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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

Compiled by E. M. HYDE and F. W. SIMPSON

For each record the following information is given: locality and habitat, Ordnance Survey 10km Square, vice-county,finder'sname or initials (see key at end of article) and date of record. The comments are those of the Compilers, based in some cases on information supplied by thefinders.The nomenclature and order of the species are with very few exceptions those of Flora Europaea. Simpson's Flora of Suffolk is used as the authority fo claimingfirstor second County records, supplemented by the large number of records received since its publication. The Compilers wish to thank the specialists who determined or confirmed the identity of specimens, especialy Mr. E. J. Clement, who hasfor many yearsgenerously given us the benefit of his time and extensive knowledge. Again we are indebted to the Rev. R. Addington for the considerable number of new records in this list arising from his third andfinalyear's survey of TM06. This has been a most worthwhile enterprise, and we would urge other members to follow suit. A thorough survey will always produce new, interesting records. I Native plants and established introductions Salix triandra L., Almond Willow. (i) Stowupland, one bush on north bank of stream, TM06, v.c. 25, RA, 2/8/90. (ii) Wortham Ling, TM07, v.c. 25, AC, 1989. (iii) Barnby Broad Estate, TM49, v.c. 25, JM and TA, 1989. An uncommon species in the County. Few recent records. Salix x reichardtii A. Kerner, a hybrid Sallow. (S. caprea L. X S. cinerea L.) (i) Depden Green, by pond, TL75, v.c. 26, RA, 19/9/88. (ii) Cotton, TM06, v.c. 25, RA, 28/8/89. Det. FWS. Exact site not recorded, but in TM0767. (iii) Thorpeness, TM45, v.c. 25, PDS, 5/6/86. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium. (iv) Wangford, one large bush near Wolsey Bridge, TM47, v.c. 25, PDS, 1991. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium. Greatly under-recorded. Many of our attractive early-flowering Sallows are this hybrid. Salix repens L., Creeping Willow. Wortham Ling, TM07, v.c. 25, AC, 1989. A declining species in the County, owing to loss of habitat. Reduced to four orfivesites.

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Polygonum rurivagum Jord. ex. Bor., Cornfield Knotgrass. Tunstall, on Suffolk Wildlife Trust protected verge, TM35, v.c. 25, ALB, 16/7/91. Several plants flowering on verge, close to tarmac. Conf. Dr. B. T. Styles. Hb. E & MH. First confirmed record for v.c. 25, East Suffolk. Chenopodium hybridum L., Sowbane. (i) Worlington, edge of farm track, TL67, v.c. 26, EMH, 12/9/86. (ii) Herringswell, abundant in fallow field, TL76, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, 13/10/91. Conf. E. J. Clement. Manyofthese plants were astriking deep crimson throughout. (iii) Tuddenham, edge of field of flax, TL77, v.c. 26, EMH, 17/9/91. (iv) Sudbury, waste ground in Quay Lane, TL84, v.c. 26, A A B , 13/8/86. (v) Bury St. Edmunds, arable field, TL86, v.c. 26, EM-R, 18/8/87. (vi) Stowmarket, on dumped sand in grounds of Museum of East Anglian Life, TM05, v.c. 26, EMH, 19/9/89. This species can be found in most years in the Breckland, but is rarely seen in East Suffolk. All the above records are for v.c. 26, West Suffolk. Montia fontana L. agg., Blinks. (i) Icklingham Plains, about 30 flowering plants in short grassy Breck, TL77, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, 18/4/91. Det. by Dr. S. M. Walters as ssp. variabilis Walters. (ii) Southwold, near Buss Creek, TM47, v.c. 25, JWP, April 1991. About 50 plants in dry grassland (wet in winter) in shallow pit. These plants were identified by Dr. Partridge as ssp. chondrosperma (Fenzl) Walters, which is thought to be the most frequent form in Suffolk. Other post-Flora records, not determined to subspecies, include: Holbrook Gardens, at edge of heath, TM13, EWP, 11/4/91; Woolverstone, in lawn, TM13, E M H , 1984; Nacton, marshy meadow, TM24,1.N.H.S. Field Meeting, 1985. Comm. PMB; BungayTM38, BecclesTM39, WalberswickTM47, all on dry heath, GWM, 1984. All v.c. 25. Corydalis bulbosa (L.) DC., Tuberous Corydalis. Haiesworth, two colonies in a large, very old garden, TM37, v.c. 25, E G , 1991. Conf. FWS. Clearly planted at some time in the distant past, these plants have survived without attention for many years. One colony grows on a bank, competing for space with Allium paradoxum (Bieb.) G. Don, whilst the other, in a far corner, long undisturbed, apart from occasional tree planting, grows happily among the roots of the trees. Corydalis solida (L.) Sw., Purple Fumitory, Purple Corydalis. Tattingstone, one flower spike in churchyard,TM13, v.c. 25, FE, April 1989. An early-flowering species, able to flower and set seed before mowing begins. Known from only one other site in Suffolk, as reported in T.S.N.S. Vol. 27, 1991.

