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NOTES ON THE SUFFOLK LIST OF COLEOPTERA: 9 18 SPECIES NEW TO THE SUFFOLK LIST WITH SIGNIFICANT RECORDS FROM THE YEAR 2001 DAVID R. NASH This paper discusses 18 species of beetle which should be considered New to Suffolk for the Index to these Transactions; records of nine of these are reported here for the first time whilst details of nine others which have been published relatively recently in the national literature are presented, with additional records for these species if available. These species are all asterisked. Noteworthy records from 2001 are reported, together with discussion of the species which were the subject of my appeal for records (Nash, 2001). The national status for scarce and threatened species is given, following Hyman (1992; 1994) for terrestrial species and Foster (2000) for aquatic ones. All records are allocated to vice county (v.c. 25, East; v.c. 26, West) and National Grid references are provided, with those assigned by me to earlier records being placed in square brackets. All records are my own except where indicated. Unless specifically mentioned, there are no Suffolk specimens of any of the species discussed in the Claude Morley/Chester Doughty collection at Ipswich Museum. CARABIDAE *Elaphropus ( = Tachys) parvulus (Dejean) Nb Lindroth (1974) cited Elaphropus parvulus from only Devon and Cornwall (querying the old Lancashire and Cheshire records) but in the intervening years it has been found to be widely dispersed in southern England, typically occurring on sandy and gravelly soils and with a number of recent captures suggesting that it may be spreading and availing itself of man-made habitats such as old walls, roadside kerbstones and patios, the slabs of the latter often being laid on a sharp sand base (Welch, 1992). The first Suffolk eaxample was found in the county on 19 September 1993 on a patio at Martlesham Heath Village, East Suffolk (TM 2344) (H. Mendel) and this is the basis for the single East Anglian dot on the species’ map in Luff’s ground beetle “Atlas” (1998). A further East Suffolk record can now be added: 11 July 2002, several examples by grubbing among gravel and large stones in a disused gravel pit at Barham (TM 1351). *Pterostichus quadrifoveolatus Letzner (angustatus Duftchmid) Nb This ground beetle was first taken on burnt ground at Crowthorne, Berkshire in the spring of 1916 (Tomlin, 1916). It has been considered an established migrant for the last century, but recently Whitehouse (2000) found it as fossil remains (dated to circa. 2900–2350 BC) from a charcoal-containing sample on Hatfield Moors, South Yorkshire indicating that it had previously been a member of the British beetle fauna. She postulates that it had originally become extinct as a result of a decline in fire habitats but that since the turn of the century conditions have once more become favourable, perhaps due to the prescribed management policy of burning of peatlands and heather moorlands and possibly the expansion of conifer plantations.

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In Scandinavia it appears to always occur on burnt ground (Lindroth, 1986) but whilst it is plainly well adapted to this unstable habitat and still sometimes occurs in it in this country, it is now perhaps more typically found in warm, dry, forest clearings in open coniferous and mixed stands with no evidence of forest fires. Surprisingly, for a xerophilous, heat-preferring and dessication resistant species, it has also recently been reported from wetlands in this country (Luff, 1998). The species is still in the process of expanding its range, with parts of Wales and Scotland currently being colonised and although it now occurs throughout eastern England it only appears to have reached Norfolk (Collier, 1985) and Suffolk in the last decade or so. I have Suffolk records as follows:– v.c. 25: March 20–10 April 1997, pitfall trap on heath, R. S. P. B. Minsmere reserve (TM 465683) (R. Wilson). v.c. 26: 1988–1994 , frequent in pitfall traps in Corsican Pine (Pinus nigra var. corsica Loudon) plantations, Thetford Forest (TL 8384) – the first record for Breckland (Doberski & Lyle, 1997); 16 June 2000, singleton under piece of concrete on wet path between conifer plantation and birch understorey on deciduous wood edge, Mellfield Wood (TL 9260); 28–30 May, 2001, pitfall traps , Thetford Forest (TL 803817) (Ying-Chi Lin; det. M. Collier). Amara famelica Zimmermann RDB3 This rare ground beetle, typically found in damp areas within dry, sandy heaths, is shown as occurring in Suffolk in a single 10 km square in v.c. 26 on Luff’s (1998) national distribution map for the species. A study of the Monks Wood B. R. C. data for the map showed that the relevant dot was based upon a record by Alex Williams for Barton Mills (TL 77) in 1966. On the basis of this record I designated the beetle a Middle List Suffolk B. A. P. species. Subsequent discussion with Alex Williams established, however, that he had never taken famelica anywhere and it is likely that an error of transposition had probably occurred when the record cards were being prepared for computerisation, famelica being followed on the checklist by the common A. familiaris (Duftschmid). The record has now been removed from the Monks Wood dataset and the species should likewise be expunged from the Suffolk B. A. P. beetle list. *Amara montivaga Sturm Like Pterostichus quadrifoveolatus, Amara montivaga is a recent introduction to our fauna and although it was added to our list on the basis of specimens taken in Kent in 1947–49 (Allen, 1950), earlier misidentified examples from 1934 were subsequently discovered in a collection at the University of Bath (Duff, 1992). The beetle occurs in sandy places, gravel and chalk pits, where there are weeds. I have the following records:– v.c. 25: 3 June 1983: one under piece of wood and another swept from elm sapling (the latter confirming the species’ known readiness to fly), Shrubland Park Estate, Coddenham (TM 1153); 11 June 1998, in pitfall traps, Ipswich Airport site (TM 1941) (P. Lee); 9 June 2000, Braziers Wood (TM 1841) (P. Lee); v.c. 26: July–August 1995, common in pitfall traps, Tuddenham Gallops (TL 7271) (M. Telfer); July 1997, 5 exx. in pitfalls, Joist Fen R. S .P. B.

