Page 1

SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT

c o m p i l e d b y E . M . HYDE a n d F . W .

RECORDS

SIMPSON

For each record the following information is given: locality and habitat, Ordnance Survey 10km Square, vice-county, finder's name or initials (see key at end of article) and date of record. The comments are those of the Compilers, based in some cases on information supplied by the Anders. The nomenclature and order of the species are those of Flora Europaea. The Compilers wish to thank the specialists who determined, or confirmed the identity of, specimens. Simpson's Flora ofSuffolk is used as the authority for claiming first or second County records, supplemented by the large number of records received since its publication. The second and final year of the BSBI Monitoring Scheme brought in a large number of interesting records, some of which have had to be held over until 1990. Polystichum aculeatum (L.) Roth, Hard Shield Fern. Thornham Magna, several specimens on roadside ditch banks, TM07 and TM17, v.c. 25, FWS, 24/4/88. No specimens of P. setiferum (Forsk.) Woynar, Soft Shield Fern, were found, which is the more frequent Suffolk species. Polypodium x mantoniae Rothm., a hybrid Polypody. (P. interjectum Shivas x P. vulgare L.) Stradishall, ditch alongside A143, TL75, v.c. 26, R A , 25/9/88 (first noted in 1987). Det. R. H. Roberts, Oct. 1988. Hb. E & MH. Only the second definite record for West Suffolk. Azolla filiculoid.es Lam., Water Fern. (i) Whatfield, covering small pond in village, TM04, v.c. 26, E M H , 29/4/88. Just within the West Suffolk vice-county, for which it is only the second record. (ii) Hoxne, in the R. Waveney, TM17, v.c. 25, SH, 13/11/88. Sometimes abundant in East Suffolk, though of sporadic occurrence. Thesium humifusum DC., Bastard Toadflax. Cavenham, two specimens surviving on ancient chalk bank, TL76, v.c. 26, FWS, 26/6/88. Formerly found in nearby chalk pit and on roadside verge before the pit was filled in, c. 1980. Polygonum rurivagum Jord. ex Bor., Cornfield Knotgrass. Brandon, forest ride, TL78, v.c. 26, M G R and PJOT, 15/9/87. Det. Dr. J. R. Akeroyd. Apparently rare in Suffolk, but worth searching for in chalky areas in late summer. Usually a cornfield weed. First post-1930 confirmed record for West Suffolk. Rumex rugosus Campd., a Sorrel. Felixstowe, several specimens, naturalised on roadside verge and adjacent grounds, Landguard Common, TM23, v.c. 25, FWS, 16/9/88. Conf. Dr. J. R. Akeroyd. Grown in gardens for its edible leaves. It is sometimes described as

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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 25

Wallflower, Cheiranthus cheiri L. - growing frequently on old walls, e.g. at Bungay, Bury St. Edmunds and Lowestoft. Originally introduced from the Mediterranean, but has probably been growing on these walls for centuries. [An original drawing by Dr. Edwina Beaumont] (drawing life size) 60% reduction

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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

