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THE BEDSTRAW HAWK ( i C E L E R I O GALII ROTT.), AND OTHER INTERESTING CAPTURES IN EAST SUFFOLK by

B A R O N DE

WORMS

P R O F . J . Dacie has asked me to record some very outstanding captures he made in the mercury vapour moth trap he installed in the garden of the house he rented at Walberswick in early August, 1959. He ran the trap for eight nights between the 2nd and 14th of that month during which period he recorded no less than 155 species of Macrolepidoptera and possibly nearly 4,000 individuals. By far the most spectacular capture was a slightly damaged female of the Bedstraw Hawkmoth (Celerio galii, Rott.), on August 5th. C. Morley in his list of the Lepidoptera of Suffolk (1937) mentions that this fine insect was taken on a number of occasions during the last Century in the County and especially in the remarkable year 1888 when the larvae were found freely on the sandhills. ßut during the present Century very few records of it in Suffolk have come to light, though it is said to have bred regularly for several years recently in Norfolk.

Another notable capture was a fine Butterbur Moth (Hydroecia petasitis, Doubleday), a green example f. prasinaria of the Barred Red (Ellopia fasciaria, Linn.), and by far the most remarkable a male Waved Black (Parascotia fuliginaria, Linn.), which will be dealt with separately. Other species of interest which were noted at the light included the Sallow Kitten (Cerura furcula, Linn.), most of the commoner Prominents, in particular the Swallow (Pheosia tremula, Clerck), also the Large Chocolate-tip (Clostera curtula, Linn.), the Läppet (Gastropacha quercifolia, Linn.), the Rosy Footman (Miltochrista miniata, Forst,), the Dingy Footman (Eilema griseola, Hübn.), and the Scarce Footman (Eilema complana, Linn.). Among the Noctuids were the Hedge Rustic (Tholera cespitis, Fab.), the Dusky Sallow (Eremobia ochroleuca, Esp.), the Double-lobed (Apamea ophiogramma, Esp.), Webb's Wainscot (Nonagria sparganii, Esp.), the Twin-spotted Wainscot (Nonagria geminipuncta, Haworth), the Brown-veined Wainscot (Nonagria dissoluta, Treits.) the Rufous Wainscot (Coenobia rufa, Haworth), Fenn's Wainscot (Arenostola brevilinea, Fenn.), the Powdered Wainscot (Simyra albcvenosa, Goeze), the Coast Dart (Euxoa cursoria, Hufn.), the Triple-spotted Clay (Amathes ditrapezium, Borkh.), the Least Yellow Underwing (Triphaena interjecta, Hübn.), the Starwort Shark (Cucullia asteris, Schiff.), the Bordered Sallow (Pyrrhia umbra, Hufn.), the Fulvous Clover (Heliothis dipsacea, Linn.), the Gold-spot (Plusia festucae, Linn.), the Beautiful Hook-tip (Laspeyria flexula, Schiff.). Of the


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THE BEDSTRAW HAWK

Geometers there were the Piain Wave (Sterrha inornata, Haworth), the Scallop Wave (Sterrha emarginata, Linn.), the Broom Tip (Chesias rufata, Fabr.), the Sharp-angled Carpet (Euphyia unangulata, Haworth), the Sandy Carpet (Perizoma flavofasciata, Thunb.), the Bordered Pug (Eupithecia succenturiata, Linn.), the V-Pug (Chloroclystis coronata, HĂźbn.), the Sharp-angled Peacock (Semiothisa alternaria, HĂźbn.), and the Pine Beauty (Bupahis piniaria, Linn.).

THE WAVED BLACK (.PARASCOTIA FULIG1NARIA LINN.) IN SUFFOLK AND ITS OCCURRENCE IN THE BRITISH ISLES b y BARON DE W O R M S

THE capture of the Waved Black (Parascotia fuliginaria, Linn.), by Prof. J. V. Dacie in his light trap at Walberswick on August 2nd, 1959, is indeed a most notable record for Suffolk Lepidoptera, since this elusive and somewhat obscure little noctuid moth has never before been seen in the eastern part of England. C. Morley, (1937), only makes passing mention of it. In a most illuminating article in the Entom. Gazette for 1950 (z. 186 seq.), the late H. D. Swain has traced the occurrence and distribution of this species since it was first recognised as a British insect about 100 years ago, but what is of especial interest is that in the light of recent research on its habits and habitats, he prophesied that the terrain in the Eastern Counties and particularly in Suffolk where light sandy soil was prevalent would probably one day see the appearance of the Waved Black. His foresight has proved correct indeed. T h e early history of the occurrence of the species in Britain centres round the City area of London where on several occasions in the 1860's and 1870's this little moth was found lurking in cellars along the Thames, while its larva was found to be feeding on various species of fungus growing on the damp old timbers

The Bedstraw Hawk Moth  
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