Page 1

SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT

RECORDS

C o m p i l e d b y E . M . HYDE a n d F . W . SIMPSON

For each record the following information is given: locality and habitat, Ordnance Survey 10 km Square, vice-county, finder's name or initials (see key at end of article) and date of record. The comments are those of the Compilers, based in some cases on information supplied by the Anders. The nomenclature and order of the species are with very few exceptions those of Flora Europaea. The Compilers wish to thank the specialists who determined or confirmed the identity of specimens. Simpson's Flora of Suffolk is used as the authority for claiming first or second County records, supplemented by the large number of records received since its publication. As in the past two years this list contains a selection of records from the BSBI Monitoring Scheme, 1987-8. Included also are a number of interesting new records from 10 km Square TMOÜ, where one of our members, the Rev. R. Addington, is carrying out a three-year survey on a tetrad basis. Again we have received much information from members of the Society and indirectly from members of the public, who have taken specimens to Ipswich Museum for identification by Martin Sanford. Dryopterispseudomas (Woll.) Holub & Pouzar, Golden-scaled Male Fern. (i) Mildenhall, one clump in ride of forest plantation, TL77, v.c. 26, A L B , 31/5/89. (ii) King's Forest, West Stow, TL87, v.c. 26, FWS, 4/6/89. Several fine specimens in area north of Dale Pond. An uncommon fern in the Breckland. Also there D. filix-mas, Male Fern x D. pseudomas = D. x tavelii Rothm. Polypodium vulgare L. sensu stricto, Polypody. Mildenhall, two patches in mixed Forestry Kommission woodland, TL77, v.c. 26, E M H , 4/6/89. Det R. H. Roberts, Dec. 1989. It is unusual to see Polypody ferns in Breckland woodland, though they are occasionally seen on walls. It is still considered that P. vulgare L. s.s. is much less common in the County than both P. interjectum Shivas and the hybrid between the two species. See Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 20: 76-7. Azolla ftliculoides Lam., Water Fern. 1988 and 1989 were exceptionally good years for this species. Independent records of abundant colonies in Ipswich in the R. Gipping and Handford Cut, TM14, v.c. 25, came from FE, PF and FWS. Also in the R. Stour at Cläre, TL74, v.c. 26, FE, Aug. 1988. Salix repens L., Creeping Willow. (i) Roper's Heath, Tuddenham, in damp hollow, TL77, v.c. 26, FWS, 27/8/89. (ii) B a m h a m Heath, TL88, v.c. 26, GC, 15/6/89. A flourishingcolony in wet hollows.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 26 (1990)


SOME RECENT PLANT RECORDS

53

Nicandra physalodes (Apple of Peru) A casual, often found in waste places. The illustration is of a plant found at Belstead House in 1986 when it occurred all over the garden. In 1989 there was a specimen 3 ft tall growing out of a pavement crack near Lowestoft Hospital. [An original drawing by Dr. Edwina Beaumont]

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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 26

