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S O M E RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS C O M P I L E D B Y E . M . H Y D E A N D F. W . S I M P S O N For each record the following information is given: locality and habitat, Ordnance Survey 10km Square, vice-county, finder's name or initials (see key at end of article) and date of record. The comments are those of the Compilers, based in some cases on information supplied by the Anders. Nomenclature and order of species are those of D. H. Kent's ListofVascular Plants ofthe British Isles, 1992, and the New Flora of the British Isles, 1991, by Professor C. A. Stace. Simpson's Flora of Suffolk is used as the authority for claiming first or second County records, supplemented by the large number of records received since its publication. The Compilers wish to thank the specialists who determined or confirmed the identity of specimens, especially Mr. E. J. Clement, who has for many years generously given us the benefit of his time and extensive knowledge. Thanks are also due to those who supplied records for this list and for the Scarce Plants project and to Mr. C. D. Preston for many records from coastal sites and aquatic habitats. TM25 is the Square which the Rev. R. Addington is now surveying; we look forward to some interesting records. A separate note describes the Scarce Plants Project. In the list which follows, Suffolk plants in this category are indicated.

I Native and established introductions Chara vulgaris L. var. contraria (A. Braun ex KĂźtz.) J. A. Moore, a Stonewort. Hawkedon, fishing lake, TL75, v.c. 26, HC, Sept. 1991. Det. J. A. Moore, July 1992, who commented that this var. is fairly common. It is clearly overlooked in Suffolk, as this is the first confirmed record for many years. It was thought to be extinct. Botrychium lunaria (L.) Sw., Moonwort. B a m h a m , on Protected Verge, TL87, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, 1992. A new site for a rare Suffolk species. Formerly on the Rex Graham N . R . , but not seen since 1989 (DJL and YJL). Thelypteris palustris Schott, Marsh Fern. Oulton Marshes, Suffolk Wildlife Trust N.R., TM59, v.c. 25, M H , 1992. In several of the marshes, growing in tall herb fen with reed and Greater Tussock Sedge, Carexpaniculata L. Also on Camps Heath N . R . in damp foot drain, MH and DC, 1992. A nationally Scarce Plant. Azolla filiculoides Lam., Water Fern. (i) Mill Stream, near Foxhall Stadium, TM24, v.c. 25, PLF, 19/8/1991. A new site in the Ipswich area.

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Between Southwoldand Reydon, in ditchN. of B u s s C r e e k , T M 5 7 , v.c. 25, C D P and NFS, 12/8/1989. Still far more frequent near the coast than in the west of the County. Ceratophyllum submersum L., Spineless Hornwort. (i) Ipswich, frequent in R. Gipping between Riverside Rd. and Handford Rd. Bridge, TM14, v.c. 25, E M H , Sept. 1991. (ii) Between Aldeburgh and Thorpeness, many fruiting plants in ditch, TM45, v.c. 25, C D P and SEY, August 1992. Det. CDP. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium. (iii) Southwold, abundant in ditches in Buss Creek marshes and on golf course, TM47, v.c. 25, CDP, 30/8/1992. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium. Seen here also in 1989 (PGL). Usually considered to be much less frequent than C. demersum L., Spined Hornwort; these records suggest it may have been overlooked. A nationally Scarce Plant. Ranunculus bulbosus L., Bulbous Buttercup, double-flowered form. Metfield, Winks Meadow, Suffolk Wildlife Trust N . R . , TM37, v.c. 25, FWS, 17/5/1992. A rare form. Recorded in Hind's Flora from Nowton. No other known Suffolk records. Ranunculus baudotii Godr., Brackish Water Crowfoot. (i) Hollesley, frequent in brackish dykes, TM34, v.c. 25, FWS, 1991. (ii) Southwold and Reydon, TM57, v.c. 25, JM1, 24/5/1992. Conf. PGL. The above records are the most recent ones. Recorded in 1984 from Leiston, near Sizewell B, TM46, v.c. 25, IMV and from Orford, in ditch by embankment, TM44, v.c. 25, FWS. Det. N. Holmes, Hb. E & M H . An uncommon plant in Suffolk and a nationally Scarce Plant. Rumex crispus L. ssp. littoreus (J. Hardy) Akeroyd x R. pulcher L. (R. x pseudopulcher Hausskn.), Curled Dock (a shingle subspecies) x Fiddle Dock. Aldeburgh, on sea front, TM45, v.c. 25, G K , 1/9/1991. Conf. J. A. Akeroyd. Specimen in Ipswich Museum Herbarium. A very interesting record, especially as we have so few Suffolk records of hybrid Docks. First Suffolk record. This counts as the first County record, but a specimen of this same hybrid was seen in the same place,on stable shingle,by Dr. J. A. Akeroyd a n d C . D. Preston in Sept. 1976, an unpublished record. Rumex crispus L. x R. obtusifolius L. Curled Dock x Broad-leaved Dock. (R. x pratensis Mert. & Koch) (i) Laxfield, Grove Farm, two plants, TM37, v.c. 25, G K , 31/8/1991. (ii) Carlton Colville, Suffolk Wildlife Trust N . R . , several plants, TM59, v.c. 25, G K , 2/9/1992. Almost certainly under-recorded. Few Suffolk records.