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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

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Cardamine pratensis L., Lady's Smock, double-flowered form. (i) Combs, TM05, v.c. 26, JH, June 1991. Growing in abundance in meadow near Church, with a preponderance of double-flowered plants. (ii) Wilby Green, colony of the double-flowered form, TM27, v.c. 25, DS, 21/4/91. Such plants are rare in the County. These are the first reported occurrences since the publication of Simpson's Flora. Lepidium heterophyllum Benth., Smith's Pepperwort. Eriswell, three plants on grassy track, TL77, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, June 1991. Conf. T. C. G. Rieh. Hb. E & MH. A rare plant in Suffolk. This is the only known extant colony in West Suffolk. Sedum telephium L. ssp. telephium, Orpine. Raydon, small colony in ancient woodland, TM04, v.c. 26, FWS, 16/6/91. A decreasing species. The plants in Glebe Lane, Woolverstone were severely burnt in 1991 in a hedgerow fire, which spread from an uncontrolled bonfire. However, by late autumn new green shoots were pushing up through the scorched soil. All but one clump appear to have survived. Rubus britannicus Rogers, a Bramble. Bradfield Woods, TL95, v.c. 26, ALB, 21/9/91. This marks a considerable extension of its known ränge in West Suffolk, along the Breck margins (Bull 1991). Rubus nilidiformis Sudre, a Bramble. Dodnash Wood, Bentley, TM13, v.c. 25, ALB, 1/8/91. Mr. Bull states that the wood has long been known as a site for this rare bramble. Now that the wood has been opened up, he was amazed to find it the dominant species all along the public footpath through the wood. Rubus leueostaehys Schleicher ex Sm., a Bramble. Martlesham, by public footpath through woodland, TM24, v.c. 25, ALB, 16/7/91. Conf. A. Newton. A Single bush only, which Mr. Bull regards as a recent arrival, presumably bird-sown, of this regional endemic of S. E. England. First Suffolk record and indeed first for East Anglia. Sorbus latifolia (Lam.) Pers., a Whitebeam. Wolsey Bridge, Wangford, TM47, v.c. 25, 1990. Det. P. D. Seil, 1991. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium. A Single tree about 5m. tall, between road and dyke, presumably bird-sown. Smothered in orange fruits when first noticed by a member of the Suffolk Wildlife Trust, in autumn 1990. First Suffolk record. Astragalus glycyphyllos L., Milk Vetch, Wild Liquorice. Piper's Vale, Ipswich, near R. Orwell, TM14, v.c. 25, FWS, 1/7/91. A specimen. An unexpected find on the sandy soil of Piper's Vale.

