16 September 1935 among dead leaves at the roots of every Horned Poppy on the beach two hundred yards north of an original search site which was “between the sea and broad near Covehithe”. In addition, he also informs us that he found the weevil on 26 September on Southwold beach, VC25 [TM 57].

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There are many specimens from both these dates in the Morley collection (all VC25) but those collected on 16 September are all labelled “Easton” and as Morley gave this locality and not Covehithe when he exhibited some of the specimens (1935b), I consider that his locality was actually near Easton Broad [TM 5179] and not Covehithe Broad. Unfortunately, Morley’s diary for 1935, which might have clarified this matter, does not mention either collecting trip. Standing above verrucatus in Morley’s collection there is also a rough mount of two ceutorhynchine weevils collected from Yellow horned-poppy on 25 August 1936 at Sizewell [TM 46]. Morley presumably thought these were conspecific but only one of these is E. verrucatus; the other is merely Stenocarus ruficornis (Stephens), a beetle which because of its pale patches of scales, but not its form or sculpture has, to the naked eye, a somewhat superficial resemblance to verrucatus. During the survey of Sudbourne Beach (see above under “Carabidae”) specimens of E. verrucatus were collected in the deep shingle pitfall traps run between April, 2002 and March, 2003, and occurred as follows: TM 4551 – Jan. (2 exx.), Feb. (1 ex.), March ( 3exx.), May (3 exx.); TM 4552 – Jan. (1 ex.), Feb. (2 exx.), March (1 ex.). I suspect, if searched for assiduously, E. verrucatus will be found at other Suffolk coastal sites where its foodplant occurs. Appendix Two species discussed in the previous paper in this series (Nash, 2002) require additional comment. Scraptia testacea Allen – An additional record is to be found in Welch (1999) where the beetle is reported from Aspal Close near Mildenhall. Anthicus angustatus Curtis – Roger Booth has recently drawn attention (1 September 2003 – Beetles British Isles e-mail group) to the highly restricted World distribution of this beetle which I recorded on Orford Beach, pointing out that it is apparently only known from the coasts of southern England, Brittany, Portugal and the Camargue and that any UK sites make an important contribution to the survival of the species. Acknowledgements I thank: Messrs. Martin Collier, Nigel Cuming, Tom Eccles, Colin Johnson, Paul Lee and Howard Mendel for allowing me to include their unpublished records (Colin Johnson also for Crowson’s record of P. gressneri and copy of Rücker’s paper); Mark Telfer (R.S.P.B. Reserves Ecologist) for his unpublished records, details of Graeme Lyons’ pitfall captures and a copy of Jones’ Havergate list ; The National Trust and Environment Agency for allowing publication of details from the Sudbourne Beach survey carried out by Paul Lee with the assistance of Jim Askins who set and emptied the pitfalls; Stuart Warrington of The National Trust for facilitating recording visits to Ickworth and Orfordness (also Dave Cormac, Orfordness warden); David Lampard (Curator, Natural History, Ipswich Museum) for facilities and access to the Morley/Doughty collection and associated documentation; Max Barclay (Natural History Museum, London) for details of their holdings of Cartodere norvegica and australica; Alex Williams for his identification of A. harwoodi;