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Rumex palustris Sm., Marsh Dock. Otley, 3 or 4 plants in gravel at entrance to newly-built house, TM25, v.c. 25, R A , 7/10/1992. Conf. E M H . Possibly introduced with the gravel. Uncommon in the County, and a nationally Scarce Plant. Malva moschata L., Musk Mallow. Variety with white flowers. White-flowered forms seem to be occurring more frequently than formerly. Recent records include: (i) Stoke-by-Clare churchyard, several plants, TL74, v.c. 26, E M H , 25/7/1989. (ii) Chedburgh, Tan Office Green, one large plant, TL75, v.c. 26, R A , 21/7/1988. (iii) Four sites in TM05; Hitcham, roadside, v.c. 26, JH, 1987; Gt. Finborough churchyard, v.c. 26, E M H , 1988; Buxhall, near Church, v.c. 26, J H and O O D S , 1988; Tarston Farm, v.c. 25, JV, 1992. (iv) Wortham Ling, TM07, v.c. 25, B.S.B.I. Field Meeting, 13/7/1991. (v) Ipswich, near Asda Store, TM14, v.c. 25, PMB, July 1989. (vi) Sandy Lane, between Barham and Coddenham, TM15, v.c. 25, PLF, 2/10/1991. Drosera rotundifolia L., Round-leaved Sundew. Market Weston Fen, Suffolk Wildlife Trust N . R . , a very few plants surviving on Sphagnum subnitens Russ. & Warnst., TL97, v.c. 26, M H and M A , 1991. Now extremely rare in the County. Cyclamen hederifolium Ait., Cyclamen. Playford, Single specimen on steep, wooded slope, not near dwellings, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 10/12/1992. No other introduced species in this area. Crassula helmsii (Kirk) Cockayne, New Zealand Pigmyweed. Wenhaston, in virtually dried-up pond on Blackheath, TM47, v.c. 25, PGL, 7/8/1992. O n e patch, roughly lm2, in flower. A new site in a new area. Still abundant at Barham and Needham Market. No West Suffolk records. Spreading in Britain from plants discarded from garden ponds and aquaria. Extremely difficult to eradicate. Rosa micrantha Borrer ex Sm., Small Sweetbriar. Near Mayday Farm, Brandon, on E. side of B1106on roadside verge at edge of conifer forest, TL78, v.c. 26, CDP, 24/10/1992. Det. A. L. Primavesi. This is the first post-1930 record for West Suffolk. Nor does it appear to be common in East Suffolk. Prunus serotina Ehr., Black Cherry. B a m h a m Cross Common, naturalised in scrub developing on grass heath, TL88, v.c. 26, K A B , 3/8/1992. First record for v.c. 26, and only twice recorded in East Suffolk. Comm. Mrs. G. Beckett.

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Astragalus danicus Retz., Purple Milk Vetch. Knettishall Heath Country Park, small colony in flower on chalky grassland, TL98, v.c. 26, R W D , 20/5/1992. An exciting and unexpected find. Never before recorded here, though the chalky areas are eminently suitable. The Heath is on the edge of the Breckland, where all but one of the known colonies in Suffolk are to be found. Lathyrus sylvestris L., Narrow-leaved Everlasting Pea. Thetford Warren, a good half dozen large, sprawling plants, TL88, v.c. 26, R H , 1992. Comm. Mrs. G. Crompton. A welcome rediscovery. Known here by Mr. Hobbs since 1987. It grows on the slightly higher rising ground, among low-growing gorse and broom. In flower it is a magnificent sight. Recorded in Simpson's Flora from the Warren, but thought to be extinct. It is the only known colony in the West Suffolk vice-county. It is, however, plentiful not far away, on the north side of the river in the West Norfolk vicecounty, pers. comm. Mrs. G. Beckett. Lathyrus nissolia L., Grass Vetchling. Eye, in rough grass on disused airfield, TM17, v.c. 25, TC, c.1987. Not previously recorded in the Eye district. It is an uncommon species in Suffolk away from the coast. Oenothera fallax Renner, Intermediate Evening Primrose. Landguard Common, Felixstowe, established on verge of Viewpoint Rd., TM23, v.c. 25, A C , 13/7/1992. Second record for East Suffolk. Specimen in Hb. E & MH. Viscum alburn L., Mistletoe. Hinton, on Sorbus aucuparia L., Rowan, TM47, v.c. 25, FWS, 22/3/1992. Not previously recorded in Suffolk on Rowan. Plentiful also, both male and female, on adjacent large old Crataegus monogyna Jacq., Hawthorn. Geranium versicolor L., Pencilled Cranesbill. (i) Buxhall, naturalised in rough grass near Church, TM05, v.c. 26, JH and O O D S , Sept. 1988. (ii) Earl Stonham, south of Middlewood Green beside road among nettles, TM06, v.c. 25, R A , 28/5/1990. A garden species, which can persist and spread in suitable sites for years. Scandix pecten-veneris L., Shepherd's Needle. Since our last report in 1988, new site and extensions to old ones have been found. New sites include: (i) Härtest, arable field edge, TL85, v.c. 26, YJL, 1990. (ii) Baylham and Nettlestead, TM05, v.c. 25, GP, April 1991. (iii) Haughley Green, arable field, 10 m. into crop and on verge, TM06, v.c. 26, R A , 29/4/1991. (iv) Barsham, 6 plants on verge between footpath and fence of Church