47

a subspecies of R. acetosa (Subsp. ambiguus (Gren.) Lรถve). Rarely naturalised. First Suffolk record. Reynoutriasachalinensis (F. Schmidt Petrop.) Nakai, Giant Knotweed. (i) N. of Wickhambrook, TL75, v.c. 26, R A , July 1988. (ii) Sudbury, by railway line, TL84, v.c. 26, MNS, 8/7/88. Also FWS, 22/7/84. (iii) Bury St. Edmunds, Hardwick Lane, growing outside garden hedge and onto pavement, TL86, v.c. 26, E M C , Oct. 1988. Known here for a n u m b e r o f years (EMC). These are the only West Suffolk records since the publication of the Flora. Salsola kali L. ssp. ruthenica (lljin) Soรถ, Russian Thistle. Nacton, two specimens among Maize, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 26/9/88. Also present several specimens of Amaranthus retroflexus L., Common Amaranthus. Amaranthus blitoides S. Wats., an Amaranthus. Icklingham, a Single prostrate plant at edge of sandy arable field, TL77, v.c. 26, EM-R, 26/8/88. Det. A . L. Grenfell. Second Suffolk record and the first for v.c. 26, West Suffolk. Herniaria glabra L., Glabrous Rupture-wort. Thetford, TL88, v.c. 26, N G , 1985-9. This is an interesting new record for a rare British species, with its main concentrations in the Norfolk and Suffolk Breckland. Sixteen plants were discovered in 1985 by Mr. and Mrs. Gibbons in the gutter outside their house in Thetford (administratively in Norfolk, but in the West Suffolk vice-county). They have succeeded in protecting the plants from all hazards except for one dose of weedkiller. Now, in February 1989, three plants survive, thriving in this season's mild winter weather. This colony is well away from other long-established Suffolk sites and would appear to have resulted from an accidental introduction. It is fortunate that it was noticed! Helleborus foetidus L., Stinking Hellebore. Thornham Magna, Single specimen on bank of pond, not near garden, TM07, v.c. 25, FWS, 24/4/88. Ceratophyllum submersum L., Spineless Hornwort. Needham Market, in R. Gipping, TM05, v.c. 25, CJH, 6/9/88. By no means common. Not previously recorded in this part of the river. Papaver rhoeas L., Common Poppy. Shottisham, several specimens with white flowers in disturbed roadside ditch and in hedge opposite, growing with forms with red flowers. The petals of the white flowers were softer, more delicate, and more similar to Shirley Poppies. TM34, v.c. 25, PC, 3/7/88. Comm. E. T. Daniels. Also a Single specimen on the Martlesham By-pass, TM24, v.c. 25, HP, also 3/7/88. In July 1985 a small patch of white-flowered poppies was seen in an enormous colony of red ones in a field by the R. Orwell near Chelmondiston, TM23, v.c. 25, E M H .

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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 25

Papaver lecoqii Lamotte, Babington's Poppy. All Saints South Elmham, one plant at edge of arable field, TM38, v.c. 25, EB and G W M , 6/6/87. Further plants along Uncle's Lane. Rare in Suffolk, with few recent records. Sedum forsteranum Sm., Rock Stonecrop. Bungay, naturalised in cemetery, TM38, v.c. 25, G W M , June 1988. Very similar to the much more frequent Large Yellow Stonecrop, Sedum reflexum L. This is the only post-Flora record. Rosa stylosa Desv., Long-styled Rose. (i) Hitcham, several bushes in hedgerow rieh in wild Roses, TL95, v.c. 26, J H , June 1988. Det. Mrs. I. M. Vaughan, Nov. 1988. (ii) Saxtead, TM26, v.c. 25, GP, 1988. Conf. P. G. Lawson, in flower and fruit. A large number of bushes in tall hedge along by-road. Cytisus scoparius (L.) Link, Broom. Bushes with bi-coloured flowers are frequently seen in gardens and just occasionally on heathland among the usual yellow-flowered bushes. Recorded in the summer of 1988 at Piper's Vale, Ipswich, TM14, v.c. 25, T H (flowers maroon and yellow) and on Warren Heath, just outside Ipswich, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS (flowers brown and yellow). Vicia tenuifolia Roth, Fine-leaved Vetch. (i) Brandon Park, open area near forest ride, 1987. (ii) Wangford, in felled conifer woodland and on sides of ride parallel to road, 4/7/88. Both records TL78, v.c. 26, M G R and PJOT. Still on verge of A l l ( T ) near Barton Mills, FWS, 1988. A rare plant in Suffolk, but apparently increasing in this part of Breckland. Vicia tenuissima (Bieb.) Schinz & Thell., Slender Tare. Bildeston, in grass between arable field and farm track, TM05, v.c. 26, EM-R and FWS, 22/6/88. A rare native species, with very few known sites in Suffolk. Lathyrus nissolia L., Grass Vetchling. (i) Chilton Industrial Estate on secondary grassland, TL84, v.c. 26, TWP, 19/6/84. Comm. E M - R . (ii) Gt. Waldingfield, on Suffolk Wildlife Trust Protected Roadside Verge, TL94, v.c. 26, RS, 26/7/87. Conf. EM-R. Abundant in 1984 inside the adjacent pits, pers. comm. E M - R . (ii) Ipswich, several unusually sturdy plants, with pods 6cm long and 'leaves' 5mm wide, on grassy slope above Stoke Park Drive, 1/7/81. Hb. E & M H . Also a few plants flowering in rough grass behind the Solar Store in June 1986. Both records TM14, v.c. 25, E M H . This attractive plant is fairly common on the coast, but rare inland. Coronilla varia L . , Crown Vetch. Wangford, a patch of about 8 x 4 paces in felled conifer woodland, with Vicia tenuifolia (see above), TL78, v.c. 26, M G R and P J O T , 4/7/88. Probably from

