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63 SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS Compiled by E. M. HYDE and F. W. SIMPSON For each record the following information is given: locality and habitat, Ordnance Survey 10 km Square, vice-county, finder's name or initials (see key at end of article) and date of record. The comments are those of the Compilers, based in some cases on information supplied by the finders. Nomenclature and order of species are those of Kent (1992) Stace (1991). Simpson's Flora of Sujfolk is used as the authority for claiming first or second County records, supplemented by the large number of records received since its publication. The Compilers wish to thank the specialists who determined or confirmed the identity of specimens, especially Mr. E. J. Clement, who has solved many a problem for us over the years. We thank all those who have supplied records for this interesting list. Native plants and established introductions Dryopteris affinis (Lowe) Fraser-Jenkins, Scaly Male Fern. Polstead, two specimens on steep bank of the Dollops, TL93, v.c. 26, FWS, 30/4/1996. It is not always possible to determine the subspecies of these ferns. These specimens bore brown scales. Not previously noticed here. Consolida ajacis (L.) Schur, Larkspur. Tuddenham St. Martin, three tiny flowering plants on edge of crop, TM24, v.c. 25, HP, 30/7/1996. Conf. PGL. Formerly a frequent cornfield weed, of which these small plants may be relics. Nowadays usually seen as garden escapes on waste land. Fumaria muralis Sonder ex Koch ssp. boraei (Jordan) Pugsley, Common Ramping Fumitory. (i) Harkstead, small colonies scattered along roadside verges, TM 13, v.c. 25, EMH, June 1996. Also occasional in Woolverstone and Freston. (ii) Swilland, between hedge and track, opposite farm, TM25, v.c. 25, RA, 8/6/1992. Conf. EMH. Not a common plant in Suffolk Fumaria pan'iflora Lam., Fine-leaved Fumitory. Lackford, many plants on field edge on N. side of the Lackford-Cavenham road, TL76, v.c. 26, MDC. 1995. A rare species in Suffolk and a nationally Scarce Plant. Atriplex littoralis L., Grass-leaved Orache. An annual plant of the dry margins of saltmarshes and sea embankments. However, in recent years, it has been observed on roadsides in Suffolk well away from the coast. Occasional plants were recorded in East Suffolk in the 1980s on trunk roads and slip-roads. Maybe the West Suffolk records which follow, herald a more widespread colonisation, similar to that of Cochlearia danica L„ Danish Scurvy-grass (Hyde, 1986). (i) Verge of A14 just East of the R. Kennett bridge, TL76, v.c. 26, MDC, 1993. (ii) North verge of AI4, West of Risby junction, TL76, v.c. 26. MDC, 1993.