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reserve, Lakenheath (TL 6985) (det. DRN); 23 June 1999, old straw heap on set-aside area, Canada near Icklingham (TL 7775); May–November 1999, pitfalls at 3 sites on R.A.F. Mildenhall Airbase (TL 6777, TL 6975, TL 7176) (P. Lee): 3–4 August 2002, singletons in pitfall traps, Wangford (TL 7583; TL 7584) (M. Telfer). *Microlestes minutulus (Goeze) In 1971, in advance of his now well-known R. E. S. “Handbook” on our Carabidae (1974), Carl Lindroth published details of a number of beetles which, given their known distribution on the Continent, might well occur with us at some stage in the near future (Lindroth, 1971). One such was Microlestes minutulus (Goeze), a small black beetle which was eventually added to the British list on the basis of a Suffolk specimen taken by me on 13 April 1976 running on the seawall by the River Stour estuary at Holbrook Bay, East Suffolk (TM 1734) and on an Essex specimen from set-aside in Essex in 1995 (Eversham & Collier, 1997). In the early 1980’s I had passed the Suffolk specimen, as a duplicate of Microlestes maurus (Sturm) – at that time the only known British species of the genus, to my friend Martin Collier but it was only in 1996 after having taken the true maurus himself on the Isle of Wight, that he realised my specimen was significantly smaller than his specimens, reexamined it and discovered its true identity. Suitably alerted, I checked the “maurus” in my reference collection and found several other minutulus that had been taken at the same time as the donated beetle. My 1976 examples are still the earliest known from this country but since that time the species has spread inland and down the east coast to at least as far as the Isle of Grain. It has recently been detected in some half dozen sites in N. E. Essex by Nigel Cuming (pers comm.). Additional Suffolk records are as follows:– v.c. 25: 12 October 1979, sieved tideline debris by lagoon, Shinglestreet (TM 3743) (H. Mendel) and still present 14 September 1996 (H. M. and J. Owen); 4 July and 8 September 1998, in shore refuse by River Stour estuary, Stutton (TM 1433) – in September also running on the sandy cliffs with its two closest and similar-sized relatives M. maurus and Metabletus truncatellus (L.). v.c. 26: 17 April–10 May 2001, pitfall trap, R. A .F. Mildenhall, Beck Row (TL 6979) (P. Lee); 4 April 2002, one among fallen masonry, Nunnery Garden Ruins, Thetford (TL 8782) (Toms, 2002). HYDROPHILIDAE Cercyon bifenestratus Kuster IUCN LOWER RISK (near threatened). Formerly Rare. This scarce little water beetle has been recorded from eleven English hectads since 1950 and from only one since 1990 (Foster, 2000). It usually occurs in recently created gravel pits and sand pits; it is also attracted at night to light sources such as MV moth traps. It was originally found in West Suffolk in a sandpit at Flixton (Collier, 1987) and I am unaware of any additional published records for the county. I can now add two further records: 6 July 2001, one at garden MV light , Reydon, Southwold, East Suffolk (TM 502772) (A. Cornish; det. DRN); 1 June 1979, flooded gravel pit, Kentford, West Suffolk (TL 7167) (H. Mendel); Morley appears never to have met with the species.

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PTILIIDAE *Nossidium pilosellum (Marsham) Notable The Ptiliidae are among our tiniest beetles (0·3–0·5 mm long) and their small size coupled with the difficulty of accurately identifying many species has caused them to be neglected by many coleopterists. Nossidium pilosellum, however, is the only member of the genus present in this country and is comparatively easy to identify even in the field but it is not represented at all in the Morley collection. It is widely distributed but local and chiefly breeds in damp, fungoidal wood, and fungi growing on trees or stumps. The well-known coleopterist E. C. Bedwell frequently collected in the county and Morley was kept apprised of his captures. He seems, however, not to have passed on details of his capture of Nossidium at Beccles [TM 49] during a collecting trip there from 1–16 August 1919; specimens are present in his own collection at Norwich Castle Museum as well as in the R. Wilding collection at Liverpool Museum. Bedwell’s diary provides no additional details regarding the capture. To this early first record can be added the following recent ones:– v.c. 25: 26 May 2001, several sieved from under the hard fungus Ganoderma adspersum (Schulz.) Donk. at base of an old ash along with Atheta sodalis (Er.) and Heterothops niger Kr. – the latter associated with a mole tunnel beneath the fungus, Great Martin’s Hill Wood, Capel St Mary (TM 0936); 4 July 2002, several sieved earth and leaves under G. adspersum at base of dead beech, Front Park near Glemham House, Great Glemham (TM 3461). v.c. 26: 28 May 1997, in wood mould from hollow oak, Aspal Close, Beck Row (TL 700773) (Welch, 1997); 19 June 1999, several sieved together with Bolitochara lucida (Grav.) from small toadstools at base of an ash on the edge of Cornard Mere S. W. T. Reserve (TL 8838). STAPHYLINIDAE Quedius ventralis (Aragona) Nb This staphylinid which usually occurs in fungi growing in or beside tree rotholes or in old birds’ nests found in hollow trees was added to our list by Geoffrey Burton who found it in the vicinity of his home at Needham Market , East Suffolk [TM 05] in 1942 (Burton, 1942). A single diminutive specimen from this source (det. K. G. Blair) is the only representative of the species in Morley’s collection. I have recent records as follows:– v.c. 25: 9 June 1963, pupa under mossy bark and adult reared, Friday Street, Rendlesham (TM 35) (C. Barham); 11 June 1988, one under sappy loose bark of live sycamore, Bullen Lane, Bramford (TM 1046); 27 June 2001, one sieved soggy interior of felled sycamore, Ramsey Wood Hintlesham, (TM 0643). v.c. 26: 27 November 1977, from rot-hole in beech, Bildeston (TL 9950) (H. Mendel). *Atheta (Acrotona) consanguinea (Eppelsheim) RDBK Insufficiently known The British history of this very rarely recorded little aleocharine beetle was summarised by John Owen when reporting his capture of it in Windsor Forest

