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MOTHS OF REDGRAVE AND LOPHAM FENS Second Report C. W .

PLERCE

FOR various reasons no working visits were paid to the Fens until the end of May, when during daytime beating of the scrub on Little Fen, larvae of the following moths feil on the tray—Sprawler (Brachionycha sphinx), Copper Underwing {Amphipyra pyramidea), Brick (Agrochola circellaris), Chestnut (Conistra vaccinii), Winter Moth (Operophtera brumata), and the November Moth (Oporinia dilutata). Species emerging this spring from pupae developed from larvae beaten during the latter part of 1967 include the Common Quaker (Orthosia stabilis), March Moth (Alsophila aescularia), Scorched Wing (Plagodis dolabraria), Pale Brindled Beauty (Phigalia pilosaria), Scalloped Hazel (Gonodontis bidentata), and the Engrailed (Ectropis biundulatä). Five evening visits only were made this year as against eight last season. In spite of this and the less favourable weather, roughly 150 of last year's species turned up again, many commonly, as well as forty-nine not recorded previously. In addition, two appeared which had not been noted since Rev. Guy Ford recorded them in 1946. On 8th June, Messrs. H. E. Chipperfield and G. Baker found the Fox Moth (Macrothylacia rubi) on Little Fen and the Common Pug (Eupithecia vulgata) near the hut on Middle Fen, but it was a cool evening and little eise was recorded. Messrs. G. Burton and R. LufT accompanied me on 29th June, when conditions were almost ideal. Eight-six species were recorded, among them being some found the previous year including the Powdered Wainscot (Simyra venosa), New Gold Spot (Plusia gracilis), Striped Wainscot (Leucania pudorina), and the Southern Wainscot (L. straminea), the latter two in fair numbers. Species noted for the first time included the Gold Swift (Hepialus heda), Clouded-bordered Brindle (Apamea crenata), and Scallop Shell (Rheumaptera undulata). The most valuable recording for this evening was not recognised as such until some time later. Several Brown Rustics (Rusina ferruginea) came to the sheet and one moth, apparently of this species was boxed because it was much smaller than the remainder. On being removed from the setting board a few weeks later, it was discovered that we had taken a female Marsh Moth (Hydrillula palustris). T h e Open Day, held by the Suffolk Trust for Nature O b servation on 13th July, enabled us to record another species when Mrs. N. H. Jones found two larvae of the Chamomile Shark


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209

(Cucullia chamomillae). A week before when the Ipswich Natural History Society visited the Fens, a larva of the Water Ermine (Spilosoma urticae) was brought to me. T h e wet weather of the next few weeks did not encourage us to make the long journey to the Fens with the possibility of fruitless evenings. It was not until 3rd August when the next trip was made and then only thirty-three species were seen, of which only the Scarce Footman (Lithosia complana) and the Triple-spotted Clay (Amathes ditrapezium) were worthy of note. Somewhat drier weather greeted our visit on 24th August, when among the sixty-three species found were a rather worn Browntail (Euproctis chrysorrhoea), a Stout Dart (Spaelotis ravida), and a single Square-spotted Clay (Amathes stigmatica). Haworth's Minor (Celaena haworthii) appeared but not in such large n u m b e r s as it did last year. T h e Oblique Carpet (Orthonama lignata) was fairly common both on this evening and again on 9th September when M r . Chipperfield and I led a party f r o m the Stowmarket Natural History Society. Otherwise this visit, the last of the season, produced little notable among the twenty species which turned u p on an evening when activities were curtailed by the rising of an almost füll moon. Düring the second half of the season, further beating of the scrub yielded more larvae. Whilst most of these will have to await identification on emergence next year, the Mottled U m b e r (Erannis defoliaria), Oak Beauty (Biston strataria), and the Brindled Beauty (Lycia hirtaria) could be easily picked out. It is hoped that more visits in favourable conditions will be possible in the next year or two. T h e 269 species recorded so far can represent only about half of what can be expected from this potentially rieh entomological habitat.

