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#1/2019

"THE RETAILER NO LONGER HOLDS THE BALANCE OF POWER." DOUG STEPHENS

Automne/Hiver 2018 Julita, Csepi et Max Aubrac 22nd year # 1/2019

WHAT TO EXPECT IN 2019: DON'T BE A KNOW-IT-ALL – DO BETTER RHYTHM Which Goods Do I Need? When Do I Need Them? And How Many? OMNITAIL Trade – Always and Everywhere. RENEWAL The Duty to Question the Status Quo.

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EDITORIAL

Into the Fog! Welcome to these lines. When the prophet comes to the mountain, he says: “We have to move boldly into the uncertainty of a new era!” We at style in progress say: “He’s right!” Even if this future, as our interview partner Doug “The Retail Prophet” Stephens (The Longview, from page 070) emphasises, is still in the fog. The fact that we won’t be driving a mere 30km/h on this misty motorway into the future, makes things even more exciting. Are there any landmarks to show us the way on this adventurous journey? Yes, there are. You are holding a magazine full of shining examples in your hands right now. Our “Do Better” focus has sent us on a journalistic voyage. We start with two fields that we believe to be inseparable: Sustainability and Innovation. We combine the two topics to Greenovation, from page 082. Next up is Rhythm, from page 104. An industry in which so much is out of tune is preparing to fine tune its multitude of rhythms again. While some dance waltzes, others rock out to fast beats. As the examples in our articles prove, the solution is so simple. The tempo must correspond to the dancer! The most skilled at orchestrating such dances are those who have deciphered the most mysterious group of customers: the youth. During her research into our third chapter, Nicoletta Schaper finds out that Youth (from page 122) neither does everything better, nor does anything worse. The most important finding remains the same: take the target group seriously. Whoever follows that rule, can navigate the Omnitail world in chapter four (from page 132) quite effortlessly. The message is both clear and redundant. It is not the sales channel that decides, but the consumer. But what is required for a skilful approach across all retail channels? The answer is: a clear, consistent, and tidy understanding of your brand. Nothing is more sustainable than a strong brand, after all. How inspiring that so many companies have realised this. You crave examples? We provide them in chapter five: Renewal (from page 158). style in progress also takes renewal very seriously. Elisabeth Prock-Huber, our Art Director, has given the magazine a tasteful make-over. Our entire editorial team questioned everything, made adjustments, and optimised processes. Because we too are eager to do better. We’d never claim to know everything. Let us know if we succeed! Enjoy your read! Your style in progress team

Cover photo: The Retail Prophet

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CONTENT

DO BETTER DO

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006 EDITORIAL Into the Fog!

102 Zero Waste Procalçado Group of Portugal boasts an excellent life cycle assessment.

016 RIGHT NOW

104 DO BETTER: RHYTHM

060 WANT IT

106 Curse or Blessing? What are the benefits of short-term programmes? Fashion retailers discuss the pros and cons.

THE LONGVIEW

110 On Demand Seasonless and freshness in exchange examples include brands such as Filippa K and Strenesse.

070 “We Have to Move Boldly into the Fog of a New Era” An interview with Doug “The Retail Prophet” Stephens.

WHAT’S THE STORY 078 DO BETTER

112 Product and Timing American Vintage shoulders risks, allowing retailers to minimise theirs. 114 Curiosity and Enthusiasm Les Deux was launched by two lateral entrants who allow themselves to think differently.

080 Better Than Ever The fashion industry is doing better than it feels. An opinion piece by Isabel Faiss.

116 Well-Rounded 360Cashmere fulfils the wishes of retailers and consumers alike.

082 DO BETTER: GREENOVATION

118 “The Delivery Rhythm and Goods at the POS Must Correspond to the Season” Liu Jo has created a tighter and more flexible collection model.

084 “We Need People Who Act” Denim manufacturer Mostafiz Uddin is a lobbyist for sustainability and his beloved home Bangladesh. 086 The Magic of Action Magazzin’s project with Ecoalf shows how powerful a pop-up store can be. 088 The Good News Setting an example: step-by-step towards sustainability. 092 Want It - Greenovation Meet the brands of tomorrow ecological and fair. 094 Act Now! Experts reveal what the fashion industry can do to become greener. 098 “It’s Possible to Create Materials with Dramatically Lower Environmental Impact” Algae sneakers and wool from human DNA: FIT’s Theanne Schiros makes it possible. 100 Innovate or Die Cleverness and intelligence conquer the fashion industry. 008

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120 More of Everything (Except Goods) Brand guru Valentino de Luca takes a stand. 122 DO BETTER: YOUTH 124 Wanted! The young target group follows its own rules. 130 “The Youth Has Its Own Bullshit Filter!” Futurologist Tristan Horx warns against youthfulness in the context of youth marketing. 132 DO BETTER: OMNITAIL 134 “We Are Mobile First” Andreas Skorski’s The List is keen to compete with established luxury e-commerce platforms. 136 “Spend at Least Two Hours a Week With a Random Consumer” Martin “Master of Small Data” Lindstrom works as meticulously as a detective.


CONTENT

FASHION

FASHION

Coolotte

The focus in womenswear is shifting back to trousers. The culotte is fashionably re-interpreted with high waists, extreme widths, and XXL lacings on the waist. Flares and girlfriend cuts are also in the mix. Particularly striking are lengths that often end above the ankle.

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AT.P.CO

Closed

Dolores

Drome

Strenesse

Levi’s

Liu Jo

Marni

Nili Lotan

FTC Cashmere

Postyr

Pomandere

style in progress

176

140 The Business Network Can a marketplace manage licenses, distributors, and manufacturers? BasicNet proves it’s possible. 144 Need for Speed Na-kd is miles ahead of the competition by relying on Big Data. 146 “We Offer Knowledge, Contacts, and Business” #Fashiontech Berlin creator Michael Stracke sits down for a chat. 148 “AI Will Change Everything” Sizolution’s Vahe Taamazyan explains how fashion will benefit from AI and machine learning. 150 Start-Ups Generate Frequency Mannheim has understood that the future will be shaped by founders. 154 Searched on the Net, Found in the Store The ROPO Effect - how stationary retailers can profit from the online world. 156 Livestream to the Customer Cover Communications’ Anne Höweler creates frequency with influencers. 158 DO BETTER: RENEWAL 160 “We Want to Rekindle the Flame” We sat down for a chat with Susanne Schwenger and Dieter Holzer, Marc O’Polo’s new management duo. 164 The Comeback of a Cult Chevignon is back on course under new management, just in time for its anniversary. 166 Up-to-Date Tradition The heart of a hippie meets modern brand management: Il Bisonte is dressing up. 167 The Sleeping Beauty is Awake Knitwear brand Lamberto Losani is really up for it now. 168 Friendship Daniel Hechter has undergone a comprehensive renewal process. 170 Feminine and Easy Strenesse New is a fitting name for a company with such fresh ideas. 010

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172 Passion for Leather Drome designer Marianna Rosati speaks about a very special love story. 174 Cult Collection Surfing brand Lightning Bolt impresses with a coherent concept. 175 “It’s Not About Clothing, It’s About Culture” Fortela is Alessandro Squarzi and vice versa.

FASHION

176 Volume Formula The trends of the autumn/winter season 2019/20.

IN STORE 193 194 196 197 198 200 201 202 203 204 206

Blue Blood Blue de Gênes/Hamburg Expect the Unexpected Urban Speed/Vienna Buy Less, Buy Better Slowear/Munich A Man’s World The Bespoker/Düsseldorf Intimate Connection Roya’s bei Motzigkeit/Hannover Directly Opposite Style & Select/Bochum Stages of the World Cabinet/Zurich Creative Fashion Duo Sany/Wiener Neustadt Italian Lifestyle We Love Stories/Salzburg “I’m Not a Yes-Woman” Homegirl Store/Munich Special Status Bratfisch/Giessen

208 EDITOR’S LETTER Do Better

208 IMPRINT


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Moose Knuckles

Humans vs Elements Given that Moose Knuckles is a Canadian family business, one could be forgiven for thinking that the label is inspired by the clichéd images that are engraved in our brains. But then Tu Luy, the Design Director of Moose Knuckles, explains that he’s inspired by workwear, rubber equipment, and fetish clothing, as well as Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick” and the Discovery Channel’s “The Deadliest Catch”. It goes without saying that this doesn’t result in boring outerwear. Moose Knuckles announces important decisions for the current season. The brand introduces fur-free models available in both Classic Core and Mid Core styles, featuring removable hoods with Sherpa lining made of pure wool. Not only are the well-known styles available in new colours, but there are completely new models too. The latter include the Mont Joli and The Colombier parkas. www.mooseknuckles.com

Launched in 2007, Moose Knuckles is a brand on a mission: protecting humans from the elements in a luxurious, stylish, and cheerful manner.

Majestic Filatures

More Than a T-Shirt

Calling them basics would be an insult: Majestic Filature’s tops and shirts are now complemented by a knitwear collection.

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To complement its tops and t-shirts, French label Majestic Filatures has added knitwear to its portfolio in its second season. The brand was founded in 1989 by Franck Ellia and Rolland Chelly in Paris. Its name is derived from the French word “majesteux”. Majestic Filatures is considered a pioneer in the blending of yarns. The tops and t-shirts are available in 30 different qualities. The average retail price for cotton with cashmere is 79 Euros. Retail prices for linen/cotton blends range from 75 to 99 Euros, while viscose/elastane blends are available from 49 Euros. The mark-up oscillates between 2.8 and 3.0. There are two main and two intermediate collections, as well as a NOS programme. All items are delivered free of charge from a warehouse in France. The list of customers includes Bon Marche, Barneys, Maxfield, Frauenschuh Kitzbühel, Vogue Graz, Daniel’s Munich and Cologne, Different Hamburg and Sylt, Greta & Luis Berlin, Burresi Wiesbaden and Frankfurt, and Stylebop. The sales representative for Germany and Austria is Agentur Klauser. www.majesticfilatures.com


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Na-kd

The Brand Builder

Valentino de Luca (centre) is celebrating the 10th anniversary of his brand Lucky de Luca. Congratulations!

Lucky de Luca

The Consistency of a Free Spirit This year, designer Valentino de Luca celebrates the tenth anniversary of Lucky de Luca, his first and still most dominant label, with creative fireworks. Based on the progressive optimism of the 1960s and the era’s rebelliously creative nature, the new Lucky de Luca collection celebrates the successes of the last ten years in its own individual manner. By pairing expressive prints with the joyful nonchalance of the entire collection, Valentino de Luca pays homage to Roy Liechtenstein and the heroes of Pop Art in this very special range. He still remains true to his roots, however. Every collection piece is manufactured exclusively by certified partners in Turkey and Italy under fair conditions. The unbelievable dynamic in the collections always intertwines with the almost pedantic perfection reflected in the cuts and details. Valentino de Luca perceives himself as the “most German Italian in the world”, because he is always punctual and supervises every process with meticulous care. style in progress wishes you continued success in the future, Valentino! www.luckydeluca.com

As the new Co-Owner and Global Sales Director Wholesale & Retail of Swedish brand Na-kd, Thorsten Baumann has achieved much within just one year - and he has more on his agenda. “We started the wholesale and retail rollout in Europe in May, after the launch in Germany and Austria in September 2017,” Baumann notes. This was followed by the Benelux markets, Italy, Scandinavia, and France. “All across Europe, we have the major department stores on board,” Baumann adds. The success of the brand, which was launched online in 2016, rubs off on retailers too. Na-kd credibly links its lifestyle with the international blogger community. Retailers who enthuse the young target group with Na-kd include Breuninger, Peek & Cloppenburg, Ludwig Beck, Citadium, Galeries Lafayette, Hudson Bay, and Magasin Du Nord. “In the first business year of the wholesale department, we were able to realise 20 percent of Na-kd Brand Group’s total sales.” The next launches will take place in the Middle East, Canada, and the US. Baumann’s previous employers include Ralph Lauren, Tommy Hilfiger, and Pepe Jeans, all companies positioned in the same brand environment as Nakd. “Charging brands with emotion and building on their success is my passion.” www.na-kd.com

Vogue Concept Store

Outlet Pop-Up

Five months in the Outletcity Metzingen: the first Vogue Concept Store.

The first Vogue Concept Store was launched as a pop-up format in November. It offered German designer labels such as Marina Hoermanseder, David Tomaszewski, and Lika Mimika, complemented by brands such as Iris von Arnim, Talbot Runhof, and Vogue Accessories. The concept was developed by Condé Nast Germany as a means of Vogue for reaching out to readers. But why was the Outletcity Metzingen chosen as a venue rather than a city centre? “In Outletcity Metzingen, we have found a partner who has the necessary retail know-how, premises, and courage to try out new things. The direct proximity to stores of luxury brands and an international, affluent audience were among the reasons for the choice of location. In addition, designers can sell collections from previous seasons,” says Ines Thomas, the Director of Corporate Communications at Condé Nast Verlag. “Vogue Germany regularly organises initiatives such as ‘Vogue loves Breuninger’, as well as co-operations with the likes of KaDeWe and Lodenfrey. We are aware of our brand’s power at the POS. It is conceivable the concept could be implemented in other locations in order to bring the Vogue Salon designers together with the right target group in an upscale environment.” www.vogue.de

Thorsten Baumann believes that Na-kd is the retail trade’s answer to Zara.

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Edelle

Grounded

Groomed understatement defines Edelle’s blouses.