A declining species in Suffolk, through loss of habitat. Still on the Suffolk Wildlife Trust Reserve at Lakenheath Poor's Fen, TL78, v.c. 26. See S.W.T. Reserves Handbook, 1989. Myrica gale L., Bog Myrtle. Barnby, TM49, v.c. 25, JM and T A , 1986, 1987, 1989. Now very rare in Suffolk. Recorded here in Hind's Flora, 1889. For many years until about 1970 several bushes were observed in an area near the railway line (FWS). The Single specimen at Pashford Poor's Fen, Lakenheath. is reported by M G R as now dead (FWS). Rumex maritimus L., Golden Dock. (i) Wangford, TL78, v.c. 26, PJOT and M G R , 1988. Also one plant on rubbish dump, JWP, 31/7/88. Det. Dr. J. Akeroyd. (ii) Gedding, in pond, TL95, v.c. 26, JCW, 1987. Det. MNS. Seen again in the same pond, then dried up, Sept. 1989. (iii) Beccles, in R. Waveney, TM49, v.c. 25, JM and T A , 1986 and 1987. Conf. G W M . An uncommon Dock, shown to be persisting in TL78 and TM49, where it is recorded in Simpson's Flora. It has never before been recorded from the Gedding area. Amaranthus blitoides S. Watson, an Amaranthus. Ramsholt, near Church, TM34, v.c. 25, E M H , 8/10/89. Det. E. J. Clement. Hb. E & M H . About a hundred prostrate plants in two adjacent arable fields, some small seedlings, others fully mature. One striking plant measured over a metre across. (A few plants of Nettle-leaved Goosefoot, Chenopodium murale L., also in one of the fields.) Second record for East Suffolk and the third for Suffolk as a whole. Mirabilis jalapa L., Marvel of Peru. Ipswich, Stoke Park, garden weed, TM14, v.c. 25, JT, 1976. Det. MNS, from description. A half-hardy annual in various bright colours, easily obtainable from seed-merchants. A native of tropical America. First Suffolk record. Phytolacca clavigera W. W. Smith, a Pokeweed. (i) Reydon, TM47, v.c. 25, PGL, 1982. Det. E. J. Clement. (ii) Falkenham, in donkey meadow, TM23, v.c. 25, MNS, 20/6/89. Det. MNS. Probably bird-sown. (iii) Felixstowe, Western Avenue, TM33, v.c. 25, M R L , 1/9/89. Det. MNS, from photographs. These are the first, second and third Suffolk records of a plant fairly frequently grown in gardens and occasionally found bird-sown in odd places. A native of Asia. Montia sibirica (L.) Howell, Pink Purslane. The Grove, Felixstowe, TM33, v.c. 25, PT, 18/5/89. Two clumps near footpath among Holly. A pretty little annual plant with pinkish-lilac flowers,

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 26 (1990)


S O M E RECENT PLANT RECORDS

55

grown in gardens. Occasionally naturalised on light soils in the wild. Also noticed here by Miss M. McKerness in 1988. Only the second recent Suffolk record. Stellaria palustris Retz., Marsh Stitchwort. More frequent than thought a few years ago. Post-Flora records include: (i) Worlington, d a m p hollows, TL67, v.c. 26, E M H , 21/6/89. (ii) Lakenheath, Pashford Poor's Fen, TL78, v.c. 26, M G R and P J O T , 1988. (iii) Near Staverton Park Ponds and near Chillesford Lodge, TM35, v.c. 25, MNS, 15/6/88. (iv) Leiston, Minsmere Fens, TM46, v.c. 25, IMV and PFC, 12/8/84. (v) Barnby Broad, TM49, v.c. 25, J M and T A , 1989. Myosurus minimus L., Mousetail Lakenheath, 4 0 - 5 0 plants in gateway trodden by cattle, TL78, v.c. 26, A L B , 1989. Now a rare species of damp fields, but perhaps more common as a garden weed. Mr. Bull has also sent details of a record from a field edge above marshes at Walberswick, TM47, v.c. 25, where it was abundant in 1962. Barbarea stricta A n d r z . , Small-flowered Wintercress Oulton Broad, by boathouse, on mud dredged up from river, TM59, v.c. 25, JMT. 3/7/89. Det. T. Rieh and H b . T. Rieh. This is an uncommon British plant, usually found on river-banks and in other d a m p places. Recorded in Hind's Flora from Thurston, Fornham, Wixoe and Stoke-by-Nayland and until now there have been n o subsequent records. This record is thus the first for Suffolk for Over a Century and the first ever for v.c. 25. Cochlearia officinalis L. ssp. officinalis, Common Scurvy Grass Dunwich, small colony at edge of brackish ditch, TM47, v.c. 25, FWS, 28/5/89. R a r e in Suffolk, but possibly overlooked. Hind's Flora gives it for Southwold. Henslow and Skepper, 1860 record it as common in salt marshes, but completely omit any mention of the frequent C. anglica L., Long-leaved Scurvy Grass. Parnassia palustris L., Grass of Parnassus Barnby, TM49, v.c. 25, J M and T A , 1989. A very interesting rediscovery. Recorded as ' A b u n d a n t in marshes from Haddiscoe to Oulton', (Henslow and Skepper, 1860) and at Barnby by Hind. There have been no recent records from this area. It is now a very rare plant in the County. Rubus elegantispinosus (Schumach) Weber, a Bramble Mildenhall Woods, TL77, v.c. 26, A L B , 10/8/89. Mr. Bull states that this bramble, of horticultural origin, is becoming widely naturalised. From its Position just inside a forestry entrance, it is likely to have spread from dumped garden waste. First record for v.c. 26, West Suffolk.

