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Bibliography P. J. O. Trist O.B.E. B.A. M.R.A.C. F.L.S. Agriculturist and Botanist 1908–1996 County Agricultural Officer East Suffolk 1946–1958 Suffolk 1958–1971 A list of books, contributions to publications and book reviews, newspaper articles on farming and papers on field botany particularly relating to studies on the taxonomy of grasses.

Abbreviations used in the text B.S.B.I. E.A.D.T

Botanical Society of the British Isles East Anglian Daily Times a daily newspaper published at 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich IP4 1AN J. Agric. Sci. Journal of Agricultural Science J. Min. of Agric. The Journal of the Ministry of Agriculture, Whitehall, London. J.N.C.C. Joint Nature Conservation Committee, Peterborough J. Royal Agric. Soc. The Journal of the Royal Agricultural Society of England N.A.A.S. National Agricultural Advisory Service Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. Transactions of the Suffolk Naturalists Society Later as from 1969 – Vol. 16 named Suffolk Nat. Hist. Suffolk Natural History c/o The Museum, High Street, Ipswich. The text of this bibliography was largely researched and written by John Trist himself in 1995 and 1996 and has been completed by his son Richard Trist, Bowden House, 4 Merton Road, Southsea, Hampshire P05 2AG telephone – 023 9275 2802, email – richard.trist@btinternet.com, who would welcome comments or corrections. An obituary and photograph of John Trist together with a list of papers from this journal was published by the Society in 1997 (TSNS 33: 100–101). This fuller list includes many items about Suffolk natural history that were published elsewhere [Ed.].

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Philip John Owen Trist John Trist – he was always known as John – was born on 22nd April 1908 in Putney Bridge Road, London, the son of a general practitioner doctor. The Trists were a Devon family of yeomen farmers maintaining a long association with the land until the start of the 19th century. From his early years he showed a deep interest in nature – butterflies, birds’ eggs and cycling in the Mendip Hills. After school in Taunton he sailed to New Zealand for three years farming experience. He was later to say that this experience was so rough that thereafter he could face anything. It was here that he started to write – keeping a diary of his rugged life – pulling tawhine scrub or walking four miles to the nearest township. One day he wrote “I learnt the art of butchering. I killed and dressed a sheep”. Returning via Suez he had circumnavigated the globe before he was twenty-one. In 1929 he enrolled in the Royal Agricultural College at Cirencester graduating MRAC in 1932. He wrote that it was impossible to find work, even to earn a meal; so, he borrowed money and spent two years farming in Herefordshire. In 1935 he joined the University of Bristol as Assistant to the Adviser in Agricultural Economics and Advisory Officer to the Wiltshire Agricultural Accounting Society. At the same time he read for a degree in Economics being awarded BA (Honours) in 1939. At the start of the 1939–1945 War, after a brief spell in the Royal Artillery he returned to agriculture. Initially he was a Lecturer at the Essex College of Agriculture in Writtle. Shortly afterwards, in 1940, he was appointed District Officer for Maldon with the Essex War Agricultural Executive Committee. Later he became Chief Cultivations and Lands Officer for Essex. There was a war on and his immediate task was to see to an increase in food production. He oversaw the reclamation of large tracts of derelict land and the conversion of many acres of grassland to cereal production. The story was told in his first book “Land Reclamation”. He was invited to place a copy in the Imperial War Museum in recognition of this important contribution to the civilian war effort. In 1946, on the formation of the National Agricultural Advisory Service as a part of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, he was appointed County Advisory Officer for East Suffolk and later promoted to County Agricultural Adviser for all of Suffolk. He oversaw and advised on the largest revolution in agriculture – the post-war years. One of his major tasks was to plan and organise the recovery of agricultural land following the disastrous sea floods along the East Coast on the night of 31st January 1953. For his tireless efforts in the initial struggle he was appointed O.B.E. in the Coronation Honours of that year. Many of his written articles focus on the problems and recovery of land from inundation by salt water. From his study of the effects on plants of the salt water grew his deep interest in botany. He was invited by the Royal Agricultural Society of England to write “A Survey of the Agriculture of Suffolk” as the seventh in the series of County Surveys published by the Society. He, thus, followed in the line of two famous previous surveys – in 1797 by Arthur Young, Secretary to the first Board of Agriculture and in 1849 by William and Hugh Raynbird.