Single

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Lathyrus nissolia L., Grass Vetchling. HesseÂŤ, several specimens in disused gravel pit, TL95, v.c. 26, JCW, 13/6/87. Seen again in 1991. An interesting record. A rare species in Suffolk away from the coast. Trifolium glomeratum L., Clustered Clover. (i) Wortham Ling, in short rabbit-grazed turf, TM07, v.c. 25, AC, 13/7/91. (ii) Piper's Vale, Ipswich, a few plants on well-trodden sandy track, TM14 v.c. 25, EMH, 20/6/91. Not previously recorded in either of these 10km. squares. Trifolium resupinatum L., Reversed Clover. (i) By R. Deben at Woodbridge, TM24, v.c. 25, JGR, 29/7/91. Det. Dr. D. E. Coombe. (ii) Bredfield, in lawn, TM25, v.c. 25, PGL, 4/7/91. A pretty pink-flowered annual clover, with its flowers borne upside down, keel uppermost. An uncommon casual. Only the second and third post-Flora records in the County. Trifolium incarnatum L. ssp. incarnatum, Crimson Clover. Brockley, Old Forge, TL85, v.c. 26, AM, Sept. 1991. Five flower spikes, in perfect condition despite the drought, appeared in Mr. Mott's vegetable garden. Comm. EMC. A striking plant, now only seen as a rare casual. Formerly much cultivated. Only the second post-Flora record. Oxalis exilis A. Cunn., Least Yellow Sorrel. Nr. Bacton Green, weed in cottage path, TM06, v.c. 26, RA, 9/9/91. Hb. E & MH. Regarded by the householder as a troublesome weed. Similar to O. corniculata L., Procumbent Yellow Sorrel, but very much smaller and with its flowers usually borne singly. Both species grow on walls and paths. O. exilis is rare in Suffolk. This is the first record for v.c. 26, West Suffolk. Tilia cordata Mill., Small-leaved Lime. On boundary bank between Westhorpe and Bacton, TM06, v.c. 26, ALB, 29/5/91. A number of stools were noted from which had grown secondary trees, possibly 40-50 years old. One or two had been blown over, but were still living and growing on. Not previously recorded in TM06. Malva sylvestris L., Common Mallow (white-flowered form). Occasional white-flowered plants are seen, three of which are detailed below. (i) Ipswich, by R. Gipping at Handford Bridge, TM14, v.c. 25, EMH, 11/8/91. (ii) Bucklesham, TM24, v.c. 25, MNS, 10/7/84. (iii) Tunstall, growing in roadside hedge, TM35, v.c. 25, EMH, 21/7/84.

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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

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Anagallis arvensis L. ssp. arvensis forma azurea Hyl., Blue-flowered Scarlet Pimpernel. This is the uncommon blue variant of the common Scarlet Pimpernel. (Much rarer is the genuine Blue Pimpernel (ssp. coerulea Hartman) with narrower petals and pedicels shorter than the subtending leaves. Not recorded in Suffolk). (i) Cläre,ingarden, probablyfrombird-seed, TL74,v.c. 26,FE,July 1991. (ii) Mendlesham, two plants at edge of field of wheat, adjacent to allotments, TM06, v.c. 25, R A , 28/7/89. (iii) Woolverstone, garden weed, (not from bird-seed), TM13, v.c. 25, E M H , July 1991. Trachystemon orientalis (L.) G. Don f., Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. (i) Ipswich, naturalised in wild part of Holywells Park, TM14, v.c. 25, MNS, 1991. Known here by MNS for a number of years. (ii) Little Glemham, in roadside copse, TM35, v.c. 25, GP, March 1991. An attractive but invasive rhizomatous perennial with purple-blue flowers. Few Suffolk records. Ajuga reptans L., Bügle. A small patch of Bügle with white flowers was noticed by several visitors to the Open Day held at Spring Wood, Wherstead, TM14, v.c. 25, in May 1991. Not previously recorded in Suffolk. Lamium purpureum L., Red Dead-nettle. White-flowered plants occur from time to time. Recent records include: (i) GreatThurlow, edge of field north ofHarlica Farm, TL75, v.c. 26, R A , 26/4/87. (ii) Herringfleet, Manor Farm, TM49, v.c. 25, HWB, 3/4/91 One whiteflowered clump in a large normal-coloured colony. Leaves light green, not at all reddish. (iii) Benacre Pits, one patch of white-flowered plants at northern end, TM58, v.c. 25, EWP, 18/5/91. Prunella vulgaris L., Self-heal. Arger Fen, Bures St. Mary, TL93, v.c. 26, FWS, 28/7/91. An uncommon form with white flowers. Nicandra physalodes (L.) Gaertner, Apple of Peru. A showy weed of gardens, nurseries and waste places, conspicuous because of its attractive blue or mauve flowers and inflated calyx. (i) Kentford, on sewage waste on site of former pit, TL76, v.c. 26, GMSE, 1985. (ii) Brockley, on pile of rubble, sand and soil, TL85, v.c. 26, EMC, 8/11/91. (iii) Easton Bavents, beside disused farm building, TM57, EWP, 28/10/91.