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(iii)Ingham, verge of AI34, within and outside the village, TL87, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. (iv) Bamham (abundant), and Thetford, on verge of AI 34, TL88, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. (v) Euston, verge of AI 088, TL88, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. Fallopia japonica (Houtt.) Ronse Decraene x F. sachalinensis (F. Schmidt ex Maxim.) Ronse Decraene, Japanese Knotweed x Giant Knotweed. (F. x bohemica (Chrtek & Chrtkova) J. Bailey) Hoxne, S. of Goldbrook Bridge, on W. side of road to Cross Street, T M 17, v.c. 25, C D P and JMC, 22/5/1996. Spreading onto roadside bank from large stand in neglected corner of grounds of ? nursery - comm. CDR Det. A. P. Conolly and M. Hart. Leaf specimens coli. PGL, Sept. 1996 for Ipswich Museum herbarium. First Suffolk record. Rumex obtusifolius L. x R. sanguineus L., Broadleaved Dock x Wood Dock. (R. x dufftii Hausskn.) Wangford Churchyard, TM47, v.c. 25, GP, 6/7/1996. Conf. PGL. Also in garden in Sotherton, TM47, GP, 1996. Said to be rather common in S. England (Lousley & Kent, 1981) and recorded as far east as W. Norfolk and Cambridge. First Suffolk record. Thlaspi alliaceum L., Garlic Pennycress. Icklingham, two clumps on roadside under pines, TL77, v.c. 26, S M W and GC, May 1996. Det. SMW. A rare casual, smelling slightly of garlic when crushed. Established as an arable weed in a few places in the South of England (Clement & Foster, 1994). Native of C. and S. Europe. Specimen in Cambridge University herbarium. First Suffolk record. Raphanus sativus L., Garden Radish. (i) Haughley, S. of A14, TM06, v.c. 26, RA, 27/7/1990. Several plants at edge of arable field. Also in TM06, sites in Stowmarket v.c. 26, and Stowupland, v.c. 25, RA, 1990. (ii) Otley, in remains of old crop in arable field, TM25, v.c. 25. RA, 7/10/1992. (iii) Wangford, in wheat-field, TM47, v.c. 25, AS, 6/7/1996. Virtually the only weed in the crop. Also seen by PGL and GP. Conf. Dr. T. C. G. Rieh, July 1996. Few Suffolk records. Probably confused with the common Wild Radish, Raphanus raphanistrum L. Cyclamen hederifolium Aiton. Cyclamen. Little Bealings, small colony on sandy woodland bank, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 1/9/1996. Probably originated from seed derived from a nearby garden, where there are many plants. Occasionally naturalised in the wild. Saxifraga granulata L., Meadow Saxifrage. Ipswich, TM 14, v.c. 25, FWS, April 1996. Single specimen against footscraper of office entrance, opposite Tower Churchyard. An unusual site for this species. It flowered, but was picked and almost uprooted, and finally destroyed by pavement spraying.

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Agrimonia procera Wallr.. Fragrant Agrimony. Stutton, large colony in damp grassy area, TM 13, v.c. 25, FWS, with INHS, 1/6/1996. Rarely seen in any quantity. Few recent records. Lathyrus nissolia L., Grass Vetchling. Ellough airfield, adjacent to old concrete road, TM48, v.c. 25, PGL, 21/6/1995. Several hundred plants in rough grass, with an abundance of Bee Orchids, Ophrys apifera Huds. nearby, including the white form. Much less frequent inland than on the coast. A second airfield site! Trifolium glomeratum L., Clustered Clover. Icklingham, Rampart Field, several plants in short grass, TL77, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. Not previously recorded in this part of Icklingham. This is a nationally Scarce Plant of dry, sandy soils. It is strangely rare in the Breckland. but locally frequent on the coast. Genista tinctoria L„ Dyer's Greenweed. Bramfield, roadside verge, TM38, v.c. 25, GP*, 24/7/1996. Several groups over 30 m. Stretch. Conf. PGL. This attractive plant, once frequent, is now only occasionally seen. Erodium moschatum (L.) Herit., Musk Stork's-bill. Woolverstone, by public footpath to Chelmondiston, TM 13, v.c. 25, LF, July 1996. Comm. and det. T. Tarpey. Several plants on almost bare soil, following regulär mowing. Very few Suffolk records. Specimen in Ipswich Museum herbarium. Sium latifolium L„ Greater Water-parsnip. Mildenhall, in ditches. TL77, v.c. 26, NG, 1995. Now a rare plant in Suffolk. This record and one from Carlton Colville in 1982 (PGL) are the only postFlora records. Oenanthe aquatica (L.) Poiret, Fine-leaved Water-dropwort. This Water-dropwort has for some years been considered to be in dechne. There are now signs that it is recovering. It has recently been recorded in two new 10km. squares and re-discovered elsewhere. (i) Framsden, many plants in pond opposite Framsden Hall, TM25, v.c. 25, RA, 18/6/1992. Conf. EMH. (ii) Huntingfield, large colony in damp pit on edge of wood. TM37, v.c. 25, MDC, 1996. Also re-found in several sites in TM06, Haughley area, RA, between 1989 and 1991. Petroselinum segetum (L.) Koch, Com Parsley. Lavenham, two plants on old railway track embankment, TL94, v.c. 26, R h August 1996. A rare and decreasing plant in Suffolk. Fortunately, this Site has some protection. Toriiis arvensis (Hudson) Link, Spreading Hedge-parsley. Great Waldingfield, edge of bean field on old airfield, TL94, v.c. 26, RF, August 1996. Spreading for over 100 metres along both sides of track. This is now one of the Scarce Plants of Britain.

