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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

c o m p i l e d b y E . M. HYDEandF. W. SIMPSON For each record the following information is given: locality and habitat, Ordnance Survey 10km Square, vice-county, finder's name or initials (see key at end of article) and date of record. The comments are those of the Compilers, based in some cases on information supplied by the Anders. The nomenclature and order of the species are with very few exceptions those of Flora Europaea. The Compilers wish to thank the specialists who determined, or confirmed the identity of, specimens. Simpson's Flora of Suffolk is used as the authority for claiming first and second County records. Dryopteris pseudomas (Woll.) Holub and Pouzar, Golden-Scaled Male Fern. Levington, colony of eighteen specimens near the Decoy, associated with D. filix-mas (L.) Schott and the hybrid D. filix-mas x D. pseudomas. Also D. carthusiana (Vill.) H. P. Fuchs, Narrow Buckler Fern, and D. dilatata (Hoffm.) A. Gray, Broad Buckler Fern, both fairly abundant. TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 19/5/85. Polypodium x mantoniae Rothm., a hybrid Polypody. (P. interjectum Shivas x P. vulgare L.) Ipswich, on brick wall in Belstead Road, TM14, v.c. 25, MNS, 17/11/85. Det. R. H. Roberts. One of only a handful of Suffolk records. It requires expert determination. Azolla filiculoides Lam., Water Fern. Felixstowe, in ditch near Peewit Caravan Park, TM23, v.c. 25, EMH, 27/7/85. It completely covered one section of the ditch. Salix fragilis L. var. russelliana (Sm.) Koch, Bedford Willow. Barham, flooded gravel pits, TM15, v.c. 25, PGL, 25/8/85. This is the only recent record of this member of the native S. fragilis L. agg., Crack Willow. First described by J. E. Smith as S. russelliana Sm. and recorded in Hind's Flora for four West Suffolk sites. It is stated as being the most widespread member of the Salix fragilis complex (Meikle, 1984). However, all true Bedford Willows are female trees; the male tree is unknown. If supposedly male trees are found, they are likely to be hybrids, or var. fragilis. Salix x rubens Schrank, White x Crack Willow. (iS. alba L. x S. fragilis L.) Barham Pits, TM15, v.c. 25, PGL, 25/8/85. The first substantiated Suffolk record for this hybrid. It was found in an extensive area of flooded gravel pits, where there are many Salix species, varieties and hybrids. A very variable hybrid with a wide ränge of intermediate forms. Salix triandra L., Almond Willow. (i) Hitcham, marshy ground by stream, TL95, v.c. 26, PJW and EM-R, 2/7/86.

