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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS Compiled by E. M. H Y D E and F. W. S I M P S O N For each record the following information is given: locality and habitat, Ordnance Survey 10km Square, vice-county, finder's name or initials (see key at end of article) and date of record. The c o m m e n t s are those of the Compilers, based in some cases on information supplied by the Anders. Nomenclature and order of species are those of D. H. Kent's List ofVascular Plauts ofthe British Isles, 1992, and the New Flora of the British Isles, 1991, by Professor C. A. Stace. Simpsons Flora of Suffolk is used as the authority for claiming first or second County records, supplemented by the large number of records received since its publication. T h e Compilers wish to thank the specialists who determined or confirmed the identity of specimens, especially Mr. E. J. Clement, w h o has for many years generously given us the benefit of his time and extensive knowledge. Thanks are also due to all those w h o supplied records for this list, and to Richard Addington for his survey of Square T M 2 5 .

Native plants and established introductions Asplenium trichomanes L., Maidenhair Spleenwort. (i) Needham Market, about 1,000 plants on ruined wall in factory complex T M 0 5 , v.c. 25, GP, 1994. (ii) Sotherton, on wall of farm building, T M 4 7 , v.c., 25, GP, 1994. Not a c o m m o n fern in Suffolk. Perhaps the largest colony grows on the brickwork o f t h e old Station platform at Cläre Country Park, with other ferns F W S 1993. Ranunculus arvensis L., C o m Buttercup. Elmsett, large population in arable field, T M 0 4 , v.c. 25, PGL. 1994. This cornfield weed was once frequent, but is now very scarce. Most recent records have been of Single plants. Ranunculus ficaria L. ssp. bulbilifer Lambinon, a variety of Lesser Celandine. This is the variety of Lesser Celandine which bears bulbils in the axils of its leaves. It usually grows in shady places and being smaller than the typical form, can soon become hidden under taller Vegetation. It is probably c o m m o n e r than our records suggest. Recent records include: (i) Barnardiston, Cowlinge and elsewhere in TL75, v.c. 26, RA, 1987. (ii) Hascot Hill area, T M 0 5 , v.c. 25, RA, 28/4/1987. (iii) Barking, by shady track leading to Church, T M 0 5 , v.c. 25, T T during S.N.S. Field Meeting, 23/4/1994. (iv) Sotherton, garden weed, T M 4 7 , v.c. 25, GP, 1994. (v) Southwold, again a garden weed, T M 5 7 , v.c. 25, PGL, 1994. Soleirolia soleirolii (Req.) Dandy, Mind-your-own-Business. C o m m o n l y found colonising, in great quantity, damp, old walls, garden paths and brickwork generally. Under-recorded in Simpson's Flora. Post-Flora records include sites in Needham Market, Mariesford, Woodbridge, Aldeburgh, Thorpeness, Barnby and Lowestoft. Recorders: TA, M D C , E M H , JM. Only twice recorded in West Suffolk. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 31

(1995)


SOME RECENT PLANT RECORDS

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Amaranthus bouchonii Thell. Indehiscent Amaranth. (i) Barton Mills, frequent on arable set-aside, TL77, v.c. 26, EMH, August, 1994. Det. T. B. Ryves. Specimen in Ipswich Museum Herbarium. (ii) Brandon, abundant at edge of beet field, TL78, v.c. 26, EMH, 23/10/1994. Det. T. B. Ryves. First and second records for v.c. 26. Well-established in the Brantham area of East Suffolk. Stellaria neglecta Weihe, Greater Chickweed. (i) Playford, common in lane, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, May 1993. (ii) Brandeston, common along edge of road, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC, May 1993. (iii) Ufford, roadside verge, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC, May 1993. (iv) Hacheston, roadside bank, TM25, v.c. 25, GP. 1994. An overlooked species, so these records are welcome. However, wellnourished specimens of Common Chickweed can be mistaken for this species. Hypericum maculatum Crantz ssp. obtusiusculum (Tourlet) Hayek, a subspecies of Imperforate St. John's wort. Great Livermere, locally frequent in one small area, TL86, v.c. 26, EMH, 1994. Known here since 1980. This colony and the one at Beccles (Hyde & Simpson, 1988) represent the only post-Flora records. It seems likely that it has been overlooked elsewhere. Hypericum pulchrum L., Slender St. John's wort. One of our most attractive wild flowers and one which has become quite scarce. (i) Bulls Wood, Cockfield, Suffolk Wildlife Trust N. R„ TL95, v.c. 26, MH and SK, 1992. (ii) Knettishall Heath Country Park, a few plants in rough grass, TL98, v.c. 26, EMH and GC, 24/7/1992. (iii) Wherstead, Spring Wood N. R., a few plants, TM 14, v.c. 25, FWS, 6/5/1991. (iv) Reydon Wood, Suffolk Wildlife Trust N. R„ TM47, v.c. 25, FWS, 12/7/1993. (v) Mutford Great Wood, in Clearing, TM48, v.c. 25, FWS, 30/5/1994. Tilia cordata Miller, Small-leaved Lime. Martlesham Creek, four trees at eastern end of copse, TM24, V.C. 25, MDC, 2/7/1993. Not previously recorded in this area. Viola odorata L., Sweet Violet. Sweet Violets vary greatly in colour, but extreme variations are rare. The following were noted in 1993, probably descendants of garden plants. (i) Boulge Churchyard, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993, dark salmon-pink flowers, and others with white flowers and dark salmon patches. (ii) Orford, at back of car park, TM44, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993, a burgundy-red form. Hesperis matronalis L., Dame's Violet. (l) Near North Stow picnic site on roadside, one very large plant, TL87, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, 1993. (ii) Polstead, Mill Street, by R. Box, a small colony, TL93, v.c. 26, FWS, 22/5/1993. (iii) Playford, in hedge opposite houses, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 3/8/1993. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 31 (1995)