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Solanum nigrum L. ssp. schultesii (Opiz) Wessely, a subspecies of Black Nightshade. Sutton, in crag pit, TM34, v.c. 25, MNS, 11/7/1996. Differs from the common form of Black Nightshade in its many patent, glandulär hairs. Rare or overlooked in the County. Second Suffolk record and the first for East Suffolk, v.c. 25. Symphytum grandiflorum DC., Creeping Comfrey. (i) Ampton, established in Ampton Wood, TL87, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. First record for West Suffolk. (ii) Sproughton churchyard, naturalised and spreading, TM14, v.c. 25, GP, 21/5/1996. Comm. PGL. Still survives at Walberswick, where first recorded in the County in 1959. Of garden origin, it becomes naturalised in suitable habitats, mainly in the south of the country. Melissa ofĂ&#x;cinalis L., Balm. (i) Lakenheath, near railway Station, TL78, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. Second record for West Suffolk. (ii) Wherstead, roadside verge on new section of AI37, TM 14, v.c. 25, EMH, August 1991. Still there, 1996. (iii) Felixstowe, in narrow passage to beach, TM33, v.c. 25, EMH, 7/8/1993. (iv) Brightwell Tip, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. An introduction of garden origin, strongly lemon-scented, which occasionally becomes naturalised on roadsides and waste ground. Verbascum virgatum Stokes, Twiggy Mullein. Upper Hollesley Common, on and near dumped soil, many plants in flower and fruit, TM34, v.c. 25, INHS, 22/10/1995. Det. FWS. Although this plant is considered to be native in the South-west of Britain, it is an introduced species in Suffolk. Records are few. Verbascum nigrum L. x V. pulverulentum Villars, Dark Mullein x Hoary Mullein. (V. x mixtum Ramond ex DC.) (i) Gazeley, single plant on raised bank near railway branch line, TL76, v.c. 26. FWS, 24/7/1996. (ii) Barnhamcross Common, two plants in colony of V. nigrum (with the other parent species nearby), TL88. v.c. 26, MDC. 1995. A rare hybrid with few records. Parentucellia Martlesham, MNS. About rough grass. and West of records.

viscosa (L.) Caruel. Yellow Bartsia. near Tesco roundabout, TM24, v.c. 25. PS, 19/6/1995. Conf. 50 plants growing with Bee Orchids Ophrys apifera Huds. in An introduced species in Suffolk, but native in the South the country. Sometimes introduced in grass-seed. Few Suffolk

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Carduus crispus L. x C. nutans L., Welted Thistle x Musk Thistle. (C. x dubius Balbis) Reydon, roadside bank, TM47, v.c. 25, PGL, 2/10/1996. Conf. MNS. Several plants. Of the parent species, only C. nutans present. An uncommon hybrid thistle. Hieracium umbellatum L., Narrow-leaved Hawkweed. An unusually fine colony on the beach and on low cliff, TM46, v.c. 25, FWS, 15/9/1996. Probably the only Suffolk colony actually on the beach. but it is fairly frequent on the nearby coastal heaths. Also occurs on Breckland heaths in a few places. Inula crithmoides L., Golden Samphire. Harkstead, Single specimen in saltmarsh, TM23, v.c. 25, FWS, 11/8/1996. A new site, probably arising from the neighbouring Erwarton colony, which is increasing. A very local species in Suffolk. The Trimley site may possibly be endangered by an extension of the Felixstowe Docks. Potamogeton perfoliatus L., Perfoliate Pondweed. Thetford, in the Little Ouse, upstream from Nuns' Bridges, TL88, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. This is only the third post-Flora record. Perhaps overlooked. Further records would be very welcome. Lemna minuta Kunth, Least Duckweed. Lakenheath Fen (new R.S.P.B. area), abundant in dyke, TL78, v.c. 26, FWS, 26/5/1996. First record for v.c. 26, West Suffolk. Now very frequent in the East of the County. Triglochin palustris L., Marsh Arrowgrass. The following two West Suffolk records were accidentally omitted from our last list (Hyde & Simpson, 1996). These two, and a record from a marsh in Stowmarket (Hyde & Simpson, 1987) constitute the only known post-Flora records for West Suffolk. (i) Tostock, marshy corner of field behind Tostock Church, TL96, v.c. 26, RA, 1/9/1985. (ii) Pakenham Fen, on peat, TL96, v.c. 26, RA, 16/6/1986. Festuca pratensis Hudson x Lolium perenne L., Meadow Fescue x Perennial Rye-grass. (x Festulolium loliaceum (Hudson) P. Fourn.) Bentley, one patch on edge of marsh below Great Martin's Hill Wood, TM03, v.c. 25, EMH, July 1996. Not very frequent or perhaps overlooked. Alopecurus aequalis Sobol., Orange Foxtail. Boulge, edge of V-shaped pond on the Boulge estate, TM25, v.c. 25, RA, June 1996. Conf. EMH. Specimen in Ipswich Museum herbarium. Among a number of introduced species, with which it may have arrived in the pond. A rare grass in Suffolk.