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(ii) Carlton Colville, Sprats Water Nature Reserve, marshland by ditch, TM59, v.c. 25, GW, 3/7/83. Conf. R. C. L. Howitt. Comm. EM-R. A very variable Willow with many named cultivars and formerly grown in Osier beds for basket-making. Many trees are relics or descendants of cultivation. Probably a native species in the County, although some varieties were introduced from the Continent. Viscum album L., Mistletoe. Bury St Edmunds, Abbey Gardens, five good bunches on Buck-eye, Aesculus sp., TL86, v.c. 26, EMC, 1985. This is an interesting new host for Mistletoe in Suffolk. Also reported in 1985 on Lime in Ickworth Park and Hardwick Park (both EMC) and at Gipping by the Church (EM-R) and on Hawthorn in Cherry Lane, Ipswich (FWS). Salsola kalt L. subsp. kali, Prickly Saltwort. (i) Shotley, nine or ten plants on sandy shore, TM23, v.c. 25, EMH, September 1985. Like Glaucium flavum Crantz, Yellow Horned Poppy, and Euphorbia paralias L., Sea Spurge, a new species for Shotley. Unfortunately this shore-line is being so rapidly eroded that their existence here will be brief. (ii) Mells, near Haiesworth, in sand-pit, TM47, v.c. 25, MNS, 15/6/85. An inland site for a maritime plant. Amaranthus bouchonii Thell., a Pigweed. Brantham, many plants in Maize field and along track,TM13, v.c. 25, EMH, 14/9/85. Hb. E & MH. Not much more than Vi mile east of the site of the first Suffolk record for this species, discovered by N. Kerr and J. Keeble in 1959. It may well have survived unnoticed in the area ever since. Amaranthus retroflexus L., Common Amaranthus. (i) Eriswell, in sugar-beet field, TL78, v.c. 26, MGR, SR, PJOT, October 1985. (ii) Campsey Ash, about a hundred plants in fallow field, TM35, v.c. 25, FWS, 22/10/85. Phytolacca acinosa Roxb. sensu lato, Poke Weed. (i) Bramford, two specimens on tip in cleared woodland, TM14, v.c. 25, BC, FWS et al., 9/6/85. (ii) Blaxhall, one specimen in plantation, TM35, v.c. 25, 17/7/85. Comm. PGL. Both finds det. E. J. Clement. A native of China. Agrostemma githago L., Corn Cockle. (i) West Stow, Single specimen near Anglo-Saxon Village, TL87, v.c. 26, NVH, 13/7/85. (ii) Wherstead, Single plant, disturbed area near Bourne Bridge, TM14, v.c. 25, LM, August 1985. (iii) Thorington, four plants in cornfield, TM47, v.c. 25, CC and GC, 6/7/84. Comm. PGL. (iv) Wenhaston, Single plant in garden, TM47, v.c. 25, JE, August 1984. Probably derived from the cornfields. Mrs Ellis recalls going out into the fields as a child to pull the Corn Cockles!

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22


SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

39

Silene gallica L., English Catchfiy. (i) Ipswich Docks, on dry gravel on wharfside, TM14, v.c. 25, MNS, 10/7/85. (ii) Benhall, on sandy bank, TM36, v.c. 25, EMH, July 1984. Gypsophilapaniculata L., Maiden's Breath, Chalk Plant. Benacre, on gravel, TM58, v.c. 25, JM, 1985, Det. P. G. Lawson. This is the perennial Gypsophila with crowded panicles of tiny white flowers, frequently grown in gardens and used by Aorists. A native of C. Europe and W. Asia. This is the first record for Suffolk outside a garden. Anemone nemorosa L., Wood Anemone. (i) Beyton, small colony of double-flowered form in woodland, TL96, v.c. 26, E M H & FWS, 17/4/85. (ii) Rushmere St Andrew, double-flowered form on roadside verge, TM14, v.c. 25, FWS, 1985. Thalictrum minus L., Lesser Meadow Rue. (i) Pakenham, three or four plants on roadside, TL96, v.c. 26, MNS, 9/7/84. (ii) Thurston, in ancient grass of Churchyard, probably indigenous, TL96, v.c. 26, FWS, 13/6/85. Thurston Heath nearby, now a housing estate, was formerly a rieh habitat of chalk-loving species, including Gentianella campestris (L.) Bรถrner, Field Gentian. Papaver atlanticum (Ball) Cosson, a garden Poppy. (i) West Stow, small increasing colony in Churchyard, TL87, v.c. 26, FWS, 11/10/85. Few West Suffolk records. We hope this colony will be allowed to flourish and that it will not be destroyed by the application of weedkillers, which threaten the churchyard flora in many parishes. (ii) Playford, on roadside bank, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 1/4/85. Frequent cutting prevents it flowering here. (iii) Waldringfield, on bank in village, TM24, v.c. 25, EMH, 28/10/85. This is one of our increasing adventive species. In gardens it increases rapidly through seedlings. Inevitably, throw-outs are found in odd places. Fumaria muralis Sond. ex Koch subsp. boraei (Jord.) Pugsl., Ramping Fumitory. Lound, on roadside, TM59, v.c. 25, CPB, 22/6/85. Seen here about 8 years ago, re-found 1985. This species seems to be decreasing, possibly through frequent verge-cutting. Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz, Gold of Pleasure. (i) Kentford Pit, on sewage waste, spread on site ofspent pit, TL76, v.c. 26, GMSE, 1985. Only the third post-1950 record for West Suffolk. (ii) Melton, many plants on roadside verge and in gutter, with bird-seed species, TM25, v.c. 25, EMH, 30/6/85. The only recent record for East Suffolk. Cheiranthus cheiri L., Wallflower. St Peter South Elmham, abundant on flint wall of church tower from bottom to top, TM38, v.c. 25, MP, 6/8/85. Comm. EM-R. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22