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in 1981 and 1982 (Owen, 1983a). The beetle has occurred in a variety of situations in broad-leaved woodland and is only known from four vicecounties in south eastern England. On 26 May 2001 I sieved a single female example at Great Martin’s Hill Wood, Capel St Mary East Suffolk (TM 0936) by breaking up a rotten oak branch. The species was also found new to Kent in 2001 (Nash, in press). *Trichiusa immigrata Lohse This little aleocharine, usually associated with decomposing plant material e.g. old dung heaps, compost and grass heaps, is believed to be a recent immigrant into Europe from North America (Lohse & Lucht, 1989). It was first found in Britain in Kent in 1992 (Heal, 1993) and since that time has spread rapidly with the most northern capture known to me coming from Yorkshire (Denton, 1998) and the most south western from South Devon (Welch & Sadler, 2000). Despite being a highly successful colonist, it is normally only found in small numbers. I have found it by sieving old dung heaps (first four localities) and damp straw (last locality), in five sites in East Suffolk: 7 April 1998, 1 ex., Stutton (TM 1333); 3 July 2001, 1 ex., White Horse Farm, Capel St Mary (TM 1037); 15 July 2001, 2 exx. near Wolves Wood, Hintlesham. (TM 0643). 11 July 2002, two or three near Barham Church (TM 1351); 4 July 2002, in abundance, White House Farm, Great Glemham (TM 3562). This appears to be only the third time the species has occurred in numbers in this country (Welch & Sadler, loc. cit.) and may indicate that dung heaps are not its preferred breeding site. EUCINETIDAE *Eucinetus meridionalis (Laporte de Castelnau) RDB3 This small leaping beetle was first added to the British list on the basis of specimens taken near Lymington, south Hampshire in 1968 (Gardner, 1969). It was later found on the Isle of Wight (Appleton, 1975). The larvae are believed to develop on fungoid growths under pine bark or in pine debris; adults occur under bark or on flowers in summer. Since David Appleton’s capture there appear to have been no further published captures until specimens were found under an old fence post with fungal mycelia in a pine plantation near Elveden, West Suffolk (TL 8077) in February and March, 1982 (Owen, 1983b). Two additional records from v.c. 26 can now be added: 6 August 1996, four swept , Center Parcs complex, Elveden (TL 8080) (G. Ackers; det. H. Mendel); 15 November 1996, under bark of fungoid pine stump, Thetford Warren Lodge (TL 8384) (H. Mendel and J. Owen). SCIRTIDAE *Prionocyphon serricornis (Muller, P. W. J.) Nb The larvae of this locally distributed but relatively infrequently recorded beetle develop among the detritus in the water-filled root-plates of mature trees, especially beech. Adults are usually taken by beating the branches of host trees, sweeping nearby or by rearing the larvae (vide Nash, 2000). Morley never found the species and it is only represented in his collection by a New Forest specimen from Donisthorpe. I have three Suffolk records:– v.c. 25: 20 September 1986, one swept near mature beeches, Shrubland Park Estate, Coddenham (TM 1253); 14 July 2001, one beaten from mature oak,

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Captain’s Wood, Sudbourne (TM 4254) – two other noteworthy saproxylic species, Aderus oculatus (Pic) (Nb) and Dorcatoma chrysomelina St. were also beaten from nearby oaks. v.c. 26: 16 July 2002, one beaten from old oak on edge of Wolves Wood, Aldham (TM 0543). NITIDULIDAE *Carpophilus sexpustulatus (Fabricius) In Fowler’s day this beetle was originally considered a very rare importation which was unable to maintain itself in the wild in this country. From 1894– 1912, however, the beetle was taken in the open on seven separate occasions in Yorkshire localities and, in a little-known paper reviewing all six of the then-known British Carpophilus (Bayford, 1912) the beetle’s status was raised to that of an indigenous species or an importation from so long ago that it had become well-established. Since recording this beetle as new to Suffolk from Holbrook Park in April, 1976 (Nash, 1978) there appear to have been no further Suffolk records although the insect turned up new to Norfolk in Norwich in 1983 (Collier, 1985). On 6 June 2001 I was pleased to rediscover the species (1 ex.) under the bark of a felled oak trunk in the wood yard on the Shrubland Park Estate, Coddenham, East Suffolk (TM 1252). The species is unrepresented in the Morley collection. Thalycra fervida (Olivier) Like the majority of our species of Leiodidae, this beetle develops in subterranean truffles and whilst it has been taken in these or at the sap exuding from tree trunks attacked by caterpillars of the Goat Moth Cossus cossus L., it is probably most frequently taken by evening sweeping as this is when the newly ecloded adults emerge from the soil. Given the infrequency with which it seems to be recorded, Thalycra fervida is, surprisingly, absent from the reviews of scarce and threatened beetles in both Shirt (1987) and Hyman (1992). Fowler (1889; 1913) considered it rare as later also did Joy in his “Handbook” (1932). The single beetle doing service for Thalycra in Morley’s collection is only a small specimen of Pocadius adustus Rt. from the New Forest (Nash, 1982). Thalycra was formally added to the Suffolk list by Elliott (1929), as T. sericea Sturm, in the Second Supplement to Morley’s 1899 “Coleoptera”, the beetle having been taken by evening sweeping at Barton Mills [TL 77] by Horace Donisthorpe in September, 1917 (Donisthorpe, 1918). I have never met with the species and I am unaware of any other published Suffolk captures since that time. I was greatly astonished, therefore, to find a single T. fervida amongst the small batch of beetles sent to me by Alan Cornish from his garden moth trap in Reydon, East Suffolk (TM 502772). It had turned up on 26 June 2001 together with the common Ontholestes murinus.(L.), Melanotus villosus Fc., and Cantharis cryptica Ashe. I am not aware of the species having previously been taken at MV light. CUCUJIIDAE *Uleiota planata (Linnaeus) Na Uleiota planata occurs under the bark of recently fallen or felled trees and was for long considered a great rarity but, in the last few decades of the 20th

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Century, began to be recorded more frequently. Although we appear to have an indigenous population, its numbers are probably swelled by regular importations on timber from the continent. I first met with the beetle under beech bark in Epping Forest in 1985 and later found it in North Essex as well (Nash, 1992). Whitehead (1991) considers it a fastidious and specialised insect which lives in and on the early products of bast and which is able to penetrate these subcortical tissues because of its flattened form. This developmental requirement may explain the usual scarcity of the species. On 8 June 2001 I found two examples under the bark of an oak trunk in the wood yard on the Shrubland Park Estate, Coddenham (TM 1252) and a further example was found there by Martin Collier on 6 April 2002. The species is unrepresented in the Morley collection. TENEBRIONIDAE Blaps mucronata Latreille This large, cosmopolitan, nocturnal black beetle which lives in or near buildings, storehouses and cellars was recorded by Morley (1899) from Bramford and Ipswich [both TM 14] There are several 19th Century specimens (various dates) from Ipswich in his collection and others taken in 1943 in a cellar at Halesworth [TM 37]. There is also a Doughty specimen taken on 7 August 1925 in Gorleston. [TG 50]. Annotations in Morley’s personal copy of his 1899 work show that the beetle was common in September, 1917 in a garden at Framlingham [TM 26] (Vintner teste CM) and that Doughty found it regularly in the stables of Martlesham Rectory [TM 2646]. Morley also notes it on a footpath (his last time from Ipswich) in May, 1934. Up to March, 1961 the beetle occurred commonly in my grandparents’ cellar in Berner’s Street in Ipswich (TM 1545) (Nash, 1974), but after the cellar was cleaned out and an old copper removed, it was only able to maintain itself in the removed heap of rubble dumped outside in the walled garden, until January, 1973. The beetle was found in the cellar of Ipswich Museum (TM 1644) in February, 1982 and a specimen was brought there for identification from an industrial unit off Norwich Road (TM 1545) in 1983 (both records from H. Mendel). The only record I have of the beetle in the county since that time is its occurrence in numbers in a small, damp ,brick-lined well, housing a piece of machinery at the Nestlé-Purina cat food factory at Great Cornard, West Suffolk (TL 833399) on 24 May 2002. It was very disappointing that my appeal to the general membership of the society for records of this beetle (Nash, 2001) was fruitless. I am quite confident that the beetle is probably scattered across the county wherever suitable habitats remain although I suspect it is far more localised these days (and likely to become even more so) as a result of damp-proofing of older buildings and cellars and the total unsuitability of our modern housing. Considered common in Ireland at the turn of the century, it now appears to be rare (O’Connor and Ashe, 2000). As it is such a large species (18–25 mm), a colony can easily be decimated, if it is considered a pest, by hand-picking in strongholds such as churches and their crypts. For example, in 1978, the beetle was collected in numbers from turret stairwells in Rochester Cathedral where

