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THE BEDSTRAW HAWK

Geometers there were the Piain Wave (Sterrha inornata, Haworth), the Scallop Wave (Sterrha emarginata, Linn.), the Broom Tip (Chesias rufata, Fabr.), the Sharp-angled Carpet (Euphyia unangulata, Haworth), the Sandy Carpet (Perizoma flavofasciata, Thunb.), the Bordered Pug (Eupithecia succenturiata, Linn.), the V-Pug (Chloroclystis coronata, HĂźbn.), the Sharp-angled Peacock (Semiothisa alternaria, HĂźbn.), and the Pine Beauty (Bupahis piniaria, Linn.).

THE WAVED BLACK (.PARASCOTIA FULIG1NARIA LINN.) IN SUFFOLK AND ITS OCCURRENCE IN THE BRITISH ISLES b y BARON DE W O R M S

THE capture of the Waved Black (Parascotia fuliginaria, Linn.), by Prof. J. V. Dacie in his light trap at Walberswick on August 2nd, 1959, is indeed a most notable record for Suffolk Lepidoptera, since this elusive and somewhat obscure little noctuid moth has never before been seen in the eastern part of England. C. Morley, (1937), only makes passing mention of it. In a most illuminating article in the Entom. Gazette for 1950 (z. 186 seq.), the late H. D. Swain has traced the occurrence and distribution of this species since it was first recognised as a British insect about 100 years ago, but what is of especial interest is that in the light of recent research on its habits and habitats, he prophesied that the terrain in the Eastern Counties and particularly in Suffolk where light sandy soil was prevalent would probably one day see the appearance of the Waved Black. His foresight has proved correct indeed. T h e early history of the occurrence of the species in Britain centres round the City area of London where on several occasions in the 1860's and 1870's this little moth was found lurking in cellars along the Thames, while its larva was found to be feeding on various species of fungus growing on the damp old timbers


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there. Odd specimens were taken towards the end of the last Century at Hull, in Yorkshire, and in Worcestershire, but it was not until the first decade of the present Century that its true habitat and life history were worked out. Several examples were captured at Camberley in Surrey about 1906 and further ones in the next 20 years in the vicinity. Not tili 1931, however, did its prevalence in this region become generally recognised. In that year the late E. E. Green found a number of larvae breeding on a fungus growing on a fallen birch in his garden near Camberley. He bred out a long series and established its life history. On further investigation by several eminent field collectors, the insect was found to be widespread in the area known as the Bagshot Sands which is still its headquarters. In more recent years the Waved Black has been Coming freely to mercury vapour light traps during late July and August in this special region extending as far south as Witley and as near the outskirts of London as Oxshott and Leatherhead. Its larvae, completely black with orange warts, have sometimes been noted in profusion on fungus on fallen trees, old posts, tree stumps and rotting woodwork. They always prefer to feed in complete darkness and hide from the light, while the imago always tries to escape from the light. Let us hope it will appear now equally plentifully in East Suffolk.

LEPIDOPTERA AT WALDRINGFIELD DURING 1959 by

T.

A.

M.

WALLER

THE addition of a new mercury vapour moth trap at the end of June considerably improved on the normal electric light and Tilley lamp which had previously been in use. Prior to this date the Pine Beauty (Panolis flammea, Schiff.), was the only species of note. Two good specimens turned up singly on April 28th and 29th. A visit to some neighbouring marshes on 26th June, was most rewarding. The most interesting find was that attractive little Pyralid the Orange-rayed Pearl (Nascia cilialis, HĂźbn.)*, which is certainly new to this part of Suffolk and has only been taken before close to the Norfolk-Suffolk border. The species seems to be well established in this locality as it is present in fairly large numbers.

The Waved Black in Suffolk  
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