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Glebe, TM38, v.c. 25, SGS, June 1992. No arable land on either side of road here. Metfield, large colony alongside road across airfield, TM38, v.c. 25, G P , May 1992.

A nationally Scarce Plant, though increasingly frequent in Suffolk. Atropa belladonna L., Deadly Nightshade. Stanstead, in ancient woodland, TL84, v.c. 26, B W , 28/5/1992. Now rare in the County. Few recent records. Hyoscyamus niger L., H e n b a n e . A nationally Scarce Plant, which occurs from time to time near the coast and less frequently inland. Below are three recent inland records. (i) East of Long Melford, just off new by-pass on disturbed ground, TL84, v.c. 26, R W G , 28/6/1992. (ii) D a r m s d e n , large colony in field of potatoes next to Church, TM05, v.c. 25, J V , August 1992. (iii) Nacton, small colony in field of sugar beet near Highfield Barn, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, August 1991. Datura stramonium L. var. tatula (L.) Torrey, Thorn Apple, mauveflowered form. (i) Tarston Farm, near Needham Market, a large patch in sugar beet crop, TM05, v.c. 25, J V , August 1992. (ii) Bentley, 20plants by roadside in field of kale, TM13, v.c. 25, C J H , 1992. Normal white-flowered plants occur frequently, but the mauve-flowered variety is rare. Lamiastrum galeobdolon (L.) Ehrend. & Polatscheck ssp. argentatum (Smejkal) Stace, a cultivated form of Yellow Archangel. A naturalised garden escape scattered throughout Britain. (i) Westleton, edge of village, off Dunwich road, TM46, v.c. 25, G K , 1/9/1992. (ii) Walberswick, by wall alongside watercourse leading to Fiats, TM47, v.c. 25, G K , 1/9/1992. First definite Suffolk records. Thymus serpyllum L., Breckland Thyme. T h e t f o r d Warren, abundant on sandy heath, TL88, v.c. 26, R H , 1992. C o m m . Mrs. G . C r o m p t o n . K n o w n h e r e b y Mr. Hobbssince 1987, following a c o m m e n t by the late Dr. E. A . Ellis, w h o h a d known of its presence here in the past. A very rare, protected species, which is included in the British Red Data Book. It is confined to West Suffolk and West Norfolk. This is a new site for v.c. 26. Thymus polytrichus A . Kerner ex Borbäs, Wild Thyme. (T. praecox auct. non Opiz) Thetford W a r r e n , growing on edge of the great spread of T. serpyllum

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TL88, v.c. 26, G B , Oct. 1992. Conf. Professor C. D. Pigott. A new site for this species in v.c. 26. It is not uncommon on heaths in both East and West Suffolk. Callitriche platycarpa Kuetz., Various-leaved Water Starwort. Shipmeadow, in ditch S. of New Dyke, TM39, v.c. 25, C D P and NFS, 12/8/1989. Distribution in the County unknown, owing to the difficulty in identifying Water Starworts. First post-1930 record for v.c. 25. Plantago major L. ssp. intermedia (Gilib.) Lange, a subspecies of Greater Plantain. Shipmeadow, S. of New Dyke, on recently-cut sides of ditch, TM39, v.c. 25, C D P and NFS, 12/8/1989. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium. Differs from ssp. major in its smaller size and shorter spikes, and in its leaves with only 3 - 5 veins and with apices subacute rather than obtuse. First Suffolk record. Scrophularia vernalis L., Yellow Figwort. Ipswich, Single specimen in garden, TM14, v.c. 25, FWS, 1992. Origin of seed, from which this plant arose, is unknown. A seedling of Clinopodium ascendens (Jordan) Samp., Common Calamint, also appeared and flowered. In 1991 there appeared a Single tall specimen of Ranunculus sardous Crantz, Hairy Buttercup, in this same small area of garden. Melampyrum pratense L., Common Cow-wheat. (i) Bradfield Woods, small colony beside grassy ride, TL95, v.c. 26, FWS, 1991. (ii) Chevins Wood, TL96, v.c. 26, JS and SS, May 1987. (ii) Westleton, Lambpits, TM47, v.c. 25, MNS, 1985. (iv) Reydon, small colony under trees beside public footpath, TM47, v.c. 25, E N , 23/7/1992. Hb. E & MH. Comm. Mrs. G. Crompton. This species is thought to be in serious decline, though its appearance from year to year is uncertain. These are the only 'recent' records. Further records would be welcome. Pedicularis sylvatica L., Heath Lousewort. (i) Redgrave Fen, TM07, v.c. 25, A K R , 1992. (ii) Lound, area of un-improved wet grassland, TG50, v.c. 25, D C , 1991. This species is found in wet, acid pastures and on heaths. 1t appears to be in serious decline. These are the only recent records. Has it been seen anywhere eise recently? Orobanche elatior Sutton, Tall Broomrape. (i) Freckenham, heathland at Red Lodge, TL67, v.c. 26, T G , 14/8/1990. (ii) Icklingham, three flower spikes on forest margin, TL77, v.c. 26, A L B , 1/9/1992.