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(iv) Melton, waste ground in Woods Lane, T M 2 5 , v.c. 25, M D C , 7/6/1993. (v) Mutford, near entrance to Great Wood, T M 4 8 , v.c. 25, F W S , 30/5/1994. A well-established introduction, scattered over the County. Lepidium campestre (L.) R. Br„ Field Pepperwort. Creeting St. Mary, grassy area in former sandpits, T M 0 5 , v.c. 25 23/5/1994. A new site.

FWS

Lepidium latifolium L., Dittander. (i) Eriswell, roadside verge on A1065, TL77, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, 1994. (ii) B a m h a m , quite a colony, TL88, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, 1993. Gradually becoming more frequent in West Suffolk, usually beside main roads. A nationally Scarce Plant, but frequent along parts of the Suffolk coast. Erucastrum gallicum (Willd.) O. Schulz, Hairy Rocket. Martlesham, field east of Porter's Wood, T M 2 4 , M D C , 6/7/1993. An established alien, still frequent by tracks and field entrances in the Breckland, but this is the first East Suffolk record since the publication of Simpson's Flora. Umbilicus rupestris (Salisb.) Dandy, Navelwort. Newbourn Springs, Suffolk Wildlife Trust N. R„ at base of wall of information centre, T M 2 4 , v.c. 25, JGR, June 1993. Also July 1993 ( M D C ) . Very rare in Suffolk, with only a handful of records. Sanguisorba minor Scop. ssp. muricata (Gremli) Briq., Fodder Burnet. Bury St. Edmunds, Single plant behind lay-by on A I 4 , T L 8 6 , v.c. 26 M D C 1993. Formerly grown for fodder, it became for a while widely naturalised in grassy places, but is now rarely seen in Suffolk. Lotus glaber Miller, Narrow-leaved Bird's-foot Trefoil. (L. tenuis Waldst. & Kit. ex Willd.). Rattlesden aerodrome (parish of Felsham), on old b o m b d u m p , TL95, v.c. 26, JCW, July 1994. Several other specimens nearby. Rarely seen in inland Suffolk, though frequent on the coast. It is suggested (FWS) that the plants may have been brought here in shingle excavated from Shingle Street during the construction of the airfield in the last war. Lathyrus latifolius L., Broad-Ieaved Everlasting Pea. Red Lodge, Icknield Way, an uncommon pale pink-flowered form, T L 6 6 v c 26, FWS. 23/7/1994. White-flowered plants are occasionally seen. Trifolium squamosum L„ Sea Clover. Hollesley, one patch between sea wall and drainage Channel, T M 3 4 v c 25 A M , 16/7/1994. A most interesting find. Last year we reported the first sighting of this plant since 1978 by Mr. D. C. Wood (Hyde & Simpson, 1994). Another record so soon afterwards in the same 10km Square is remarkable. This is a nationally Scarce Plant. Trifolium subterraneum L„ Subterranean Clover. Below are two records from 10km. squares in which this plant has not previously been recorded. It is still fairly frequent in coastal areas. There are no known post-Flora records from West Suffolk. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 31