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it was feeding on dead pigeons (pers. comm. C. Mackechnie-Jarvis). Fortunately, the larvae are perhaps more difficult to eradicate as they often conceal themselves in cracks between flooring bricks and in the base of walls with crumbling brickwork. Diaperis boleti (Linnaeus) RDB2 This rare tenebrionid which chiefly breeds in the birch polypore Piptoporus betulinus (Bull. ex Fr.) was included in Morley’s 1899 “Coleoptera” on the basis of an old record by the Rev. William Kirby contained in Stephens “Illustrations” (1827–1835) viz .”Mr. Kirby told me that he once found a considerable number on a Boletus, near Barham”. Later, in his “Manual” (1839), Stephens repeats this record and reports Diaperis also from Hastings, East Sussex and Dalston, Cumbria giving June as the month of capture. Shirt (1987) refers to a pre-1891 record from Nottinghamshire as well as its occurrence at Dalston again in 1907. The beetle seems not to have been found again until it was reported from localities on the Hampshire-Dorset border in 1952–3 (Harwood, 1956); it apparently persisted there until 1956. It appears to have been lost sight of again until 1985 when it occurred in Holme Fen, Cambridgeshire to Roger Key and others. Subsequently, it was rediscovered in East Sussex (Hodge, 1991) and Hyman (1992) refers to a post1970 record from East Kent. On 19 October 1996 Keith Alexander and Malcolm Edwards found Diaperis to be widely distributed on the Suffolk Sandlings Heaths recording it from Rendlesham Forest (TM 3646), Lower Hollesley Common (TM 3446) and Tunstall Forest (TM 3756); the following day Peter Chandler found it at Walberswick N.N.R. (TM 47) (Alexander & Edwards, 1997). To these can be added the following unpublished records all from P. betulinus (except where indicated) and v.c. 25:– 8 November 1996, several, Rendlesham Forest (TM 34) (J. Owen and A. J. Allen); 12 October, 1997, 4 exx. near Upper Hollesley Common car park (TM 3446) (M. Collier); 29 October 1997, 6 exx., Hollesley (TM 3646); October, 1997, Rendlesham Forest (TM 34) ( M. Luff); 19 June 1998, one in Polyporus squamosus Huds. ex Fr. on oak, Shrubland Park, Barham (TM 1252): interesting confirmation of Kirby’s early 18th Century record from the parish ; 26 October 2000, 4 exx., Rendlesham (TM 3546) (J. Bowdrey and N. Cuming); 6 September 2001,4 exx. in Laetiporus sulphureus (Bull. ex Fr.) Murr. on moribund poplar, North Warren R. S. P. B. reserve (TM 4559) (N. Cuming); 14 September 2001, 32 exx. counted, Aldringham Common (TM 4560) (N. Cuming); 15 July 2001,1 ex., Wolves Wood R. S. P. B. reserve, near Hadleigh (TM 0543). Shortly after the rediscovery of the beetle in Suffolk, it turned up for the first time in Norfolk (Denton, 1997) and more recently, in Essex (Bawdsey, 2002). Species such as Diaperis boleti which are normally rare in this country are often considered to have tiny relict populations which are so small that chances of encountering them are extremely slight but quite what has caused the present population explosion and apparent expansion of range in some areas of East Anglia is unsure although it could be linked to climate amelioration; some beetles only fly and disperse to new sites when air temperatures are suitably high.

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Another question for which there are currently no satisfactory answers, is why certain beetles which have very common and widely distributed host plants occur rarely and have extremely limited distributions. MELOIDAE Meloe proscarabaeus Linnaeus and M. violaceus Marsham Nb This genus was figured and its habits briefly described in my appeal for records (Nash, 2001). Only the two above species are recorded from Suffolk and whilst they are abundantly distinct when placed side by side it would appear that they have been confused in the past. Fowler (1891) states that violaceus is more local and much less common than proscarabaeus which is cited as common and generally distributed. Buck (1954) describes them both as widely distributed with proscarabaeus being coastal. Only violaceus features in Hyman’s (1992) review of our scarce and threatened coleoptera where it is described as widespread but local and predominantly a northern and western species. At the present time, both species appear nationally to be very much scarcer than in the past and the whole genus is currently the subject of a 3-year national survey which will, hopefully, help clarify their present status. Morley (1899) records both from the county as follows:– proscarabaeus – v.c. 25: 1860, Eye District [TM 17], (Tyrer); Bramford [TM 14]; Felixstowe, near the beach [TM 33]; Levington [TM 23]; v.c. 26: Long Melford [TL 84]; Bury District [TL 86] (Tuck). violaceus – v.c. 25: 1860, Eye District, (Tyrer); uncommon at Bentley Woods [TM 14]. In his annotated copy of this work he adds the following records (all v.c. 25):– proscarabaeus – Foxhall [TM 24] (CM); Oulton Broad [TM 59] (Bedwell); Aldeburgh [ TM 46] (Nicholson and CM); Gorleston, 14 February 1928 [TG 50] (Doughty). violaceus – Oulton Broad (Bedwell); Ipswich [TM 14] in March 1901 (Platten). Proscarbaeus is also cited from Martlesham, v.c. (TM 24) by Doughty in his collection notebook. Specimens of proscarabaeus in the Morley collection yield the following data: 7 May 1894, Orwell [probably from Levington, TM 23]; 13 April 1897 (his diary shows he took this specimen at Five fields, Wherstead [TM 14]; 6 April 1898, Belstead [TM 14]; 26. March. 1929, several in sun on red crag cliff, Bawdsey [TM 34]; 7 March 1938, one walking in Fucus seaweed, East Lane breakwater, Bawdsey. There are also 7 exx. taken by Doughty at Gorleston between 1916–20 (various dates). The single Suffolk specimen standing over violaceus in the collection (April 1895, Bentley Woods) is only proscarabaeus as is Morley’s other putative violaceus taken in the New Forest in the same year (det DRN).The only more recently published records for Suffolk of which I am aware are those of Sankey (1948) and Chadwick (1982). Sankey recorded violaceus on 23 and 30 March 1948, at Brantham [TM 13] and on 7 May 1948, at Claydon [TM 14] whilst Chadwick recorded proscarabaeus on 13 April 1980 on Bawdsey Cliff, confirming Morley’s earlier records. So far, I have been unable to trace voucher specimens for Sankey’s records; I have

