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44

COLLECTING IN SUFFOLK

These included several of the Pugs among which were the Foxglove (.Eupithecia pulchellata Stephens), the V Pug (Chloroclystis coronata Hübn.). Others of this family included the Common Emerald (Hemithea aestivaria Hübn.), the Sharp-angled Carpet (Euphyia unangulata Haworth), the Sandy Carpet (.Perizoma flavofasciata Thunb.), the Spinach (Lygris mellinata Fab.) and the Mottled Beauty (Cleora repandata Linn.). Two of the latest visitors were the Poplar Hawk (Laothoe ^opw/i Linn.) and the Eyed Ua\\ k(Smerinthus ocellatus Linn.). We had also put down many patches of sugar which were equally well patronised, chiefly by large numbers of the Crescent (Celaena leucostigma Hübn.), as well as by a few of Fenn's Wainscot (Arenostola brevilinea Fenn), two Silky Wainscots (iChilodes maritima Tausch.) and the Gothic (Naenia typica Linn.). Again the Sussex Wainscot failed us. Even at that late hour we paid a visit to the sandhills which was alive with insects, mainly the Lyme-grass Wainscot which was at rest on its food plant in dozens and also Aying freely about it. T h e following day I visited the Bentley Woods just south of Ipswich where the Silver-washed Fritillary (Argynnis paphia Linn.) and the White Admiral (Limenitis Camilla Linn.) were in numbers. T h u s ended another successful collecting trip to Suffolk. C.

G.

M.

DE W O R M S .

MOTHS AT WALDRINGFIELD DÜRING 1956 Owing to the exceptionally bad weather this year, the season has provided only a few, but nevertheless very interesting, insects. T h e early months brought some well-marked specimens of the Brindled Beauty (Lycia hirtaria Clerck). T h e Scarce Tissue (Calocalpe cervinalis Scop.) also came abundantly to light. In recent years this insect seems to be on the increase here and has frequently been taken at both light and on the plum blossom. On May 9th, I was Very pleased to find the Lunar Marbled Brown (.Drymonia ruficornis Hufn.) in the moth-trap. My grandfather had never taken it here and it was also new to me. Quite the most outstanding insect of the season was the Scarce Chocolate T i p (Clostera anachoreta Fabr.) which came to light in the local telephone box on August 3. In the " Memoirs " Mr. Claude Morley says it is lacking to our list. This appears to be the first time that this species has been recorded for Suffolk. Mr. Chipperfield writes that, while looking through the late Mr.


45

MOTHS AT WALDRINGFIELD

Platten's collection, he discovered a specimen of this Chocolate Tip apparently overlooked, but labelled " T r a p 1898 ". At this time the captor was probably living in Ipswich. My specimen can certainly claim to be the first recorded capture. T h e Varied Coronet (Hadena compta Fabr.) has also turned up at light here. No less th'an three were taken on July 23. Since 1953, when Mr. Aston first took it at Polstead, it has appeared at Southwold and now, I hear, at Stowmarket this year. This indicates it is spreading rapidly over the whole county. The Purple Thorn (Selenia tetralunaria Hufn.) also occurred again here. A single example of the White Admiral (Limenitis Camilla Linn.) was seen in this garden on August 1. T h e late Major Glossop of Rivers Hall, Waldringfield, put down a good many larvae of this butterfly near his house some twelve years ago. A few imagines were seen the following year, but it has not been seen since then, though this one may be a survival from that stock. ALFRED

WALLER,

Waldringfield Rectory.

THE DEATH'S HEAD MOTH AND OTHER RARE SPECIES IN NORFOLK T h a t grand insect, the Death's Head Hawk (Acherontia atropos Linn.) has visited this county in exceptional numbers this season, especially in the late summer, quite fifty häving been recorded from all over the British Isles right up to the Hebrides. Possibly the most remarkable catch, and a record one as well, was that reported by Mr. Geoffrey Todd at West Runton. He says that on the night of September 2, 1956, with a very muggy and damp atmosphere he found no less than fourteen Death's Heads in or sitting around his Mercury-vapour trap. T h e majority were at rest within a few feet of it. Besides these there were five examples of the Convolvulus Hawk-moth (Herse convolvuli Linn.). A week later four more Death's Heads appeared, but no more Convolvulus. Mr. T o d d also reports the capture by a boy in the same area of a Bedstraw Hawk-moth (Deilephila galii Rott.) as well as two larvae of this species of which a moth was also found in the same spot in 1955. Other uncommon species which Mr. Todd has taken in his trap this year include four specimens of the White-point Wainscot (Leucania albipuncta Fabr.), an unusually marked Scarce Bordered Straw (Heliothis armigera Hübn.) and that pretty white Pyrale the Olive-tree Pearl (Margeronia unionalis Hübn.) C.

G.

M.

DE W O R M S .

Moths at Waldringfield in 1956  
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