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Allium roseum L., Rosy Garlic. Ipswich, eight flower spikes on very dry ground near jetty below Piper's Vale, TM 14, v.c. 25, TH, June 1996. An unlikely spot in which to find these plants. An uncommon, but persistent introduction in Suffolk, widely naturalised in Britain. Listera ovata (L.) R. Br., Common Twayblade. (i) Old Broom Plantation, Great Livermere, TL87, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. (ii) Gedgrave, unusually abundant with fine flowering specimens in old willow carr, TM45, v.c. 25, FWS, 12/5/1996. Also there, an exceedingly fine specimen of Primula vulgaris Hudson x P. veris L., False Oxlip, with Black and Red Currant and Gooseberry. Dactylorhiza fuchsii (Druce) SoĂś, Common Spotted-orchid. Hasketon, colony in woodland Clearing, all with unspotted leaves, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 2/6/1996. Ophrys apifera Huds., Bee Orchid. (i) Kessingland sewage works, 96 plants, TM58, v.c. 25, CAJ, 16/6/1996. (ii) Kirkley Ham, 6-8 plants in Compound of A. K. D. engineering by Northwest corner of fence, TM59, v.c. 25, CAJ, 21/6/1996. It is always interesting to hear of orchids thriving in industrial areas. Bird-seed aliens, casuals and escapes Cistus laurifolius L., Laurel-leaved Cistus. Bentley, Great Martin's Hill Wood, about 40 plants in flower, TM 13, v.c. 25, CJH, 30/6/1996. Can be seen from the public footpath, in an area of low bramble and Wood Sage. The area was fĂźll of Standard trees before the 1987 gale. It is a very interesting re-discovery. See Plate 2. This colony was first recorded in c. 1921 by Mr. E. C. Green, under the name Cistus ladanifer L., Gum Cistus. It was last seen about 1952. Clearance and replanting after the gale probably provided light and space in which the plants could flourish again. It is an attractive small shrub with large white flowers. It is said to have been brought here from France many years ago by the monks of Dodnash Priory. Rhododendron luteum Sweet, Yellow Azalea. Nacton estate, several plants naturalised in woodland, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC. 11/5/1993 and GP, 31/5/1996. Established mainly in woodland on acid soils (Clement & Foster, 1994). Known in woodland at Nacton since 1920 (FWS). Philadelphus coronarius L., Mock Orange. Frostenden, Single large tree in plantation by road. TM48, v.c. 25, GP. 6/7/1996. Origin unknown. Third Suffolk record. Sorbaria kirilowii (Regel) Maxim.. Chinese Sorbaria. Reydon, seeding or suckering freely outside a garden. TM57, v.c. 25, PGL, 2/10/1996. Conf. MNS. A native of China, a member of the Rose family. Sorbaria sorbifolia (L.) A. Braun, Sorbaria. (i) Little Blakenham, small bush by entrance to old chalk-pit, TM 14, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. Possibly a descendant of one planted by the track some 20 years ago (EMH).