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John Trist’s “Survey” canvassed the practice of agriculture in Suffolk including enough of past history to make the book an interesting and informative source of knowledge on how farming had reached its present state in the county. The book started in 1963; there followed hard years of research and writing. By 1967 the author recognised that there had been further changes whilst he had been writing. There were revisions until completion in June 1969 but publication did not come until 1971. The reviewer in Farmers Weekly wrote “the book is clearly a labour of love”. In 1966 he was elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London – a recognition of his standing amongst botanists. He retired from the Ministry in 1971 after twenty-five years in the service of agriculture in Suffolk. The East Anglian Daily Times recorded “Suffolk’s Own ‘Mr Agriculture’ retires this month”. Immediately he started again. He was, for five years the first Conservation Officer with the Suffolk Trust for Nature Conservation (later Suffolk Wildlife Trust). His knowledge of Festuca and Bromus led to the B.S.B.I. inviting him to become the referee for these genera and he served in this capacity for many years. He was rewarded with Honorary Membership of the B.S.B.I. in his 86th year. His correspondence with fellow enthusiasts and experts extended across much of the world. As a personal endeavour and enthusiasm he recorded in the field over some fifteen years and ultimately edited for publication in 1979 “An Ecological Flora of Breckland”. Somehow, in the midst of all his activities he found time and energy to make regular visits to the Herbarium of the School of Botany in the University of Cambridge where he checked through the whole of the British grass collection correcting and updating the classification where appropriate. On being asked to tackle the wider European collection he commented – in his eighties – that he might not be able to finish the task, but he would tackle the job. By his will he left his collection of some three thousand grass specimens, beautifully mounted, to the same Herbarium. He was keen that they should be freely available for use and study. Throughout his life he wanted to record and share his knowledge and research. He wrote on many agricultural and botanical subjects but with a particular focus on his special interest – the grasses of the United Kingdom. One of his last endeavours was the production of the list of publications in this bibliography – no mean feat in itself. He died on the 10th June 1996 – plant specimens still waiting on his desk for identification and draft, learned articles nearing completion. “the fields were his study and nature was his book” Robert Bloomfleld – Suffolk poet

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Bibliography 1937 Factors which influence pig keeping profits: (with C. V. Dawe). Farmers Weekly: April Why some pig farmers lose money. Farmers Weekly: July Prices and quantities of pig foods fed on 10 farms in the West of England: 1935–36 & 1937. Farm Economist, 235–237. Oxford 1938 Cost of erecting fattening houses for pigs. Farm Economist, 80–82. Oxford 1948 Ploughing–up for a better grass. E.A.D.T. Ipswich. December 11th Land Reclamation. An account of farming in Essex as a contribution to the war effort 1939–1945. Foreword & Preface 11–20: 21–178. Faber & Faber London 1949 “Wheatsheaf and Willow” by H. Wymer. Book Review in Agriculture (J. Min. of Agric.) November Ley Farming. Suffolk Farmers Journal. May 1950 Trial Spraying of Lesser Broomrape (Orobanche minor) (with W. A. Hayles). N.A.A.S East Suffolk 1951 Essex and Suffolk Clays. J. Min. of Agric. 58: 4 Control of Lesser Broomrape (Orobanche minor) (with W. A. Hayles). N.A.A.S. East Suffolk: 1951 Trials 1952 “The Elveden Enterprise,” G. Martelli. Book Review J. Min. of Agric. May Machines for the £10 ploughing. Power Farmer October: article The Coypu. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 8: 1–2 Frost Cracks. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 8: 26–29 1953 Reclamation after sea water flooding. E.A.D.T: 14th February “The Sea Coast” J. A. Steers. Book Review : J. Min. of Agric. :July 18 Sea flood reports. J. Min. of Agric. : April Ecology in the reclamation of salt flooded marshes. J. Min. of Agric. 59: 571– 573 The great sea floods of 1953. Unpublished personal records deposited in Suffolk County Archives, County Record Office, Ipswich Ecology at Minsmere. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 8: 66–72 Sheep on Suffolk Farms. E.A.D.T. October Salt tolerant flora on the Suffolk marshes Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 8: 147–148