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Lepidium heterophyllum Benth., Smith's Cress. Shotley, edge of field by farm-track, TM23, v.c. 25, MNS, 29/5/85. An interesting new site for a perennial Lepidium rare in Suffolk. Sedum spurium M. Bieb., Caucasian Stonecrop. (i) Rushmere St Andrew, edge of Common, TM14, v.c. 25, FWS, 1985. (ii) Melton, flowering on mown roadside verge, TM25, v.c. 25, EMH, 30/6/85. (iii) Holton, in private Park, TM47, v.c. 25, MBE and JPE, 1985. A very large colony on the site of temporary houses allotted to American Forces in the last war. Completely naturalised. Rosa coriifolia Fr. Market Weston Fen Nature Reserve, in scrub S.E. of Fen, TL97, v.c. 26, IMV, 27/6/85. First record for West Suffolk. A description of this Rose and the one that follows can be found in Mrs Vaughan's 'Introductory note on the native Roses of Suffolk', Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 18(4). Rosa obtusifolia Desv. Market Weston Fen Nature Reserve, in scrub S.E. of Fen, TL97, v.c. 26, IMV, 27/6/85. Second record for West Suffolk. The 1962 record in Simpsons Flora from a roadside hedge near Redgrave Fen (E. L. Swann), although in TM07, is just inside the vice-county of West Suffolk. Comm. MNS, from correspondence held at Ipswich Museum. Mrs Vaughan has now added several new Rosa records to the Suffolk list, since she returned to live in the County. Potentilla recta L., Sulphur Cinquefoil. (i) Bramford, naturalised beside track, spread from garden, TM14, v.c. 25, BC, 9/6/85. (ii) Barham, on central reservation of A45, TM15, v.c. 25, H M G , June 1985. It is surprising how successfully this plant competes for a place on roadsides, heaths and waste land, even in tall rank Vegetation. Potentilla anglica Laicharding, Trailing Tormentil. (i) Snape, in mown grass just inland of river wall, TM35, v.c. 25, IMV, 9/8/84. (ii) Friston, dry heathy verge, TM45, v.c. 25, IMV, 1/7/84. Prunus padus L., Bird Cherry. (i) Long Melford, in spinney beside Chad Brook, TL84, v.c. 26, AW, 12/5/85. (ii) Hunston, single specimen in ancient roadside hedge, TL96, v.c. 26, FWS, 7/5/85. Trifolium incarnatum L. subsp. incarnatum, Crimson Clover. Levington, on central reservation of A45, TM23, v.c. 25, HM, 10/6/85. Also recorded by HT, PGL, and others. A large patch of the striking blood-red flowers caught the eye of a number of people driving to Felixstowe. Mrs H. Thompson has kindly drawn the plant for us. See opposite. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22


SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

Trifolium

incarnatum

Crimson Clover

L., s s p .