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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 28

Datura stramonium L., Thorn Apple. Lakenheath, several plants on banks of Cut-off Channel, all with mauve flowers, TL78, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, Sept. 1991. This mauve-floweredform, var. tatula (L.) Torr., is rare in the County. Cymbalaria muralis Gaertn., Mey. & Scherb., Ivy-leaved Toadflax. A form with white flowers has been recorded from: (i) Ipswich, wall in Cumberland Terrace, TM14, v.c. 25, MNS, 31/7/84. (ii) Baylham, by door of Church, TM15, v.c. 25, ED, 2/8/91. Melampyrum cristatum L., Crested Cow-wheat. Dalham Hill, Denham, several plants on roadside, TL76, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, Sept. 1991. Known at this site by Mrs. Leonard for over forty years. Only four known sites in the County. Orobanche purpurea Jacq., Yarrow Broomrape, Purple Broomrape. Lakenheath, in rough grass, growing on Achillea millefolium L., Yarrow, TL78, v.c. 26, M G R , 1990. Conf. FWS, 1991. This is a very exciting and important find. Yarrow Broomrape is a British Red Data Book species, occurring in only a handful of sites in the country. Appeared again in 1991, with about 20 flower spikes. It is hoped that local conservation measures will succeed in protecting this rare and attractive plant. First record for v.c. 26, West Suffolk, for more than a hundred years. Galium parisiense L., Wall Bedstraw. (i) Mildenhall Woods, several hundred plants in recently disturbed area, TL77, v.c. 26, DJL and YJL, Sept. 1991. Still to be found on one or two old walls in Mildenhall itself. (ii) Thetford Heath, a few plants on thin calcareous grass heath, TL88, v.c. 26, PD, 17/6/89. A very rare plant in the County, possibly now confined to these two areas. The small colony at Westleton (seeT.S.N.S., 22, p. 43,1986) appears to have died out. Leucanthemella serotina (L.) Tzvelev, Autumn Ox-eye. A large group of plants, well-established on sand-dunes just S. of Minsmere Sluice, TM46, v.c. 25, EB, 13/7/91, during a field meeting of the Wild Flower Society. Comm. GWM. Det. R. M. Burton. A garden throw-out or relic of cultivation, though no longer a common garden plant. A tall vigorous perennial, with off-white daisy flowers about 2 inches in diameter. Only the second Suffolk record, both in the East of the County. See T.S.N.S., 20, p. 82, 1984. Tragopogon porrifolius L., Salsify. Tarston Farm, near Needham Market, one particularly fine plant in young plantation, TM05, v.c. 25, JV, June 1991. An uncommon casual, with few Suffolk records. (There are, however, two flourishing colonies on verges at Tunstall and Creeting St. Mary.)

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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

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Tragopogon X mirabilis Rouy, Hybrid Goat's-beard. (T. pratensis x T. porrifolius) Tunstall, one plant on Protected Roadside Verge, TM35, v.c. 25, PGL, June 1991. With abundant T. porrifolius and fairly frequent T. pratensis, it is possible that more hybrids may be found in 1992. This is a rare hybrid. First Suffolk record. Hieracium perpropinquum (Zahn) Druce, Wood Hawkweed. Spouse's Grove, Assington, TL93, v.c. 26, FWS, 28/7/91. About forty specimens. Generally uncommon in Suffolk, though locally frequent in heathy places in the South of the County. Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L., Day Lily. Westleton, one sizeable clump on the Heath, TM46, v.c. 25, GWM, 13/7/91. This garden plant can survive and increase for many years, if dumped in a suitable habitat. Fritillaria meleagris L., Fritillary. Wetherden, five flower spikes, two of them white, in meadow behind Church, TM06, v.c. 26, FE, 25/4/91. This part of the meadow had been deliberately left un-cut for the previous two years, which suggests that the survival of these plants may be assured. Allium paradoxum (Bieb.) G. Don, Few-flowered Leek. (i) Haiesworth Park, many plants, TM37, v.c. 25, PGL, April 1991. Also reported as frequent in old Haiesworth gardens (EG) March 1991. (ii) Beccles Common, TM49, v.c. 25, JM, 23/4/86. (iii) South Cove, beside Southwold - Wrentham road, TM57, v.c. 25, PGL, April 1991. Becoming established in an increasing number of sites. Very difficult to eradicate when established in a garden. Allium oleraceum L., Field Garlic. (i) Shaker's Lane, Bury St. Edmunds, with A. vineale L., Crow Garlic, TL86, v.c. 26, E M - R and PGL, 11/8/89. Also FWS. Recorded here in 1921 by H. D. Hewitt. A report of some eighty plants in 1991 was received by PGL. (ii) Culford, on top of grassy roadside bank, TL87, v.c. 26, EMC, 8/8/1979. Re-found, over 100 plants, E M H , July 1991. These two colonies and those on the Hadleigh Railway Walk are the only ones known in the County. x Festulolium loliaceum (Huds.) P. Fourn., Hybrid Fescue. (Festuca pratensis Huds. x Lolium perenne L.) (i) Fen Acre, N. of Stowmarket, in drier part of meadow, TM06, v.c. 26, R A , 4/6/90. (ii) Wortham Ling, among lush Vegetation in dampish site, TM07, v.c. 25, AC, 1989. Not previously recorded in these areas. Probably an under-recorded grass. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 28 (1992)