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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

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garden waste, though nowhere near a garden. This perennial vetch can persist in a suitable habitat for a very long time. First record for West Suffolk. Ruta graveolens L., Common Rue. Ipswich, Single specimen by entrance to the Ipswich Market, Black Horse Lane. This specimen managed to survive and commenced fiowering before being pulled up along with other 'weeds' by Council 'gardeners'. It most likely grew from a seed brought in with Mediterranean produce. TM14, v.c. 25, FWS, 1987. Malva sylvestris L., Common Mallow. Blaxhall, Single specimen on verge of hard stand near Stone Farm with very unusual attractive violet blue flowers, TM35, v.c. 25, FWS, 1986-8. This specimen has survived although its stems are cut each year when in flower by the destructive verge and hedge cutting machine before seed is developed. Ferula communis L., Giant Fennel. Found in Icklingham, v.c. 26, by Mrs. G. Crompton, accompanied by Professor H. Art, 24/5/88. Det. C. J. King. This species is a native of S. Europe, in dry hills and rocky places. This must surely be the most impressive alien plant ever to have appeared on a Suffolk roadside. Two metres tall, with almost horizontal branches crowded with bright yellow umbels, it stood throughout the summer in rough grass on the verge of the A l l ( T ) . It had probably been there for several years, fiowering for the first time in 1988. Its origin is a mystery. Deliberate planting beside that highly dangerous Stretch of road is most unlikely. It is perhaps just possible that seed feil from the proverbial lorry on its way to or from the Mediterranean. First Suffolk record and probably only the second for Britain. Toriiis arvensis (Huds.) Link, Spreading Hedge Parsley. Icklingham, margin of sugar-beet field, TL77, v.c. 26, D E C , 6/7/88. Also PDS and J G M , 21/7/88. Now very rare. This is the only post-Flora record of this species as an arable weed. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium (P. D. Seil). Anagallis minima (L.) E. H. L. Krause, Chaffweed. Tuddenham, TL77, v.c. 26, D E C , 9/8/88. The rediscovery of this very rare and very tiny Suffolk plant was one of the highlights of our botanical year. It was re-found by Dr. D. E . Coombe on Roper's Heath in a hollow where he last saw it in 1953. No other extant colony is known in the County and the plant was feared extinct. A total of twenty-five plants was found. One, about 7mm tall, with one capsule, was taken as a voucher specimen, now in Cambridge University Herbarium. Also in the hollow was Anagallis tenella (L.) L., Bog Pimpernel. This is another now rare plant, last seen here by Dr. Coombe in 1949. The appearance of A. minima was probably helped by shallow excavation of the hollow, at the suggestion of Dr. Coombe, in Order to keep the site moist, and also by the exceptionally high water levels on the Breck in the preceding months. It may also have contributed to the re-appearance, also in 1988, of a rare

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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 25

Liverwort, Rieda beyrichiana Hampe ex Lehm. It was first discovered here in 1953 by R. Parker and is known nowhere eise within a distance of 250km (Richards and Whitehouse, 1988). It has been seen here once or twice in the intervening years. We are indebted to Dr. Coombe for photographs of the site and its plants and for much detailed information. Polemonium caeruleum L., Jacob's Ladder. Sudbury, Single speeimen on roadside of new roundabout. Possibly a relic of cultivation or a garden throw-out. TL84, v.c. 26,15/7/88. Det. FWS. Finder's name not recorded. Second Suffolk record. Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth., Fiddleneck. Sutton, abundant at edge of arable field, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 7/6/88. This attractive species may become common on the light soils of the Sandlings. Brunnera macrophylla (Adams) I. M. Johnston, Greater Forget-me-not. Lidgate, Bury Lane, one plant on shady bank, TL75, v.c. 26, R A , 16/5/88. Hb. E & M B . Second Suffolk record. Still in the ditch at Thurston where first seen in 1979. Verbena rigida Sprengel Ipswich, waste ground near old maltings in Princes St., TM14, v.c. 25, MNS, 15/7/88. Det. MNS. A perennial species with reddish-purple flowers grown in gardens as a bedding plant. Native in Argentina and Brazil. First Suffolk record. See drawing on page 51. Stachys x ambigua Sm., Hybrid Woundwort. (S. palustris L. x S. sylvatica L.) (i) Creeting St. Mary, on dry chalky bank, TM15, v.c. 25, E M H , 22/7/88. Hb. E & M H . Growing with Clinopodium vulgare L., Wild Basil and Anacamptis pyramidalis (L.) L. C. M. Richard, Pyramidal Orchid. This hybrid combines the general appearance of S. palustris with the smell of S. sylvatica. More usually found in wetter places than the habitat described above. (ii) St. Cross South Elmham, Hall Farm Walks, TM38, v.c. 25, Lowestoft Field Club, 3/8/88. Mentha x smithiana R. A . Graham, Glabrous Red Mint. (M. aquatica L. x M. arvensis L. x M. spicata L.) Eriswell, waste ground, TL77, v.c. 26, A A B , Sept. 1988. Det. Dr. R. M. Harley. Comm. E M - R . One of the many mints grown in gardens. It occasionally survives in waste places. Very few Suffolk records. Solanum nigrum L. ssp. schultesii (Opiz) Wessely, a subspecies of Black Nightshade. Lakenheath, Claypits, about 30 plants near car parking space, TL78, v.c. 26, JWP, 31/7/88. Differs from the common ssp. nigrum in its much more hairy stem, the hairs glandulär and usually patent. First Suffolk record. *Veronica anagallis-aquatica Pink Water Speedwell. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 25