41

incarnatum

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22


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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 22

Trifolium medium L., Zigzag Clover. Bures St Mary, Arger Fen, small colony in woodland ride, TL93, v.c. 26, FWS, 21/7/85. An unusual habitat for this species. Uncommon in West Suffolk, with few records. Euphorbia cyparissias L., Cypress Spurge. Westerfield, Single new colony on railway verge bank between Westerfield and Ipswich, TM14, v.c. 25, FWS, 21/5/85. Euonymus latifolius (L.) Mill., Broad-leaved Spindle-tree. Hunston, Single specimen in old hedge, TL96, v.c. 26, FWS, 6/5/85. First Suffolk record. Anative ofS.-C. andS.E. Europe. Perhaps occurs elsewhere in the County, overlooked. E. europaeus L. also occurs in this same hedge. Viola hirta L. subsp. hirta, Hairy Violet. Holton, in private Park, TM47, v.c. 25, M B E and JPE, April 1985. A small colony growing in open grassland on chalky soil with Carex flacca Schreb., Glaucous Sedge, Ophrys apifera Huds., Bee Orchid, and Lathyrus nissolia L., Grass Vetchling; plants found later in the year heavily infected with the rust Puccinia violae D.C., Flor., Fr. ( E A E , MBE and JPE). Coriandrum sativum L., Coriander. (i) Kentford Pit, on sewage waste, spread on site of spent pit, TL76, v.c. 26, GMSE, 1985. Only the second record for West Suffolk. (ii) Bramford, by footpath, TM14, v.c. 25, MNS, 18/8/85. Carum carvi L., Caraway. Wherstead, roadside verge, TM14, v.c. 25, MNS, 26/5/85. The second post-1950 record for East Suffolk. Toriiis arvensis (Huds.) Link, Spreading Hedge Parsley. Boxford, weed in flower-bed, TL93, v.c. 26, CJL, 7/8/85. Conf. M. J. Wigginton. This is the first record for some 20 years. Once a common arable weed. Cuscuta campestris Yuncker, Field Dodder. Wortham, abundant in nursery garden, TM07, v.c. 25, JL, October 1985. Hb. E & MH. A striking orange-yellow species, usually parasitic on cultivated plants. In this case there were patches up to a yard Square scrambling over Platycodongrandiflorum A . D C . var. mariesii Nichols, Balloon Flower. Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth., Fiddleneck. (i) Westleton, Single specimen on verge of old bridleway where the hedge had been cleared, TM46, v.c. 25, FWS, 9/7/85. Det. E. J. Clement. First Suffolk record. This annual species, a native of California, is grown in gardens as a good bee-flower. (ii) Ipswich, appearedingroundsofStokeHighSchool,TM14,v.c. 25, M H , 27/9/85. Det. M. N. Sanford. Symphytum caucasicum Bieb., Caucasian Comfrey. Stoke-by-Clare, on roadside verge, TL74, v.c. 26, JH, 16/6/85. First record for West Suffolk. A blue-flowered Comfrey, sometimes grown in gardens.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22


SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

43

Trachystemon orientalis (L.) G. Don fil., Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. Hardwick Park, Bury St Edmunds, TL86, v.c. 26,1985. Appeared in garden of Mrs Sewell. Comm. EMC and GT. An introduction, naturalised in the Park and known there for some years by members of the Bury Naturalists' Society. It is an attractive member of the Borage family with purple-blue flowers and, like the preceding species, it needs plenty of room. Lavandula angustifolia Mill., Lavender. Nacton, Single seedling bush at base of Church wall, TM23, v.c. 25, FWS, 19/5/85. Second Suffolk record. Although Lavender is very common in gardens, seedlings are quite rare. Frequently bushes and cuttings are thrown out on to tips and waste places and occasionally take root. Buddleia globosa Hope, Orange-ball Tree. (i) Kesgrave, one bush by A12, TM24, v.c. 25, E M H , July 1985. Perhaps self-sown from garden rubbish. (ii) Aldeburgh, Single specimen in Brickworks pit, TM45, v.c. 25, FWS, 30/6/85. New Flora record. A native of South America. Verbascum x semialbum Chaub., Dark x Great Mullein. ( V . nigrum x V. thapsus) Little Welnetham, Railway Walk, frequent on disused railway track and banks, TL85, v.c. 26, EM-R, 20/9/85. Third record for West Suffolk. Also there Rhamnus catharticus L., Buckthorn, in a new site. Veronica scutellata L., Marsh Speedwell. Fressingfield, margin of pond on Chippenhall Green, TM27, v.c. 25, FWS, 31/5/85. A decreasing species, owing to loss of habitat. Veronica spicata L. sensu lato Garden Spiked Speedwell. Bramford, on filled-in tip, TM14, v.c. 25, PMB, July 1985. A second site for one of the cultivated forms of Spiked Speedwell. Galium parisiense L., Wall Bedstraw. Westleton, on sandy heath, TM46, v.c. 25, G W M and EB, 27/7/85. Hb. E & MH. First record for East Suffolk. All previous records have been from the Breckland, where plants have occurred on old walls and in sandy places. This exciting discovery may now lead to more sites being found on other East Suffolk heaths. Legousia speculum-veneris (L.) Chaix, Large Venus's Looking-glass. Newmarket, near grain silo, TL66, v.c. 29 in Suffolk, GMSE, 16/6/85. A member of the Bellflower family, native in S. Europe, with bright violet-blue flowers. An occasional casual in Britain. First record for West Suffolk. Jasione montana L., Sheep's Bit. Polstead, acid grassland on sand, TL93, v.c. 26, D R B , 24/8/85. Comm. EM-R. An interesting record. This is a new area for this species and for Potentilla argentea L., Hoary Cinquefoil, which was also there. Filago lutescens Jord., Red-tipped Cudweed. Westleton, growing fairly extensively on open sandy ground, TM46, v.c. 25,

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22


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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 22

EB, 30/9/85. A new site about a couple of miles from the long-established colony on Westleton Heath. This species is now very rare in Britain, so this is an important new discovery. Omalotheca sylvatica (L.) Schultz Bip. & F. W. Schultz, Heath Cudweed. (Gnaphalium sylvaticum L.) (i) Wordwell, appeared sporadically in forest ride, 1968-82, TL87, v.c. 26, JH. (ii) Tattingstone, a few plants in rough grass by Alton Water, TM13, v.c. 25, CR, 1985. Rudbeckia hirta L., Gloriosa Daisy. (i) Barham Pits, waste ground, TM15, v.c. 25, FWS, 1984. The first Suffolk record in the wild for this attractive autumn-flowering Composite frequently grown in gardens. The flowers vary from yellow to mahogany, with frequent bi-coloured forms. (ii) Bramford, near site of former tip, TM14, v.c. 25, E M H , 24/7/85. Det. R. H. S. Wisley, Sept. 1985. Silphium perfoliatum L., Cup Plant. Freckenham, in scrub alongside road, TL67, v.c. 26, E M H , 4/9/85. Det. E. J. Clement, Oct. 1985. Hb.E & MH. One large clump, about 6 feet tall, of this striking yellow-flowered Composite, presumably a relic of cultivation, on the site of former army huts. It has rough Square stems below. The bases of the upper leaves overlap to enclose the stem in a 'cup' - hence its name. The heavy rain on that particular morning had filled the cups with water, which, coupled with the great size of all parts of the plant, made it very difficult to dry off a good voucher specimen! First Suffolk record. Ambrosia artemisiifolia L., Roman Wormwood. Kentford Pit, on sewage waste, spread on site of spent pit, TL76, v.c. 26, GMSE, 1985. First record for West Suffolk. This is a casual, which appears occasionally on tips and waste places. Cirsium eriophorum (L.) Scop., Woolly Thistle. Long Melford, in meadow in Kentwell Park, TL84, v.c. 26, EM-R, 14/8/85. A good colony. This Thistle is rare in Suffolk. Centaurea macrocephala Puschk. Belstead, several plants in abandoned orchard, TM14, v.c. 25, RT, 1983. Escaped on to roadside, DS, 1985, Hb. E & MH. A sturdy garden perennial with large yellow thistle-like flower heads, not previously recorded in Suffolk as an escape. Native in the Caucasus. Tragopogon pratensis L. subsp. pratensis, Goat's Beard. (i) Dallinghoo, roadside verge, waste corner, TM25, v.c. 25, IMV, 10/10/84. (ii) Boyton, also on roadside, near turn to Ely Hill, TM34, v.c. 25, IMV, 1984. These are the only recent records. Very similar to the common subsp. minor (Mill.) Wahlenb., but distinguished by involucral bracts shorter than or equalling the florets, by anthers with dark violet tips and