Hilke Blömeke’s Edelle endeavours to create the perfect shirt for women. “The shirt blouse trend is drawing attention to us, because the shirt is where we come from,” says the brand founder, who intends to increase Edelle’s presence in the media over the next six months with lifestyle images and storytelling. At its core, the collection from the Edward Copper stable presents shirt blouses in unis, fine-liners, and striking stripes made of cotton poplin and silk blend qualities. In addition, there are oversized models in flannel or silk with large check designs, jacquards, and plain shirt blouse dresses, as well as a velvet range in a variety of colours, uni-coloured, or with floral prints. What all styles have in common is a grounded style featuring sporty elegance without frills. www.edelle.de

Pure minimalism: Standard Project starts life with a black t-shirt.

Standard Project

In the Beginning There Was Black

Sun68

Sushi Capsule Collection Italian fashion brand Sun68 presents a capsule inspired by pure creativity for the upcoming autumn/ winter 2019/20 collection. “It’s not the result of commercial necessity, but an expression of communicative freedom. It underlines the brand’s DNA and philosophy,” explains Enrico Spinazzè, the founder and designer of Sun68. The main inspiration for the capsule is “Take Away Sushi”. In addition, the line contains excerpts from Japanese thinking and characters. The famous waving “Lucky Cat” also makes an appearance. The capsule is a refresher inspired by Japanese streetwear, consisting of t-shirts, sweatshirts, and overalls made of acetate. In Germany and Austria, Sun68 is represented by Modeagentur Weiss from Düsseldorf. In Germany, the collection can be viewed at the Premium. www.sun68.com

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At the Pitti Uomo, Sun68 launches a capsule inspired by Japanese streetwear.

The absence of colour and the reduction to bare essentials are the maxims on which Munich-based newcomer Standard Project is based. “Black embodies style and understatement. It’s universal. The restriction to one colour shifts the focus to the piece and its fabric, the yarn quality, the weave, and the cut,” Dominique Eggeringhaus, the Managing Director of Standard Project, explains. “We create our items anew from the ground up. The t-shirt was, for instance, reduced to its essence. Our first piece is also a promise to evolve with every new creation.” The t-shirts, which are manufactured in Portugal, are individually packaged in high-quality boxes. The retail price is 75 Euros. www.standard-project.com


WWW.STRENESSE.COM


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3 questions

Handstich

New Agency

for:

From autumn/winter 2019, Ben Botas’ fashion agency Ben And is the sales representative of Handstich in Germany and Austria. This centralises the brand’s distribution. “We want to present the Handstich story as a whole. We are eager to present the menswear and womenswear in the agency’s showrooms in Munich and Düsseldorf in a modern, younger brand environment,” says André Berger, the owner of Handstich. The collection is also on show at the Pitti Uomo and the Premium Berlin. For the current season, the focus is not only on classic themes, but also on Handstich’s typical material mix. It includes loden and technical materials, leather and lambskin, shearling, and plenty of down. In addition, the women’s collection is expanded with relaxed yet feminine silhouettes and longer jacket styles in a cleaner look. www.handstich.de

Marking its territory: Meindl will open a store and showroom in Salzburg this March. Markus Meindl believes it is a “home game”.

Markus Meindl

Meindl Authentic Luxury You’ll be opening a Meindl Authentic Luxury Store in Salzburg in March 2019. What was the reason for this step? Most importantly, we found the perfect store: 350 sqm in an ingenious location on the “Platzl”, the interface between the Old Town and the “Andräviertel”. It allows us to present the entire Meindl world on three floors: clothing, accessories, shoes, and interior pieces. Our customers, both locals and tourists, should experience our excellence and passion with all senses. We want them to feel us, quite literally. As everyone knows, offthe-shelf solutions aren’t my cup of tea. The top floor will also house the showroom for our friends and partners from the retail trade. We will be able to present our vision to them in a completely new, high-quality environment. Is this a test run for further expansion with own stores? Salzburg is a home game, an ideal place to develop and refine a concept. We have been gaining experience for several years with our Meindl Authentic Luxury Store in Munich, which we run very successfully with a partner. That was an excellent preparation! We are in no rush and feel no pressure. We want to continue to grow in a self-determined and healthy manner. And we want to bring our partners along… What are your expectations for the season? We at Meindl have been thinking inter-seasonally for a long time. Our products have no expiry date; they should be part of our customers’ lives for a long time. That’s how I define sustainability. With this philosophy, we are keen to promote international growth too. That’s why we are showcasing Meindl at the Tranoi in Paris for the first time. www.meindl-fashions.de

Handstich is shifting its focus to presenting womenswear.

Nubikk

Wanderlust Netherlands-based brand Nubikk is currently mixing up the fashion sneakers market with its newly defined DNA. The latest models are Yeye and Jagger, calfskin sneakers with extremely light soles and eye-catching hiking boot eyelets. Colour variants include white with gold, white with silver, white with glitter, and black. The shoes are handcrafted in Portugal with separate lasts for women and men. At a mark-up of 2.6, the retail price stands at 179 Euros. For summer, the label offers models in leather/canvas blends, accentuated with red or green tones. The shoes are available immediately ex stock in The Netherlands. The sales representative in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland is Munich-based fashion agency Roshan Paul, which also represents Leandro Lopez, Lemon Jelly, and Nobrand. Existing customers include De Bijenkorf, Paul Warmer, Breuninger, KaDeWe Group, and Mia Shoes. In Germany, the collection can be viewed at the Gallery and Gallery Shoes in Düsseldorf. www.nubikk.com

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Nubikk presents sneakers with hiking boot laces.


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Disney x Lacoste

Birthday for Two Lacoste and Disney turn 85 and 90 respectively. To celebrate these milestones, the green crocodile and the cheeky mouse pop the corks together. The result is a limited collection that awakens the child in every adult. The capsule collection consists of five key pieces: a Mickey Mouse embellished sweatshirt in oversize, a striped sweater, various Mickey shirts, and a hoodie. The range is completed by a polo shirt that Lacoste is so famous for. The place of the iconic green crocodile is, however, taken over by frolicking Mickey and Minnie motifs. The pieces are also available for kids. Hooray! Most of the motifs play with the tennis theme as a reference to the origin of the brand. The special edition is complemented by leather goods and sneakers in Mickey and Minnie designs. www.lacoste.com

“First and foremost, fashion should be fun.” Ulli Ehrlich received the Brand Life Award 2018.

Sportalm Kitzbühel

Award-Winning Concept The European Brand Institute awarded Ulli Ehrlich, the Creative Director and Managing Director of Austrian family business Sportalm Kitzbühel, the Brand Life Award last November to honour her services to the brand. Specifically commended was her personal commitment to re-injecting values into the brand by embodying special leadership qualities, consistency, and sustainable action. style in progress congratulates Ulli Ehrlich, who said at the award ceremony: “We understand ‘Made in Austria’ as an obligation.” Thus, she once again highlights that she sets herself high standards in terms of her own performance, as well as the quality of Sportalm Kitzbühel as a brand. www.sportalm.at

The Disney x Lacoste capsule awakens our inner child: limited Mickey and Minnie Mouse motifs adorn the co-branding collection.

Mountain Force

Joint Forces

The manufacturer as a figurehead: a name change turns Mountain Force AG into KTC Unlimited AG.

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Mountain Force AG is now KTC Unlimited AG. This statement is quite significant. For the very first time, KTC Unlimited, a product specialist with the highest level of know-how in terms of functionality and sophisticated outerwear, highlights its ownership of Mountain Force officially. It is understood as a statement that the company will act more offensively in the market and position itself more clearly as a manufacturer. In addition, the focus is shifted to the product competence that KTC Unlimited intends to inject into the products. As of the autumn/winter 2019 season, the collection, which retains the label name Mountain Force, is trading under the roof of KTC Unlimited. At the same time, AdM - Artisan de Montagne is added to the stable as an additional private label. It offers technical mountain clothing that adapts to the weather conditions on mountains all year round. This means KTC Unlimited can celebrate two major premieres at the upcoming Ispo. www.ktcunlimited.com


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Fil Noir

Homage to Femininity The women’s collection by shirt and blouse specialist Fil Noir, which offers three delivery dates, deserves special attention. Retail prices start at 79 Euros, with core prices ranging from 99 to 129 Euros. Elaborate pieces can cost up to 199 Euros. The markup is 2.8. Two new slip-over blouses, one casual and one feminine model, provide new silhouettes. The straightcut blouses feature detachable bows on the collar for a classic or playful look. A loosely fitting blouse with flounces on the button placket and two new dresses are new highlights. One of the dresses boasts frills on the button tape and cuffs, while the other is a slip-over with three-quarter sleeves and a stand-up collar. The designers have remained true to last season’s more feminine line and implemented more playful details such as frills, glitter tapes, and piping. The sales representative in Austria and South Tyrol is Salzburg-based Free Mountain, while Modeagentur Lüthi is responsible for the distribution of the Donna by Fil Noir in Switzerland. www.fil-noir.com

Sweat, baby, sweat? The era of perspiration has come to an end thanks to Hydro-Bot technology.

Kjus

High-Tech The Swiss sportswear brand has launched a real innovation: the very first ski jacket that eliminates sweat at the push of a button. The Hydro-Bot technology relies on an electro-­ osmotic membrane that can be controlled by the wearer via an app on an iPhone or Android app device. Moisture is actively removed from the inside of the jacket, thus ruling out a cool off process after skiing. This means skiers can channel all their energy into their favourite sport. www.kjus.com

3

questions for:

Helmfried Strupat Owner of Better Rich

Fil Noir Donna relies on an excellent mix of body-hugging and loose oversize pieces.

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Better Rich embodies cosiness and quality. How do you maintain standards? We invest in quality. We only use organic cotton, produce in Turkey, often develop fabrics in-house, and constantly conduct wash tests - all this without raising prices. We ensure that our materials don’t cause allergies and are pesticide-free. This is by no means a given among premium brands anymore. At least that’s what I hear from market sources. Could you expand on that? It seems the focus has shifted to profit and margin optimisation, at the expense of the product. But if I produce cheaply in Bangladesh, my product is different too. The goods become boring and interchangeable! It’s no surprise that the retailers’ trust in brands is fading, especially when the quality of the sample doesn’t correspond to the actual delivery. What’s your conclusion? What good is it to take back goods when they don’t sell? Retailers don’t make a profit and we brands damage our own reputation. If you abandon product development, you can’t create desirability. www.better-rich.com

Better Rich invests in both feel and emotion.


WERK

HANDWERK

luxury authentic luxury KULTUR UND HANDWERK

authentic luxury

Tradition since 1683 Our products are engineered in Germany and handcrafted in Europe. The chamois tanned leather comes from wild red deer, respectfully hunted in the European Alps. This leather is, now more than ever, a material that deserves trust and respect. For centuries it has proven its value, reliability and highly emotional affect. Therefore it is our aim to share our passion for this unique product with you. Markus Meindl VISIT US: Pitti Immagine Uomo H/13 - Firenze, Italy Welcome Edition, Showroom 2 - Paris, France Showroom Salzburg Gusswerk - Salzburg, Austria fashion@meindl.de +49 8685 9850 www.meindl-fashion.de


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Mey

Spot On

Luis Trenker founder Michi Klemera has discovered the benefits of lining his outerwear with wool from a sheep breed known as the Villnösser Brillenschaf.

Luis Trenker

In Touch With Nature In the spirit of sustainability, the Alpine lifestyle brand Luis Trenker has opted for an exclusive partnership with the label Villnösser Brillenschaf. The jackets and coats in question are no longer made with down, but with the wool of this oldest sheep breed in South Tyrol. They are supplemented with a high-quality layer of artificial fibres to achieve maximum functionality and thermoregulation. Recycled down will be used for the autumn/ winter 2019 season only, because the current stock of Villnösser Brillenschaf is not yet sufficient. Until recently, the breed was almost extinct. Currently, there are approx. 1,000 animals in 115 South Tyrolean breed registry farms, the existence of which should be secured due to increased demand. Bolzano-based company Luis Trenker, which manufactures its products exclusively in small European factories, relies on tradition and forward-looking design alike. “Luis Trenker’s goal is not merely to reach the summit, but to leave traces behind,” says brand founder Michi Klemera. www.luistrenker.com

The motto of Mey’s autumn/winter 2019 collection for women is “Autumn Poem”. It presents darker, sensual colours such as olive sand, autumn grey, and dusty plum, which harmonise perfectly in lingerie and nightwear. “Yet again, the stylistic highlight is the Mey Lovestory segment, with a modern pattern mix and new cuts,” says Claudia Wigge, the Head of Design at Mey Women. Precious materials, large polka dots, and check designs, combined with floral prints in the trend colour graphite, represent a bold fashion statement and blur the boundaries between home wear and outerwear. In addition, there are all-over patterned two-piece items that play with the contrast of casual feminine cuts and masculine elements. “Generally speaking, Mey’s growth is dominated by the upswing in the lingerie segment. Mey Lovestory is performing admirably. We have also recorded excellent sales figures with Mey Night2Day in the nightwear segment,” says Matthias Mey, the Managing Partner of Mey Group. www.mey.com

Head Legacy Line

The Best of Two Worlds

The new Head Sportswear Legacy Line is progressive in terms of both design and material.