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(ii) Little Bealings, established on roadside verge, by village hall, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 5/7/1993. (iii) Hollesley, edge of wood near Manor Cottage, TM34. v.c. 25, MDC, 5/7/1993. (iv) Butley, edge of disused pit, TM34, v.c. 25, MDC, 5/7/1993. A garden escape in a few localities in England, establishing itself by suckering (Clement & Foster, 1994). These are the first Suffolk records. Waldsteinia ternata (Stephan) Fritsch Mildenhall, spreading and now established from spoil heap, TL77, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. A garden plant in the Rose farnily, native in the Carpathians, Siberi'a and Japan (Clement & Foster, 1994). It is a creeping perennial with yellow flowers. First Suffolk record. Cotoneaster frigidus Wallich ex Lindley, Tree Cotoneaster. Ufford, long-established plants in grounds of old isolation hospital, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. Second Suffolk record. Cotoneaster horizontalis Decne., Wall Cotoneaster. (i) Lakenheath, waste ground by railway Station, TL78, v.c. 26. MDC. 1995. (ii) Ampton, bird-sown on top of wall, Ampton Hall. TL87, v.c. 26. MDC, 1995. (iii) Woodbridge, at base of wall in lane behind St. John's Church. and at Broomheath on railway bridge, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC. April 1993. (iv) Eyke Church, small plant growing out of West side, TM35, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. Cotoneaster simonsii Baker, Himalayan Cotoneaster. (i) Elveden, roadside verge, Mayday Farm, TL78, v.c. 26, MDC. 1995. (ii) Barnhamcross Common, bird-sown, TL88, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. (iii) Woolverstone, sapling beside bridlepath near Mannings Lane. TM 13, v.c. 25, EMH, 12/6/1996. (iv) Orford churchyard. growing beside grave, TM44, v.c. 25, MDC, 9/6/1993. Cotoneaster bullatus Bois, Hollyberry Cotoneaster. (i) Barnhamcross Common, bird-sown, TL88, v.c. 26. MDC. 1995. (ii) Ufford, common in scrub on site of old isolation hospital, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC. 10/5/1993. „ ^ „ , The last three are the most likely species to be found naturahsed in Suttolk. but it is worth looking out for others, as many have been recorded in other counties. Stachys byzantina K. Koch, Lamb's Ear. Reydon, two or three plants established on waste ground. TM47. v.c. 25. OK 6/10/1996. Det. PGL. Probably garden rejects. Only one previous Suffolk record. Phlomis fruticosa L., Jerusalem Sage. Southwold, South Green, two or three plants established in roadside crack outside street garden. Parent c. 50 m. away. One seedling flowering. TM57, v.c. 25, PGL, 7/8/1996. A showy plant often grown in large gardens. First Suffolk record. Eccremocarpus scaber (D. Don) Rufz Lopez & Pavön, Chilean Glory Vine. Felixstowe, Quilter Road. several seedüngs found at different stases of developmeni. One reached flowering stage by latc summer. 1M33, v c 25. MDC, ! 99<.. An attractive garden clii iber which shcds large quantities of ,>eed. First Stiffoik record.