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(i) Creeting St. Mary, former sandpits, TM05 v.c. 25, FWS, 23/5/1994. (ii) Melton, on river wall, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. Geranium pratense L., Meadow Cranesbill. (i) Bentley, beside A137, TM13, v.c. 25, CJH, 21/6/1994. (ii) Grundisburgh, on verge at road junction, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC, 4/8/1993. Possibly a native species in Suffolk, but more often of garden origin. Scandix pecten-veneris L., Shepherd's Needle. (i) Offton, strip at edge of arable field, TM04, v.c. 26, EMH and FWS, 25/5/1994. (ii) Shadingfield, edge of arable field, TM48, v.c. 25, FWS, 30/5/1994. Two more sites where this plant has regained a perhaps temporary foothold. 1t is a nationally Scarce Plant. Pimpinella major (L.) Huds., Greater Burnet Saxifrage. (i) South of Bacton, in ditch by track, TM06, v.c. 26, RA, 9/9/1991. Also west of Mendlesham, TM06, v.c. 25, RA, 29/7/1991. (ii) Sotterley, verges of ancient track, TM48, v.c. 25, FWS, 30/5/1994. These are new sites discovered since our last report on this uncommon Suffolk species (Hyde & Simpson, 1988). Oenanthe fluviatilis (Bab.) Coleman, River Water Dropwort. In a few stretches of the R. Deben, TM25, and TM26, v.c. 25, DC, 1994. Now very rare in Suffolk. Formerly known in the R. Gipping and the R. Waveney and its tributaries. Peucedanum ofĂ&#x;cinale L., Hog's Fennel. Southwold, in a reed bed, TM47, v.c. 25, M. A. R. and C. Kitchen, 4/11/1994. The find of the year! See separate note. Myosotis laxa Lehm. ssp. caespitosa (Schultz) N. Hylander ex Nordh., Tufted Forget-me-not. (i) Ufford, beside R. Deben, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC. 5/7/1993. (ii) Beside Butley River, TM35, v.c. 25, MDC, 5/7/1993. (iii) Oulton Marshes, Suffolk Wildlife Trust N. R„ TM59, v.c. 25, MH, 1992. Appears to be more frequent than thought at the time of the publication of the Flora. Stachys officinalis L., Betony. Polstead, TL93, v.c. 26, RK, 1992. Rediscovery of a site known in the 1930s (FWS). Betony has become very scarce in the County. Nepeta cataria L., Catmint. (i) Near Newmarket, verge of A14, TL66, v.c. 26, MDC, 1993. (ii) Worlington, disused pit, TL77, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, 1992. This represents an increase from about 10 plants in 1980 and 1989 (EMH) to an estimated 300 by Mr. and Mrs. Leonard. (iii) Eriswell, several colonies, one on a Protected Roadside Verge, TL77, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, between 1992 and 1994. Also, FWS, 1994, one very large colony. Glechoma hederacea L., Ground Ivy, pink-flowered variant. Knettishall Heath Country Park, small patch with attractive pink flowers among others of the usual purple hue, TL98, v.c. 26, GC with EMH, 20/5/1992. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 31 (1995)


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Rarely seen. T h e r e are only t w o records in S i m p s o n ' s Flora. Verbascum thapsus L. x V. pulverulentum Villars, Great M u l l e i n x Hoary Mullein. (V. x godronii Boreau). H i g h a m , on A I 4 , on north side of slip-road, three plants in large colony of Hoary Mullein, T L 7 6 , v.c. 26, M D C , 1993. A notable find. This hybrid has occurred in a f e w places in the south of England (Stace, 1991). First record for v.c. 26 and for S u f f o l k . Verbascum Mullein.

nigrum

L. x V. pulverulentum

Villars, Dark M u l l e i n x Hoary

(V. x mixtum R a m o n d ex DC.) fi) West of B a r r o w j u n c t i o n on north verge of A I 4 , a Single plant with both parents, T L 7 6 , v.c. 26, M D C , 1993. This site is further w e s t on the A 1 4 than an earlier record f r o m Barrow in 1980 ( F W S ) . (ii) Woodbridge, spoil heap at Notcutt's Nurseries, T M 2 4 , v.c. 25, M D C , 4/7/1993. T w o plants in total absence of either parent, and not see'n at this site previously. First record for v.c. 25, East S u f f o l k . Mimulus guttatus DC., M o n k e y Flower. Nacton, Lady Wood, three colonies on banks of pond, T M 2 4 v c 25 F W S 13/9/1994. ' An established introduction which has b e c o m e scarce. Galium palustre Bedstraw.