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1954 Blythburgh Marshes. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 9: 36–37 The Land of Promise (East Coast Marshes). Farmer & Stockbreeder 24 Nov Suffolk Marsh Reclamation Policy J. Min. of Agric. 61: 328–332 1955 On the Marsh. Farmer & Stockbreeder March Reseeding Salt Flooded Marshes. J. Min. of Agric. April 29 The River Blyth I Blythborough is Steeped in History June 17 II Trouble with Consulting Engineers Aug 2 III Three Reports But Very Little Action Aug 9 IV Commissioners Have to Admit Defeat Aug 19 V Can Modern Methods Defeat Old Problems? Aug 20 History of the River Blyth – Series of articles published in EADT based on the Minute Books of the Commissioners appointed under the River Blyth Navigation Act 1756 Old marsh pastures get a new arable face. Farmer & Stockbreeder. July 26 Sandcovert Marshes, Blythburgh. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 9: 259–261 Two and a half years after – bringing back the land after the Great Floods E.A.D.T: 30 May 1956 Plant damage by summer storms. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 10: 68–69 A frequent alien ; Amsinckia intermedia. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 10: 74 “Land, Water & Food” by Herbert Addison. Book review in J. Min. of Agric. : Jan Some Aspects of East Anglian Farming 111. East Suffolk. J. Royal Agric. Soc. 117: 13–16 1957 Changes in the East Suffolk farming scene Eastern Daily Press. July 1958 Ten Years of change in the livestock pattern. E.A.D.T. 3 June Sandpit Covert Marshes, Blythburgh, III. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 11: 68–70 1959 Beware : Poison plants are a threat to stock. E.A.D.T. 10 Oct A Short History of the Saxmundham Experimental Station, Suffolk :1899– 1959. Min. of Agric. Fish. & Food. June 1960 “Big Business” Coming to Suffolk Countryside. East Anglian Farming World. May 26 C.L.A. sees results of seven years’ patience. E.A.D.T. 23 July 44 “The Horse in the Furrow” by G. E. Evans. Book review in J. Min. of Agric. August 45 Protective Flora of Sea Walls. J. Min. of Agric. 67: 228–231

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Vegetative Proliferation of grasses and phyllody of clovers. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 11: 307–310 An ecological study of Fritillaria meleagris L. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 11: 392– 399 1961 “Suffolk : A Shell Guide” by Norman Scarfe. Book Review in J. Min. of Agric. July Records of Interesting Grasses in Suffolk 1960–61. Trans. Suffolk. Nat. Soc. 12: 58 Now Time to Look at Costs and Marketing. E.A.D.T. Suffolk Show Supplement 30th May Weather : The Worst Hazard. E.A.D.T. N.A.A.S. Affairs 11th November 1962 Land Clearance and drainage machinery. Ch. l, part 12 of Vol. 3 in “Progressive Farming” 205–219 “Fat of the Land” by J. Seymour. Book review in J. Min. of Agric. March “The Book of the Country Town” E. W. Martin. Book review in J. Min. of Agric. November “A Window in Suffolk” by Allan Jobson. Book review in J. Min. of Agric. November The Flora of an Old Pasture: Habitat Study. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 12: 100 Icklingham Plains : Habitat Study. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 12: 199 The Affect on Agriculture of the East Coast Floods. Report of the Working Party. Min. of Agric. PJOT reports pp 1–47, 163–165, 276, 234–246 1963 How the Flooding Affected the Farmers. E.A.D.T. Feb. 1 Dealing with problem of frosted beet still in ground. E.A.D.T. March 16 Blythburgh and the River Blyth. Bull. of Min. of Agriculture, Fisheries & Food April “A Keeper’s Tale” by Fred. J. Speakman. Book Review in J. Min of Agric. June 1964 Avena fatua, L., and other Gramineae records for Suffolk. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 12: 345–346 Spray Earlier to Avoid Death of Bees. E.A.D.T. April 25 “Suffolk Prospect” by Justin & Edith Brooke. Book review in J. Min. of Agric The Pattern of Farming in the Eastern Counties. Farm Economics Branch, School of Agriculture, University of Cambridge. Book review in J. Min. of Agric. March 1966 A Suffolk Calendar” by Allan Jobson. Book review in J. Min. of Agric. May Suffolk’s service to agriculture. E.A.D.T. Supplement June 27 The Saxmundham rotation experiments: rotation 1 – with D.A. Boyd. J. Agric. Sci. 66: 327–336