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Symphoricarpos x chenaultii Rehder, Pink Snowberry. (S. microphyllus Kunth x S. orbiculatus Moench) (i) Ipswich, one very large colony in rough grass between sports ground and Brazier's Wood, TM14, v.c. 25, TH, 1996. Det. E. J. Clement, 1996. Specimen in Ipswich Museum herbarium. Undoubtedly a garden throw-out which has had time to increase greatly. Also planted in several council shrub beds in Ipswich. (ii) Blythburgh, edge of car park, TM47, v.c. 25, GP, 1995. These are the second and third Suffolk records. Alkanna orientalis (L.) Boiss., Oriental Alkanet. Recorded in error for Nonea lutea (Desr.) DCâ&#x20AC;&#x17E; Yellow Nonea, in T.S.N.S. 32 (1996). A specimen was re-determined by Mr. E. J. Clement in early 1997. This is a yellow-flowered annual grown in gardens, and is a native of E. Europe and S.W. Asia. First Suffolk record. Carthamus tinctorius L., Safflower. Reydon, came up in garden exposed by removal of overgrown shrub, TM57, v.c. 25, AC, Sept. 1996. Det. R. M. Burton. Comm. PGL. Very spiny form with yellow flowers which turned orange as they died. Sent to Mr. Burton for determination because it was so unlike the usual non-spiny form (PGL). Setaria pumila (Poiret) Roemer & Schuhes, Yellow Bristle-grass. (i) Timworth, from crop grown for game-birds, TL86, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. (ii) Playford, roadside verge, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, Oct. 1989. An annual grass, usually associated with bird-seed, which occurs in the County from time to time. Setaria verticillata (L.) P. Beauv., Rough Bristle-grass. Southwold, in crack at base of wall in town, TM57, v.c. 25, GP, 28/9/1996. Conf. PGL. A rare annual grass which sometimes persists for several years. Second record for East Suffolk, v.c. 25. Galanthus nivalis x G. plicatus M. Bieb., Snowdrop x Pleated (or Crimean) Snowdrop. Cavenham churchyard, TL76, v.c. 26, MDC, 1995. First record for West Suffolk, v.c. 26. Galanthus plicatus M. Bieb., Pleated (or Crimean) Snowdrop. Recorded in 1995 by M. D. Crewe in churchyards at Barton Mills, TL77; Barrow, TL76; West Stow, TL87; Ampton, TL87. In addition colonies in: Culford, in scrub W. of Culford Park, TL87. Nowton, roadside verges, TL86. Timworth, Church Lane, TL86. Rougham, Two Mile Spinney, TL86. Until now there have been very few localised records. Galanthus elwesii Hook, f., Greater Snowdrop. Henstead churchyard, well-naturalised, TM48, v.c. 25, GP, 2/3/1996. Comm. PGL. An established introduction in woods and damp grassland in S. England. First Suffolk record. Alstroemeria aurea Graham, Peruvian Lily. Outskirts of Ipswich near Brazier's Wood, well away from houses, one tall specimen sticking out of bramble bush. TM 14, v.c. 25, TH, August 1996. Conf.

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SOME RECENT PLANT RECORDS

EMH. A native of Chile, despite its English name! Specimen in Ipswich Museum herbarium. First Suffolk record. Crocus speciosus M. Bieb., Bieberstein's Crocus. Rushmere St. Andrew, small spreading colony of this attractive autumnflowering species on edge of Common, originating from garden throw-out of corms, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, Sept. 1996. Gladiolus communis L. ssp. byzantinus (Miller) A. P. Harn., Eastern Gladiolus or Whistling Jacks (Suffolk). Aldeburgh, Single colony growing against wall of roadside brick building at Fort Green, TM45, v.c. 25, FWS, 30/6/1996. Few Suffolk records. Key to contributors Addington, Canon. R. Cornish, A. Crewe, M. D. Croft, Mrs. J. M. Crompton, Mrs. G. Edwards, R. Firmin, Mrs. L. Ford, R. Gibbons, N. Hawes, C. J. Hutton, T. Hyde, Mrs. E. M.

RA AC(2) MDC JMC GC RE LF RF NG CJH TH EMH

Ipswich and District Natural History Society Jacobs, C. A. Lawson, P. G. Peck, G. Perkins, Miss G. Philbrick, H. Preston, Dr. C. D. Sanford, M. N. Simpson, F. W. Smith, P. Sutton, A. Walters, Dr. S. M.