L. ssp. elongatum

(C. Presl) Arcang., a subspecies of M a r s h

T h o r i n g t o n , at side of dyke, T M 4 7 , v.c. 25, GP, 1994. While this subpsecies is frequent in the North-east of the C o u n t y in fens, d y k e s and open carr, its distribution outside that area is not k n o w n . (Ssp. palustre is the generally c o m m o n taxon in most of Suffolk). Utricularia australis R. Br., Bladderwort. In acidic lake, Hopton and L o u n d , and also flowering on the slimy m u d left after the lake waters receded, T G 5 0 , v.c. 25, M H , 1994. Large c l u m p s also a m o n g giant tussocks of Juncus effusus L., S o f t Rush. A very interesting discovery. T h e r e are no other recent records of this plant. Its distribution in the C o u n t y is u n k n o w n , o w i n g to c o n f u s i o n with other Bladderworts. Filago lutescens Jordan, Red-tipped C u d w e e d . Hollesley, five plants at edge of arable set-aside, T M 3 4 , v.c. 25, E M H . 12/7/1994. Filago vulgaris Lam., C o m m o n C u d w e e d , present in the s a m e Held" Five extant colonies are now k n o w n in the County, all in East S u f f o l k , but there may well be others. It is worth looking carefully at any fields or heathland where there are large n u m b e r s of C o m m o n C u d w e e d plants, as the two species tend to g r o w together. Both are annuals. This a rare plant in Britain, protected under S c h e d u l e 8 of the Wildlife and C o u n t r y s i d e Act, 1981. Gnaphalium sylvaticum L „ Heath C u d w e e d . (i) Tunstall, by path where trees had been felled, T M 3 5 v c 25 A M 17/7/1994. ' (ii) D u n w i c h , frequent in grassy rides, T M 4 7 , v.c. 25, F W S , 11/9/1994. A n o t h e r rare Suffolk plant. This species was included in the Scarce Plants in Britain project 1 9 9 1 - 2 (Hyde, 1993), as it w a s then thought to o c c u r in f e w e r

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than 100 10km. squares. Fortunately this proved incorrect, the total being 290 such squares. Silvbum marianum (L.) Gaertner, Milk Thistle. Culpho, among derelict farm buildings, TM24, v.c. 25, RP, 13/11/1994. Det. R. Addington. Also at back of field, at the same site, MDC. A naturalised introduction, becoming perhaps less frequent. In 1993 and 1994 I (FWS) found a few seedlings in Playford Lane, Rushmere. One was allowed to flower. No seedlings observed this year. A man at the site told me that the seeds had been brought back from Guernsey. Stratiotes aloides L., Water Soldier. Thorington/Wenhaston boundary, abundant in dyke across marshland, TM47, v.c. 25, DC., June 1994. Not previously recorded in this area. Occasionally, as here, abundant, but in general an uncommon plant in Suffolk. Groenlandia densa (L.) Fourr., Opposite-leaved Pondweed. (i) Flempton, in pond on golf course, TL87, v.c. 26, HC, July 1994. Seen here c. 1980, but not in the intervening period. (ii) Shipmeadow, in dyke, TM39, v.c. 25. CDP and NFS, 12/8/1989. This species seems to be decreasing in Suffolk. Eriophorum angustifolium Honck., Common Cotton-grass. (i) Ilketshall St. John, wet corner of pasture, TM38, v.c. 25, DC. 1994. (ii) Bulcamp, wet meadow, TM47, v.c. 25, DC, 1994. Now a rare species in Suffolk. Carex echinata Murray, Star Sedge. Hopton, wet acid meadow, TG50, v.c. 25, MH, 1994. Growing here with Carex ovalis Gooden., Oval Sedge, C. panicea L., Carnation Sedge and other sedges. Never a common sedge in Suffolk and now hard to find. Puccinellia distans (Jacq.) Pari., Reflexed Saltmarsh-grass. Near Newmarket (TL66) and Kentford (TL76), v.c. 26, on the verge of the AI4, MDC, 1993. Second and third inland records for a plant normally associated with saline habitats. Like Cochlearia danica L., Danish Scurvygrass, it is colonising verges of salted roads, though its progress in Suffolk is much slower than that of Cochlearia. Catapodium rigidum (L.) C. E. Hubbard ssp. majus (C. Presl) Perring & Seil, a Fern Grass. (i) Southwold , foot of wall near St. Edmund's Church, TM57, v.c. 25, PJOT, 22/6/1994. Second Suffolk record. Hb. PJOT. (ii) Woolverstone, a frequent, persistent garden weed, TM 13, v.c. 25, EMH, 1994. Conf. PJOT. Recorded under the above name by Mr Trist. It appears under the name var. majus (C. Presl) Lainz, in Stace's Flora, 1991. X Calammophila baltica (Fluegge ex Schräder) Brand, Wood Small-reed x Marram. Also known as Purple Marram. (Calamagrostis epigejos (L.) Roth x Ammophila arenaria (L.) Link) (i) Dunes near south bank of the mouth of R. Blyth, Walberswick, TM57, v.c. 25, PJOT, 20/6/1994. Hb. PJOT. Confirms its continued existence after an earlier record (Rihan and Gray, 1991). (ii) S. of Minsmere Cliffs, at rear of beach, TM46, v.c. 25, PJOT, 18/8/1992. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 31 (1995)


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Localised site for T M 4 6 . Hb. PJOT. A rare coastal grass. Its native distribution in S u f f o l k has b e c o m e distorted by introductions. F o l l o w i n g the 1953 floods, M a r r a m w a s brought f r o m N o r f o l k to strengthen dunes, and with it c a m e this hybrid. Bromus racemosus L., S m o o t h B r o m e . (i) Clopton, corner of road and war-time track, east of S n i p e Farm L a n e T M 2 5 , v.c. 25, RA, 17/6/1994. Det. R A . C o n f . PJOT. (ii) Dallinghoo, field-divide, grassy footpath, south of P o u n d Lane, T M 2 5 v.c. 25, RA, 31/5/1994. C o n f . F W S . (iii) Shadingfield, field path, T M 4 8 , v.c. 25, F W S , 30/5/1994. T h e s e records are the first since 1981.