List of Species Recorded (Nomenclature as M o t h s of the British Isles, Richard South—1961 Edition) SPHINGIDAE

Privet Havvk

Sphinx

ligustri, Linn.

LYMANTRIIDAE

Brown Tail Vapourer

Euproctis chrysorrhoea, Linn. Orgyia antiqua, Linn.

DREPANIDAE

Chinese Character

Cilix glaucata,

Scop.

WESTERMANNIINAE

Cream-bordered Pea

Earias clorana, Linn.


210

Transactions of the Suffolk Naturalists',

Vol. 14, Part 3

ARCTIINAE

Water Ermine Buff Ermine

Spilosoma urticae, Esp. (also in 1946 by Ford) S. lutea, H u f n .

LITHOSIINAE

Scarce Footman

Lithosia complana,

Linn.

NOCTUINAE

Stout Dart Square-spotted Clay Triple-spotted Clay Purple Clay

Spaelotis raviäa, Schiff. Amathes stigmatica, H ü b n . A. ditrapezium, Schiff, (also in 1946 by Ford) Diarsia brunnea, Schiff.

HADENINAE

Pale Shining Brown Bordered Gothic C o m m o n Quaker

Polia nitens, Haw. Heliophobus calcatrippae, Orthosia stabilis, Schiff.

View.

AMPHIPYRINAE

Dusky Sallow Large N u t m e g Dusky Brocade Clouded-bordered Brindle Brown Rustic Marsh Moth Rustic

Eremobia ochroleuca, Schiff. Apamea infesta, Ochs. A. remissa, H ü b n . A. crenata, H u f n . Rusina ferruginea, Esp. Hydrillula palustris, H ü b n . Caradrina blanda, Schiff.

CUCULLIINAE

Sprawler Brick Chestnut Chamomile Shark

Brachionycha sphinx, H u f n . Agrochola circellaris, H u f n . Conistra vaccinii, Linn. Cucullia chamomillae, Schiff.

PLUSIINAE

Beautiful Golden Y

Plusia pulchrina,

Hufn.

LASIOCAMPIDAE

Fox

Macrothvlacia

rubi, Linn.

STERRHINAE

Dwarf Cream Wave Small Blood Vein

Sterrha interjectaria, Boisd. Scopula imitaria, H ü b n .

OENOCHROMINAE

March M o t h

Alsophila aescularia, Schiff.

LARENTIINAE

Winter M o t h Scallop Shell Dark Marbled Carpet N o v e m b e r Moth Common Pug Narrow-winged Pug Brindled Pug Mottled Pug Green P u g White-pinion Spotted

Operophtera brumata, Linn. Rheumaptera undulata, L i n n . Dysstroma citrata, Linn. Oporinia dilutata, Schiff. Eupethecia vulgata, Haw. E. nanata subsp. angusta, Prout. E. abbreviata, Steph. E. exiguata, H ü b n . Chlorodystis rectangulata, Linn. Bapta bimaculata, Fabr.


MOTHS OF REDGRAVE AND LOPHAM FENS

211

ENNOMINAE

Engrailed Ectropis biundulata, de Vill. Small Engrailed E. crepuscularia, Schiff. Bordered White Bupalis piniaria, Linn. Scorched Wing Plagodis dolabraria, Linn. Pale Brindled Beauty Phigalia pilosaria, Schiff. Brindled Beauty Lycia hirtaria, Clerck. Scalloped Hazel Gonodontis bidentata, Clerck. Oak Beauty Biston strataria, Hufn. Feathered Thorn Colotois pennaria, Linn. Mottled Umber Erannis defoliaria, Clerck. (Total species recorded to date, including the 220 recorded up to the end of 1967—269) Reference

Pierce, C. W. (1967). Moths of Redgrave and Lopham Fens. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 14, 41.

Moths of Redgrave and Lopham Fens - Second Report  
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