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22


SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS 45 by larger achenes. However, intermediates occur, combining characteristics of both subspecies.

Zostera marina L., Common Eel-grass. Southwold Harbour, washed up along R. Blyth, TM57, v.c. 25, EB, 30/9/85. A rare species. This is the only record since 1952. Gagea lutea (L.) Ker-Gawl., Yellow Star-of-Bethlehem. Kedington, a small colony in Churchyard, TL74, v.c. 26. Recorded during the Churchyard Survey. Still there, 1985 (FWS and EMH). Possibly a relic of former woodland. It is to be hoped that the plants will continue to be protected and their survival thus ensured. Allium schoenoprasum L., Chives. Levington, roadside verge 100 yards from Heath Cottages, TM23, v.c. 25, MNS, 29/7/84. Subjected to mowing, but surviving. Juncus compressus Jacq., Round-fruited Rush. Gedding, meadow and roadside verge, TL95, v.c. 26, JCW, 16/7/85. This Rush is now rarely seen in Suffolk. There are probably only two or three known sites in the County. Det. M. N. Sanford. Conf. A. Copping. x Festulolium loliaceum (Huds.) P. Fourn., Hybrid Fescue. (Festucapratensis Huds. x Lolium perenne L.) (i) Little Cornard, Shalford Meadows, TL83, v.c. 26, FWS, 18/8/84. (ii) Gedding, in meadow, TL95, v.c. 26, JCW, 18/6/85. Det. M. N. Sanford. Probably under-recorded in the County. Poa subcaerulea Sm., Spreading Meadow-grass. Shottisham, roadside verge, TM34, v.c. 25, AGM, June 1985. An overlooked species, probably more frequent than the records suggest. Bromus commutatus Schrad., Meadow Brome. (i) Cavendish, abundant on roadside verges and field edges near Easty Wood, TL74, and TL84, v.c. 26, EMH and MAH, 23/7/85. (ii) Hawkedon, uncultivated strip near stream, TL85, v.c. 26, EMH and MAH, 23/7/85. Hb. E & MH. (iii) Bures St Mary, roadside hedgebank between Bures and Nayland, TL93, v.c. 26, FWS, 21/7/85. (iv) Tostock, edge of arable field, TL96, v.c. 26, RA, July 1985, Det. Dr P. M. Smith. Following the loss of so many damp meadows, this grass has retreated to verges and field edges. Hordeum jubatum L., Fox-tail Barley. (i) Monks Eleigh, bank of reservoir, TL94, v.c. 26, EMC, 30/9/85. Second record for West Suffolk. (ii) Creeting St Peter, alongside A45, TM05, v.c. 25, EMH, 1982-4. Phalarisparadoxa L. var. praemorsa Coss. & Dur., a Canary Grass. Hawkedon and Boxted, abundant in several fields of Wheat and Barley, TL75 and TL85, v.c. 26, MAH and LMH, 23/7/85. Standing up well above