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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 28

Puccinellia rupestris (With.) Fern. & Weath., Stiff Saltmarsh Grass. (i) Landguard C o m m o n , Felixstowe, TM23, v.c. 25, A C , 15/6/85. O n e plant beside concrete road, surviving until the habitat dried out. Specimen in Landguard Herbarium (Hb. E & M H ) . (ii) Felixstowe, near King's Fleet, one plant on top of sea wall, TM33, v.c. 25, DS, 8/8/91. Also growing abundantly in the same habitat a short distance away (DS). A rare coastal grass. Few Suffolk records. Phleum phleoid.es (L.) Karst., Purple-stem Cat's-tail. Stuston, several clumps in chalky hollow on Golf Course, TM17, v.c. 25, SH, 22/6/91. Conf. A. Copping. A remarkable find. Cleverly spotted among the rieh chalk flora. This rare native grass is largely restricted in Britain to the Breckland of Suffolk and Norfolk, where it is locally abundant on dry chalky and sandy soils. It is therefore extremely interesting to hear of its discovery in the eastern half of the County. First record for v.c. 25, East Suffolk. Dactylorhiza praetermissa (Druce) Soรถ, Southern Marsh Orchid. Ipswich, on fly ash near old Power Station, TM14, v.c. 25, T H , June 1989. Still there 1991, when more than 100 plants, some very small, were counted. This might appear to be an uncongenial habitat for Marsh Orchids, but several orchid species are known to occur in Britain in other similar manmade habitats on derelict industrial land. Also growing within the orchid area, one plant of Campanula persieifolia L., Narrow-leaved Bellflower, (TH 1991). Ophrys sphegodes Mill., Early Spider Orchid. One small plant in flower was found by Lynne Farrell of English Nature on open Breck grassland in TL78, West Suffolk, on June 2nd 1991. Conf. at Kew Orchid Herbarium by J. Wood. A most exciting and important discovery, especially as this rare British orchid was last recorded in Suffolk in 1793. Ophrys apifera Huds., Bee Orchid. Ipswich, Piper's Vale, over 70 plants over a wide area, TM14, v.c. 25, M T W and, independently, T H , 1991. Piper's Vale and the surrounding area, despite their proximity to the town, are the source of several interesting records in this article. II Bird-seed aliens and other casuals Saponaria oeymoides L., Rock Soapwort. Wortham Ling, one patch naturalised on heathland, TM07, v.c. 25, A C , B.S.B.I. Field Meeting, July 1991. A pretty rock garden plant, which occasionally establishes itself in the wild. First Suffolk record.