Danthonia decumbens (L.) DC., Heath-grass. (Sieglingia decumbens (L.) Bernh.) (i) (ii) (iii) This

Wortham Ling, T M 0 7 , v.c. 25, AC, 1 9 8 9 - 1 9 9 1 . Stuston C o m m o n , T M 1 7 , v.c. 25, SH, 1991. Hopton, large colony on wet, acid meadow, T G 5 0 , v.c. 25, M H , 1994. species has b e c o m e scarce in the County.

Aceras anthropophorum (L.) Aiton f., Man Orchid. Nedging, thirty-five flowering s p e c i m e n s on grassy verge, w h e r e first seen in 1931, F W S , 25/5/1994.

Bird-seed aliens, casuals and escapes Papaver allanticum (Ball) Cosson, Atlas Poppy. (i) Moulton, on flint churchyard wall, T L 6 6 , v.c. 26, E M H , 10/6/1989. (ii) Woodbridge, established in Beaconsfield Rd., T M 2 4 , v c 25 M D C 10/5/1993. (iii) Felixstowe Ferry, on sandy section of sea wall, T M 3 3 , v.c. 25, M D C 30/4/1993. (iv) Westleton, roadside verge on the road to Middleton, T M 4 6 , v.c. 25 E M H 17/8/1992. Of garden origin. N o w less frequently recorded than about ten years ago. Native of N. Africa. Disphyma

crassifolium

(L.) L. Bolus, Purple Dew-plant.

(Mesembryanthemum crassifolium L.) Felixstowe, large colony well-established on cliffs north of C o b b o l d Point, T M 3 3 , v.c. 25, M D C , 1993. ' P r e s u m a b l y present for m a n y y e a r s ' ( M D C ) . A trailing succulent, a s s u m e d to h a v e established itself f r o m plants in cliff-top gardens. 1t is a native of S. Africa. First S u f f o l k record.

Ceratostigma plumbaginoides Bunge. Woodbridge, on brick wall. T M 2 4 , v.c. 25, M D C . 1993. Well-established and thriving, despite many attempts by the occupants to eradicate it. This is a d e e p blue-flowered shrub frequently g r o w n in gardens. First S u f f o l k record.

Reseda alba L., White Mignonette. Ipswich, Single plant g r o w i n g f r o m base of wall in St. G e o r g e ' s St., T M 14, v.c. 25, M D C , 1993. A casual of garden origin. T h e 1979 Ipswich record in S i m p s o n ' s Flora refers to a plant in High St.. where it w a s g r o w i n g near a wall o p p o site the public house. T h e s e two sites are not far apart. Could seed h a v e been

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SOME RECENT PLANT RECORDS

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transported by some means from one to the other? Reseda odorata L., Garden Mignonette. Barton Mills, in long grass alongside disused road, TL77, v.c. 26, EMH, May 1994. Of garden origin, but not near one in this case. Not previously recorded in Suffolk. Cyclamen hederifolium Aiton, Cyclamen. Rushmere Common, two specimens by gorse bushes beyond the houses, TM 14, v.c. 25, FWS, 5/4/1994. Likely to be of garden origin, but such plants are able to persist in the wild. Sedum spectabile Boreau, Butterfly Stonecrop. Shingle Street, on grassy Strip between houses and beach, TM34, v.c. 25, MDC, 27/4/1993. The familiar pink-flowered perennial often grown in gardens to attract butterflies. Can persist in the wild where there is little competition. Tellima grandiflora (Pursh) Douglas ex Lindley, Fringe-cups. Blyford Wood, TM47, v.c. 25, GP, 1994. A relic of cultivation known here for many years. Second Suffolk record. Spiraea x pseudosalicifolia Silverside, a Bridewort. Maidscross Hill, Lakenheath, large bush in one of the hollows, TL78, v.c. 26, JR, July 1994. This bush, or another one, has been noted by serveral recorders since about 1987, but this is the first time that its identity has been pursued. Taken to B.S.B.I. Exhibition Meeting in November 1994 and generally agreed to be this. First record for v.c. 26, West Suffolk. Alchemilla mollis (Buser) Rothm., a cultivated Lady's Mantle. (i) Great Whelnetham, railway walk, TL85, v.c. 26, FWS, 28/5/1994, during INHS field meeting. This species is naturalised throughout Britain in suitable places. First record for v,.c. 26, West Suffolk. (ii) Stradbroke Cemetery, a couple of young plants in grass, spreading from large plant on grave, TM27, v.c. 25, INHS, 15/5/1994, during field meeting. Myrtus communis L. ssp. tarentina (L.) Arcangeli, a garden Myrtle. Bawdsey, Single plant surviving on concrete section of cliffs, TM33, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. Many interesting and unusual shrubs and herbaceous species were planted many years ago in the Bawdsey Manor grounds, and some have survived. This Myrtle is a variety with very small leaves. Det. MDC. First Suffolk record. Rhus hirta (L.) Sudworth, Stag's-horn Sumach. (i) Near Mildenhall, in an otherwise natural hedge, not near houses, TL67, v.c. 26, EMH, 6/7/1994. Det. E. J. Clement. First record for v.c. 26. (ii) Martlesham, roadside verge, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. Possibly planted, but suckering freely. Also, Brightwell Tip, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 7/6/1993. Polemonium caeruleum L., Jacob's ladder. Dallinghoo Gull, two plants on top of separate piles of builders' rubble, in pit, TM25, v.c. 25, RA, 24/5/1994. The rubble had been there for some years. Specimen in Ipswich Museum Herbarium.