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22


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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 22

the level of the crops. Conf. E. J. Clement, Oct. 1985. Hb. E & MH. The first records for West Suffolk. Setariapumila (Poiret) Schultes, Yellow Bristle-grass. (5. glauca (L.) Beauv.) Shottisham, appeared in garden, TM34, v.c. 25, A G M , 1984. Det. EMH. A rare casual, perhaps associated with bird-seed. Scirpus setaceus L., Bristie Scirpus. Wherstead, muddy field excavated during construction of by-pass, TM14, v.c. 25, E M H , 29/8/85. Hb. E. & MH. A decreasing species with few recent records. Carex hostiana DC., Tawny Sedge. Pakenham, a few specimens in Fen, TL 96, v.c. 26, FWS, 13/6/85. A rare Sedge with few authentic records. Carex elata All., Tufted Sedge. Herringfleet, a few clumps in fenny Wood, TM49, v.c. 25, FWS, 2/6/85. Key to Contributors Addington, Rev. R. Baker, D. R. Barsted, C. P. Beaumont, Dr E. Brinkley, P. M. Coe, Mrs E. M. Coleman, C. Coleman, Mrs G. Curtis, Mrs B. Easy, G. M. S. Ellis, D r E . A. Ellis, Mrs J. Ellis, Mrs J. P. Ellis, Dr M . B . Gaught, Miss H. M. Harris, Mrs. J. Howard, M. Hunt, N. V. Hyde, Mrs E. M. Hyde, Mrs L. M. Hyde, M. A. Last, J. Lawson, P. G.

RA DRB CPB EB PMB EMC CC GC BC GMSE EAE JE JPE MBE HMG JH MH NVH EMH LMH MAH JL PGL

Lowe, C. J. Maxim, L. Maybury, G . W . Mendel, H . Milne-Redhead, E. Minihane, J. Morgan, Mrs A. G. Parker, Mrs M. Rutt, Mrs D. Rutterford, M. G. Rutterford, S. Sanford, M. N. Simpson, F. W. Smee, D. Thompson, Mrs H. Tibbenham, R. Townsend, Mrs G. Trist, P. J. O. Vaughan, Mrs I. M. Wakerley, J. C. Wanstall, P. J. Watchman, A. Wynne, G.

CJL LM GWM HM EM-R JM AGM MP DR MGR SR MNS FWS DS HT RT GT PJOT IMV JCW PJW AW GW

References Meikle, R. D. (1984). Willows and Poplars. London: Botanical Society of the British Isles. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22


SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT 5ECORDS

47 Simpson, F. W. (1982). Simpsons Flora of Suffolk. Ipswich: Suffolk Naturalists' Society. Tutin, T. G. et al., eds. (1964-1980). Flora Europaea, 1-5, Cambridge. E. M. Hyde, F. W. Simpson, Parkside, 40, Ruskin Road, Wool verstone, Ipswich IP4 1PT. Ipswich IP9 1 AR. Additions and emendations to Simpson's Flora. Carpobrotus glaucescens (Haworth) Schwantes Recorded in Simpson's Flora as C. chilensis. Re-determined independently in 1985 by Dr C. A. Stace and Dr C. D. Preston. This is the small colony on Bawdsey Cliffs, now much reduced after the severe winter of 1984/5. Psoralea americana L., a Trefoil. Recorded by W. M. Morfey among Begonias in his garden in Anglesea Road, Ipswich in August 1966. Det. at Kew. A native of S. Europe, which occurs occasionally as a casual in Britain. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 13, 335 (1967), but omitted from Simpson's Flora. Primula elatior (L.) Hill X P. veris L., Oxlip Cowslip hybrid. (P. x media Petermann) Recorded from Long Wood, Horningsheath (Horringer) in West Suffolk by Miller Christy, April 25th 1897. In Essex Naturalist 10 April-June 1898. This becomes thefirstSuffolk record, preceding by 35 years that published in Simpson's Flora. Ajuga chamaepitys (L.) Schreb., Ground Pine. Recorded from West Stow, infieldE. of Icknield Way, Sept 21st 1939, by W. H. Mills in his annotated copy of Hooker's Student's Flora, 1884. This is precisely where A. L. Bull found it in 1948 and where it still occurs. This now becomes the earliest Suffolk record. E. M. Hyde.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 22

Some recent Suffolk plant records with additions and emmendations to Simpson's Flora  

Hyde, E. M. & Simpson, F. W.

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