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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

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Sisymbrium loeselii L., False London Rocket. Shotley, on sandy bank behind Marina, TM23, v.c. 25, EMH, 6/8/91. Det. and Hb. T. C. G. Rieh. One large plant with atangle of branches. Acasual of waste ground, doeks, tips and similar plaees. Naturalised in many places in and around London. First Suffolk record. Iberis umbellata L., Garden Candytuft. King's Forest, scattered plants at the base of recently planted trees, TL87, v.c. 26, E M H , 6/8/90. Re-appeared 1991. Presumably introduced with the young trees, accidentally or otherwise. Geranium pratense L., Meadow Cranesbill. Ipswich, by jetty below old Power Station, one plant, TM14, v.c. 25, TH, 1989. Still there 1991, despite being damaged during pipe-laying. Of garden origin. Ammi visnaga (L.) Lam., one of the two Bullworts occurring in Britain. Cläre, in garden where bird-seed is regularly scattered, TL74, v.c. 26, FE, July 1991. Conf. E. J. Clement. A tall-growing white umbellifer, very similar to A. majus L. An infrequent casual. Ambrosia artemisiifolia Cläre, in garden where Sept. 1991. Conf. R. amongst other sources,

L., Roman Wormwood, Ragweed. bird-seed is regularly scattered, TL74, v.c. 26, FE, Phillips. An infrequent casual, associated with, bird-seed. Only one previous West Suffolk record.

Lilium candidum L., Madonna Lily. Tattingstone, one flower spike protruding from a dense blackberry bush beside bridle path, TM13, v.c. 25, E M H , July 1991. No gardens in the immediate vicinity, but several clumps of this lily were seen in a cottage garden about 200m. away. Second Suffolk record. Allium neapolitanum Cyr., Neapolitan Garlic. Thorpeness, TM46, v.c. 25, JPM, 28/4/90. Det. FWS. One plant in flower c. 40-50cm. tall in quite dense Vegetation on dry sandy sea-cliff. Assumed to originate from dumped garden rubbish. A common plant of the Mediterranean region, grown frequently in gardens in Britain. First occurrence in Suffolk. Ehrharta erecta Lam., Veldt Grass. Woolverstone, growing in crack between wall of unoccupied house and the asphalt Surround, TM13, v.c. 25, MAH, August 1991. Conf. E. J. Clement. Specimen in British Museum Herbarium. One patch about Im. long was found, growing with Hordeum murinum L., Wall Barley. This grass is a native of southern Africa, naturalised also in Australia and New Zealand. It is not sufficiently striking or attractive to be grown in British gardens, but it has been recorded once or twice in Britain as a wool alien (E. J. Clement pers. comm.). Origin here a mystery. First Suffolk record.

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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 28

Key to contributors Abrehart, T. Addington, Rev. R. Beaumont, Dr. E. Bloomfield, H. W. Brinkley, P. M. Bull, A. L. Butcher, A. A. Coe, Mrs. E. M. Copping, A. Dickson, Mrs. E. Dolman, P. Easy, G. M. S. Edmonds, F. Farrell, Miss L. Grant, Mrs. E. Harris, Mrs. J. Hooton, Mrs. S. Hutton, T. Hyde, Mrs. E. M. Hyde, M. A.

TA RA EB HWB PMB ALB AAB EMC AC ED PD GMSE FE LF EG JH SH TH EMH MAH

Lawson, P. G. Leonard, D. J. Leonard, Mrs. Y. J. Martin, J. P. Maybury, G. W. Milne-Redhead, E. Mott, A. Muddeman, J. Partridge, Dr. J. W. Patrick, E. W. Peck, G. Ryland, Mrs. J. G. Rutterford, M. G. Sanford, M. N. Seil, P. D. Simpson, F. W. Strauss, D. Wakerley, J. C. Wright, M. T. Vane, J.

PGL DJL YJL JPM GWM EM-R AM JM JWP EWP GP JGR MGR MNS PDS FWS DS JCW MTW JV

References Bull, A. L. (1991). Further notes on the Brambles of Suffolk. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc., 27, 32. Simpson, F. W. (1982). Simpsons Flora of Suffolk. Ipswich. Suffolk Naturalists' Society. Tutin, T. G. et al., eds. (1964-1980). Flora Europaea, 1 - 5 . Cambridge. E. M. Hyde, Parkside, Woolverstone, Ipswich, IP9 1AR

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 28 (1992)

F. W. Simpson, 40, Ruskin Road, Ipswich, IP4 1PT

Some recent Suffolk plant records  

Hyde, E. M. & Simpson, F. W.

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