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Pinguicula vulgaris L., Common Butterwort. Market Weston Fen, Suffolk Wildlife Trust N.R., TL97, v.c. 26, MH and MA, 1991. Just a f e w p l a n t s i n mown areas, includingone in 1992 on top of a tussock of Schoenus nigricans L., Black Bog-rush, heavily 'cropped' by mower, MH pers. comm. This is one of Suffolk's rarest plants, fortunately saved from extinction by the Trust's careful management. Senecio x albescens Burb. & Colgan, Silver Ragwort x Common Ragwort. (S. cineraria DC. x S. jacobaea L.) Southwold Cliffs, one plant with S. jacobaea, TM57, v.c. 25, GK, 2/9/1992. Rare in Suffolk. Previously recorded only from Bawdsey Cliffs. Tragopogon porrifolius L., Salsify. Wherstead, TM14, v.c. 25, LAM, May 1992. Hb. E & MH. Over 100 flowering plants on both verges of the A137. Also a few plants in an adjacent meadow, and one large colony in a patch of grass beside Bourne Bridge. All these plants bore striking dark red-purple flowers. Origin not known. Doronicum pardalianches L., Great Leopard's-bane. (i) Denston, spreading from garden into woodland and hedgerow TL75 v.c. 26, RA, 13/6/1988. (ii) Harkstead, Old Rectory, in marshy woods by stream, TM13, v.c. 25, recorded by Mrs. Ward, May 1992. Comm. PGL. Known here since 1976 (EMH). An interesting survival. (iii) Barsham, wooded section of lane immediately N. of Barsham Church TM38, v.c. 25, SGS, 24/5/1992. Known here for at least 30 years. (iv) Ringsfield, naturalised in roadside meadow, TM48, v.c 25 JM2 Mav 1987. ' ' An extensive stream-side colony at Battisford, first recorded in 1930 (FWS), was still flourishing a year or two ago. Baldellia ranunculoides (L.) Pari., Lesser Water-plantain. Lound Lakes, a few plants in association with Pilularia globulifera L., Pillwort and Anagallis tenella (L.) L., Bog Pimpernel, TG50, v.c. 25, DC, 1991. Possibly now the only site for Lesser Water-plantain in Suffolk and certainly the only one known for Pillwort. B. ranunculoides is recorded here in Simpson's Flora of Suffolk. Elodea nuttallii (Planchon) H. St. John, NuttalPs Waterweed. (i) Gt. Ashfield, roadside pond opposite farm, TM06 v c 26 RA 20/8/1989. Det. MNS. ' (ii) Barsham, in several ditches and in a backwater of the R Wavenev TM39, v.c. 25, CDP and NFS, 12/8/1989. ' (iii) Shipmeadow, in New Dyke (specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium) and in several associated ditches, TM39, v.c 25 CDP and NFS 12/8/1989. (iv) Hollesley, ditches S.E. of Cauldwell Hall Farm TM34 v c 25 CDP and SEY, 29/8/1992. ' '

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Between Southwold and Reydon, N. of Buss Creek, TM57, v.c. 25 C D P and NFS, 12/8/1989. Greatly increased since the publication of Simpson's Flora in 1982, when only one site was known. It is sold for aquaria and ponds and rapidly becomes naturalised if discarded in a suitable place. Carex lasiocarpa E h r h . , Slender Sedge. Hopton Fen, Suffolk Wildlife Trust N . R . , TL98, v.c. 26, M A , 1991. Conf. A. C. Jermy. A few individuals among dense reeds along edge of pond in the peat. A very interesting find. There have been few Suffolk records of this sedge. Recorded in 1938 in a bog between Eriswell and Mildenhall. This is the only confirmed Suffolk record since then. Carex viridula Michaux ssp. viridula, Small-fruited Yellow Sedge. (C. serotina Merat). Lakenheath Poor's Fen, Suffolk Wildlife Trust N . R . , a few plants, TL78, v.c. 26, M H , 1992. Conf. A . C. Jermy. A b o u t 30 winter leaves seen in January 1993. A welcome re-discovery. It has not been recorded here since the 1950s. This is the only known extant colony in v.c. 26. Carex viridula Michaux ssp. oedocarpa (Andersson) B. Schmid, C o m m o n Yellow Sedge. (C. demissa Hรถrnern.) L o u n d Lakes, on small area of un-improved wet grassland, TG50, v.c. 25, D C , 1991. A scarce sedge in Suffolk with few recent records. Nardus stricta L., Mat-grass. Lound Lakes, in a small area of un-improved grassland, TG50, v.c. 25, D C , 1991. Not previously recorded in this area. Locally f r e q u e n t , but only in a few suitable heathland habitats. Festuca rubra L. ssp. megastachys G a u d . , a subspecies of Red Fescue. Shottisham, round edge o f l a w n , T M 3 4 , v.c. 25, A M , 17/6/1992. D e t . P . J. O . Trist. Much planted on roadsides and perhaps a constituent of grass seed for turf. The only previous record is from Landguard C o m m o n in 1987 (Copping, 1990). Vulpia fasciculata (Forsskaol) Fritsch, D u n e Fescue. Southwold Denes, a patch at least 50 m2 in area, TM57, v.c. 25, G P , 27/5/1992. Conf. P G L . A new site for this rare coastal grass, which is a nationally Scarce Plant. Poa bulbosa L., Bulbous Meadow-grass. A nationally Scarce Plant, which is, however, found along most of the Suffolk coast and occasionally inland. (i) Knodishall C o m m o n , at southern end of open grassy area, TM46, v.c. 25, P G L , 20/5/1992. U n c o m m o n on inland sites such as this. Growing with Trifolium subterraneum L., Subterranean Clover, T. suffocatum