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Dr. M. Luff for confirming my identification of N. quadripunctatus; Dr. Mike Cox for information from his forthcoming chrysomelid “Atlas” and Mr. A. A. Allen for information relating to W. O. Steel’s capture of C. norvegica. Finally, I am grateful to the following for permission to record on their property or that in their care: Alice Parfitt (formerly of R.S.P.B., Minsmere); Lord de Saumarez ( Shrubland Estate); The Rt. Hon. Peter Strutt (Stutton Estate); Major Philip Hope-Cobbold (Glemham Park); Mr. G. Agnew (Rougham Estate); Mr. J. Keeble (Brantham Hall); Mr. R. Nightingale (Estate Manager, Foxhall Estate); Mr. S. Paul (Freston Estate) and Mr. J. Rudderham (Forestry & Conservation Manager, Elveden Farms Ltd.). References Allen, A. A. (1952). Lathridius norvegicus A. Strand (Col., Lathridiidae) rediscovered: an addition to the British List. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 88: 282–283. Allen, A. A. (1973). An ecological note on Saprinus virescens Payk. (Col., Histeridae). Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 109: 131. Donisthorpe, H. (1918). Caenocara subglobosa Muls., a species of Coleoptera new to Britain. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 54: 55–56. Donisthorpe, H. (1920a). A new locality for Dryophilus anobiodes, Chevr., and some other Coleoptera from Freckenham and Barton Mills. Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. 32: 153–154. Donisthorpe, H. (1920b). Coleoptera at Freckenham and Barton Mills again. ibid 32: 199–200. Donisthorpe, H. (1944). Falagria concinna Er. (Col., Staphylinidae), a very interesting addition to the British list. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 80: 226. Donisthorpe, H. (1947). Insects in a pigeon’s nest. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 83: 294. Doughty, C. G. (1929). Coleoptera of Gt. Yarmouth and its neighbourhood. Photocopy of unpublished ms. notebook of The Great Yarmouth Naturalists’ Society held at Ipswich Museum. Accession details: R. 1978 – 66 ; File R. 1939 – 84. Elliott, E. A. (1930). The Coleoptera of Suffolk. Second Supplement. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 1: 121–126. Elliott, E. A. (1936). Critical notes on our beetles. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 3: 121–128. Leedes Fox, J. & Garness, W. (1858). A list of the rarer species of Coleoptera which occur, or have been taken in the neighbourhood of Harleston, Norfolk and in the neighbourhood of Bungay. Naturalist 8: 16–18; 87–89; 160–161. Hinton, H. E. (1941). The Lathridiidae of Economic Importance. Bulletin of Entomological Research 32: 191–247. Hodge, P. & Hance, D. (2000). Four beetles new to Cambridgeshire (VC 29). The Coleopterist 9: 64. Hyman, P. S. (revised Parsons, M. S. ) (1992). A review of the scarce and threatened Coleoptera of Great Britain. Part 1. U.K. Nature Conservation No. 3. Peterborough: Joint Nature Conservation Committee.

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Hyman, P. S. (revised Parsons, M. S. ) (1994). A review of the scarce and threatened Coleoptera of Great Britain. Part 2. U.K. Nature Conservation No. 12. Peterborough: Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Jennings, F. B. (1904). Coleoptera, etc., at Brandon, in August, 1903. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 40: 87. Jones, R. A. (n. d.). Havergate Island R.S.P.B. Reserve. Provisional Invertebrate Survey. Unpublished report to R.S.P.B. Luff, M. L. (1998). Provisional atlas of the ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) of Britain. Huntingdon: Biological Records Centre. Morley, C. (1899). The Coleoptera of Suffolk. Plymouth: J. H. Keys. Morley, C. (1915). The Coleoptera of Suffolk. First Supplement. Plymouth: J. H. Keys. Morley, C. (1935a). Two weevils new to Suffolk. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 3: 82. Morley, C. (1935b). Proceedings for 1935 – exhibit at General Meeting held at Campsey-Ash, October 1st, 1935. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 3: lxii. Nash, D. R. (2002). A belated record of Myrmecocephalus concinnus (Erichson) (Staphylinidae) in West Lancashire. The Coleopterist 11: 82. Nash, D. R. (2003a). Notes on the Suffolk list of Coleoptera: 10. 23 species new to the Suffolk list with significant records from the year 2002. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 39: 37–59. Nash, D. R. (2003b). Red Admiral butterflies at sap. White Admiral – Newsletter of the Suffolk Naturalists’ Society 56: 23. Nash, D. R. (in prep.). Saprinus virescens Paykull (Histeridae) in Suffolk and Norfolk with observations on its ecology. The Coleopterist. Newbery, E. A. (1898). Harpalus Frœlichi, Sturm (tardus, Pz.): an addition to the British list. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 34: 84–85. Pope, R. D. (1977). Kloet and Hincks. A Checklist of British Insects, 2nd. Ed., Part 3: Coleoptera and Strepsiptera. Handbk. Ident. Br. Insects 11. London: Royal Entomological Society. Rücker, W. H. (1995). Cartodere australica (Belon) und Cartodere norvegica (Strand). Mitt. internat. entomol. Ver. 20: 59–61. Spittle, R. J. (1947). The coleopterous fauna of carrion crows’ nests. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 83: 270. Welch, R. C. (1999). Notable saproxylic beetles (Coleoptera) from Aspal Close, Beck Row, near Mildenhall, Suffolk. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 35: 62–64. Williams, B. S. (1930). Atheta harwoodi, a species of Coleoptera new to science. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 66: 274–275. David R. Nash 3 Church Lane Brantham Suffolk CO11 1PU

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 40 (2004)

NOTES ON THE SUFFOLK LIST OF COLEOPTERA: 11 TEN SPECIES NEW TO THE SUFFOLK LIST  

David Nash

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