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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 26

Duchesnea indica (Andrews) Focke, Indian Strawberry Gazeley, TL76, v.c. 26, R B W , Spring 1989. H b . E & M H . Occasionally planted in gardens, but not in this case. Here it appeared under a garden tree, possibly bird-sown. Det. E M H from a specimen flowering at Christmas 1989! T h e flowers are a clear yellow and the fruits red, like those of the Wild Strawberry, Fragaria vesca L., but spongy and insipid. Second Suffolk record and the first for v.c. 26. Geranium columbinum L., Long-stalked Cranesbill (i) Gt. Ashfield airfield, edge of runway, TM06, v.c. 26, R A , 1/7/89. Conf. EMH. (ii) Barham Pits, in waste area, TM15, v.c. 25, H M G , August 1980. These are the only two recent records of an uncommon annual Cranesbill. Recorded in Hind's Flora in only a handful of parishes. Euphorbia waldsteinii (Sojäk) A. Radcliffe-Smith, a Spurge Ipswich, Woodbridge R d . , railway bank, TM14, v.c. 25, MNS, 1989. Det. A . Radcliffe-Smith. A native of C. and E. Europe. First Suffolk record. These plants were recorded as E. esula L. in Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 20, p. 80. Euphorbia x pseudovirgata (Schur) Soö, a hybrid Spurge (E. esula L. x E. waldsteinii (Sojäk) A. Radcliffe-Smith) (i) Eriswell, E. of Lord's Walk, TL78, v.c. 26, 1988, M G R and P J O T , who have known it here for Over twenty years. (ii) L a k e n h e a t h , N. of the Delph, TL78, v.c. 26, J W P , 30/7/88. Det. J. McNeill. A large colony of about 50 plants. Known only from a few Suffolk sites, all in the Breckland, though it is said to be the commonest m e m b e r of the E. esula aggregate in Britain (RadcliffeSmith, 1988). It would seem advisable for us to check, if possible, our previous records for this group. Sida spinosa L., a Wire-weed Hadleigh, old railway yard, TM04, v.c. 26, J H , 31/10/89. Det. E M H . Conf. E. J. Clement. H b . E & M H . First Suffolk record. The Hadleigh specimen was a small woody plant, bearing many tiny orange-coloured flowers in the leaf axils. It is a m e m b e r of the Mallow family, of tropical origin. It is associated in Britain with soya bean waste and is said to be an increasing casual (Grenfell, 1987). Close by was a large plant of Amaranthus retroflexus L., C o m m o n A m a r a n t h u s , E M C et al., Sept. 1989. Abutilon theophrasti Medic., Indian Mallow or Chinese Jute (i) Near Badmondisfield Hall, Wickhambrook, weed in arable field, TL75, v.c. 26, L R , Sept. 1989. A report in the East Anglian Daily Times of Sept. 27th 1989 brought further correspondence and comment. (ii) Brockley, six plants among runner beans and on compost heap, in garden, TL85, v.c. 26, A M , August 1989. C o m m . E M C . Det. E M H . Second and third records for v.c. 26. (iii) Chillesford Lodge, near Orford, in disused chicken run, TM35, v.c. 25,