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L . , S u f f o c a t e d Clover and Crassula tillaea L e s t e r - G a r l . , Mossy Stonec r o p . T h e two last-named are also nationally Scarce Plants. (ii) B e n a c r e N . N . R . , locally f r e q u e n t on b r o a d track across d u n e s , T M 5 8 , v.c. 25, C D P , 25/5/1992. Elylrigia repens ( L . ) Desv. ex Nevski ssp. arenosa ( S p e n n e r ) A . L ö v e , a subspecies of C o m m o n Couch-grass, f o u n d on maritime sand d u n e s . (Agropyron maritimum (Koch & Ziz) Jansen & W ä c h t e r , non ( L . ) P. Beauv.) (i) S o u t h of H ä v e n H o u s e , T h o r p e n e s s , on small shingle, partially colonised, c.80 yards f r o m sea, T M 4 5 , v.c. 25, P J O T , 8/7/1989. W i t h Ononis repens L . , R e s t h a r r o w , Silene uniflora With., Sea C a m p i o n and Senecio vulgaris L . , G r o u n d s e l . (ii) Sizewell b e a c h , on covered fixed d u n e s c.65 m . f r o m the sea, nearly o p p o s i t e t h e P o w e r Station, T M 4 6 , v.c. 25, P J O T , 8/7/1989. W i t h Carex arenaria L., Sand Sedge, Holcus lanatus L., Y o r k s h i r e Fog, Elytrigia atherica (Link) Kerguelen ex C a r r e r a s Martinez, Sea C o u c h , etc. (iii) D u n w i c h , on sandy shingle at t h e foot of sea-ridge d e f e n c e s , T M 4 7 , v.c. 25, P J O T , 8/7/1989. With Lathyrus japonicus Willd., Sea P e a and Festuca rubra L . , R e d Fescue. (iv) C o r p o r a t i o n M a r s h e s , Walberswick, sand erosion f r o m sea d e f e n c e s , T M 4 7 , v.c. 25, P J O T , 1991. H e r b . P J O T . (v) T h e Fiats, W a l b e r s w i c k , higher saltings near car p a r k , colony a d j a c e n t to track leading to s h o r e and on track behind s h o r e - d u n e s , T M 5 7 , v.c. 25, P J O T , 8/7/1989. With Atriplex portulacoides L . , Sea Purslane, Spergularia marina (L.) G r i s e b . , Lesser Sea-spurrey, Glaux maritima L . , Sea Milkwort, etc. T h e s e a r e the only Suffolk records. M r . Trist states that it is a t a x o n which has b e e n f o r g o t t e n and is now o v e r l o o k e d . Allium paradoxum (M. B i e b . ) D o n , Few-flowered Garlic. (i) C l ä r e , small colony n e a r R . S t o u r in w o o d e d a r e a a d j a c e n t to C o u n t r y P a r k , T L 7 4 , v.c. 19, F W S , 8/4/1992. (ii) P l a y f o r d , a n o w established small colony at edge of sandy lane u n d e r elm suckers, T M 2 4 , v.c. 25, F W S , 1992. I n t r o d u c e d c.1980 with bulbils f r o m Ipswich g a r d e n . Epipactis helleborine ( L . ) C r a n t z , Broad-leaved H e l l e b o r i n e . T h e t f o r d W a r r e n , o n e small clump u n d e r trees in small pit, T L 8 8 , v.c. 26, D A W , 11/7/1992. A new 10 km. Square for this species in v.c. 26. Dactylorhiza fuchsii ( D r u c e ) Soö x D. maculata ( L . ) Soö, C o m m o n Spotted x Heath Spotted Orchid. (D. x transiens ( D r u c e ) Soö) C r a n s f o r d , L a d y ' s M a n t l e M e a d o w , Suffolk Wildlife Trust N . R . , T M 3 6 , v.c. 25, M H and SK. R e c o r d e d during 1992 survey of this site. This confirms earlier r e c o r d s of this hybrid by F W S in 1973 and 1986. Both p a r e n t s then