L. x V. catenata Pennell, Water Speedwell x


SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

51

I cm fioiw Q/\d. brarieoti

lern corotla comed out tu' sbau sttuviefvs

Verbena rigida Sprengel [An original drawing by Hilli Thomson]

i-IA uÃ&#x;fKjn

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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 25

(i) Blaxhall, Langham Bridge, in damp ground by R. Aide, TM35, v.c. 25, J M C and C D P , 11/6/88. Conf. Dr. S. M. Walters. Growing with V. catenata, from which it differed in its larger, rather purplish-blue flowers and in most of its capsules not swelling in fruit. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium. (ii) Bungay, Stow Fen, in pond, TM38, v.c. 25, EB and G W M , 29/6/88. First and second Suffolk records. Utricularia minor L., Lesser Bladderwort. Reydon, Smear Marshes, in dyke,TM47, v.c. 25, SH, 1988. A rare speciesin Suffolk. This is the only recent record. Galium album Mill. ssp. album, Upright Bedstraw. Beccles, small colony on verge of former railway track, TM49, v.c. 25, FWS, 21/8/88. Leycesteria formosa Wall., Himalayan Honeysuckle. Martlesham, appeared in garden as a seedling, TM24, v.c. 25, HM, Aug. 1988. Det. MNS. A deciduous shrub frequently grown in gardens. Its purple berries are particularly attractive to Blackbirds. Native of India and S. W. China. First Suffolk record. Campanulaposcharskyana Degen, Trailing Bellflower. Snape, on hedgebank by road, TM35, v.c. 25, FWS, 1984-8. A pretty, pale blue bellflower grown in gardens and occasionally surviving in the wild. Native of W. Yugoslavia. First Suffolk record. Lobelia erinus L., Blue Lobelia. (i) Near Ousden Church, two plants in stubble at edge of field, TL75, v.c. 26, R A , 9/9/88. None seen in adjoining garden. First record for West Suffolk. (ii) Ipswich, TM14, v.c. 25, 1988. Three plants in Elm St. at base of building, with seedling Buddleias (FWS); one plant outside a shop in The Walk, exactly where seen about seven years ago ( E M H ) and dozens of plants flowering between paving stones round the Wolsey Theatre (EMH). (iii) Beccles, waste ground, TM49, v.c. 25, E B , PGL, G W M , J M , 19/9/87. Bellisperennis L., Common Daisy. Playford, form with larger, semi-double flowers on verge; obviously a cross with a cultivated variety. TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 15/4/88. Artemisia dracunculus L., Tarragon. Between Poslingford Corner and Cläre, on Strip of former garden between two cottages, TL74, v.c. 26, FE, Oct. 1988. Det. E M H . A relic of cultivation surviving on its own. First Suffolk record. Hb. E & M H . Cirsium eriophorum (L.) Scop., Woolly Thistle. Poslingford, roadside verge, TL74, v.c. 26, FE, July 1987. Comm. EM-R. This Thistle appears now to be restricted to a small area in West Suffolk.