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The range of classic ski clothing is broad, whereas the number of ideal days on the slopes is decreasing and the seasons start later. A challenge that Head Sportswear from Kennelbach in Austria meets with its new Legacy Line. A team was created specifically for this ski clothing and distribution concept to develop exclusive materials, trims, and cuts, as well as to combine progressive design with technical innovation. The first collection for the 2019/20 season presents three-layer outfits for women and men, mainly in the colours navy and ivory white. The pieces promise high wearing comfort and are robust, breathable, and waterproof. Jogging styles in shades of grey add the finishing touch. Thanks to the carefully thought-out layer system, the outfits can be worn on the slopes in all weather conditions, but are also suitable for the city. The collection is positioned sharply and distributed to stores in ski resorts. www.head.com

Underwear and loungewear is a growth business for the Mey Group.


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North Sails

Waging War on Plastic

North Sails has launched the Free the Sea campaign to prevent marine pollution.

In keeping with the Free the Sea campaign and the Go Beyond Plastic initiative, North Sails will, as of early May 2019, present an installation in Hirmer’s flagship store in Munich. It will underpin the brand’s commitment to protecting the marine environment and highlight its co-operation with the Ocean Family Foundation. The title of the 3D Virtual Reality installation is “Dive with Sharks”. Hirmer, located in middle of a pedestrian zone, offers a high-frequency platform ideal for drawing widespread attention to the issue of sustainability by showcasing mesmerising underwater photography by Juan Oliphant and Ocean Ramsey. Moreover, North Sails supports projects such as “A Plastic Planet”, an initiative that lobbies against disposable plastic packaging. Maria Sole Bianco, a marine biologist at the World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA), is North Sails’ ambassador in Italy. She passes on her knowledge on TV and at schools. She also organises many acclaimed beach clean-up events. www.northsails.com, www.oceanfamilyfoundation.com

mey story

Diligence and Consistency “Driven by the fashion segment, mey story has been performing exceptionally,” says Matthias Mey, the Managing Partner of Mey. “Given our quality and craftsmanship, our products are met with enthusiasm internationally, for example in the US and Asia.” Consequently, the autumn/winter 2019 collection has been expanded considerably. It focuses on the latest trend topics in soft materials: wool, fleece, double-faced qualities, and ribbed velour in luxurious colours. “We strive to create favourite pieces that are guaranteed prominent positions in every wardrobe,” Mey adds. A selective distribution to department and concept stores such as Andreas Murkudis, Lodenfrey, Braun, and KaDeWe, as well as The Boon Seoul, United Arrows, Rose & Born Stockholm, and Rialto Living, reinforces mey story’s image as a premium brand. “With mey story, we have created basics of exceptional quality - this can only be achieved by monitoring the entire value chain and by offering a fully transparent insight into the production process. This is how we define modern luxury.” This form of luxury also appeals to an exceptional retailer like Andreas Murkudis. Together with his brother Kostas, he designed a limited edition of three mey story pieces exclusively available at his store in Berlin. www.meystory.com

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questions for:

Klaus Kirschner

CEO of FWS Hats, Stetson Europe

mey story’s fabrics are exclusively made of hand-picked Pima cotton from Peru.

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What are the most important hat and cap silhouettes in the coming season? Larger shapes are becoming more important. They’re slowly but surely shaking off their exotic status. In the commercial segment, we expect new knitted hats to do well. Do social media trends influence your sales? Not directly. We primarily address men. And I mean men, not boys. They’re not that easy to sway. Naturally, we notice that products that are repeatedly featured in the media perform better. What needs to be done better? Communication. We need to explain to the consumer what makes our product so special. We often use great fabrics with incredible features. But when one talks to customers, they often seem confused. They bought the product because it looks great, but didn’t know about the features. We need to make this information more accessible to salespeople and consumers. To what do you doff your hat? I respect established retailers who are brave enough to try creative approaches in difficult times and constantly question and re-invent themselves. www.stetson-europe.com


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Steiner 1888

Colour and Core Competence Steiner 1888 is shifting its focus to the outerwear segment. The label’s approach is colourful. “Our customers desire special products. As a loden manufactory, we are in a position to offer just that,” says product manager Christian Steindl. “Blending tradition and innovation is even more important to us than before.” As a fully integrated manufacturer, the brand from Mandling produces exclusively in Austria. The focus on outerwear means a return to its core competence. Steiner 1888 even supplied loden seats for the “Plattenkarbahn” ski lift in Obertauern in November 2018. “We wanted to add a bit of local colour to the ski circus,” says co-owner Johannes Steiner. Schladming loden is always an integral part of every collection. Steiner 1888 is aware of its roots. The fabric is made of wool sourced exclusively from Austrian mountain sheep. It is produced on an original machine that dates back to 1888. www.steiner1888.com

Holubar is the masterpiece of sportwear visionary Alberto Raegno.

Holubar

Donations Welcome The independence of a brand is its most valuable asset. This also applies to sportswear brand Holubar. All the more annoying when styles are copied, be it in details or even 1:1. The usual procedure would be tenacious litigation with high legal costs, ultimately leading to the copies being taken off the market and destroyed. “Instead, we have decided to ask those who copy Holubar to voluntarily donate a percentage of their turnover to a good cause,” says Tomislav Grajzar, the Managing Partner of Holubar Distribution GmbH. The donations go to “Senegal Hilfe”, an aid organisation based in Kaiserslautern, which co-owner Thomas Köhler has supported with private funds for quite some time. His funds financed, for example, the construction of a school in Senegal. It will soon be followed by another (www.charitycircle.me). “The strengths of Holubar are its authenticity and trend-setting design that deliberately follows its own paths,” Grajzar emphasises. “All the more we strive to protect the brand, which was re-launched by Alberto Raegno, and to sensitise manufacturers and retailers alike.” www.holubar.it

DGL

Time is Now

Steiner 1888 offers checked coats in many colours.

The loden manufactory Steiner 1888 has supplied high-quality loden seats for the “Plattenkarbahn” ski lift in Obertauern.

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How more obvious can change in menswear be than ready-to-wear specialist Digel launching a streetwear collection? It has its own name, its own identity, and is definitely not a sub-line of Digel. The name of the project, which focuses on male millennials, is DGL. At a mark-up of 2.8, prices range from 60 to 600 Euros. DGL offers two delivery windows per season. In terms of sales, the label quite consciously chooses to work with MAB Fashion as an external agency for Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Without wanting to praise this urban and functional collection prematurely, it is clear that someone has recognised the signs of the times and implemented them consistently. www.dgl.global

“Stay Focused” is the credo of streetwear label DGL. For the parent company Digel, this is a step in a new direction.


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alberto-pants.com


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Floris van Bommel

The Power of the Brand

A completely new line for a completely new target audience: Peuterey Plurals revs up the fashion level.

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questions for:

Elia Soskic

Head of International Sales Peuterey Exciting times at Peuterey. What’s new? Two major projects define our innovative course in the autumn/winter season. The first is known as Guardian 5.0, a journey back to the roots of the brand. We translated the very first Peuterey parka into contemporary silhouettes and colours. An innovative essential that unites past, present, and future. The second is Peuterey Plurals, a completely new product line that incorporates and experiments with new trends in the outerwear and ready-to-wear segments. Peuterey Plurals brings a whole new spirit to the Peuterey world by addressing a younger, cooler, and more dynamic target audience. The product line is driven by urban, positive vibes - a dynamic approach for a lifestyle determined by technology and music. What are your goals in the medium and long term? Peuterey’s focus will always be the enthusiasm with which we work on our products in order to offer innovative and high-quality collections - Italian in design, international in taste, and inspired by the most stylish cities in the world. We create a modern range of casual wear that captures the rhythm and dynamism of urban life. That’s what the brand embodies. We always look to the future in terms of functionality and style. In the retail sector, we want to further strengthen our partnerships with the most important European multi-brand stores and implement special projects together with them. Not only branded shop windows, but also street marketing activities and in-store events to increase brand awareness. That’s why we completely renewed our digital platform and use social networks. Given that we utilise all these channels in our own way, we achieve excellent results. Today, it is vital to pursue a multi-channel approach with intent and to rely on a strong marketing mix. In this way, we strive to improve the customer journey in line with our brand, both before and after buying a Peuterey piece. www.peuterey.com

At this January’s Premium Berlin, Floris van Bommel has opted for the increased visibility at a different position. “The German market, including the stationary retail trade, has developed exceptionally,” says Pepijn van Bommel, the brand’s Commercial Director. “Our new stand underlines our brand’s power and appeal, both online and offline. As such, Floris van Bommel is not only represented in modern men’s footwear ranges, but also highlighted on brand walls and corners in fashion stores and premium department stores.” The current shoe collection features 180 styles in the categories Sport, Casual, and Dressed; most models are new designs. “We don’t recycle styles, but seek constant change,” says Floris van Bommel, the brand’s Head of Design and Marketing. To this end, advertising campaigns portray the collection as the first choice for globetrotters at breath-taking sites of natural beauty. The autumn/winter collection is presented in China with brand ambassador Floris van Bommel. www.florisvanbommel.com

Floris van Bommel’s collection has a high recognition value.

Airfield

Top Quotas

Airfield’s womenswear remains true to its individual design language.

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Philipp Liftinger has been the Creative Director of Airfield, a newly created position, since November. He has, however, shaped the brand’s core products - blazers, jackets, and outdoor-wear - for more than six years as Senior Designer. Thus, he has always had significant influence on the Austrian brand’s collection. “Our strongest source of inspiration is - and always will be - our own DNA: sportiness, femininity, sexiness, and provocation,” Liftinger says. “We plug a gap in the mid to upper luxury fashion segment for high-impact pieces that women instinctively embrace. Excellent sales ratios and a high recognition value prove us right.” The autumn/winter 2019/20 collection focuses particularly on outerwear. It consists of both fashionably urban and functional styles in various colours, as well as many down pieces. Airfield has 260 customers in the German-speaking market. In 2019, the brand plans to gradually modernise its own Airfield stores, shop-in-shop formats, and franchise stores with new shopfitting. www.airfield.at


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Vegan jacket brand Save the Duck has proven that one doesn’t necessarily need down fillings to claim summits in the Himalaya.

Save the Duck

Outdoor Innovation For the development of its autumn/winter 2019/20 collection, Save the Duck teamed up with vegan mountaineer Kuntal A. Joisher. He climbed the 8,516 metres high summit of Lhotse in the Himalayas in a suit without down filling, made especially for him by Save the Duck. This unprecedented venture on the world’s fourth highest mountain marks a turning point in the history of technical sportswear. No one has ever climbed an eight-thousander without a down suit before. The results of the joint development and experiences from the mountain ascent were also incorporated into the other lines of the respective collections. Protech, an urban lifestyle range, is increasingly manufactured with Gore-Tex fabrics and expanded by new Arctic Protech models. The line made of recycled materials has also been expanded, and now includes more fashion trends, in addition to jackets in a minimal chic look. The basic silhouettes will in future also be available in an oversized version and lined jackets come with extensive quilting in a mountaineering look. www.savetheduck.com

Circolo 1901

Easy, Not Simple It’s not always the loudest who inspire. The Italian brand Circolo 1901 has decided to be quiet on principle - never pushy, never superficial, always profound. Every piece of the collection is a revelation, every glance at the details a delight. Why not highlight all this? Brand and wearer alike don’t do that. That’s exactly why the wearers have been asked to step in front of the camera for the latest campaign. Company founder Gennaro Dargenio is perhaps the best figurehead for his brand. He always has a smile on his lips, is both carefree and rigid. The customer, as in the retailer, is always at the centre of his thinking. “The most important aspect of a relationship between a brand and the retailers is to make their job easy. Today, we have to pay the same attention to stores as we do to our employees. We need to solve their problems in order to make selling easier. We call that easy, not simple.” www.circolo1901.it Strong even beyond the blue heart: The Nim Standard impresses with non-denims - even for women.

The Nim Standard

Women and Non-Denims “At a time when denim is flying under the radar, The Nim Standard is an exciting alternative for many retailers,” says Niklas Rill, the Sales Manager responsible for the Italian specialist brand at Komet & Helden. Retail prices between 150 and 230 Euros promise an excellent price-performance ratio. The passion for the product is, however, equally impressive. “One can feel that Claudio Parolini backs the brand with real enthusiasm.” The brand is also strong in non-denim, chinos, corduroy, and velvet. This is appreciated by retail customers. In the past season, renowned houses such as Braun, Apropos The Concept Store, Mientus, and Ortner have upgraded the list of customers even more.

Circolo 1901 founder Gennaro Dargenio has created a brand that doesn’t care for superficiality.

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Young designer Alessio Bonauti has a tongue-in-cheek approach to creating fashion for men.

The Italian brand Manuel Ritz is now available for both men and women.