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 26 (1990)


SOME RECENT PLANT RECORDS

57

MW and G V , summer 1989. Det. at R. H . S. Wisley. C o m m . P. M. Brinkley. Like Sida spinosa above, an orange-flowered member of the Mallow family, though very different in appearance. Oenothera fallax R e n n e r emend. Rostanski, a hybrid Evening Primrose (O. erythrosepala Borbäs x O. biennis L.) O. fallax is usually treated as a species because it is constant in its characters (Bowra, 1987). Cotton, roadside verge S. of Church, TM06, v.c. 25, R A , 19/6/89. Det. J. C. Bowra, August 1989. Second Suffolk record and the first for v.c. 25. An interesting find. It is hoped that despite verge-cutting the colony will survive. Astrantia major L., Pink Masterwort Lackford Gravel Pits, TL77, v.c. 26, 1987, recorded by S. W. T. Survey Team. Re-visited, R T , 13/6/88, who supplied the above information. Frequently grown in gardens. It is possible that this colony originated f r o m seed from a garden in nearby West Stow. First record for West Suffolk and the only known extant colony in the County. Seseli libanotis (L.) Koch, M o o n Carrot Cläre, appeared in garden, TL74, v.c. 26, F E , 1989. Det. R. M. Burton. Origin unknown, but not sown or planted by the owner. An intriguing record, the first for Suffolk. Moon Carrot is a native species on chalky soil in a few counties in Britain, including Cambridgeshire, but this particular plant is thought to be an introduction. Heracleum sphondylium L. var. angustifolium Huds., a variety of Hogweed First, an earlier record: Bulls W o o d , Cockfield, TL95, v.c. 26, P J O T , July 1975. A few plants in shade near wood boundary. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium. A distinct form with very narrow linear-lanceolate leaf segments. First Suffolk record of this variety. Also recorded in 1989 just inside v.c. 19 (N. Essex), but administratively in Suffolk, as follows: Cläre, frequent along disused railway line in partial shade, TL74, v.c. 19, PJOT, 10/5/89. Also JL and FWS, 29/5/89. Gilia tricolor Benth., Bird's-eyes. (Polemoniaceae) Finningham, on roadside bank, TM06, v.c. 25, R A , 14/8/89. T h e bank had been cut back, probably to improve visibility. Various annual species had appeared, including also Galinsogaparviflora Cav., Gallant Soldier. It is not known whether the Gilia had sprung from buried seed or whether it was deliberately sown. Its flowers are small with a funnel-shaped corolla with lilac lobes, a yellow tube and a yellow throat with purple blotches. A native of western North America. Not previously recorded in Suffolk. Trans. Suffolk Nal. Soc. 26 (1990)