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Centaurea montana L., Mountain Cornflower. (i) Near Sudbury, TL864418, A A B , 1983. This site is in administrative Suffolk, but in v.c. 19, N. Essex. (ii) Hitcham, several plants in long grass by field gateway, TL95, v.c. 26, J H , Sept. 1988. Known here by Mrs. Harris for at least 4 years. First record for v.c. 26, West Suffolk. (iii) Between Thorpeness and Aldeburgh, in long grass, well away from houses, TM45, v.c. 25, PDS and J G M , 23/6/88. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium. Second record for East Suffolk. Centaurea macrocephala Puschk., Yellow Hardhead. Middleton, appeared in farmyard, TM46, v.c. 25, Mrs. Brown, 1988. Det. PGL. Perhaps bird-sown, since none exists in farmhouse garden. Second Suffolk record. Mycelis muralis (L.) D u m . , Wall Lettuce. (i) Lidgate, near Church. TL75, v.c. 26, PJW, 30/10/87. (ii) Gt. Finborough, on churchyard wall, TM05, v.c. 26, E M H , 29/7/88. (iii) Wingfield, on walls in grounds of Castle, TM27, v.c. 25, FWS, 5/8/84. (iv) Flixton, TM38, v.c. 25, PGL and G W M , 2/5/87. By no means common. Records from these widely spaced localities are encouraging. An attractive slender plant of old walls and banks. Stratiotes aloides L., Water Soldier. A n e w site, in the Stowmarket area, v.c. 26, PMB, April 1988. Alarge colony in a wide, deep ditch. An interesting record, because this species is now virtually confined to the Lothingland area. It is also only the second post1930 record for the West Suffolk vice-county. Potamogeton perfoliatus L., Perfoliate Pondweed. (i) Bungay, TM38, v.c. 25, G W M and EB, June 1988. (ii) Barsham, in deep marsh dyke near the R. Waveney, TM38, v.c. 25, JM, July 1988. Recorded in this area in Hind's Flora, but not in the years between. Potamogeton coloratus Hรถrnern., Fen Pondweed. Lakenheath Poor's Fen, in fen ditch and in fen, TL78, v.c. 26, M G R , 15/8/87. A rare Pondweed, with very few recent records. Kniphofia uvaria (L.) Hooker, Red Hot Poker. (i) Ipswich, The Dales, TM14, v.c. 25, M A H , 28/4/81. A garden outcast, growing in rough grass. (ii) Freston, roadside verge, TM14, v.c. 25, FWS, 24/9/88. Another garden outcast. Also reported near Spring Wood, Wherstead, 1988. These are the only Suffolk records. The plant is a native of South Africa. Juncus tenuis Willd., Slender Rush. (i) Wangford, S. W. of Mayday Farm, in open forest ride, TL78, v.c. 26, M G R and P J O T , 4/7/88.

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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 25

(ii) G t . Bricett, disturbed area in d a m p woodland, TM05, v.c. 26, E M H and J H , 20/7/88. First and second West Suffolk records. * Agropogon littorcelis (Sm.) C. E. H u b b a r d , Perennial Beard-grass. (Agrostis stolonifera L. x Polypogon monspeliensis (L.) Desf.) Beccles, in field entrance, with both parent species, TM49, v.c. 25, T A and JM, 20/7/87. Conf. P J O T , 1988. An exciting find. First Suffolk record. * Alopecurus x plettkei Mattfeld, Bulbous x Marsh Foxtail. (A. bulbosus G o u a n x A. geniculatus L.) (i) Burgh Castle, Castle Farm, in managed grazing marshes, T G 4 0 , v.c. 25, recorded by the late R . P. Libbey, 1980. Specimen in Leicester University H e r b a r i u m . (ii) H u m b e r s t o n e Marshes, south of Breydon Water, TG50, v.c. 25, P J O T , 1982. H b . P J O T . A very rare hybrid in Britain. First and second Suffolk records. Phalaris minor Retz., Lesser Canary Grass. Witnesham, Single specimen by footpath in Maize crop, TM15, v.c. 25, FWS, 13/8/88. Carex divulsa Stokes ssp. leersii (Kneucker) W. Koch, Leers's Sedge. (i) Worlingon Golf Club, by first tee, TL67, v.c. 26, G C , July 1988. Det. R. W. David, A u g . 1988. First confirmed West Suffolk record since the publication of the Flora. (ii) Bungay, Holy Trinity Churchyard, G W M , May 1987 and Ilketshall St. A n d r e w , BB, C P B and G W M , 3/6/87. Both records TM38, v.c. 25. All the recent East Suffolk records are from this area of the vice-county. Carex strigosa H u d s . , Thin-spiked Wood Sedge. A l d h a m , Wolves W o o d . A b u n d a n t in glade with C. sylvatica H u d s . , Wood Sedge. T M 0 4 , v.c. 25 and v.c. 26, FWS, 5/6/88. Carex distans L., Distant Sedge. (i) Stradishall, in wet part of field, TL75, v.c. 26, R A , 2/6/88. Conf. FWS. (ii) Sudbury, wet m e a d o w on the flood piain of the R. Stour, TL84, v.c. 26, A A B , 3/7/88. Conf. R . W. David. Comm. E M - R . Seidom found in Suffolk away f r o m the coast, so these records are of particular interest. Carexpallescens L., Pale Sedge. (i) Wolves W o o d , three specimens, TM04, v.c. 26, 5/6/88. (ii) R a y d o n W o o d , two specimens, TM04, v.c. 26, 2/6/88. (iii) Gosbeck W o o d , single specimen, TM15, v.c. 25, 6/6/86. (iv) R e y d o n W o o d , several specimens, TM47, v.c. 25, 1986-8. All records FWS. Carex acuta L., Slender Tufted Sedge. Ickworth, TL86, v.c. 26, 27/5/88, MS (National Trust Biological Survey T e a m ) . D e t . R. W. David, Nov. 1988. H b . E & M H . This sedge was found in