Bob

Manuel Ritz

All Grown Up

Following a capsule, Manuel Ritz’s women’s collection officially launches for the new autumn/winter season. “Our womenswear is inspired by the same values as our menswear. It’s aimed at modern women who love combining the past and the future,” says Raffaelo Severini, the Commercial Director of Manuel Ritz. “The result is a total look with a twist, perfect for dynamic urban living with comfortable and custom-fit pieces.” Manuel Ritz is characterised by Italian fashion traditions, with a typical Italian sense of style and innovative details. Another strength of the collection, which is distributed in Germany and Austria by Hinterhofagentur, is the service provided by Paoloni Group. “We attribute this to our well-organised processes within the company,” Severini argues. “In addition, the fact that we mainly produce in our own factories makes us very competitive.” www.manuelritz.com

Bob’s new autumn/winter 2019/20 collection is a little more sophisticated. It has, however, not lost any of the typical Bob style, which is defined by lovingly hand-crafted details. Nevertheless, the brand is keen to satisfy international demand, yet always with a healthy dose of “Made in Italy”. The complete range includes jackets, coats, sport jackets, vests, knitwear, shirts, jerseys and sweats, trousers, and - last but not least - witty scarves and hats. Particular attention is paid to comfort, which is why many ready-to-wear pieces are made of jersey and knitted fabrics. “Cold Wash” piecedyed qualities are made of wool, featuring technical elements and detachable linings. The knitwear range features many new, nubby yarns, as well as two-colour knitted models with classic cable stitch. The sweat and t-shirt segment includes interesting washes, some even with appliqués. Shirts come with typical “hand-stitches” in beautiful flannel qualities. www.bobcompany.it

Launch of the Women’s Collection

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PROUDLY PEOPLE Circolo 1901 supports real people.

circolo1901.it


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Parajumpers

Outdoor Culture

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questions for:

Lars Braun

Owner of Braun Hamburg and 04651/

Is fashion fun? Yes, of course! Fashion is even more fun in times of change. It’s a creative people’s business with ever-changing challenges. I work in a great industry with great perspectives. Then why is there so much whining in this great industry? The challenges are considerable. Digitisation is changing the rules at a rapid pace. We need to find adequate answers. The “earlier, higher, faster” insanity is no longer justified. Customers don’t want winter jackets in July and linen blouses in December. This rhythm wasn’t the customers’ idea; it was forced upon them by us. That was a mistake that many retailers are atoning for bitterly today in the form of write-offs. That’s true… but is there a way to break this cycle? Yes! We can solve the problem together with our customers, who we must focus even more on in terms of strategy today. A customer who is excellently informed and has all options in an omni-channel market must be addressed perfectly. It’s all about the right collection composition, selection without overstocking, quality, service, convenience, and - of course - offering the right product at the right time. What can you learn from that for 04651/? First and foremost, we have been proven right. At 04651/, we have always thought outside the box. Our claim is to offer products without seasonal stamps that are part and parcel of an individual look. By this I don’t mean they can only be basics, but rather essentials - a quiet look that allows for highlights, but always of the finest quality and durability. We will continue to pursue this philosophy all the more consistently and thus - to speak again from the retailer’s point of view - create the possibility of withdrawing these products from the spiral of devaluation that is causing the fashion trade so much trouble. How strongly does this idea influence assortment planning? Let me put it this way: suppliers who meet this requirement at a high level will undoubtedly have a bonus in the future. www.braun-hamburg.com, www.04651-sylt.de

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Massimo Rossetti, the Creative Director of Parajumpers, has decided to focus on the re-interpretation of archetypical athleisure and outerwear pieces. The leitmotif is, however, innovation. His mission is to transcend technical boundaries. In addition to numerous new models, the Italian premium jacket brand is introducing three new capsules: Outstanding, Endurance, and Top Notch. The down jackets of the Outstanding range are mostly made of Ventile, an untreated cotton fabric without laminate developed in the UK. It was famously used to climb Mount Everest. Yoshinori Ono, Parajumpers’ long-term guest designer, has designed technically sophisticated and equally luxurious jackets for the Endurance line - made of extremely light and durable Cordura. An absolute highlight is the Alpha Jacket with removable lining from the Top Notch capsule. It is made of piece-dyed nylon and boasts a cool “used look” effect. In addition to leather and silk, the new women’s collection also utilises chenille and velvet. www.parajumpers.it

Function meets style: Parajumpers combines the great outdoors with big city life.

Alpha Studio

New Partnership

Alpha Studio has a new partner for the German market.

As of the autumn/winter season 2019/20, Alpha Studio has a new partner for the German market in Düsseldorf-based fashion agency Max Paatzsch. “We intend to start selling the women’s collection in our showroom in Düsseldorf in January,” says agency owner Max Paatzsch, who believes the label has great potential. “Alpha Studio’s women’s collection is young and fresh; it has a fashion level that appeals to our customers. This is set to be a highend collaboration. We are particularly impressed by the company’s reliability and its excellent B2B platform. The latter allows us to offer our customers constant support during the season.” www.francorossi.it, www.modeagentur-paatzsch.de


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High potentials: the cotton and silk blouses by Silk Sisters.

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questions for:

Mel Nienaber Head of Design at Marlino Group

Alberto can’t live without denim. Once again, it is the basis for the label’s designs.

Alberto x Midnight

Support Your Local Artist Alberto collaborates with Rhenish independent street artist Midnight. At the beginning of December 2018, the label celebrated this in its concept store in Mönchen­ gladbach. Cem Demirezen (aka Midnight) designed individual denim prints for customers on location. Visitors of the release party were able to examine the print on their individualised treasures and take the finished articles home on the spot. Denim is also one of the focal points for the autumn/winter 2019/20 season, be it finished with plaid lining, as classic button-fly styles, raw selvedge, or black denim pants with dividing seams. Jeans always look great! Alberto presents a total of six premium business denim models: Tencel, Left-Hand, and cashmere qualities meet Dynamic Superfits and bi-stretch goods. “Get out of the office and mount your bike” is the motto of the successful range of bike pants and jeans. In addition to materials such as flexible water-repellent gabardine, this line also focuses on qualities such as Ecorepel or Hardtex denim. www.alberto-pants.com

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Mel, why is fake fur so successful? One can approach the fake fur topic much more courageously than others. The price plays the decisive role. When it comes to real fur, the design always teeters on the narrow line between innovation and wearability. After all, customers want to wear a lambskin coat that cost 1,500 Euros for many winters. A funky fake fur piece can also be considered from a purely fashionable - and somewhat more short-lived - point of view. With fake fur, we make a fashion statement based on colours, unusual prints, and pleasant materials. Silk Sisters is mainly produced in Portugal. Is that a statement? We tried different production countries. For the last two seasons, we have been producing cotton blouses in Portugal. Silk will be added in the coming season. In terms of price, performance, quality, service, speed, and accessibility we feel like we are in excellent hands. The Portuguese understanding of fashion is very subtle and the communication runs smoothly. Do you believe that production in Europe is the future? Quantities are an important factor for our offline labels. Europe is much more flexible in this respect. Small businesses and fashion brands join forces to create special collections that stand out from the mass market and offer stationary retailers individual alternatives. www.marlinogroup.com


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Bright colours outside, print inside: Massimo Rossi boasts a strong design language for the brand Freedomday.

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questions for:

Massimo Russo Designer of Freedomday

What are the highlights of the autumn/winter collection? We have drawn inspiration from the themes “environment” and “travellers of the world”. This is reflected in the images that are printed on the lining of all Freedomday jackets. In addition to the parkas, with which we have been successful since the beginning, we have expanded our range: parkas featuring beautiful fur in bright colours and cool down accessories, for example. The latter include scarves and gloves that match the jackets. We paid special attention to the weight and length of our jackets, which ensures that they can be worn throughout autumn and winter. You have invested heavily in technology. Why? First and foremost, we have invested heavily in the collection. At the Premium Berlin, we will present Freedomday Black Label, a collection for the urban traveller. It is the result of our research and development on performance fabrics, functionality, and detail solutions. In addition, we have also invested in logistics and warehousing in order to meet market needs and increase our efficiency. In terms of marketing, we intend to increase our digital marketing budgets to facilitate the discourse with our customers. Freedomday has returned to the German market. What are your expectations? We are thrilled to be given an opportunity to show this market how much we have developed. We strive to be as successful in Germany as we are in other export markets. www.freedomday.it

Blauer USA

New Look & Feel

Soft and light in a new look: down jackets by Blauer USA.

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Blauer USA, an American cult brand with an Italian heart, presents a completely renewed range of down jackets for autumn/winter 2019. In line with its heritage, Blauer USA’s designers have studied the characteristics of historical uniforms of the US police and army in order to re-interpret them fashionably. Highlights of the collection are classic parkas with basic silhouettes. The typical military-style jackets are elaborately piece-dyed to achieve individual vintage effects. The same applies to variants made of iridescent nylon, which boast details such as carrès and sleeve patches in black taslan, zipper edging underlaid with herringbone nylon, and 90/10 down padding. The result: soft, light, and unmistakable pieces that fascinate with their technical design throughout. www.blauerusa.com

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questions for:

Katerina Grigoriadis

Head of Design Marc Cain Sports On which inspirations and colours is the Marc Cain Sports collection based in autumn/winter? Essentially on Paris and the easy chic of French women… Feminine elements with influences from sportswear dominate the image with fresh, bright colours such as chili and neon pink. Pastels such as lilac, rosé, and mint break up black/white combinations and make outfits appear softer. What are the highlights? Striking or hidden lettering as messages are important stylistic elements to emphasise the dynamic character of the outfits. Charmingly playful hearts make an appearance as appliqués, prints, or patterns. The Tomboy aesthetic is particularly evident in the processing of scuba qualities, as well as tweed bonding and taping. Tulle skirts appear both feminine and casual in combination with boxy sweats and shirts. Sequins, lurex, and lacquer coatings create cool, sparkling styles. The interplay with velvety or knitted surfaces is particularly exciting. What about the silhouettes? Organic lines on dresses, tops, and zip pullovers emphasis the athleisure concept. Costumes present themselves anew in denim variants with loops and open edges or in a sportier manner. Knitted capes and dresses team up perfectly with colour-coordinated turtlenecks. Berets and Baker Boy caps underline the French attitude. www.marc-cain.com


Vegan climber Kuntal Joisher, reached the top of Lhotse 8.516 mt on May 15th 2018, with Save the Duck technology.


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Design meets functionality: C.P. Company combines piece-dyed nylon with rubber coating

C.P. Company

Color-Zone Concept Italian sportswear brand C.P. Company is known for discreet design, functional materials, and its homeland’s sophistication. For autumn/winter 2019, the jacket specialist presents the two models Explorer and Mille in a brand-new look. The jackets are made of a multi-thread nylon which comprises different qualities and allows warp and weft threads to shimmer in subtle colours. The hood, chest and shoulder areas are extensively coated with rubber material. This mix of nylon and rubber taps into the Color-Zone concept of last winter and continues the combination of technical outerwear with elaborate piece-dying to deliver visually striking and function-oriented jackets. The brand, founded by Massimo Osti, was sold to Tristate Holdings of China in 2015 and upholds the tradition of distinctive material developments. The sales representative in Germany and Austria is Peter Haertel’s fashion agency Vestitus. www.cpcompany.com

Weber + Weber Sartoria embodies slow fashion in its purest form.

IQ+ Berlin

Certified Furs Weber + Weber Sartoria

Next Level

“Weber + Weber Sartoria has matured in many areas,” says Christian Weber, the designer of the Austrian brand. First of all, the label showcased its range at the Pitti Immagine Uomo for the very first time - at eye level with brands that populate the same retail environment as Weber + Weber Sartoria. Secondly, the women’s range is being expanded in line with demand. “Even though we still don’t claim to have an actual womenswear collection, the range is much more complete.” Thirdly, the traditional costume segment is now a label in its own right. Josef & Anna by Weber + Weber Sartoria celebrates its launch in January. “We have very loyal customers in the Alps. They love what we do. We want to create something especially for them.” While Agentur Schwarte represents the Sartoria line, Josef & Anna is handled by Stolz Modeagentur. www.weberweber.it

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For the autumn/winter 2019/20 season, IQ Berlin launches a cosy knitwear collection featuring boxy sweaters, hoodies, and long-coats in expressive colours. It complements the range of the Berlin-based brand, which embodies premium sportswear with a love for detail. New are, for instance, a Polar Down parka in technical material and a puffa down jacket with a vest in ultralight, especially developed nylon qualities. Functional features, neon details, and reflective ribbons are key elements. The label currently uses more lambskin for its parkas, interpreted in a sporty context with Shearling Lamb or in a more feminine manner with Toscana Lamb. Under the label WePreFur, IQ Berlin uses certified fur as part of a co-operation with the German Hunting Association and the German Furriers’ Guild to ensure a responsible use of resources. Original Steiff teddy qualities for parkas and nylon styles offer an alternative. Wool coats made of fabrics sourced in Italy complete the collection. www.iqplusberlin.com, www.weprefur.de

IQ Berlin embodies premium sportswear with a love for deta


www.wunderfell.com


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“The market is changing in all areas,” says Die Hinterhofagentur’s Dominik Meuer.

Die Hinterhofagentur

Michaelis Fashion Agency welcomes Outhere, an outdoor collection for women and men that combines technology with aesthetics, to its portfolio.