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present. This u n c o m m o n or perhaps overlooked hybrid is difficult to identify unless found growing near both parents. II Bird-seed aliens, casuals and escapes Aconitum napellus L. sensu lato, Monkshood. Felixstowe, in undergrowth in T h e Grove, TM33, v.c. 25, O M H , 1991. This species is recorded from time to time in the wild, usually from d u m p e d garden waste. Anemone apennina L., Blue A n e m o n e . Earl's G r e e n , near Bacton, two plants on grass verge, spread from garden opposite, TM06, v.c. 26, R A , 28/3/1989. T h e r e are fewSuffolk records of this species, though it is frequently grown in gardens and can become naturalised in the wild. Fiscus carica L., Fig. Bacton, roadside S. of railway bridge, TM06, v.c. 25, R A , 22/5/1989. Seedlings found on verge beneath parent tree overhanging road. Phytolacca clavigera W. Smith, a Pokeweed. Felixstowe, two plants, presumably bird-sown, appeared in Rosemary Avenue, TM33, v.c. 25, M O , 1991. In 1992 three or four seedlings appeared round parent plant. A n o t h e r Felixstowe site for this striking pink-flowered Pokeweed. As with other Pokeweeds, the fruits are very attractive to birds. Bassia scoparia (L.) A . J. Scott. Burning Bush. (Kochia scoparia (L.) Schrad.) Westleton, Reckford Bridge, in soil used to build up verge after road-works, TM46, v.c. 25, P G L , 29/9/1992. An uncommon casual of garden origin. O t h e r garden plants also there and one plant of Solanum rostratum Dunal, see below. Agrostemma gracilis Boiss., a Corncockle. Castlings H e a t h , G r o t o n , one plant among native grass and herbs on roadside verge, well away from houses and gardens, TL94, v.c. 26, E M - R and RSS, July 1989. Recognised by the Anders as something other than A githago L., (the Corncockle formerly frequent in arable fields) and therefore photographed by Mr. Sweetman. O n seeing the photograph, Mr. D . McClintock suggested it might be what seedsmen were selling as A. githago. Seed of A. githago cv. 'Milas' from Thompson and Morgan was duly sown by Mr. Milne-Redhead and did indeed produce plants identical to the G r o t o n one. However, no specimen good enough for identification purposes was obtained, but seed was collected and distributed. Finally, a plant sown and grown from this seed in Woolverstone ( E M H ) wassent in 1992 t o M r . E. J. Clement. H e identifiedit a s A gracilis Boiss. First Suffolk record. Hb. E J C . This species was also found near Swanley in K e n t i n 1990 (Palmer, 1990). It

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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 29

should be borne in mind when unusual-looking Corncockles are found. The plant is a native of Central Greece and Asia Minor. Agrostemma githago L., Corncockle. Claydon, a dozen clumps on traffic island below the A45 (T), TM14, v.c. 25, O M H , 22/6/1992. Also CJH, who counted up to 17 flowering stems in some clumps. Perhaps introduced in a wildflower seed mixture. Also there Centaurea cyanus L., Cornflower, a few plants. Dianthus armeria L., Deptford Pink. Ipswich, on waste ground in Belstead Avenue, one large plant, TM14, v.c. 25, A P , Oct. 1992. Det. FWS. Of garden origin. Thought to be extinct in Suffolk as a native plant. Hypericum androsaemum L., Tustan. (i) Bentley, TM13, v.c. 25, CJH, 4/6/1990. One plant, presumably birdsown, came up in field at Dodnash Fruit Farm after fruit trees were grubbed out. (ii) Blyford, roadside verge, probably bird-sown, TM47, v.c. 25, J M , 24/8/1987. Very rare, if not extinct, as a native plant in Suffolk. Sisymbrium irio L., London Rocket. St. Mary-le-Tower churchyard, Ipswich, TM14, v.c. 25, E M H , 18/5/1992, while recording for the Suffolk Wildlife Trust. Conf. T. C. G. Rieh. About twenty very small speeimens of this rare casual were found, in flower and fruit, on bare well-trodden soil in the cycle racks. It has apparently survived in the churchyard since 1974, when one large, straggling plant was recorded. Vicia pannonica Crantz, Hungarian Vetch. Rede, several plants under bird-table with other bird-seed aliens, TL85, v.c. 26, H C , July 1992. Comm. EMC. Hb. E & MH. Det. EJC, who commented that it was an unusual find. An annual species with pale yellow flowers, found throughout continental Europe. First Suffolk record. Solanum rostratum Dunal, Buffalo Bur. (S. cornutum auet. non. Lam.) Westleton, Reckford Bridge, one plant on roadside following bridge repairs, TM46, v.c. 25, D G , August 1992. Conf. PGL. Usually associated with birdseed or animal feed. An attractive plant with yellow flowers and yellow prickles. Few Suffolk records. Polemonium caeruleum L., Jacob's Ladder. Coddenham, one clump in rough grass near shooting ränge, TM15, v.c. 25, O M H , 1991. A garden throw-out, unlikely to compete successfully with the surrounding Vegetation.