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Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth., Fiddleneck Icklingham, on rubbish dump, TL77, v.c. 26, PDS and MB, 14/7/86. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium. First West Suffolk record of a commonly grown 'bee plant'. There have been several East Suffolk records. Ipomoea hederacea Jacq., a Morning Glory (i) Open ride in coppiced woodland, near Oak Farm, Framlingham, TM36, v.c. 25, MB*, 29/9/89. Det. E M H . Conf. E. J. Clement, Oct. 1989. Hb. E&MH. (ii) Rushmere St. Andrew, weed in nursery garden, TM14, v.c. 25, FWS, Oct. 1989. Det. E M H . One of several Ipomoea species grown in gardens. It is interesting to speculate how it came to be in a woodland ride. First and second Suffolk records. Physalis angulata L. Rushmere St. Andrew, weed among Dahlias in nursery garden, TM14, v.c. 25, FWS, Oct. 1989. Det. E. J. Clement, Feb. 1990. Hb. E & M H . A small annual plant with golden-yellow flowers and pale green leaves. Unlike the closely related Chinese Lanterns, its inflated calyx remains green as the fruit ripens. Thought to have been introduced with pig slurry from Martlesham. A native of the tropics. Solanum cornutum Lam., Buffalo Bur. (i) Coddenham, weed in pasture, one plant only, TM15, v.c. 25, H W , 9/9/89. Specimenbroughtby Mrs. B. Hudson. Det. E M H . Hb. E & M H . (ii) Hoxne, weed in garden, TM17, v.c. 25, TJ, Oct. 1989. Det. MNS. Probably a constituent of bird-seed or animal feed. An attractive yellowflowered and yellow-prickled member of the Nightshade family. Few Suffolk records. Verbascum blattaria L., Moth Mullein (i) Ipswich, weed in garden, TM14, v.c. 25, KE, 7/9/89. Det. MNS. (ii) Bungay, four plants on bank of by-pass, TM39, v.c. 25, G W M , 19/7/89. An uncommon casual of roadsides and waste land. Euphrasia confusa Pugsley, an Eyebright Between Thorpeness and Sizewell on beach near cliffs, TM46, v.c. 25, E M H , 31/7/85. Det. Dr. A . J. Silverside, 1989. With other heathland species, including Jasione montana L., Sheep's Bit. Specimen in Ipswich Museum Herbarium. First record for v.c. 25, East Suffolk. Cephalaria gigantea (Ledeb.) Bobrov, Giant Scabious Cläre, roadside verge, well away from houses, TL74, v.c. 26, RSS, 22/6/89. Comm. E . Milne-Redhead. A tall yellow-flowered perennial Scabious normally seen in herbaceous borders. Second record for West Suffolk.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 26 (1990)


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Echinops exaltatus Schräder, a Globe Thistle (i) Gt. Ashfield, roadside verge S. of Daisy G r e e n , TM06, v.c. 26, R A , 20/8/89. Opposite houses, but none seen in gardens. (ii) Finningham, roadside verge, TM06, v.c. 25, R A , 14/9/89. Both specimens det. E. J. Clement. Both H b . E & M H . This is one of the Globe Thistles commonly grown in gardens. The Gt. Ashfield record is the first for v.c. 26 and that for Finningham the second for v.c. 25. Cirsium oleraceum (L.) Scop., Cabbage Thistle Harleston G r e e n , two flowering specimens in uncultivated area of cottage garden. Origin unknown, but possibly introduced by seed brought on clothes from Bornholm, D e n m a r k . TM05, v.c. 26, FWS, 24/9/89. A frequent species over much of Continental Europe in damp woods and watersides. First Suffolk record. Taraxacum spectabile Dahlst. agg., Marsh Dandelion Marshes in TM47, v.c. 25, MP*, May 1989. An uncommon Dandelion of damp grassy habitats, meadows and marshes. Mrs. Peck and her husband went on to find a substantial number of plants. There are very few Suffolk records. Allium oleraceum L . , Streaked Field Garlic Hadleigh, small colony on verge of old railway track, TM04, v.c. 26, MP and FWS, 14/8/89. A rare or perhaps overlooked species. It flowers later than the frequent A. vineale L., Crow Garlic. Recorded in Hind's Flora for Claywell Farm, Hadleigh, where it was reported as a great nuisance in the corn. Nerine bowdenii W. Wats., Nerine Wherstead Strand, one plant in flower on roadside verge opposite houses, TM14, v.c. 25, E M H , 3/10/89. No doubt a garden throw-out. Soon picked! First Suffolk record. Crocus speciosus Bieb. Bungay, waste ground where garden rubbish appeared to have been dumped, TM38, v.c. 25, G W M and P G L , 19/9/89. An autumn-flowering Crocus grown in gardens. T h e flowers are purplish-blue. Second Suffolk record. Deschampsia cespitosa (L.) Beauv. var. parviflora (Thuill.) Coss. & G e r m . , a variety of Tufted Hair-grass. A distinct variety characterised by very small spikelets and narrow leaves (up to 2.5mm). Frequent in the South of England in damp, shady woodland on heavy soils. Probably overlooked in Suffolk. (i) G r o t o n W o o d , TL93, v.c. 26, P J O T , 1974. (ii) Beils W o o d , TM05, v.c. 25, E M H , 1/8/87.