Michaelis Fashion Agency

Twist & Zeitgeist For the coming season, the team headed by Daniela and René Michaelis has set itself the goal of further expanding its successful collaboration with long-standing partners such as Peuterey. Following this summer’s move from Munich’s Lodenfreypark to the Fashion Mall in “Karl-Weinmair-Strasse”, the portfolio has been expanded by a few brands. There’s also a new addition for the upcoming season: Absolut Cashmere, a progressive cashmere collection from Paris. “It’s a high-end collection that exclusively uses purest cashmere. The sustainable, certified extraction and production of raw materials is just as self-evident as a homogenous, modern design signature with a special twist and zeitgeist appeal. Core retail prices range from 199 to 299 Euros,” René Michaelis explains. Another newcomer is Outhere, an outdoor collection for men and women created by Graziano Moro and Renato Pigatti. It combines technology and aesthetics. “Outhere’s creativity is hard to beat. We are incredibly excited,” René Michaelis adds. “Only very few sportswear brands offering complete looks are capable of harmoniously combining such design innovation levels and product know-how in, for example, in-house fabric developments.” Labels: Absolut Cashmere, Airfield, Furry, Outhere, Peuterey, Yippie Hippie Michaelis Fashion Agency, Munich/Germany, mail@michaelis-fashion-agency.com, www.michaelis-fashion-agency.com

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Relaxed, but Wide Awake! Dominik, what is your credo for the coming season? Dominik Meuer, owner of Die Hinterhofagentur: The market is currently very dynamic, with certain hints of panic. Autumn has brought what the summer suggested. You can see that the market is readjusting in every area. For us, this means working even more closely with our brands and communicating the needs of our customers. What does the market need now? It needs collections that are on point. The best example is latest newcomer Blune, a womenswear collection from Paris. Stylistically, Blune is very feminine and French. Sometimes the label is, however, a little more rock & roll and progressive, which complements us perfectly. But our customers are also interested in fine, smaller items like special accessories. As of this season, we represent a new scarf collection named Code Ltd by Codello. It draws from the know-how of its parent company but is much more exclusive and - as a unisex collection - much smaller. We also sell a highend, handcrafted jewellery collection for men. 8 and 7 stands for masculine bracelets and necklaces made of sterling silver - sporty and sparsely decorated. This is the icing on the cake. Labels for women: Ad Hoc, Blune, Cape Horn, Des Petits Hauts, Kori, Lightning Bolt, The Jacksons, Wool & Co, Wyse London Labels for men: Ad Hoc, Bob, Cape Horn, Code ltd., Koike, Lightning Bolt, Manuel Ritz, Portofiori, Taylor Tweed, Wool & Co, Prime Shoes & Hamlet, 8 and 7 Die Hinterhofagentur, Munich/Germany, info@diehinterhofagentur.de, www.diehinterhofagentur.com


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Agentur Schwarte

Japanese Soul, European Heart

Deus ex Machina appeals to a large community.

59 Inches is the usual width of bales of fabric. Now it is also the name of a new collection of sweatshirts for men by Heiko Storz. Are they classic sweaters? “No,” says Matthias Schwarte, the owner of the eponymous fashion agency. “The motto of 59 Inches is: Japanese Soul - European Heart One Identity.” Another newcomer is the sneaker label Mason Garments of Amsterdam. “The brand is performing exceptionally well in the Benelux markets and England,” Schwarte explains. His agency acts as the sales representative for Germany and Austria. At retail prices ranging from 250 to 300 Euros, the range is upscale. The womenswear collection Daniele Fiesoli 01 performed admirably over the summer, which is not a given for knitwear. “The styles can be quite voluminous, in super beautiful qualities,” Schwarte gushes. “We, as an agency, tend to focus on product specialists. The fact that we are very successful is an indicator that retailers appreciate this approach. The modern customer doesn’t want any old jacket, but THE jacket.” Labels: Armani Exchange, EA 7, Emporio Armani, 59 inches, AT.P.CO, Daniele Fiesoli Collection 01, Fil Noir, Mason Garments, Parajumpers, People of Shibuya, Piola, Spalding, Weber + Weber Agentur Schwarte, Munich/Germany, office@agentur-schwarte.de, www.agentur-schwarte.de

The Parajumpers collection is always a bold statement in terms of innovative outerwear.

Komet und Helden

Immense Potential Florian, what’s new and cool? Florian Ranft, Managing Director of Komet und Helden: Tela Genova, a collection offering Selvedge denim at affordable prices, upholds workwear traditions. Generally speaking, we are still not on the hunt to procure as many brands as possible each season. Rather, we appreciate the very intensive, long-term relationships with most of our producers. Our relationship with many of them dates back more than 10 years. It’s not a great time for new collections, unless they are brands that really embody something, have a distinctive DNA, and can tell a real story. We like that! Which of your collections are you most keen to present to retailers and why? We believe that Deus ex Machina has enormous potential. There’s hardly a brand that has an equally cool image, is so diverse, and reaches such a huge community, while still remaining affordable. Anyone who has ever been in a Deus Temple is infected by the brand. What else is important to you? We want to ensure that we enjoy what we do, even when times are tough. And we have the privilege of working with the best team. Which question do you not want to hear from your customers in 2019? Do you think FC Bayern can still win the title despite trailing Dortmund by 7 points? Bayern always wins the title. They have only lost the title once they have actually lost the title! Labels: 7 for all mankind, AG Jeans, B.D. Baggies, Baracuta, Barena, Blauer USA, Bowery NYC, Deus Ex Machina, Diemme, Hartford, Ottod’Ame, Paltò, Save the Duck, Tela Genova, The.Nim, White Sand Komet und Helden, Munich and Düsseldorf/ Germany, www.kometundhelden.de

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Ben And

Innovations and Icons What are you particularly happy about this season? Ben Botas, owner of Ben And: I’m happy that we can represent Handstich in Germany and Austria. The label has thus centralised its distribution and places more focus on womenswear. The jackets boast inspirational looks and the German manufacturer guarantees excellent service. That’s what we need! Which brand has the most potential? Sunspel is a new addition. It offers t-shirts, sweats, knitwear, and underwear in excellent quality and an extensive NOS programme for women and men. We intend to make the collection even more visible in the D-A-CH market. Any other surprises? In addition to its iconic raincoat, Stutterheim now also offers other innovative rainwear styles. The shoe line interprets wellies in a modern way - a perfect match for the coats. It’s great that the core styles are always available via NOS programmes! Labels: Mason’s, Axel Arigato, NA-KD, Filippa K, Moose Knuckles, Juicy Couture, Stefanel, Odd Molly, Freddy´s, 2Shirtsago, Handstich, Sunspel, Stutterheim Ben And, Düsseldorf and Munich/Germany, agency@ben-and.com, www.ben-and.com


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D-tails

Flessa Modeagentur

Successful Tour of Italy

Cashmere at Its Best

In the upcoming order round, Patrick Coppolecchia-Reinartz presents six new collections from Italy. Giab’s. The trouser specialist from Florence descends from a traditional company that has been designing men’s and women’s trousers since 1953. Manufactured exclusively in Italy, the label utilises traditional craftsmanship to re-interpret classics from their own archives in a trend-conscious manner. Paltò. The name says it all. The collection stands for breathtakingly elegant Italian coat designs. D-tails represents the women’s line. Purchase prices range from 160 to 230 Euros. Allegri. This is Italy’s answer to the trench coat. The style icon of menswear is modernised with innovative material combinations. The current highlight is a capsule in co-operation with the high fashion brand Cottweiler. Paolo Pecora. This is relaxed casualness for every day. The sophisticated menswear line focuses on knitwear and is manufactured exclusively in Italy. Freedomday. These colourful down jackets and parkas are made unmistakable by lining with large-format photo prints. Tucano. Accessories, backpacks, iPad covers, and much more - this diverse collection peps up product ranges. Labels: Add, Allegri, Best Company, Bitossi, Bruno Parise, Flower Mountain, Fracap, Freedomday, Giab’s, Il Bisonte, Tucano, Paltò (women’s line), Paolo Pecora D-tails, Munich/Germany, info@d-tails.de, www.d-tails.de

Claudia Flessa has a knack for exceptional cashmere collections. Her portfolio already boasts a top-class specialist: 360 Cashmere from LA. Last July, she added a small, refined project that was placed at 20 top retailers almost immediately: Ella Silla. The label offers hand-knitted sweaters and jackets by Hamburg-based designer Lisa Weinhold. “A special feature of the collection is that Lisa processes only the finest Italian yarns that she selects herself. Whether smoothly knit or with voluminous cable stitch, every piece envelopes the wearer like a fluffy cloud,” agency owner Flessa says. Volume and casual oversized looks are trends that the designer intends to retain when she expands the collection next season. In addition to sweaters and jackets, the label will then offer a coat model, scarves, and hats. At a markup of 2.8, retail prices for sweaters revolve around the 1,200 Euro mark. Labels: 360 Cashmere, Ama Pure, Charlotte Sparre, Drome, Ella Silla, Lalo, Michael Stars, Sara Martignoni Flessa Modeagentur, Buch am Buchrain/Germany, info@flessa-modeagentur.de, www.flessa-modeagentur.de

Allegri interprets the trench coat in an Italian context.

Room with a view

Chill Out

Christian, what’s your current personal highlight? Christian Obojes, owner of Room with a view: The Veja sneakers are receiving a lot of good press lately. They hit the nerve of the time, even with the Royal Family. Which collection presentation inspired you? The Arkk Copenhagen Meeting in a historic cinema hall impressed us immensely. There were more than 150 participants: agents, retailers, press representatives, and employees. The professionalism is exemplary. The graphics and statistics really “flashed” us. New, highly qualified people join the team almost every month. It’s great to be able to witness this development. What’s nice is that we had the best growth rate of all “smaller” countries. What things need to be done better in 2019? At the moment, our biggest challenge is to work through the customer rush our agency is experiencing. What we can definitely do better is to take business less seriously and to simplify processes. We are often a bit too overzealous on our part and we would like to rein in our customers a little too. After we went on a tour through Austria with five brand representatives, everyone was enthusiastic about the quality of the retailers we work with. Our headquarters have been almost PET-free for a year. We only use glass bottles, drink tap water, forego disposable plastic packaging, and offer organic food and drinks. I dream of a green area with a vegetable patch on our 300-square-metre roof. Unfortunately, the City of Salzburg doesn’t like the urban gardening approach as much as we do. Labels: Alto, Article of Society, Arkk Copenhagen, Better Rich, D.A.T.E Sneakers, Devotion Twins, Ecoalf, Happy Socks, Holubar, Moon Boot, Moose Knuckles, Pomandere, R13 Paris, RRD, Stand Stockholm, Steamery, Steven K, Swell, Veja, Warm Me, White Sand, Xacus Room With A View, Salzburg/Austria, office@roomwithaview.at, www.roomwithaview.at

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# pe u te rey

p e u te rey. c om


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Cuore Tricolore

Room for More! “Our business is built on give and take,” says Uwe Deinert in describing the fundamental principles of his agency Cuore Tricolore. To this end, he constantly expands his range of services to include new aspects that support the retail trade. The latest highlight is a free podcast sharing model. Every Thursday, he uploads a one-hour mix by DJ Alex Kentucky via ProjectParadise.cc which his customers can use in their store. “We have also launched ‘Raum für’ (‘Room for’), a project that utilises our showroom as a platform for various events involving artists, musicians, writers, and companies – all in co-operation with Artig Marketing, an agency which we gladly recommend to customers interested in social media and marketing measures,” Deinert adds. Cuore Tricolore became the sales representative of French women’s outerwear brand On Parle De Vous in autumn. In addition to two classic pre-order collections per year, the label can deliver within a few days. “They are capable of delivering five pieces in two days, but also 5,000 in one week,” Deinert explains the service concept. At the January edition of Premium, Cuore Tricolore presents an expanded collection by Vic Matié, which now also offers men’s shoes and bags. Labels: Chevignon, Hidnander, Mc Lauren, On Parle De Vous, The Seller, Toasties, Vic Matié Cuore Tricolore, Düsseldorf/ Germany, info@cuore-tricolore.com, www.cuore-tricolore.comcom, www.cuore-tricolore.com

Heritage Agents

The Promenade

Warm-Me is a new addition to Heritage Agents’ brand portfolio.

To mark the start of the new season, Heritage Agents has refurbished their premises. Furthermore, the agency reduced its showroom in Munich’s Lodenfreypark from two floors to one. “This is our new promenade. Since January, our customers can view all our brands without having to switch floors,” says Michael Brockmann. At the same time, space was created for a newcomer: the hats and knitwear collection by Warm-Me. “We were enticed by the power package consisting of an almost complex colour palette and the relaxed, charismatic looks. In addition to hats, the label will also offer a small knitwear range for men,” Brockmann adds. With Circolo 1901, the agency ventured into uncharted terrain last season when it agreed to represent the brand’s womenswear line alongside its range for men. The success story continues with the addition of more sporty designs to the menswear line: colourful trousers, extravagant knitwear, and bomber jackets. “This completes the collection and makes it even more exciting.” Labels: Bagutta, Circolo 1901, Fortela, Lardini, Matteucci, Mey Story, Warm-Me Heritage Agents, Munich/Germany, office@heritage-agents.com, www.heritage-agents.com

Agentur Wittmann

Additions to the Portfolio The brand list of Agentur Wittmann, which is also the importer of sneakers label P448 (incl. P448 Kids) and the womenswear brand Sevenday Wonder, has changed quite considerably. The latest addition is the men’s brand Les Deux from Copenhagen. Wittmann is the sales representative in North, Central, and West Germany. In addition to jackets, trousers, knitwear, shoes, and accessories, the label also offers a small line for children consisting of shirts, hoodies, and sweaters. In its capacity as general agent, Wittmann represents the brands Della Famiglia and Fabienne Chapot in Germany and Austria, as well as Sylt Boheme in Germany only. The agency is also responsible for the distribution of Billybelt, Canadian Classics, Collezione No 01, Daniele Fiesoli, Litchi, Soul Katheriné, and Wunderfell in various regions. Labels: Della Famiglia, Fabienne Chapot, La Fée Maraboutée, P448, P448 Kids, Sevenday Wonder Agentur Stefan Wittmann, Düsseldorf/Germany, T 0049.211.58589690, stefan.wittmann@agentur-wittmann.de, www.agentur-wittmann.de

Maximum flexibility: On Parle De Vous is capable of both pre-order and Pronto fashion.