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The Saxmundham rotation experiments: rotation 2, 1899–1952 – with D. A. Boyd. J. Agric. Sci. 66 : 337–339 1967 The Flora of a Manorial Pasture. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 13: 288–289 Suffolk landscape reflects rapid changes E.A.D.T. May 30 1968 The West Suffolk Reserves of the Suffolk Trust for Nature Conservation. East Anglian Life August Records of Some Grasses in Suffolk 1968. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 14: 220–221 The Flora of Suffolk. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 14: 1 Visit to the West Suffolk Sites held by the County Trust for Nature Conservation. Trans. Suff. Nat. Soc. 14: 226 1970 Suffolk. J. Min. of Agric. December Farming Cameo : Series 4: 41 Conservation and The Farmer. Bury St Edmunds 24 February – publication unknown The properties & problems of the sands and clays of Suffolk. In British Soc. of Soil Sc. Sept. pp 34–38 The Changing Pattern of Agriculture. In “The Flora of a Changing Britain”. B.S.B.I. Conference 1969 Report, F. Perring Ed., 45–50 1971 Festuca glauca Lam. and the var. caesia (Sm.) K. Richt. Blue or Grey Fescue. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 15: 443–444 A survey of the agriculture of Suffolk. Royal Agricultural Society of England 1–11, 1–366. County Agricultural Surveys No. 7 Corynephorus canescens (L.) Beauv. in West Suffolk. Watsonia 8: 402 Suffolk. J. Royal Agric. Soc. 1973 Festuca glauca Lam. and its var. caesia (Sm.) K. Richt. Watsonia 9: 257–262 1974 Suffolk farming and conservation. E.A.D.T. April Narcissus “Van Sion” at Monewden. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 16: 230–231 1975 A remarkable population of Ophioglossum vulgatum L. in Suffolk. Watsonia 10: 415 Flowers in danger. BSBI News 10: 25 1976 Festuca glauca auct. and Festuca caesia Sm. Watsonia 11: 73 1978 Alopecurus bulbosus Gouan BSBI News 19: 22–23 Fritillaria meleagris L. at Mickfield, Suffolk. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 17: 332–334 Fox Fritillary Meadow, Framsden. Suffolk Trust for Nature Conservation (with Gordon J. Clarke)

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1979 Tulipa sylvestris L. in Suffolk v.c. 25. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 18: 82–83 Some observations on Catapodium rigidum. (L.) C. E. Hubbard subsp. majus (C. Presl) Perring & Sell. Watsonia 12: 261–262 An ecological flora of Breckland. Editor – the Breckland Flora Project. Extensive field survey work and recording. EP Publishing Ltd 1–105 and Maps 1–95. Wakefield 1980 Corynephorus canescens (L.) Beauv. in West Suffolk v.c. 26. Watsonia 13: 61–62 1981 Charles Edward Hubbard CBE DSc FLS : 1900–1980. Obituary in Watsonia 13: 243–244 Fritillaria meleagris L.: its survival and habitats in Suffolk, England. Biological Conservation 20: 5–14 The survival of Alopecurus bulbosus Gouan in former sea flooded marshes in East Suffolk v.c. 25. Watsonia 13: 313–316 1982 Rex Graham Nature Reserve. The Suffolk Trust for Nature Conservation, Ipswich 1–12 1983 The past and present status of Gastridium ventricosum (Gouan). Scliinz & Thell. as an arable colonist in Britain. Watsonia 14: 257–261 Panel of Referees and Specialists. Advice on the taking and sending of Specimens. BSBI Year Book: 10 1986 A reconsideration of the taxonomic status of Poa balfourii Parnell (Gramineae) Watsonia 16: 37–42 The distribution, ecology, history and status of Gastridium ventricosum (Gouan) Schinz & Thell. in the British Isles. Watsonia 16: 43–54 Festuca trachyphylla (Hackel) Krajina. Nature in Cambridgeshire 28: 54–56 Molinia caerulea (L.) Moench. subsp. arundinacea (Schrank) H. Paul a subspecies of Purple Moor-grass. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 22: 57–58 Festuca trachyphylla (Hackel) Krajina a grass introduced into the Suffolk Breckland. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 22: 59–61 1988 Hildersham Furze Hills. Nature in Cambridgeshire 30: 4–12 Festuca arundinacea var. strictior. BSBI Scottish Newsletter 9: 6–7 Two subspecies of Molinia caerulea (L.) Moench in the British Isles (with P. D. Sell). Watsonia 17: 153–157 The identification of grasses. Wild Flower Magazine 24–25 Autumn Identification keys to Desmazeria rigida and subsp. majus; Molinia caerulea subsp. caerulea and subsp. altissima; Spartina anglica, maritima and × townsendii. Plant Crib : Ed. T. C. G Rich & M. D. B. Rich : B.S.B.I. London