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Orobanche hederae Duby, Ivy Broomrape. Letheringham Mill, a dozen post-mature spikes seen, TM25, v.c. 25 RA 31/8/1993. Known to have been introduced here. Native in some parts of Britain. Petasites japonicus (Siebold & Zucc.) Maxim., Giant Butterbur. Little Bealings, south bank of R. Fynn, on east side of road, TM24, v c 25 MDC, 1993. Few Suffolk records. Introduced and naturalised throughout Britain. Flowers cream-coloured. Echinochloa crusgalli (L.) Beauv., Cockspur Grass. (i) Ipswich Docks, TM 14, v.c. 25, GP, 1994. (ii) Woodbridge, many plants in field east of Porter's Wood, TM24, v c 25 MDC, 1993. A casual associated with bird-seed, wool and soya-bean waste, which appears from time to time in the County. Most of the entries which follow have been compiled and annotated by Francis Simpson, mainly from M. D. Crewe's records of species in the U l y and Iris families. Fritillaria imperiales L., Crown Imperial. (i) Woodbridge, single plant on soil heap at edge of nursery land, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. This heap had been left undisturbed for at least four years. (ii) Butley Mills, beside road where garden refuse had been dumped in previous years, TM35, v.c. 25, MDC, 18/4/1993. (iii) Thorpeness, on waste heap between road and Meare, TM45 v c 25 MDC, 1993. ' ' On April 24th 1984 a small group of flowering Crown Imperiais were seen on the outskirts of Sudbury in a spinney behind the roadside hedge (FWS). These appeared to be a long-established colony, probably from a garden throw-out. Tulipa gesneriana L., Garden Tulip. (i) H e r r i n g s w e l l , flowering EMH, 1993 and 1994.

in w o o d l a n d strip a l o n g s i d e road, T L 7 6 v c

(ii) Rushmere Common, several sites near houses, TM 14/24 v c 25 April 1994. (iii) Brightwell Tip, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 27/4/1993. (iv) Felixstowe Ferry, on rough ground near houses, TM33, v c 25 30/4/1993. (v) Shingle Street, in rough grass by houses, TM34, v c 25 27/4/1993. A frequent garden throw-out. Various varieties, not always flowering wild.

26

FWS

MDC MDC in the

Tulipa greigii Regel. (i) Rushmere Common, single flowering specimen, TM 14 v c 25 FWS April 1994. (ii) Brightwell Tip, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 27/4/1993. A small-flowered, scarlet, yellow and black species, often with spotted leaves. Native of Asia. First Suffolk records.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 31 (1995)