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Agentur Wittmann’s showroom in Düsseldorf showcases many new labels.


Pitti Uomo January 8-11 2019 Stand D/14 Fortezza da Basso Padiglione Centrale

Selvedge Run January 15-17 2019

Premiere Classe January 18-21 2019

IWA Outdoors Classic March 8-11 2019 Hall 4, Stand 4-140


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Vestitus

Unique Specimen What will customers visiting the Vestitus showroom enjoy in particular? Volker Haertel, co-owner Vestitus: The Herno Resort capsule can be ordered in Düsseldorf and Munich for the very first time. To date, this was only possible in Milan. The collection presents concentrated innovation in high-end qualities such as cashmere silk or neoprene wool. It also offers sporty nylon-cord blousons, parkas, and field jackets. What else is new? C.P. Company’s great strength is the garment dyeing process developed by Massimo Osti in the 1970s. It sets standards in the new Bespoke Colour programme. Customers can now customise model and colour online. Thus each piece is a unique specimen!

Herno combines fashionable creativity with functional materials.

Labels: Antonelli, C.P. Company, Fedeli, Finamore, Herno, Jacob Cohën, L.B.M. 1911, Olivieri, Santoni, Tortona 21 Vestitus, Plange Mühle 1, Düsseldorf/ Germany, service@vestitus.eu, www.vestitus.eu

Velvety softness: Briglia specialises in quiet luxury.

Agentur Klauser

Cord Comback Product specialists from Italy, instant collections, and more… Anyonelooking for something new should look no further than Agentur Klauser. Trouser specialist Briglia heralds a cord and velvet revival. Each item is individually piece-dyed in Italy. Light fashion accents paired with contemporary, wearable cuts determine the entire main collection. The Briglia Blu jeans line includes ten different environmentally friendly washes manufactured utilising lasers and nitrogen. The inspiration comes from the legendary Resina Vintage Market in Naples. The trousers of the Briglia Racconta line are particularly elaborate. Quiet luxury meets modernised, comfortable cuts in English style. Labels: 2 Stars, Baglioli Sartoria Napoli, Bloch, Blooming 24, Briglia, Care Label, Esemplare, F. de Laurentiis, Faking, Giangi Napoli, Lamberto Losani, Ma-ry-ya, Majestic Filatures, Not Shy, Pierre Luis Mascia, Salvatore Piccolo, Hevó, Suns, Texas Robot, Zinga Leather, Maddam, Code, Souvenir Agentur Klauser, Munich/Germany, info@kirstenklauser.de, www.klauserpressoffice.com

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Renzo Braglia and Riccardo Grassi (pictured) have created global distribution and sales organisations – now they’ve agreed to collaborate.

Brama Group X Riccardo Grassi Showroom

Joint Forces

Which values do you share? Renzo Braglia: For both of us, customer satisfaction is paramount. We work very hard every day to ensure that we’re not merely salespeople, but also offer added value. Riccardo Grassi (Riccardo Grassi Showroom): Quality in distribution, excellent service, products that meet a demand, and avant-garde… You have decided to collaborate. Which benefits can customers and brands expect? RB: The Brama Group is the distributor of the brands Boyish and Cotton Citizen in Europe and EMEA. We are responsible for warehousing and dispatch. Riccardo Grassi acts as an agency. Is this merely the beginning then? RG: This was the first step! We are keen to make the best use possible of our two platforms. Labels Brama: Current/Elliott, Equipment, Fine Edge, Frame, Jean Atelier, J Brand, Local Authority LA, Mother, Norma Kamali, Opening Ceremony, The Script Labels Grassi: among others Act N°1, Alchemist, Angel Chen, Blancha, Boyish Jeans, Brognano, Cotton Citizen, Del Pozo, Drome, Erika Cavallini, Giamba, Giambattista Valli, Ground Zero, Khrisjoy, Marco De Vincenzo, Mother of Pearl, MSGM, Walk of Shame, X Nightmarket Brama Srl, Milan/Italy, ammannati@bramamilan.com, www.brama-group.com Riccardo Grassi Showroom, Milan/ Italy, europe@riccardograssi.com, www.riccardograssi.com


showroom@lambertolosani.com

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lambertolosani.com


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Agentur Toepfer

Homage

Christine, what should retailers not miss out on when visiting your premises? Christine Jahn, partner at Agentur Toepfer: Our new shearling and leather collection by Steven K offers top quality at a great price. Which collections offer the highest innovation levels? Ago by Luca Laurini. His high-end knitwear collection Label Under Construction is sold exclusively to worldwide opinion leaders in Paris. Ago offers innovative knitwear for men and women based on Label Under Construction. Purchase prices starting at 120 Euros are considerably lower. Luca Laurini, a true artist in my opinion, perceives this as a tribute to his father, the founder of the business. What is your wish to retailers? I’d like to see retailers be more open-minded, more willing to explore their identity. Doing what you feel and love is the key to success. Labels: 8PM, Ago, An(+)other Cotton, An(+)other Knit, An(+)other Pants, B’Unique, Betta Corradi, Erika Cavallini, Faliero Sarti, F-Cashmere, GMS-75, History Repeats, inbedwithyou, Labo Art, Lost in Me, MYTHS, Roqa, Semi Couture, Sgamo, Siyu, Smarteez, Steven K., Ultra Low Luxe, VLN, WLNS Cashmere Agentur Toepfer, Düsseldorf/Germany, office@agentur-toepfer.com, www.agentur-toepfer.com

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Room Nine Agency

True Partners Haupt of Lippstadt provides shirts for confident men. “The collection impresses with trendy design, reliable fits, and commercial retail prices ranging from 59 to 129 Euros,” says Torsten Müller, whose Room Nine Agency acts as the brand’s representative in North Rhine-Westphalia. “The excellent warehouse service, an extensive NOS programme, and above all - absolute delivery reliability and punctuality make this company a true partner.” This also applies to the sweats, shirts, and polos by Kitaro, which are supplied by Georg Haupt Bekleidungswerke as well. The label is a new addition to the agency’s portfolio. Ma.strum, a brand owned by London-based John Sharp that was founded in 2008 in partnership with the Massimo Osti Archive, promises functional innovations at a more commercial price than Stone Island and C.P. Company. Retail prices for jackets range from 299 to 599 Euros, while knitwear costs between 99 and 159 Euros. The exclusive materials are influenced by sportswear and military. Orlebar Brown’s refined

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capsule scheduled for May and June emanates a real James Bond feeling. Apart from in its own stores, it can be viewed at approx. 30 customers, including Braun Hamburg and Breuninger Düsseldorf. Labels: Bikkembergs, Bomboogie, Flip Flop, Haupt Shirts, Kitaro, Lauren Moshi L.A., LN Knits, Ma.strum, Orlebar Brown Room Nine Agency, Düsseldorf/Germany, torsten.mueller@roomnineagency.de, www.roomnineagency.de

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Modeist

Consistent Selection “Generally speaking, we plan to handle the selection of our labels even more consistently, especially in our already excellently positioned women’s segment. We no longer pick up D-labels that are mass marketed by major online retailers and often reduced in price way too early. Which retailer is still capable of competing with them in terms of choice and price? Last season proved yet again that our labels generate excellent sales figures and don’t need to be reduced in price,” says Marion Hoferer. The range of accessories is broadened by Frankfurt-based brand Altuner Ateliers, which manufactures hand-crafted oversize scarves with all-over prints made of merino/ silk blends. Another newcomer is Kooreloo, a Greek bag collection that promises to deliver within three weeks. It’s trademarks are innovative material combinations and traditional manufacturing processes. Alessandra Chamonix, an Italian label that offers fashionable, high-end coats and jackets, has also been added to the brand portfolio. Labels: Alessandra Chamonix, Altuner Ateliers, Balr, Dolores, It Peace, Kooreloo, Pride to be, Sassi Cara, Silk Sisters, Sold Out, Super Legere Modeist, Munich and Düsseldorf/ Germany, info@b-kleidung.com, www.modeist.com

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MAB – Modeagentur Benabou

Design Collective

Regis, what’s new? Regis Benabou, owner MAB: There’s MCQ Alexander McQueen, the premium contemporary line for men and women by Alexander McQueen, including ready-to-wear, bags, and shoes. The sneakers are particularly interesting. For a designer label, retail prices up to 270 Euros are afforda-

ble, which is reflected in great sales figures. Which other must-sees does MAB offer? I stumbled upon the streetwear label DGL Design Collective and was blown away. Two designers from Amsterdam and Berlin are behind the project. The attitude and style of both cities are reflected in the collection. That’s the label to watch. Labels: 3.1 Phillip Lim, Ba & Sh, Designers Remix, DGL Design Collective, Jerome Dreyfuss, Jimmy Choo Textile Accessoires, MCQ Alexander McQueen, Mes Demoiselles, National Standard, Paul & Joe, Paul & Joe Sister, Rachel Zoe Collection, Splendid, The Kooples, Utzon MAB Modeagentur Benabou, Düsseldorf/Germany, info@mab-fashion.com, www.mab-fashion.com

Agency Ticker Studio Pezzetta The agency is the new Italian distributor for a number of brands. New addition: the down jacket collection by Brumal. +++ Select Studio Michael Höhenberger is the new sales manager for all brands. Florian Schultz is now the brand manager for Oscar Jacobsen. New additions to the portfolio are Anecdote and Fren-ken, two Netherlands-based brands. +++ Modeagentur Mindner Newcomers at Mindner are Munich-based collection Marlino, the British cashmere collection Madeleine Thompson, and the summer line of Star Mela. The latter includes kaftans and bags. +++ Moormann & Co A new addition is Andrea 1945, a label offering cashmere scarves and silk made in Italy. The company is also a production partner of many well-known labels. +++ Room von Berlin Uncomplicated re-ordering processes and many customer visits - Michaela von Berlin firmly believes that customer proximity results in excellent sales.


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Premium

Creating Awareness & Impulses

Jörg Wichmann, the CEO of Panorama Berlin, strives to offer added value for retailers.

Panorama

A Host of New Arrivals What can Panorama Berlin visitors expect that they didn’t see last season? Jörg Wichmann, CEO Panorama Berlin: Everything revolves around entertainment, infotainment, communication, and presentation. We have managed to acquire many exciting new exhibitors. Newly staged community areas, music and food, and the Panorama Berlin Store are inspiring experiences. Selvedge Run & Zeitgeist is now an integral part of Panorama Berlin. We have expanded the infotainment area in the Retail Solutions hall. We now offer exciting keynotes and top speakers on two stages. Hall Six is dedicated to street style. Sustainability topics are addressed in the two Xoom halls. Who are the most interesting new exhibitors? There’s Mango, a brand eager to expand its wholesale business. Other exciting newcomers include Copenhagen Studio by Vero Moda, which will present its collection for the first time at our event. Then there’s Edited, a former online business that has decided to move into the wholesale segment. At the Selvedge Run & Zeitgeist, we welcome, for example, Kings of Indigo. What needs to be improved in the Berlin trade show landscape? Berlin has an enormous creative power that many people aren’t aware of. We need to succeed in exploiting this potential and strengthen Berlin as one of the most important trade fair locations in Europe. 15th to 17th of January 2019, www.panorama-berlin.com

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Trade fairs and sustainability - how can this be reconciled in the future? Anita Tillmann, Managing Partner of Premium Exhibition and Station-Berlin: We have organised symposia on the subject of sustainability and have highlighted its importance. It is now our own responsibility to take further important steps. We are planning initiatives involving the city, caterers have agreed to no longer use plastic, and much more. We have also established a co-operation with the brand Ecoalf involving lectures, videos, an installation, and the dissemination of its message #thereisnoplanetb. It’s all about education and impulses. Is it realistic to expect Berlin or the German government to provide funding programmes to aid the internationalisation of the city as a fashion trade show location? I hope so. The Fashion Council Germany has already achieved a fair amount. The senate and Michael Müller, the mayor of Berlin, are aware of the importance of the fashion industry in Berlin. We are also moving forward at federal level, albeit not at the pace I would like, and are active on a European level too. Fashion was not taken seriously as an economic factor for a long time. But that’s changing now… What can be done better in the future? Transparency and sustainability are the key themes for 2019. It often requires a paradigm shift, but every little step counts. It’s not about what you don’t do, but about what you do! 15th to 17th of January 2019, www.premiumexhibitions.com

Pitti Immagine Uomo

Out of the Box The highlights of the 95th edition of the Pitti Immagine Uomo in Florence include a special event by Y/Project under the direction of Glenn Martens and the debut of Aldo Maria Camillo. The latter, who worked for the likes of Ermenegildo Zegna, Valentino, Cerruti, and Berluti Collection, presents his first collection in the Spazio Alcatraz of Stazione Leopolda. Slam Jam, the distributor of brands such as Carhartt, Visvim, and Stussy in Italy, marks its 30th anniversary with an exhibition and - more importantly - a fulminant party. In the historic Palazzo della Mercanzia, Gucci presents the new furnishings of two rooms in Gucci Garden’s Period Room. Moon Boot celebrates its 50th anniversary, while Diadora celebrates its 70th. Ecoalf returns to the Pitti Uomo to present the Made in Italy capsule by stylist Ana Gimeno and designer Tiziano Guardini. In the Sala Ottagonale, Woolrich gives an exclusive preview of its new stylistic aesthetic and performance-oriented product range. This season’s guest nation is Portugal. In collaboration with the Revolver Copenhagen, the Pitti presents the second edition of the Scandinavian Manifesto: a selection of designer collections from Denmark, Sweden, and Norway. 8th to 11th of January 2019, www.pittimmagine.com +++

Munich Fabric Start

More Sustainable Sourcing

Anita Tillmann is the Managing Partner of Premium Exhibitions and Station-Berlin.