INHS CAJ PGL GP GP* HP CDP MNS FWS PS AS SMW

lieferen ccs Clement, E. J. and Foster, M. C. (1994). Alien plants of the British Isles. Botanical Society of the British Isles. London. Hyde, E. M. (1986). Maritime plants on Suffolk's roadsides. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc., 22: 50. Hyde, E. M. and Simpson, F. W. (1987). Some recent Suffolk plant records. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc., 23: 27. Hyde, E. M. and Simpson, F. W. (1996). Some recent Suffolk plant records. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc., 32: 53. Kent, D. H. (1992). List ofvascular plants of the British Isles. Botanical Society of the British Isles. London. Lousley, J. E. and Kent, D. H. (1981). DocksandKnotweeds ofthe British Isles. Botanical Society of the British Isles. London. Simpson, F. W. (1982). Simpsons Flora of Suffolk. Ipswich. Suffolk Naturalists' Society. Stace, C. A. (1991). New Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge. E M Hyde, Parkside, Woolverstone, Ipswich, Suffolk IP9 1 AR

F

-

w

Simpson,

40 Ruskin

Road

< Ipswich, Suffolk IP4 1PT

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Framlingham local moths in 1996 Cnephasia longana Haw., a variable tortrix that is rarely found inland, was abundant in short grass beside the Framlingham to Saxtead Green road on July 28th. Further on, where the verges opened out, a pale grass-moth, Crambus perlella Scop., was well in evidence, with the clearly outlined Agriphila selasella Hb., more of a coastal species, in a lush meadow behind the Mill Restaurant. Light at Framlingham that night brought Catoptria falsella D. & S., which feeds mainly on moss near the sea, and Achips rosana Linn., the Rose Tortrix, infrequently recorded from Suffolk. To light at Framlingham on 30th came a female Leopard Moth, Zeuzera pyrina Linn., with the first of several Synaphe punctalis Fabr., usually confined to salt-marshes, and quite a few Aglossa pinguinalis Linn., a hay-refuse feeder that has, understandably, declined. The Lunar-spotted Pinion, Cosmia pyralina D. & S., rarer now, as are elmfeeders generally, arrived on July 3Ist, together with The Sycamore, Acronicta aceris Linn., which has adapted to consume quite a ränge of deciduous trees. On August 2nd I was surprised to find (and photograph) a Large Twin-spot Carpet, Xanthorhoe quadrifasciata Cl. The species is widespread, if sparse, on Galium. On the same night appeared Endothenia quadrimaculana Haw., a rarely noted tortrix, with Blastobasis lignea Wals., a fairly recent arrival in the county, the Dingy Shears, Parastichtis ypsillon D. & S., from willow and rarer than formerly, and the Dwarf Cream Wave, Idaea fuscovenosa Goeze, a dandelion species that seems to have grown scarcer. The relative lateness of the season was underlined by the survival of the Engrailed, Ectropis bistortata Goeze, until August 3rd and the Blastobasis decolorella Woll., although very welcome as a recent coloniser, was latish, on August 4th. A wave, restricted to damp places and associated with bedstraw, the Small Scallop, Idaea emarginata Linn., flew up to Castle Street lights on the same night. The holiday finished on August 5th with a specimen of the Brown Tail, Euproctis chrysorrhoea Linn., which is 'essentially a coastal species' and a threat to horticulturalists. Quite a rush of other interesting moths including a White Satin, Leucoma salicis Linn., also coastal, although I did see it once at Stowmarket, on August 3rd 1948. Throughout our visit we were heartened to note one of our favourite noctuids, the Dusky Sallow, Eremobia ochroleuca D. & S., both at light and on heads of common knapweed. A return trip at the end of October was graced by several Large Wainscots, Rhizedra lutosa Hb., and Red Underwings, Catocala nupta Linn., both, doubtless, by courtesy of the meres. Ther was also a Rush Veneer, Nomophila noctuella D. & S., offspring of an immense influx from North Africa in June, possibly the largest invasion here by that insect since 1947. In 1996 it became, as Claude Morley would say, 'a perfect pest at light.' Alasdair Aston

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 33 (1997)


Plate 2: Laurel-leaved Cistus, Cistus laurifolius L.. with longhorn beeile Strangalia (Poda) at Bentley. June 1996 (p. 68).

maculata

Some recent Suffolk plant records  

Hyde, E. M. & Simpson, F. W.

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