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Several adventive grasses were noted in Suffolk in 1989, including the following five species. Lagurus ovatus L., Hare's-tail. Brandon on filled-in dump in forest, TL78, v.c. 26, EMH, 22/5/89. Second record for v.c. 26. Phalaris aquatica L., a Canary-grass. Gt. Ashfield, a Single branched plant at edge of beet päd, TM06, v.c. 26, RA 4/10/89. Hb. E & MH. Det. E. J. Clement, July 1990. Second record for v.c. 26. Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv., Green Bristle-grass. Bungay, on waste ground outside garden, TM38, v.c. 25, GWM, 19/7/89, and also in Ipswich as a garden weed, TM14, v.c. 25, FWS, Oct. 1989. Det. EMH. Setaria pumila (Poiret) Schuhes, Yellow Bristle-grass. Playford, roadside verge, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, Oct. 1989. Det. EMH. Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers., Johnson Grass. Ipswich, waste ground in Purplett St., TM14, v.c. 25, EMH, 1987-9. A large patch about to be lost in a new road scheme. Within 200m of the site in Bath St., where it was recorded in 1977. Also in Bungay, TM38, v.c. 25, GWM, 19/7/89, outside a garden where bird-seed appeared to have been thrown. Scirpus sylvaticus L., Wood Club-rush. Brent Eleigh, marshy area N. of R. Brett, TL94, v.c. 26, JH*, June 1989. An interesting record, as this uncommon species has not previously been recorded here. One plant was removed in 1989 to the Suffolk Showground Conservation Area. Comm E. Milne-Redhead. Blysmus compressus (L.) Panz. ex Link, Fiat Sedge. In marshes near Reydon, TM47, v.c. 25, SH, 1988. Now very rare indeed in Suffolk. Cyperus longus L., Galingale. Felixstowe, beside pond near the Grove, TM33, v.c. 25, BM, Sept. 1989. Det. MNS. Specimen in Ipswich Museum Herbarium. Possibly, but not necessarily, planted. Second Suffolk record. Carex xpseudoaxillaris K. Richter, False Fox Sedge x Remote Sedge. (C. otrubae Podp. x C. remota L.) (i) Ousden, Back St., in roadside ditch, TL75, v.c. 26, RA, 24/5/88. Conf. FWS. (ii) Wickham Market, edge of pool in Potsford Wood, TM25, v.c. 25, EMH, 29/6/86. Both parents close by. These are the only two post-Flora records. Probably overlooked.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 26 (1990)


SOMF. RECENT PLANT RECORDS

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Chrysanthemum segetum ( C o m Marigold) An arable weed which used to be abundant around Dunwich, but in recent years it has declined. In February 1990 fields near Minsmere were fĂźll of its flowers due to the very mild Winter and the fields being left fallow. [An original drawing by Dr. Edwina Beaumont]

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Carex vesicaria L., Bladder Sedge. Between Westhorpe and Bacton, TM06, v.c. 25, R A , 16/6/89. Conf. E M H . Specimen in Ipswich Museum Herbarium. The plants were growing in tufts in the water, along a shaded Stretch of the river. Now a very rare sedge in Suffolk. This is the only recent record. Carex laevigata Sm., Smooth-stalked Sedge. Between Westhorpe and Bacton in marsh, TM06, v.c. 25, R A , 16/6/89. Conf. FWS. Specimen in Ipswich Museum Herbarium. Another very rare species in Suffolk. This is the first record for over 50 years. Last recorded by F. W. Simpson in a wood in the parish of Rickinghall Inferior in 1935. Gymnadenia conopsea (L.) R. Br., Fragrant Orchid. (i) Market Weston Fen S. W. T. Reserve, in marsh with other orchids, TL97, v.c. 26,1989. See S. W. T. Reserves Handbook, 1989. (ii) Barnby, TM49, v.c. 25, JM and T A , 1989. Very rare in the County, existing in only a few sites. Formerly abundant in areas of Redgrave Fen, and still occurs at Thelnetham. The Barnby record is from an area where it has not previously been observed (FWS).