Which area are you keen to expand? Sebastian Klinder, CEO MFS: The Keyhouse is the linchpin for the fusion of innovation, sustainability, and technology. Thus, it represents the continuous development and presentation of smart fabrics, fashion tech, innovative materials, and sustainable solutions. We also plan to expand our Resource Area as a platform for environmentally friendly textiles and processes. Which innovations will be more visible in collections in the future? Spring/summer 2020 will be dominated by rustic aspects - robust, tangible, and emotional in crepes, ajourés, open bonds, and Panama, as well as in cut and burnt-out pieces. There are first experiments with graphene, an extremely conductive and highly stable material, as coating, especially in sportswear. The new 3D structures are also innovative. 29th to 31st of January 2019, www.munichfabricstart.com


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15–17 JANUARY 2019

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#Fashiontech

Transformation The Fashiontech is considered the leading C-Level tech conference for the fashion industry. The main topic in January: “How to Transform Your Organisation”. Keynote speeches by international experts cover aspects such as Leadership & Culture, Innovation & Technology, Future of Work, and Customer Journey. During the conference, visitors are afforded the opportunity to engage in interdisciplinary exchange with the speakers and to discuss topics related to digital transformation, innovation, change management, and disruptive technologies in the Networking Area. Between lectures, there are interactive masterclasses providing in-depth knowledge. In the Exhibition Area, numerous companies present their latest developments and products. Tickets for the conference cost 285 Euros. Access to the Exhibition Area and Networking Area is free of charge. 15th of January 2019, www.fashiontech.berlin

Maren Wiebus, the Director of Seek, strives to create new opportunities in the Trade Union area.

Seek

Happy Birthday Seek is celebrating its 10th anniversary. Congratulations! What can visitors look forward to? They can look forward to loads of specials and surprises. Additionally, we guarantee a good time that can be used efficiently. We are proud of what we have achieved with our partners in the last 10 years and want to celebrate this with the whole Seek family. What are the most significant innovations? We are co-operating with the Berlin initiative “One Warm Winter”. We hereby appeal to all Seek visitors, partners, and friends to bring samples or surplus stock that we can divide into “Give Bags” that will be passed on to the homeless and people in need. We are also expanding the Trade Union segment by moving it into its own area in the foyer. It’s time to bring industry pioneers closer together to create better business opportunities for everyone involved. What added value do trade fairs have to offer? Needs must be recognised and satisfied quickly. It’s important to promote exchange. Many believe they know better, but what can actually be done better in 2019? Exactly that: do more, talk less. It’s not that everything was better in the past, it was different. Whatever the future holds, we can and must shape it together. 15th to 17th of January 2019, www.seekexhibitions.com

Gallery/Gallery Shoes

In Time with the Industry Gary Wassner, the CEO of Hildun Corporation, has been providing funding for renowned designers for 40 years.

According to Handelsblatt, Prof. Ulrich Weinberg, the Director of HPI School of Design Thinking, is among the top 100 innovators in Germany.

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Fast, flexible, and service-oriented - four events focusing on fashion, accessories, and shoes are Düsseldorf’s answer to changing market requirements. An increasing number of manufacturers are taking advantage of the early dates of the season instead of waiting for the events tailored especially for them. “Shoes and accessories were already in great demand in July 2018,” says Ulrike Kähler. As Managing Director of Igedo Company, she is in charge of the two trade shows Gallery and Gallery Shoes. Newcomers for January include agencies such as One Eleven and Stornello, as well as brands such as Café Noir and Lottusse. Accessories by MGM Design and the Swiss label Veronica Gautsch are also on the list. A central access concept, as well as digital registration and ticketing, are major innovations, but the proven hall plan remains in place. In addition to the central “Alte Schmiedehalle”, the focus is on showrooms in “Kaltstahlhalle”, “Kesselhaus”, and “Halle am Wasserturm”. The networking continues after the trade show. An international industry meeting is scheduled for the evening of the 27th of January 2019. Gallery from 26th to 28th of January 2019 / 20th to 22nd of July 2019 Showroomkonzept from 25th to 29th of January 2019 / 19th to 23rd July 2019 Gallery Shoes from 10th to 12th of March 2019 / 1st to 3rd of September 2019 www.gallery-duesseldorf.com, www.gallery-shoes.com

One trade show offers four events per year.


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d a n i e l - h e c h t e r. d e


WANT IT

FUNCTION, SUSTAINABILITY, AND INNOVATION - AN INCREASING NUMBER OF NEW BRANDS ARE LAUNCHED WITH A SPECIFIC MISSION IN MIND. THESE FASHION START-UPS DEFINITELY PROVE THAT SUCH AN APPROACH CAN BE PERFECTLY IN LINE WITH THE ZEITGEIST. THEY HAVE UNDERSTOOD THAT MERELY BEING BEAUTIFUL SIMPLY DOESN’T CUT IT ANYMORE.


WANT IT

Support Your Local Hood

GOLDGARN DENIM. Mannheim’s first and only denim brand is Goldgarn Denim. As a tribute to the town, each model is named after districts and a map of the city can be found printed on the inside of every pocket. The manufacturing process of the elaborate denim pieces requires up to 250 work steps: leather patches, decorative seams, embroidery, and hangtags brand each model. Retail prices for the palette for women and men range from 99 to 159 Euros. Goldgarn Denim is no longer merely a local label; it also co-operates with sales agencies on an international level. The label also has a heart for the youngest. One Euro of every pair of jeans sold is passed on to “Aufwind”, a Mannheim-based social project that fights against child poverty. Goldgarn Denim, Masquare Mode GmbH, Brühl/Germany, T 0049.6202.5799281, b2b@masquare.de, www.masquare.de

Professional Newcomer

LIEBESGLÜCK. As flexible as professionals: Liebesglück is one of the start-ups that have successfully established themselves with the help of Mannheim-based incubator Textilerei. The general idea is to offer swift delivery of goods that retailers require at that moment. The instant womenswear collections, which consist of approx. 70 pieces, can be delivered within four to six weeks - fresh impulses guaranteed. Liebesglück offers fashionably feminine looks full of joie de vivre, exclusively manufactured in Europe. The label receives fresh input by collaborating with new creative talents. Liebesglück already co-operates with renowned agencies and retailers such as Engelhorn, Reischmann, Breuninger, and About You. The label’s first store in Mannheim presents a cross-section of its exciting portfolio, as does its stand at Panorama Berlin. Liebesglück, Masquare Mode GmbH, Brühl/Germany, T 0049.6202.5799281, b2b@masquare.de, www.masquare.de style in progress

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WANT IT

Professionals at Work #workplaylive

ONU. Cosmopolitan and adventurous alike - this is the ideal state of mind for digital nomad Paul Lee. In 2016, he teamed up with Thomas Moon to launch the clothing label Onu Inc. The young brand perceives itself as the answer to the disbalance of function and aesthetics. It is fully committed to “everywear”, clothing that can be worn every day for every occasion. To this end, Onu scours the globe for new functional materials and fabric innovations, which are then passed on to designers in various corners of the world. This results in exciting collections such as a textile clash of Brooklyn’s hot sultry summer and Shanghai’s wet flash thunderstorms. The price structure of the US brand is based on an average price of 200 US Dollars. Onu can currently only be ordered online, but is planning pop-up stores and wholesale operations in the future. Onu Inc, Los Angeles/US, T 001.2132357939, paul@onu.is, www.onu.is 062

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Loud and Cuddly

LIV BERGEN. Positioned somewhere between athleisure and statement brand, the simple, expressive collection consists of sweats, t-shirts with bold slogans, casual pants, and relaxed dresses. The fast-moving range has swiftly become the darling of retailers such as Jades, Bailly Diehl, Brauneis, Mooon, Castros, and Apartment 72. Michaela von Berlin, the sales representative in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, is currently serving 160 customers. In addition to the main collections delivered in January and June, Liv Bergen offers a small X-Mas bundle. At a mark-up of 2.7, retail prices range from 29 to 89 Euros. If a pre-order is placed, the label offers immediate and secondary orders from a stock list. Liv Bergen, Stuttgart/Germany, T 0049.711.25518322, mail@livbergen.de, www.livbergen.de

59 INCHES. Grey sweatshirts may be considered basics, yet it’s hard to find the perfect model. 59 inches, a focused sweater collection for men, is keen to help. It is a joint project of sales professional Matthias Schwarte and product expert Heiko Storz. The 20-ounce goods from Japan are just as much a quality label as the Japanese-inspired restrained style. The quality of the pieces is reflected in their reduction to essentials. The cuts are oversized, the shoulders overlap. Instead of a classic round neck, the items feature fashionable stand-up collars or special cuffs. The core colours of the collection, which is manufactured in Europe, are light grey and grey melange. At a mark-up of 2.75, retail prices for sweatshirts and hoodies range from 139 to 249 Euros. Shirts, which follow the same style principle, cost between 100 and 150 Euros. The label launches two collections consisting of up to 18 styles per year, complemented by a NOS programme. Agentur Matthias Schwarte, Munich/Germany, T 0049.89.3580576, office@agentur-schwarte.de, www.agentur-schwarte.de


WANT IT

“We Want to Be the Best”

MASON GARMENTS. Designer Rendi Aditia fulfilled his dream of creating a high-end shoe label when he launched Mason Garments in 2012 together with a creative collective consisting of people with different backgrounds who share the same vision. “We have a design studio in Amsterdam and manufacture in Italy. We are determined to be the best,” says Aditia, originally from Jakarta and raised in Amsterdam. Mason Garments only uses high quality Italian materials such as calfskin from the most accomplished tanneries in Italy. The materials are processed in line with artisan footwear manufacturing traditions. Thus, the soles are made according to the proven Sacchetto technique. The insole and lining are sewn directly onto the upper shoe forming a whole. The interior is made of lined leather that wraps around the foot like a moccasin for added comfort and flexibility. At a markup of 2.7, retail prices range from 250 to 300 Euros. The two main collections per year are supported by a NOS programme including carry-overs. Another advantage of Mason Garments is that the label offers different soles for summer and winter. Mason Garments B.V., Lijnden/ The Netherlands, T 0031.644.946095, nabil@masongarments.com, www.masongarments.com 064

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Brand with a Mission

MISSION WORKSHOP. It all started with the idea of making fashion that is both resilient and appealing. Mission Workshop was subsequently launched in San Francisco in 2009. The creative label quickly established itself at the forefront of the urban clothing and bag industries. It is still in the same building 20 years later; and it still excites its fans with a very individual style that particularly appeals to city dwellers and cyclists. Mission Workshop enjoys experimenting with materials, technology, and design. Every collection contains technological innovations that are part of the Advanced Projects™. The clothing moves with the body and consists of fabric that harmonises with the skin perfectly. The latter is ensured by the 37.5® technology, which keeps the microclimate between body and fabric at the ideal body temperature and absorbs moisture. Mission Workshop, San Francisco/US, T 001.41586472253, DealerInfo@missionworkshop.com, www.missionworkshop.com

West-Eastern Dialogue

A.B.C.L. Mattia Cavinato and his business partner Antonia Laverda strive to unite the best of both worlds. Their family business is not only influenced by their Venetian homeland, but also by the Japanese flair for quality and tradition. The shirt line A.B.C.L. combines Italian design and production know-how with high-end Japanese materials. The cuts and colour palette (traditional blue-white-beige) are classic in nature. Many smaller details - such as Oxford, round, and stand-up collars, as well as materials such as chambray and bouclé - are reminiscent of the “good old days” of ready-to-wear menswear, albeit with a modern twist. As it stands, the label offers two collections per year, each consisting of approximately 50 pieces. Purchase prices range from 60 to 150 Euros with a 2.5 mark-up. A.B.C.L. has so far found favour with retailers such as Classico and Braun in Hamburg, Stuff in Düsseldorf, Mulligans in Wuppertal, Kentarus in Cologne, and Heckmann Store in Darmstadt. A.B.C.L., Venice/Italy, T 0039.3398549645, cavinatomattia@gmail.com, www.abclgarments.com


FALL/ WINTER 2019 BERLIN-PREMIUM 15.01.- 17.01.2019 HALLE 7, STAND G04 WHOLESALE INQUIRIES JOANNA.BEHRENS@BLOOM-FASHION.COM WWW.BLOOM-FASHION.COM


WANT IT

Dream Present

CLAUS PORTO. Wonderful content, beautifully packaged: “Claus Porto is famous for hand-crafted, finely scented soaps whose ingredients are sourced from the Portuguese flora,” says Gloria Massaro-Conrad. Her Premium Beauty Brands agency represents the brand in the German-speaking market. “The paper packaging, with its unmistakable illustrations, is a work of art in itself. The soaps are packaged by hand with love.” The roots of the 131-year-old company reach back to its two German founders Ferdinand Claus and Georges Schweder, who both resided in Porto. After a successful relaunch, Claus Porto continues its success story. The soaps, room fragrances, and beauty products are not only available at luxury department stores such as Le Bon Marché and Bergdorf Goodman, but also at Manufactum, Lodenfrey, and online at Niche Beauty. At a mark-up of 2.2, retail prices range from 7 to 79 Euros. A real highlight within the range is the new Agua de Colonias line, which was created by the renowned perfumer Miller Harris. Premium Beauty Brands GmbH, Cologne/Germany, T 0049.163.251.9839, Gloria@premiumbeautybrands.com, www.clausporto.com 066