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found proscarabaeus but not violaceus at Claydon (see below). Until definite confirmation of the presence of violaceus in the county comes to light, therefore, I consider it wisest to view earlier records with scepticism. I have the following unpublished records for proscarabaeus:– April 1962, Claydon (TM 1349) – site destroyed when Claydon Secondary Modern School was built and I’ve not seen it there since; 21 April 1977, singleton in Ipswich garden (TM 1845) (A. Hubbard); 9 May 1998 et seq., Thorpeness Common (TM 476604) (N. Cuming); 21 April 2002, Trimley Marshes S. W. T. Reserve (TM 257352) (S. Babbs and J. Higgott) (see Plate 3). The records of proscarabaeus support the view that the beetle is predominantly coastal and therefore restricted to v.c. 25 with only two old records from just inside the western vice-county. CHRYSOMELIDAE Timarcha tenebricosa (Fabricius) This, our largest leaf beetle, is figured and its habits briefly described, in my appeal for records (Nash, 2001). It appears to be widely distributed and generally not uncommon in southern Britain but becomes rarer the farther north one travels. Morley (1899) gives East Suffolk records from Southwold [TM 57] (W. C. Hewitson), Levington Heath [TM 23], Walberswick [TM 47] and Ipswich [TM 14] and a single West Suffolk record for the Bury district [TL 86] (Tuck). His annotated copy adds Bramford [TM 14], common in April 1901 (Platten) and Felixstowe [TM 33] whilst his collection has only a solitary Suffolk example bearing the data “07. v. 94, Orwell”. which his diary for that year tells us was taken “crawling in heath” and which I suspect is the basis for the inclusion of Levington Heath in his “Coleoptera”. I am aware of only five additional modern records: v.c. 25: 17 August 1997, one on footpath, Eastbridge , (TM 455661) (N. Cuming.); 30 June 1998, 1 ex., Castle Marsh, Barnby (TM 4790) (H. Mendel); 2 April 2000, mating pair, North Cove S. W. T Reserve near Beccles (TM 469909) (Jacobs, 2001). vc. 26: 2 May 1987, several in damp area near pond, Clare Castle Country Park (TL 7745) (Nash, 1988); 30 July 1991, several on riverside walk in central Hadleigh east of the bridge, (TM 0242 ) (J. Bowdrey). *Chaetocnema picipes Stephens Until the 1990’s, the flea beetle Chaetocnema picipes was a poorly known species and confused with the very common C. concinna (Marsham). A study of British material in The Natural History Museum and two modern collections showed picipes to be widely scattered throughout the southern half of England with specimens dating back to the historic collections of J. F. Stephens and William Kirby indicating that it was a long-standing native (Booth and Owen, 1997). The species was originally described by Stephens (1827–1835) from “near London in June, and in Suffolk. ’Bottisham’ – Rev. L. Jenyns” but in his later inexpensive version of this work (Stephens, 1839) this became “London district; Bottisham”. Booth & Owen (loc. cit.)

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discovered a female specimen taken in May/June, 1895 at Lowestoft, East Suffolk [TM 59] by A. Fry and I can add a single example swept on 2 July 1983 on Orford Beach, East Suffolk (TM 34). Early evidence appears to indicate that the beetle is somewhat scarce. *Longitarsus reichei (Allard) Na Although Fowler (1890) included this flea beetle as a “good” species in his monumental work, he commented that “there is, however, considerable confusion regarding it, and immature specimens of L. pusillus appear to do duty for it in collections” This confusion persisted and the species was for a long time considered synonymous, both in this country and on the continent, with pratensis (Panzer) (= pusillus Gyllenhal). Kevan (1967) cleared up the confusion in his thorough revision of the genus and re-established reichei as a good species whose distribution appeared to cover ” most, probably all, of England”. Despite this clarification, there have been relatively few records published subsequently. The species can now be securely placed on the Suffolk list; I swept several in the water meadows by the River Box, near Boxford (TL 9540) on 18 August 1998. The foodplant was not noted, but Allen (1968) considered it an unusually polyphagous species citing Sea-aster Aster tripolium L. as a true host and occurrences on Black horehound Ballota nigra L. and Selfheal Prunella vulgaris L. The latter was almost certainly present at Boxford. APIONIDAE Melanapion minimum (Herbst) Revised from Na to RDB3; Suffolk B.A.P. species. Melanapion minimum is a small weevil which lives on a wide range of Salix species where its larvae are inquilines in the abandoned red or yellow galls on stems and leaf veins, of sawflies (Pontania spp., Tenthredinidae) and the dipteron Iteomyia caprea Winnertz (Cecidomyiidae) (Gonget, 1997). The species is very local and usually rare in this country and was added to the Suffolk list by Morley from specimens beaten on 13 May 1933 from young sallow trees in Parham Wood, v.c. 25 [TM 3061] (Morley, 1933). He found it there again on 26 April and 17 May of the following year (Morley, 1934). Specimens from all dates are in his collection. A visit to Parham Wood and its environs on 7 June to look for the beetle proved fruitless. I was only able to search the perimeter of the privately owned Parham Wood from a public footpath beside which there were only one or two sallow bushes. Beating both broad - and narrow- leaved Salix spp. close by for several hours failed to turn up the weevil. The beetle is well-known from the Redgrave and Lopham Fen N. N. R. but only from Lopham Fen which is on the Norfolk side of the River Waveney (Pope, 1967). Deciding that the beetle must surely occur in Redgrave Fen, East Suffolk, I visited the site on 19 June 2001 and after much beating of sallows and willows eventually found the insect to be highly localised but not uncommon in one area of sallow carr (TM 0479). *Ischnopterapion modestum (Germar) Following the discovery by Dieckmann that three species were confused under the name Apion loti Kirby , Morris was able to add Ischnopterapion modestum