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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

43

Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth., Fiddleneck. T h e r e are two recent bird-seed records f r o m gardens: (i) Cläre, TL74, v.c. 26, F E , 1991. (ii) Ipswich, several plants under bird-table, TM 14, v.c. 25, H T , June 1992. and one of less certain origin: (iii) Sudbourne, three plants on Protected Verge, TM45, v.c. 25, MNS, 15/7/1991. Cynoglottis barrelieri (All.) Vural & Kit T a n , False Alkanet. (Anchusa barrelieri (All.) Vitman) Stutton, many long-established clumps on site of former sandpit, TM13, v.c. 25, E M H , 12/7/1992. D e t . E. J. Clement. Hb. E & M H . A garden throw-out, with attractive bright blue flowers. First Suffolk record. Also there, several patches of Potentilla recta L., Sulphur Cinquefoil, also of garden origin and also well-established. Salvia sclarea L., a garden Clary. Holton St. Peter, came up in a garden, not knowingly introduced by owners, TM47, v.c. 25, P G L , 15/6/1992. A tall striking biennial with blue corollas and white or pink bracts. Seeds freely. Not previously recorded in Suffolk as a casual. Downingia elegans (Douglas ex Lindl.) Torrey, Californian Lobelia. Elveden, Single plant on new golf course, TL88, v.c. 26, P G L , August 1992. Conf. E. J. Clement f r o m transparency, Nov. 1992. First Suffolk record. This is an annual species in the Bellflower family, native in western N. America. It has attractive bright blue flowers with a white centre, and is very similar to the bedding Lobelia frequently grown in gardens. Probably introduced in grass seed. First recorded in Britain in 1978 in Bucks (Clement, 1978). Leycesteria formosa WalL, Himalayan Honeysuckle. Bentley, T M 1 3 , v.c. 25, C J H , 29/6/1990. O n e plant, presumably bird-sown, discovered on Perry Field at Dodnash Fruit Farm after fruit trees were grubbed out. T h e purple-black fruits are very attractive to blackbirds. Second Suffolk record. Lonicera x italica Schmidt ex Tausch, a garden Honeysuckle. (L. caprifolia L. x L. etrusca Santi) B a m h a m Cross C o m m o n , one plant on stunted oak, TL88, v.c. 26, N G , August 1992. D e t . K. A . B e c k e  , C o m m . Mrs. G . Beckett. This honeysuckle is frequently grown in gardens. First record for v.c. 26. Cicerbita macrophylla (Willd.) Wallr., C o m m o n Blue Sowthistle. A vigorous garden perennial which sometimes escapes and persists. (i) H u n d o n , ditch by farm gate, TL74, v.c. 26, F E , July 1991. Not previously recorded in West Suffolk. (ii) Middleton, on verge outside garden, TM46, v.c. 25, CPB, August 1992.

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Vol. 29

Puschkinia scilloides A d a m s , Striped Squill. Belstead, one plant in woodland alongside Belstead Brook, TM14, v.c. 25, E M H , May 1991. O t h e r garden throw-outs have been seen here in the past. A spring-flowering bulbous species with a loose spike of pale blue flowers. A native of Asia Minor and the Caucasus. First Suffolk record. Key to contributors Addington, Rev. R. Ausden, M. Barsted, C. P. Beckett, Mrs. G . Beckett, K. A . Brinkley, P. M. Bull, A . L. Casey, Mrs. D. Cawston, Miss H. C o e , Mrs. E. M. Copping, A . Craven, T. David, R. W. E d m o n d s , Mrs. F. Furze, P. L. G a r d i n e r , R. W. G e a t e r , Mrs. D. Gibbons, N. Gladwin, Rev. T. Harding, M. Harris, Mrs. J. H a t t o n , Mrs. O . M. Hawes, C. J. H o b b s , R. Hyde, Mrs. E. M. Kay, S. Kitchener, G . Lawson, P. G . Leonard, D. J.

RA MA CPB GB KAB PMB ALB DC HC EMC AC TC RWD FE PLF RWG DG NG TG MH JH OMH CJH RH EMH SK GK PGL DJL

Leonard, Mrs. Y. J. Maxim, L. A. Milne-Redhead, E. Minihane, J. Morgan, Mrs. A . M u d d e m a n , J. Norman, Mrs. E. Oliver, Miss M. Peck, G . Plumb, Miss A . Preston, C. D . Rivett. A . K. Sanford, M. N. Sheppy, the late Mrs. O . O. D. Simpson, F. W. Standing, S. G . Stone, J. Stone, Mrs. S. Sweetman, R. S. Thompson, Mrs. H. Trist, P. J. O . Vane, J. Vaughan, the late Mrs. I. M. Wells, D . A . Williamson, Mrs. B. Yates, Miss S. E.