Trans. Suffolk

Nat. Soc. 25


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Purple Viper's Bugloss, Echium plantagineum L. - f o u n d at Beccles in 1987 in large numbers. Probably a garden escape. Native of SW Britain on sandy cliff tops. [An original drawing by D r . E d w i n a B e a u m o n t ] (drawing life size) 6 0 % reduction

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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 25

a marshy area on the eastern side of the estate. A rare sedge in Suffolk. Only the second West Suffolk record since the publication of the Flora. Key to Contributors Abrehart, T. Addington, Rev. R. Barsted, Mrs. B. Barsted, C. P. Beaumont, Dr. E. Brinkley, P. M. Butcher, A. A. Cambridge, P. Coe, Mrs. E. M. C o o m b e , Dr. D. E. Croft, Mrs. J. M. Crompton, Mrs. G. Edmonds, Mrs. F. Gibbons, N. Harris, Mrs. J. Hawes, C. J. Hooton, Mrs. S. Hutton, T. Hyde, Mrs. E. M. Hyde, M. A.

TA RA BB CPB EB PMB AAB PC EMC DEC JMC GC FE NG JH CJH SH TH EMH MAH

Lawson, P. G. Maybury, G. W. Mendel, H. Milne-Redhead, E. Muddeman, J. Murrell, J. G. Palmer, T. W. Partridge, Dr. J. W. Peck, G. Philbrick, H. Preston, C. D. Rutterford, M. G. Sanford, M. N. Scruby, Miss M. Seil, P. D. Simpson, F. W. Sweetman, R. Trist, P. J. O. Wanstall, P. J. Lowestoft Field Club

PGL GWM HM EM-R JM JGM TWP JWP GP HP CDP MGR MNS MS PDS FWS RS PJOT PJW LFC

References Hind, W. M. (1889). Flora of Suffolk. London. Richards, P. W. & Whitehouse, H. L. K. (1988). Fifty years of the Cambridge Bryological Excursions. Nature in Cambridgeshire, no. 30, 41. Simpson, F. W. (1982). Simpsons Flora of Suffolk. Ipswich. Suffolk Naturalists' Society. Tutin, T. G. etal., eds. (1964-1980). Flora Europaea, 1 - 5 , Cambridge. E. M. Hyde, Parkside, Woolverstone, Ipswich, IP9 1AR

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 25

F. W. Simpson, 40, Ruskin Rd., Ipswich, IP4 IPT


's

Plate 5: Giant Fennel, Ferula communis, a Mediterranean species flowering on the verge of the A l l at Icklingham. First Suffolk record (p. 49). (Photo: Francis W. Simpson)


Plate 6: Gum Cistus, Cislus laurifolius, a S. European species now naturalised at Rosehill, Farnham. (Photo: Francis W. Simpson)


Plate 8: Water Soldier, Stratiotes

aloides at Howard's Common, Lothingland, 13th June 1989 (p. 53). (Photo: Howard Mendel)

Some recent Suffolk plant records  

Hyde, E. M. & Simpson, F. W.

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