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(as Apion sicardi Desbrochers) to our list (Morris, 1976), indicating that it was likely to be widely distributed in this country. The latter species occurs on Large Birdsfoot-trefoil Lotus uliginosus Schkuhr, a plant of wet meadows, marshes etc. whilst the sibling species loti is attached to Birdsfoot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus L. a plant of dry grasslands, roadsides etc. Apart from this specificity of foodplant, habitat is also, therefore, a good indicator of which of the two species is likely to occur at a particular site. Despite this, there can still be difficulties with the identification of some specimens of the loti group if these are taken away from the two main foodplants, as was discussed by Mendel (1991) when incidentally adding modestum to the Suffolk list on the basis of material collected on 18 July 1983 at Oulton Marsh, v.c. 25 (TM 5093). On 18 August 1998 I tapped a single female from Lotus uliginosus growing close to the River Box at Boxford, v.c. 26 (TL 9540). CURCULIONIDAE *Ceutorhynchus unguicularus (Thomson) RDB3 This rare weevil which is attached to Hairy Rockcress Arabis hirsuta (L.), a plant of grassland, dry sandy soils etc., was added to the British list by Morris (1966) who swept several specimens in Ireland and a single example from a roadside verge in the Breck near Mildenhall, West Suffolk (TL 7275) on 2 July 1962. Later he found the beetle in Wiltshire and “tolerably plentiful” on its foodplant at the Suffolk site on 27 May 1966 (Morris, 1968) as well as on 15 June 1969 and 19 June 1975. He also found the beetle on 28 May 1972 beside the nearby Foxhole Heath (TL 7377) The beetle was found in East Sussex in 1977 (Jones, 1979) and Hyman (1992) records it without any details from Buckinghamshire pre- and post-1970. To Dr. Morris’ records I can add the beetle from a new locality: 18 July 1999, a single example by general sweeping on Thetford Heath N. N. R. , West Suffolk (TL 8579). *Tychius quinquepunctatus (Linnaeus) RDB2 - Vulnerable This attractively marked weevil is associated in this country with bitter vetch Lathyrus montanus Bernhardi and narrow leaved vetch Vicia sativa L. ssp. nigra. both plants of sand dunes, grassland, heaths etc. Hyman (1992) knew of the occurrence of this weevil in only two vice-counties since 1970 viz. West Norfolk (where I swept it near Grime’s Graves on 2 July 1985) and Glamorgan, although before this it had also occurred in Devon, Hampshire, Sussex, Surrey, Middlesex and Cambridgeshire. He suggested that the species’ decline was attributable to loss of habitat and conversion to other land use and perhaps also natural succession and overgrazing. It is especially gratifying, therefore, to be able to add this threatened species to our county list from North Warren R .S. P. B. Reserve (TM 463585) where Nigel Cuming found three specimens trapped in sandy rabbit holes on 9 July 2001. SCOLYTIDAE *Dryocoetes autographus (Ratzburg) Like most bark beetles, Dryocoetes autographus only causes secondary damage to felled or dead trees i. e. it attacks after some primary cause of disease or death. In this country D. autographus chiefly attacks Spruce Picea abies L. and occasionally Scots pine Pinus sylvestris L. although the original

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capture of the beetle in this country was from Larch Larix decidua Mill near Scarborough in April 1869 (Fowler, 1891). Early last century, the beetle was considered a northern species, widely distributed and local in Scotland but known in England only from Northumberland, Durham and Yorkshire and although it remains principally a northern and western species, it has for some time been known from as far south as the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire. In 1999, the beetle turned up for the first time in south-east England in “the tough bark of the solid stump” of a fallen Spruce on Esher Common in Surrey (Allen & Owen, 2000). Monroe (1926) states that D. autographus breeds in bark which is sodden and invaded by fungus mycelium, generally selecting trunks which other bark beetles have abandoned although sometimes occurring with the bark beetles Hylurgops palliatus (Gy.) and Hylastes cunicularius Er. This describes well the state of the bark of the Spruce trunk in which I found the beetle on my only previous encounter with it which was in Derbyshire in 1985. Many records of bark beetles are only reported in the journals specialising in economic forestry so may be missed by the majority of coleopterists but Allen and Owen (loc. cit.) in the “Acknowledgements” for their paper, were able to cite Dr. Tim Winter for advising them that the Forestry Commission have no records for D. autographus in south-east England (the “no” preceding the word records was unfortunately omitted by the editor of the journal, making the statement read as the opposite of that which was intended!). On 4 July 2001 I found a single specimen crawling on an unidentified conifer trunk in the Shrubland Park Estate wood yard, Coddenham, East Suffolk (TM 1252). Careful searching failed to reveal further examples. These two recent records may indicate that D. autographus is currently in the process of extending its range. A single German example represents the species in Morley’s collection. *Taphrorychus bicolor (Herbst) Na The rare bark beetle Taphrorychus bicolor chiefly occurs in the bark of dead beech and hornbeam although it does also sometimes occur more rarely in that of other broad-leaf trees. It is restricted to broad-leaved woodland and pasture-woodland sites in southern and south-eastern England and until now has been recorded, as far as I am aware, only as far north as South Essex where I found it in abundance in its most well-known locality, Epping Forest, in 1985. Whilst collecting in the wood yard on the Shrubland Park Estate, Coddenham, East Suffolk (TM 1252) on 1 August 2000, I came across some scolytid larvae in the thin, quite dry bark of a small beech trunk (circa 44 cm. diameter) which had been lying there for several years. From a sample of this bark, two specimens of T. bicolor emerged a few weeks later. Morley appears never to have met with the species. Acknowledgments I thank: Messrs. Guy Ackers, Cliff Barham, Jerry Bowdrey, Martin Collier, Nigel Cuming, Alan Hubbard,Paul Lee, Martin Luff, Howard Mendel, John Owen, Mark Telfer, Mike Toms and Ms. Ying-Chi Lin for allowing me to include their unpublished records (John Owen also for an amended copy of his