YJL LAM EM-R JMl AM JM2 EN MO GP AP CDP AKR MNS OODS FWS SGS JS SS RSS HT PJOT JV IMV DAW BW SEY

This is by far the largest number of contributors in any year since regulär lists began in 1980. References Clement, E. J. (1978). Aliens and Adventives. B.S.B.I. News 20, 9. Copping, A . (1990). Plant records from Landguard Common 1985-1988 Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 26, 64. Hind, W. M. (1889). Flora of Suffolk. London.

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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

Kent, D. H. (1992). List of Vascular Plauts of the British Isles. London. Botanical Society of the British Isles. Palmer, J. R. (1990). A second c o m cockle inBritain. B.S.B. 1. News55,33. Simpson, F. W. (1982). Simpsons Flora of Suffolk. Ipswich. Suffolk Naturalists' Society. Stace, C. A. (1991). New Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge. E. M. Hyde, Parkside, Wool verstone, Ipswich, IP9 1 A R

F. W. Simpson, 40 Ruskin R o a d , Ipswich, IP4 1PT

THE SCARCE PLANTS PROJECT 1991-2 A new Atlas of the British Flora, planned for publication in the year 2000, came a step nearer in 1991-2. The distribution of Britain's 'not-so-rare' plants, i.e. those recorded f r o m 16-100 10 km. squares, was reassessed in a Scarce Plants Project. (The very rare species are monitored regularly and formed no part of this project.) The work was organised jointly by the Botanical Society of the British Isles, the Nature Conservancy Council and the Biological Records Centre at Monks Wood. Lists of all records of these plants held at B . R . C . were sent to vice-county recorders, whose job it was to check, up-date, and add to them. Of the complete list of about 324 nationally Scarce Plants, 155 have been recorded in Suffolk, a surprisingly high proportion. This does not include aquatic species, for which lists have not yet been circulated. Suffollj members of the B.S.B.I., several of them also S.N.S. members, kindly supplied a number of new records or confirmed earlier ones, which was very helpful. The results of the project will be revealed later this year, in the form of distribution maps. In the list 'Some recent Suffolk Plant Records', published in this volume, all the nationally Scarce Plants are indicated. E. M. Hyde

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Willow Tit on Honeysuckle In September 1992 there was a fruiting clump of Honeysuckle (Lonicera periclymenus) with numerous red fruits near the toilet block at Minsmere. A Willow Tit (Parus montanus), with its characteristic dull cap and paler margins of the flight feathers, flew into the clump and took into its bill one of the fruit. It then flew into a Hawthorn, landed some 20 ft. above ground, and pecked at the fruit, an activity which took about 20 seconds. W h e t h e r it was feeding on the soft red flesh or attacking the seed inside I could not see as the branch was some 2 in. in diameter and the bird was above my line of sight. After feeding it flew off and then returned to the Honeysuckle, taking another fruit, but this time Aying off into some woodland. From the striking action of the bird's bill one is inclined to suggest that the Willow Tit was feeding on the seed. Marsh Tits have been reported to take Spindle berries (.British Tits, C. Perrins (1979), Collins New Naturalist) but there are few records of Willow Tits taking such seeds. Dr Alan Beaumont.

Co-existance of hörnet and wasp Just after Christmas I was beetle hunting in the wooded area close by Flixton Marshes among rotten stumps. On lifting a piece of loosened bark of a rotting tree lying on the ground I found a specimen of that most dreaded m e m b e r of the Vespidae, the hörnet ( V e s p a crabro), a fine hibernating queen in a State of torpor lying in a chewed-out Chamber quite large in size. It is well known that these queens will hibernate in hollow trees, which are also a favourite place for nesting. Incidentally, hornets are not usually aggressive. Inside the hollow Chamber, no more than an inch away from the hörnet, lay a hibernating queen wasp (Vespula sp.). It is strongly believed that, on occasions, hornets will take the smaller wasps as food and I was therefore surprised to find them hibernating together. I assume that the hörnet was there first, since had the wasp been there first the Chamber would have been smaller. It seems stränge that the lesser creature, being the prey, had taken up residence with the predator. Tony Brown.

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Plate 3: T h o r n - a p p l e , m a u v e - f l o w e r e d f o r m (Datura slramonium var. tatula), a rare f o r m f o u n d at Bentley, Sept. 1992. (p. 36).


Plate 4: A n a l i e n C o r n c o c k l e species (Agrostemma gracilis), Castlings H e a t h , G r o t o n , July 1989. (p. 41).


Plate 6: Mossy S t o n e c r o p (Crassula in Suffolk Breckland. (p. 40 & 75).

tillaea), at L a k e n h e a t h , 1992; a nationally scarce species occuring


Plate 7: Moo nwo rt (Botrychium /unaria), a ra re fe rn species, La kcnheath Warren, Ma y, 1993. (p. 32).

Some recent Suffolk plant records  

Hyde, E. M. & Simpson, F. W.

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