SOME RECENT PLANT RECORDS

35

Convallaria majalis L., Lily-of-the-valley. (i) Ipswich, small colony established from seed, bank of ancient footpath, Rushmere Road, TM 14, v.c. 25, FWS, May 1994. (ii) Aldeburgh, growing from cracks in pavement. Aide Road, TM45, v.c. 25, MDC, 8/5/1993. These records refer to the larger-flowered cultivated variety. Polygonatum multiflorum (L.) All., Solomon's Seal. Playford, beside stream, Spring Pond Wood, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 5/5/1993. Origin uncertain, perhaps bird-sown. The fruits, rarely produced in any quantity, are very attractive to birds. Scilla siberica Haw., Siberian Squill. (i) Rushmere Common, from garden throw-out, TM 14, v.c. 25, FWS, April 1994. (ii) Little Bealings and Martlesham Churchyards, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. (iii) Hasketon and Burgh Churchyards, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. Puschkinia scilloides Adams, Striped Squill. Martlesham Churchyard, small colony, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. Native of Asia Minor. Second Suffolk record. Hyacinthus orientalis L., Hyacinth. (i) Woodbridge, verge opposite houses on Sandy Lane and on a soil heap at edge of Notcutt's Nurseries, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. (ii) Hasketon and Burgh Churchyards, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. (iii) Thorpeness, garden throw-out in dune area near car park, TM45, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. The much cultivated hyacinth, native in eastern Mediterranean. Usually a garden throw-out, persisting, but flowers becoming poor due to reduction in size of bulbs in poor soils, Not recorded in Flora. Chionodoxa forbesii Baker, Glory-of-the-snow. (i) Rushmere Common, small established colony from garden throw-out, TM 14, v.c. 25, FWS. 1994. (ii) Woodbridge, on soil heap at edge of Notcutt's Nurseries, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. (iii) Ufford and Martlesham Churchyards, also Boulge, in long grass beside track, TM25, v.c. 25. MDC, 1993. Native in Turkey and Crete. Allium triquetrum L., Three-cornered Garlic. Bawdsey, beside old gun emplacement, East Lane, TM34, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. Likely of garden origin. Native in western Mediterranean. Tristagma uniflorum (Lindley) Traub, Spring Starflower. (Ipheion uniflorum (Lindley) Raf.) (i) Rushmere Common, three colonies established from garden throw-outs, TM 14, v.c. 25, FWS, 1994. (ii) Woodbridge, spreading and becoming established from original plantings in Doric Place, also on soil heap at edge of Notcutt's Nurseries and at Broomheath, Single plant on east side of road, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 31 (1995)


36

Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 31

(iii) Little Bealings, naturalised and increased on bank by houses, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 1994. A native of Argentina and Uruguay. Leucojum aestivum L. ssp. pulchellum (Salisb.) Brig., Summer Snowflake. (i) Foxhall, large clump beside footpath across Tip, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC. 28/4/1993. (ii) Burgh Churchyard, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. (iii) Campsey Ash, on edge of scrub on east side of railway opposite Station, TM35, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. This frequent garden species still occurs in the shrubbery at Woolverstone on the banks of the R. Orwell, where it was probably planted in the last Century. Well-established at Rosehill, Farnham, the property of the Suffolk Naturalists' Society. Galanthus plicatus M. Bieb., Crimean Snowdrop. Little Bealings and Martlesham Churchyards, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. Very few of this species grow in Little Bealings Churchyard. The Snowdrops there are mainly G. nivalis L., Single and double-flowered forms, and its variable hybrids G. nivalis x G. plicatus. G. nivalis is the first to flower and bears smaller flowers than G. plicatus and the hybrids, which are strong growers. Good colonies of the species and hybrids can be observed in the grounds and surrounds of the Grove, Little Bealings, where first recorded in 1947. Narcissus poeticus L. group, Pheasant's-eye Daffodil. (i) Woodbridge, established colony Warren Hill Wood, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC. 1993. (ii) Bromeswell, established on nature reserve, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC. 26/4/1993. (iii) Rushmere Common, established garden throw-outs, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 1994. (iv) Culpho, small colony long established by footpath, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 1994. (v) Shingle Street, Hollesley, in rough grass by houses, TM34, v.c. 25, MDC, 27/4/1993. Native of pastures in central and southern Europe. Many of the garden throwouts are N. poeticus 'Ackaea'. Narcissus x incomparabilis Miller sensu lato, Nonesuch Daffodil. Bromeswell, two clumps on nature reserve, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC, 26/4/1993. A hybrid between N. pseudonarcissus L. and N. poeticus. Both parents were observed at Bromeswell. This hybrid is frequent and persistent in old gardens or their sites. Many named varieties of Daffodil and Narcissi occur in the County as garden throw-outs on waste ground, commons, ditches and other suitable sites. They have also been planted for their amenity value. Iris germanica L. group, Flag Irises. (i) Rushmere Common, garden throw-out. TM 14, v.c. 25, FWS, 1994. (ii) Shingle Street, Hollesley, in rough grass by houses, TM34, v.c. 25, MDC. 27/4/1993. /. germanica and hybrid bearded irises occur, usually as garden throw-outs, on

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 31 (1995)


SOME RECENT PLANT RECORDS

37

rubbish heaps, commons and other habitats. They persist if left undisturbed, although rarely flowering. Iris x hollandica hört., Dutch Iris. (i) Great Whelnetham, Single specimen, edge of old railway track, TL85, v.c. 26, FWS. 28/5/1994. (ii) Brightwell, on south edge of tip, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 27/4/1993. (iii) Aldeburgh, on south-east corner of clay pit, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC. 1993. Iris pallida Lam., Bearded Iris. Martlesham, established plant on edge of field. Perhaps from nearby nursery, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. The species is native in southern Tyrol. Crocus vernus (L.) Hill, Spring Crocus. (i) Rushmere Common, scattered specimens from garden throw-outs, TM 14, v.c. 25, FWS, 1994. (ii) Martlesham, abundant in churchyard, TM24, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. (iii) Hasketon, a few plants in churchyard, TM25, v.c. 25, MDC, 1993. Various species and varieties of Crocus are found as garden throw-outs. Key to contributors: Abrehart, T. Addington, Rev. R. Casey, Mrs. D. Cawston, Miss H. Copping, A. Crewe, M. D. Crompton, Mrs. G. Harding, M. Hawes, C. J. Hooton, Mrs. S. Hyde, Mrs. E. M. Ipswich and District Natural History Society Kilshaw, R. Kitchen, Mrs. C.