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D. autographus paper); Alan Cornish for sending beetles from his MV moth trap; Steve Babbs and Jeff Higgott for the photos and record of M. proscarabaeus; Mr. A. A. Allen for a MS. list of Suffolk records from Bedwell’s diaries; Colin Johnson (Manchester Museum) for informing me of Suffolk Nossidium in the Wilding collection; Tony Irwin (Norwich Castle Museum) and Steve Judd (Liverpool Museum) for details of Nossidium in the Bedwell and Wilding collections respectively; Alice Parfitt, R. S. P. B. Minsmere for details of the P. quadrifoveolatus record; the following for permission to record on their property: Suffolk Wildlife Trust (Cornard Mere and Redgrave Fen N. N. R. ; Andrew Excell, warden at the last-named for his help and encouragement); Bev Nichols, Norfolk Wildlife Trust (Thetford Heath); Rick Vonk R. S. P. B. (Ramsey and Wolves Woods); Lord Cranbrook and his son Jason (Great Glemham Farms); Lord de Saumarez (Shrubland Park Estate); Major C. Gurney (Great Martin’s Hill Wood), Mr. G. Agnew (Rougham Estate); Mel Glazier (Captain’s Wood); Nestlé-Purina Pet Foods and Stuart Read (Great Cornard Mill); David Lampard (Curator, Natural History, Ipswich Museum) for access to the Morley / Doughty collection and associated documentation. Finally, I am extremely grateful to Dr. M. G. Morris for a MS. list of his unpublished Suffolk weevil records and for confirming C. unguicularis and I. modestum, Dr. M. Cox for identifying L. reichei and C. picipes and Alex Williams for naming A. consanguinea and my first specimens of T. immigrata. References Ackers, G. L. (1996). Coleoptera Survey. Center Parcs, Elveden, Suffolk, TL8080. 30 July–9 August 1996. Unpublished report for Suffolk Wildlife Trust and Center Parcs. Alexander, K. N. A. & Edwards, M. (1997). Diaperis boleti Linnaeus (Tenebrionidae) widespread on the Sandlings Heaths of East Suffolk. Coleopterist 6: 46 Allen, A. A. (1950). Two species of Carabidae (Col.) new to Britain. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 86: 89–92. Allen, A. A. (1968). Notes on Longitarsus reichei Allard, etc. (Col., Chrysomelidae) with special reference to foodplants. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. (1967) 103: 154. Allen, A. A. & Owen, J. A. (2000). Dryocoetes autographus (Ratzeburg) (Col.: Scolytidae) in Surrey, apparently new to south-east England, with a taxonomic note. Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. 112: 121. Appleton, D. (1975). A second British locality for Eucinetus meridionalis Laporte (Col., Eucinetidae). Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 110 (1974): 231. Bayford, E. G. (1912). Carpophilus sexpustulatus F., its congeners, and their occurrence in the British Isles. Naturalist 37: 141–145. Booth, R. G. & Owen, J. A. (1997). Chaetocnema picipes Stephens (Chrysomelidae:Alticinae) in Britain. Coleopterist 6: 85–89. Bowdrey, J. (2002). Diaperis boleti (Linnaeus) (Tenebrionidae) new to Essex. Coleopterist 11: 45. Buck, F. D. (1954). Handbooks for the Identification of British Insects . Coleoptera (Lagriidae–Meloidae) vol. V. part 9. Royal Entomological Society of London.

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Burton, G. J. (1942). Some uncommon Suffolk beetles. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. , V: 36–37. Chadwick, L. (1982). In search of heathland. Durham: Dobson Books. Collier, M. (1985). Coleoptera in Norfolk. Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. 97: 132–133. Collier, M. (1987). The beetles (Coleoptera) of Flixton sand pit. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc., 23: 13–15. Denton, J. (1997). Diaperis boleti (Linnaeus) (Tenebrionidae) in Norfolk. Coleopterist 6: 108. Denton, M. (1998). Trichiusa immigrata Lohse (Staphylinidae) in Yorkshire. Coleopterist 7: 27. Doberski, J. & Lyle, L. (1997). A study of ground beetles (Carabidae) of Corsican pine plantations in Thetford Forest, eastern England. Entomologist 116: 15–23. Donisthorpe, H. St. J. (1918). Coleoptera at Barton Mills. Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. 30: 28–29. Doughty, C. G. Notes on collection of beetles, localities etc. Unpublished ms notebook. Ipswich Museum accession no. 595.76 R 1939–84.E. Duff, A. G. (1992). Some old records of rare Carabidae (Col.) from western Britain. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 128: 37 Elliott, E. A. (1929). The Coleoptera of Suffolk. Second Supplement. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 1: 121–126. Eversham, B. & Collier, M. (1997). Microlestes minutulus (Goeze) new to Britain. Coleopterist 5: 93–94. Foster, G. N. (2000). A review of the scarce and threatened Coleoptera of Great Britain. Part 3. Aquatic Coleoptera. Peterborough: Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Fowler, W. W. (1889). The Coleoptera of the British Islands. III. London: Reeve and Co. Fowler, W. W. (1890). The Coleoptera of the British Islands. IV. London: Reeve and Co. Fowler, W. W. (1891). The Coleoptera of the British Islands. V. London: Reeve and Co. Fowler, W. W. and Donisthorpe, H. St J. (1913). The Coleoptera of the British Islands. VI .Supplement. London: Reeve and Co. Gardner, A. E. (1969). Eucinetus meridionalis Lap., (Col. Eucinetidae), a family and species new to Britain. Entomologist’s Gaz. 20: 59–62. Gonget, H. (1997). The Brentidae (Coleoptera) of Northern Europe. Faun. Ent. Scand. 34. Leiden: Brill. Harwood, P. (1956). Reappearance of Diaperis boleti L. (Col., Tenebrionidae). Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 92: 17. Heal, N. F. (1993). Trichiusa immigrata Lohse (Staphylinidae) – first record for Britain. Coleopterist 2: 18. Hodge, P. J. (1991). Diaperis boleti L. (Col.,Tenebrionidae) rediscovered in East Sussex. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 127: 116. Hyman, P. S. (revised Parsons, M. S. ) (1992). A review of the scarce and threatened Coleoptera of Great Britain. Part 1. U.K. Nature Conservation No. 3. Peterborough: Joint Nature Conservation Committee.