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1989 Alopecurus × plettkei Mattfeld in Britain (with M.J. Wilkinson). Watsonia 17: 301–308 An introduction to Bromus spp. in Britain. Wild Flower Magazine 31–32 Spring Spreading Meadow-grass Poa subcaerulea Sm. Nature in Cambridgeshire 31: 57–60 The influence of farming practice on the survival and final extinction of Veronica triphyllos L. at Lakenheath v.c. 26. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 25: 61–64 1990 Molinia caerulea var. viridiflora Lejeune: a variety of Purple Moor-grass in Suffolk. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 26: 82–84 Molinia caerulea subsp. altissima (Link) Domin. A Purple Moor-grass. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 26: 85 1991 Festuca arundinacea Schreb. var. strictior (Hack.) K. Richt. Watsonia: 18: 4, 414–415 Margerson George Rutterford FLS : 1907–1991. Obituary “Rutterford of Breckland”. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 27: 59–60 Margerson George Rutterford FLS : 1907–1991. Obituary “Rutterford of Breckland”. Suffolk Wildlife Trust 1992 Molinia caerulea (L.) Moench subsp. arundinacea (Schrank) K. Richter in Cambridgeshire v.c. 29. Nature in Cambridgeshire 34: 61–63 Ecological Change in Breckland (PJOT quoted throughout). English Nature, P. Lambley Ed. 30–71 Corynephorus canescens (L.) Beauv., in Scotland BSBI Scottish Newsletter 14: 13–15 1993 Corynephorus canescens (L.) Beauv. (Poacae) on the west coast of Scotland. Watsonia 19: 3, 192–193 Veronica triphyllos L. in Breckland v.c. 26. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 29: 61 “Breck, Fen & Forest” by M. G. Rutterford published by Bruce Rutterford, Lakenheath. Book review in Nature in Cambridgeshire 35: 79 Herbaria: Towards a Better Use. BSBI News 64: 18 1994 Alopecurus aequalis Sobol: p 40. Corynephorus canescens (L.) Beauv.: p 122. Hordelymus europaeus (L.) Jessen : p 208. Potentilla argentea L. : p 332.In “Scarce Plants in Britain”. Ed. A. L. Stewart, D. A. Pearman and C. D. Preston. Peterborough 1995 Elytrigia repens (L.) Desv. ex Nevski subsp. arenosa (Spenner) A. Love (Poaceae) in north-western Europe. Watsonia 20: 4, 385–390 Elytrigia repens (L.) Desv. ex Nevski subsp. arenosa (Spenner) A. Love. Suffolk Nat. Hist. 31: 54–56

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Puccinellia distans (Jacq.) Parl. subsp. borealis (O. Holmb.). W. E. Hughes (Poaceae) in mainland Scotland and the Outer Isles (with J. K. Butler). Watsonia 20: 391–396 The incidence of Lolium × boucheanum Kunth in Cambridgeshire, v.c. 29. Nature in Cambridgeshire 37: 41–42 1996 Field notes made available and assistance given on Poaceae in Flora of Great Britain, Isle of Man and Channel Islands, vol. 5, ButomaceaeOrchidaceae. P. D. Sell & G. Murrell. Cambridge University Press Published postumously 1998 Identification Keys to Catabrosa aquatica var. aquatica and var. uniflora; Elytrigia repens subsp. repens and subsp. arenosa; Molinia caerulea subsp. caerulea and subsp. arundinacea; Spartina subsp. maritima, subsp. townsendii and subsp. anglica; Puccinellia distans subsp. distans and subsp. borealis. In Plant Crib. T. C. G. Rich and A. C. Jermy. B.S.B.I. The distribution and status of Corynephorus canescens (L.) P. Beauv. (Poaceae) in Britain and the Channel Islands with particular reference to its conservation. Watsonia 22: 41–41 1999 Poa flexuosa Sm. (Poaceae) and Festuca longifolia Thuill. British Red Data Books, 1 Vascular Plants 3rd edition. Compiled and edited M. J. Wigginton J.N.C.C. Unfinished Work A review of the distribution, ecology and conservation status of Festuca longifolia Thuill. subsp. longifolia Blue Fescue (Poaceae) in Britain and the Channel Islands

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Bibliography: P. J. O. Trist  

R. Trist