TA RA DC HC AC MDC GC MH CJH SH EMH INHS RK CK

Kitchen, M. A. R. Lawson, P. G. Leonard, D. J. Leonard, Mrs. Y. J. Morgan, Mrs. A. Muddeman, J. Peck, G. Preston, C. D. Pryke, R. Rathmell, Dr. J. Ryland, Mrs. J. G. Simpson, F. W. Stewart, N. F. Tarpey, Mrs. T. Trist, P. J. O. Wakerley, J. C.

MARK PGL DJ L YJL AM JM GP CDP RP JR JGR FWS NFS TT PJOT JCW

References Hind, W. M. (1889), Flora of Suffolk. London. Hyde, E. M. (1993). The Scarce Plants Project, 1991-2. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc., 29: 45. Hyde, E. M. & Simpson, F. W. (1988). Some recent Suffolk plant records. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc., 24: 59. Hyde, E. M. & Simpson, F. W. (1994). Some recent Suffolk plant records. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc., 30: 32. Kern, D. H. (1992). List of vascular plants of the British lsles. Botanical Society of the British lsles, London. Rihan, J. R. & Gray, A. J. (1991). The distribution of hybrid Marram Grass, X Calammophila baltica (Flügge) Brand, in the British lsles. Watsonia 18: 369. Simpson, F. W. (1982). Simpsons Flora of Suffolk. Ipswich. Suffolk NaturaTrans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 31 (1995)


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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 31

lists' Society. Stace, C. A. (1991). New Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge. E. M. Hyde, Parkside, Woolverstone, Ipswich IP9 1 AR

F. W. Simpson, 40 Ruskin Road, Ipswich IP4 IPT

More orchids from seed George Maybury (see T.S.N.S. 28 p.60) is not the only person to be lucky enough to have orchids growing in his lawn. A correspondent from Bradfield Combust, near Bury St. Edmunds, described his 'lawn' to me a few years ago and in June 1994 I visited him to admire a superb wild flower meadow which had grown up over a 10 year period. The owner had re-seeded the site about 10 years ago and added a few Cowslips and Ox-eye Daisies. These increased greatly, aided by a beneficial mowing regime and a nice chalk soil. After about three years, Bee Orchids (Ophrys apifera) and a few Pyramidais (Anacamptis pyramidalis) appeared spontaneously (they had probably arisen from wind-blown seed when the site was bare earth). In a damp corner Common Spotted Orchid (Dactylorhiza fuchsii) and Twayblades (Listera ovata) started to increase and, as the mowing was decreased to one cut per year, the whole lawn became an attractive flower meadow. Four years ago the owner visited the south of France and brought back seed pods of two more orchids; a tongue orchid (Serapias) and the Giant Orchid (Barlia robertiana) - a species that looks like a robust cross between an Early Purple and a Lizard Orchid! The pods were split open and the dust-like seed blown over the lawn. Two years later plants of both species appeared and in 1993 fiowers were produced. In 1994 there were about 25 spikes of the Serapias (the species is S. vomeracea I think) and one spike of the spectacular Barlia. Both species have set some seed and the owner thinks the Serapias will increase from 'home-grown' seed. The grassy bank where the tongue orchids grow is very sheltered and south-facing with a well-drained, highly chalky soil which also supports Yeilow-wort (Blackstonia perfoliata) and Common Centuary (Centaurium erythraea). In 1993 a Single plant of Man Orchid (Ateras unthropophorum) appeared in another part of the lawn, probably from windblown seed and in 1994 the owner has added a plant of Southern Marsh Orchid {Dactylorhiza praetermissa) from a garden source. This makes a total of eight different orchid species on the site. Martin Sanford

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 31 (1995)


'S g c ra co 2

5 Plate 9: Corn Buttercup, Ranunculus arvensis L.. this cornfield weed was once frequent, but is now very scarce. (p. 26).


Plate 15: Giant Orchid. Barlia robertiana (Loisel.) W. Greuter. an introduced species from the south of France, (p. 38).


Plate 16: Tongue Orchid. Serapias sp.. an introduced species from the south of France, (p. 38).

Some recent Suffolk plant records  

Hyde, E. M. & Simpson, F. W.

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