Key to Contributors Abrehart, T. Addington, Rev. R. Block, Dr. M. Briscoe, Mrs. M. Bull, A . L . Cammell, Miss P. F. Coe, Mrs. E. M. Crompton, Mrs. G. Edmonds, Mrs. F. Ellis, Mrs. K. Furze, P. Gaught, M i s s H . M. Harris, Mrs. J. Hawkins, Mrs. J. H o o t o n , Mrs. S. Hyde, Mrs. E. M. Jones, T. Lake, Mrs. M. R. Last, J. Lawson, P. G. Mathews, Mrs. B. Maybury, G. W.

TA RA MB MB* ALB PFC EMC GC FE KE PF HMG JH JH* SH EMH TJ MRL JL PGL BM GWM

* Records from a strictly private site.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 26 (1990)

Mott, A. Muddeman, J. Parker, Mrs. M. Partridge, Dr. J. W. Peck, Mrs. M. Rix, L. Rutterford, M. G. Sanford, M. N. Seil, P. D. Simpson, F. W. Sweetman, R. S. Taylor, Mrs. J. Thomas, Mrs. P. Tofts, R. Trist, P. J. O. Tusting, Miss J. M. Vaughan, Mrs. I. M. Vincent, G. Wakerley, J. C. Warren, R. B. Watson, M. Wyles, MissH.

AM JM MP JWP MP* LR MGR MNS PDS FWS RSS JT PT RT PJOT JMT IMV GV JCW RBW MW HW


SOME RECENT PLANT RECORDS

63

References Bowra, J. C. (1987). Oenothera in Plant Crib 1988. BSBI London. Grenfell, A. L. (1987). Aliens and Adventives, BSBI News 47: 34. Henslow, J. S. and Skepper, E. (1860). Flora of Suffolk. London. Hind, W. M. (1889). Flora of Suffolk. London. Radcliffe-Smith, A. (1988). Euphorbia esula L.IE. x pseudovirgata (Schur) So6/E. cyparissias L. in Plant Crib 1988. BSBI London. Simpson, F. W. (1982). Simpson's Flora of Suffolk. Ipswich. Suffolk Naturalists' Society. Tutin, T. G. etal., eds. (1964-1980). Flora Europaea, 1-5. Cambridge. E. M. Hyde, Parkside, Wool verstone, Ipswich, IP9 1AR

F. W. Simpson, 40, Ruskin Rd., Ipswich, IP4 1PT

Corrections Lathyrus sylvestris L., Narrow-leaved Everlasting Pea, recorded from roadside, Upper Layham, 1984, Trans. Suffolk. Nat. Soc. 21, p. 39, is incorrect and is a variety of L. latifolius L. (FWS). L. sylvestris is very elusive and as far as is known has not been observed in the County for many years. F. W. Simpson. Cheiranthus cheiri L., on the church of St. Peter South Elmham, Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22, p. 39, is not the native Wild Wallflower. Seeds taken from these plants by Mr. E . Milne-Redhead and sown on the wall of his garden have proved it to be a cultivar (E. Milne-Redhead in litt. 1988). Sedum hispanicum L., recorded in Bury St. Edmunds, Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22, p. 38, is now considered by Mr. E. Milne-Redhead to be almost certainly its perennial ally S. bithynicum Boiss. This is sometimes treated as a variety of 5. hispanicum, which isabiennial (E. Milne-Redhead in litt. 1988). E. M. Hyde.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 26 <1990)

Some recent Suffolk plant records  

Hyde, E. M. & Simpson, F. W.

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