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Hyman, P. S. (revised Parsons, M. S. ) (1994). A review of the scarce and threatened Coleoptera of Great Britain. Part 2. U.K. Nature Conservation No. 12. Peterborough: Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Jacobs, C. (2001). Observations of the bloody-nosed Beetle Timarcha tenebricosa. White Admiral –Newsletter of the Suffolk Naturalists’ Society 48: 39. Jones, R. A. (1979). Ceuthorhynchus unguicularus C. G. Thomson (Col., Curculionidae) in Sussex. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. (1977) 113: 247. Joy, N. H. (1932). A Practical Handbook of British Beetles. 2 volumes. London: Witherby. Kevan, D. K. (1967). The British species of the genus Longitarsus Latreille (Col., Chrysomelidae). Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 103: 83–110. Lindroth, C. H. (1971). Taxonomic notes on certain British ground-beetles. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 107 (1972): 207–223. Lindroth, C. H. (1974). Coleoptera : Carabidae. Handbk Ident. Br. Insects IV, part 2. Royal Entomological Society of London. Lindroth, C. H. (1986). The Carabidae (Coleoptera) of Fennoscandia and Denmark. Faun. Ent Scand. 15 part 2. Leiden: Brill. Lohse, G. A. & Lucht, W. H. (1989). Die Käfer Mitteleuropas . Band 12, Supplementband mit Katalogteil. Krefeld: Goecke & Evers. Luff, M. L. (1998). Provisional atlas of the ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) of Britain. Huntingdon: Biological Records Centre. Mendel, H. (1987). Notable Coleoptera at Pashford Poors Fen, Suffolk. Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. 99: 95–96. Mendel, H. (1991). Apion loti Kirby and Apion modestum Germar (Col., Apionidae): unresolved identification difficulties. Coleopterist’s Newsletter 43: 3–4. Morley, C. (1899). The Coleoptera of Suffolk. Plymouth: J. H. Keys. Morley, C. (1933). Beetle new to Suffolk. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 2: 180. Morley, C. (1934). Proceedings for 1934 in Trans Suffolk Nat. Soc. 2: clx; clxix. Morris, M. G. (1966). Ceuthorhynchus unguicularis C. G. Thomson (Col., Curculionidae) new to the British Isles, from the Suffolk Breckland and the Burren, Co. Clare. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 101 (1965): 279–286. Morris, M.G. (1968). Ceuthorhynchus unguicularis Thomson (Col., Curculionidae) in Wiltshire and Suffolk. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 104: 45. Morris, M. G. (1976). Apion sicardi Desbrochers, a species of weevil (Col., Apionidae) new to Britain. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 111 (1975):165– 171. Munro, J. W. (1926). British Bark-Beetles. London: H. M. S. O. Nash, D. R. (1974). A note on the occurrence of Blaps mucronata Latr. (Col., Tenebrionidae) in Suffolk. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 109 (1973): 71. Nash, D. R. (1978). Carpophilus sexpustulatus (F.) (Col.,Nitidulidae) out-ofdoors in Wilts. and Suffolk. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 113: 84. Nash, D. R. (1982). Records of Pocadius spp. from four English counties. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 117 (1981): 184.

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Nash, D. R. (1988). Proceedings - Pond dipping at Clare Castle Country Park. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 24: 103. Nash, D. R. (1992). Uleiota planata (L.) (Cucujidae) in N. E. Essex. Coleopterist 1: 18–19. Nash, D. R. (2000). Prionocyphon serricornis (Muller) (Col.:Scirtidae) in Wiltshire and Suffolk. Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. 112: 183. Nash, D. R. (2001). Records wanted of three Suffolk beetles. White Admiral – Newsletter of the Suffolk Naturalists’ Society 48: 30–31. Nash, D. R. (in press). Acrotona consanguinea Epp. (Col., Staphylinidae) in Kent and Suffolk. Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. O’Connor, J. P. & Ashe, P. (2000). Irish Indoor Insects : A Guide to Irish Indoor Insect pests. Dublin: Town House & Country House Ltd. Owen, J. (1983a). Acrotona consanguinea Epp. (Col., Staphylinidae) in Windsor Forest, Berkshire. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 119: 198. Owen, J. A. (1983b). Eucinetus meridionalis Laporte (Col., Eucinetidae) in Suffolk. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 119: 198. Sankey, J. H. P. (1948). A note on the sex ratio of Meloe violaceus Mm. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 84: 168. Shirt, D. B. ed. (1987). British Red Data Books: 2. Insects. Peterborough: Nature Conservancy Council. Stephens, J. F. (1827-1835). Illustrations of British Entomology. (Mandibulata). London: privately published by the author. (Not seen). Stephens, J. F. (1839). A Manual of British Coleoptera. London: Longman et al. Pope, R. D. (1968–1969). A preliminary survey of the Coleoptera of Redgrave and Lopham Fens. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 14: 25–40; 189–207. Tomlin, J. R. Le B. (1916). Another carabid amongst charred pines. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 52: 157–-159. Toms, M. P. (2002). Two new inland records of Microlestes minutulus (Goeze) (Carabidae). Coleopterist 11: 68–69. Welch, R. C. (1992). Tachys parvulus (Dejean) (Col.: Carabidae) from synanthropic habitats in Northamptonshire and Bedfordshire. Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. 104: 81–82. Welch, R. C. (1997). Aspal Close, Beck Row. A preliminary assessment of the Saproxylic Coleoptera. Unpublished consultancy report for Forest Heath District Council. Welch, R. C. & Sadler, J. P. (2000). Trichiusa immigrata Lohse (Staphylinidae) in South Devon and South Hampshire with further notes on its occurrence in East Northamptonshire. Coleopterist 9: 54. Whitehead, P. F. (1991). New Vice-county records for Uleiota planata (L.). Col.,Cucujidae). Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 127: 17–18. Whitehouse, N. J. (2000). Forest fires and insects: palaeoentomological research from a subfossil burnt forest. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 164: 231–-246. David R. Nash 3 Church Lane Brantham Suffolk CO11 1PU

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Jeff Higgott Plate 3: Oil beetle (Meloe proscarabaeus L.), Trimley Marshes SWT Reserve (TM257352) April 2002. Records support the view that this beetle is predominantly coastal and therefore restricted to v.c. 25 with only two old records from just inside the western vice-county. (p. 116 ).

NOTES ON THE SUFFOLK LIST OF COLEOPTERA: 9 18 SPECIES NEW TO THE SUFFOLK LIST  

David Nash

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