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Cool Down

BRUMAL. These down jackets in a trendy oversized look combine the best of two worlds with the typical nonchalance of American outerwear. For one, there are the benefits of down and functional jackets. And then there’s Frank Leba, a functionality specialist with many years of experience in the ski sector, most recently at The North Face. While he resides on the West Coast, his brother Chris Leba, an established designer in the luxury segment and founder of R13, lives on the East Coast. For the launch of Brumal in 2018, the two brothers met in the middle - allegorically. Following the launch for the autumn/winter 2018 season, the collection was swiftly listed by reference customers such as Antonia of Milan, Barneys New York, and Net-a-Porter. At a mark-up of 2.7, retail prices range from 700 to 1,800 Euros. Live Fashion, London/UK, T 0044.20.76132275, duncanl@livefashion.net, www.brumal.com

Pioneer Backpack

#WEARECOBI. Tommaso Briccola and Luca Foglia Ranin met at the Milan Design School. Their friendship gave birth to the dream of creating a label of their own. The result: #weareCOBI. The label’s name is made up of its founders’ home towns Como and Biella. The Pioneer Backpack, their very first product, combines functionality and technological sophistication with high-quality materials. Water-repellent and robust, the business-minded performance backpack impresses with functional compartments, a laptop pocket, a USB plug, LED lighting, and a security lock. If additional storage space is required, one simply opens the zipper. Effortless organisation and business suitability are clearly important to the founders. The retail price currently stands at CHF 149. The label’s base is financed via Kickstarter. Wholesale and direct sale follow later. #weareCOBI, Italy, T 0039.3480747192, info@wearecobi.com, www.wearecobi.com


WANT IT

Online Taboo Relaxed Poetry

BLUNE. Premiere in the German-speaking market: Hinterhofagentur has added Blune, a Parisian womenswear collection, to its portfolio as of this season. The creative minds behind the sophisticated complete look, which cleverly interprets the romantic style of French women’s outerwear with progressive prints, cuts, and materials, are two designers who have turned their hair colours into a label name. Blune stands for “blonde” and “brunette”. It also stands for the variety of colours the collection contains. With retail prices from 150 to 200 Euros for pullovers, from 120 Euros for trousers, and from 300 Euros for coats, the collection is positioned in the mid-price segment. “We have enjoyed success with French womenswear collections for some time now, which is why Blune is a very valuable addition for us,” says Dominik Meuer. Blune, Paris/France, T 0033.1.73702678, shop@blune.fr, www.blune.fr 068

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French Trench

ON PARLE DE VOUS. The fact that speed and quality are not mutually exclusive has been demonstrated by a native Chinese woman, who has chosen to live in Paris, for the last twenty years. Six years ago, she launched On Parle De Vous. The label combines all advantages of a pre-order collection with those of a pronto collection. Customers can re-order at any time and receive their goods within a few days. Since this season, the fashion agency Cuore Tricolore is accompanying the market entry in Germany. The core of the collection is the trench coat, complemented by a multi-faceted range of coats, bomber jackets, and down jackets. At a mark-up of 3.0, purchase prices range from 50 to 120 Euros. A special commitment to the retail trade is that On Parle De Vous guarantees that items in its own online shop are always more expensive than in wholesale. On Parle De Vous, Paris/France, T 0033.1.40280898, commercial@onparledevous.fr, www.onparledevous.fr

HIDNANDER. Anyone interested in buying pieces by this brand had better start walking. “Rare and Real” is a fitting motto, as Hidnander is not available online. Following the order, every single product is customised for the store in question as a tribute to independent retailers. The driving force behind the fashionably sophisticated streetwear collection is former Golden Goose designer Alessandro Viganò. He relies exclusively on Italian materials and produces in Italy, quite deliberately in small batches. “Hidnander was launched last season and impressed a number of top customers right from the offset, because it is a concept brand with an incredibly high level of workmanship. Every single product has a special feature that may only become apparent on second glance, hence the name Hidnander,” says Uwe Deinert of Cuore Tricolore. At a mark-up of 2.7, purchase prices ranging from 20 to 35 Euros for t-shirts, 60 to 120 Euros for trousers, and 75 to 130 Euros for shoes translate into tangible added value for customers. “This story is well thought through. Every cog in the machine benefits. This will encourage other brands to think differently too.” Hidnander, Milan/Italy, T 0033.981.231900, sales@hidnander.com, www.hidnander.com


THE LONGVIEW

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THE LONGVIEW

Doug Stephens: “We Have to Move Boldly into the Fog of a New Era” He calls himself “The Retail Prophet”. And it goes without saying that prophets are very welcome in times like these. Canadian Doug Stephens is a speaker and bestselling author. His extensive experience gained in leading retail positions has taught him that it makes no sense to not address uncomfortable truths. The transformation the sector is currently undergoing is so fundamental that Doug Stephens recently claimed that one needs to let the old retail trade die before embracing the new retail world. Interview: Martina Müllner-Seybold. Photos: The Retail Prophet

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THE LONGVIEW

et’s start with a huge question. How can the retail trade do better? That certainly is a huge question. Certainly, retail can do better. Some retailers are doing better, some even tremendously well. Some, however, have huge difficulties and issues. The first and most important realisation is to understand that we have, in a short period of time, moved out of one era of retail and moved into an entirely different era of retail. If we step back 25 years, the entire premise of retail economy was based on the idea of scarcity. It was based on the idea that consumers fundamentally lacked access to brands, they lacked access to distribution of products, and they lacked access to information. In that world, the conditions were perfect for any retailer to come along and say: “I have this product that you don’t currently have in your market and I am opening two stores and now we are the local experts in this category.” That was an easy thing to do. But now we have moved to a place where the consumers have infinite access to brands, products, trends, and information about those products. In that world, the retailer really no longer holds the balance of power. Consumers now believe that the only store that really matters is the one in the palm of their hand - in the form of their smartphone. That’s the biggest and most convenient store on earth. With that in mind, retailers have to ask themselves: How do I reinvent my value? If a product alone is no longer good enough, and if service is no longer good enough in and by itself, then what is the next step? What do I need to create that is differentiating, that is valuable, and that will be memorable for customers? In my opinion, the next level is experience. Even if you sell the same things that someone else sells, engineering unique and differentiated experiences, and delivering that to customers, can set you apart… In an article you stated that to save the retail trade we need to let it die first. Is this really your belief? Or does such a statement merely sell itself well? It’s truly my belief. You find leaders within the retail industry who are grasping and desperately trying to cling to anything that they can feel comfortable with from the old era of retail. For example: This year in North America, the retail economy has picked up a little bit. More consumers are visiting stores again and so what you find is the retail industry as a whole saying: “OK great, it looks like all our problems are over. Consumers are coming back to stores, everything is okay. Everything is fine as long as we keep doing what we are doing.” That’s the kind of thinking that we have to get beyond. We have to recognise that all the conditions that brought us to where we are today have unravelled. Population and economic growth in the post-war era, the explosion of consumerism, the huge wave of baby boomers - that’s simply not there anymore. And the trend toward online buying behaviour is abundantly clear. We have to leave that past behind and move boldly into the fog of this new

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era. Until we let go of the past, it is very difficult to embrace the future. The era that we are moving into looks nothing like the old era, so until we let the old era die, we can never move successfully into the new one. That’s a good explanation. And how do you think retailers who experienced this golden era can change their mindsets? How does a retail company make this change possible? I think it’s challenging and it’s something that most companies fall victim to. It’s a concept that is referred to as organisational imprinting. The era in which your company experiences its greatest success can often form its view of the world, in some cases for decades or even centuries. So, Walmart for example: the absolute pinnacle for Walmart was really in the 1980s and 1990s. Consequently, for a long time, Walmart had a sort of frozen view of the world and continued to invest into large super-centres. They continued to invest in brick-and-mortar instead of online retail and they continued to offer the same level of customer experience. Eventually it became very clear to Walmart, that if they continued down that path, it would lead to extinction. So, it’s certainly a challenge. The interesting thing is that we as people, as individuals, are really no different than organisations. We all try and replicate what made us successful. You believe that we will see a re-engineering of the retail industry’s economic model. How will retailers of the future earn their money? We are going to see a number of different things happening. First of all, we are seeing more and more brands selling directly to the consumer. Brands and retailers have traditionally had a relationship that was adversarial. Retailers were tough on pricing, only to promote those products and blow them out of their stores on a discount. Brands have, in many cases, seen their brand damaged. So, they are getting increasingly to the point where they say: “Look, we now live in a world where we can have a direct relationship with consumers and users, so we should foster that. We should take the ownership of our brand back”. Secondly, we are going to see the emergence of new retail models that look more like a media model. Retailers will represent brands and they will design and curate experiences around the brand’s products. They won’t be paid for selling these products, but rather they will be paid a media or placement fee by the brand directly. One example of this is Story in New York – a store that acts like a magazine for brands. We are starting to warm to the idea that physical retail is actually the most powerful media channel and the most powerful media experience a consumer can have. Given that upwards of 80 percent of all retail transactions are influenced to some degree by

“Consumers now believe that the only store that really matters is the one in the palm of their hand – in the form of their smartphone.”


“Our story is about passion, family tradition, attention to detail and many years of experience.”

Lay your trust in the world’s finest white T-shirt. Find out more online or shop at Andreas Murkudis/Berlin, KaDeWe/Berlin, Braun/Hamburg, Weitkamp/Münster, Engelhorn/Mannheim, Abseits/Stuttgart, Lodenfrey/ Munich, Helmut Eder/Kitzbühel, Dantendorfer/Salzburg, Steffl/Wien, Grüner/Klagenfurt, Phänomen/Luzern, Ausoni/Lausanne, Cabinet Store/ Zürich, Pauw/Amsterdam, Rose & Born/Stockholm, Rialto Living/ Palma de Mallorca, Harry Rosen/Toronto, Masons/Melbourne, Joyce/Hong Kong, United Arrows/Tokyo, etc. www.meystory.com


THE LONGVIEW

digital elements: Does it even make sense to invest so much money in stationary retail? Would many brands be better advised to spend the money on an even better digital experience? Brands are really starting to re-think their old distribution plans. It’s becoming increasingly apparent that the retail world as we see it today was built for a different time. Our retail industry was built for a time when you wanted as many stores populating a market as possible. Even if it meant having mediocre stores, covering a market was most important. Now retailers are re-thinking that. What they should be doing is closing many of the mediocre stores and focusing on key markets strategically important to their brand, as well as developing next-level store concepts that are memorable, exciting, and that consumers will gravitate towards. Beyond that, we can rely on digital. Once someone has had a phenomenal experience in one of your premier stores, they can order from you online once you’ve formed that relationship with them. It won’t be about the quantity of retail stores, it will be more about the quality of those stores. In your books you always mention that repeatability is crucial when it comes to retail. Can you expand on that? When I was researching the book, I spoke to various CEOs of companies that are widely regarded as being purveyors of great experiences. Many of them said it’s a matter of a brand’s ability to repeat excellence. Simply designing a great experience is not enough. When I was talking to them about how they run their stores, it sounded to me less like it was a retail operation, and more like a stage production. They talked about it like a Cirque du Soleil performance, not merely opening the doors to a Walmart. How can a retailer measure if he provides this repeatability? When measuring consumer experience in a given space, it is important that brands obtain a complete 360-degree view of that experience. Some of that is technology, making sure that you understand where consumers are going within the space. How many of those customers are repeat customers versus unique customers? It’s very similar to how we collect performance data of websites. How long on average are people staying in the space? What are they engaging with versus what they aren’t engaging with. Alternately, you have to get to know the feelings and sentiments of your audience. The last measurement - and probably the most important - is the net-promoter score. At the end of the day, you want to know if the experience someone had in your store was something they would recommend to friends and family. And if the answer to that is anything but yes, you still have work to do. Most retailers know so much more about their customers than they are taking advantage of. Based on my order history, Amazon knows I own a dog. A stationary retailer, however, knows the name of my dog and how it’s doing. Why are so few taking advantage of this knowledge? I agree. I think part of it is that we’ve gone through a long period of mass thinking. From the 1950s to the 1990s, consumers ceased to be individuals. As marketers, we were talking about markets, segments, sub-markets, profiles, and demographics. We 074

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“Retail chains should close their mediocre stores and focus on strategically important key stores.”

approached those mass markets with mass mailings, mass advertising, and mass media to sell mass products, because we believed that most people wanted the same things. Before WW2, retail was much more personal. You could walk into a store and people might know you by name. They may know your children, where you work. You may go to church with those people on Sundays. There was a familiarity and that familiarity was built into the selling process. People would know your tastes and your preferences. They were happy to order things that were specifically for you. So many of the merchants that are struggling today were founded in the era of mass marketing. They’re training taught them: “I just need to advertise a bit more.” But now we are coming back to a place where technology is allowing us to know who each of our customers are, some particulars about those people, and what their tastes or preferences are. How they are unique from other customers. And we can now deal with people on a one-to-one basis again. I think to many retailers that not only feels kind of foreign, but even somewhat uncomfortable. A lot of retailers are concerned about invading their consumers’ privacy. They may be able to capture the information, but they are afraid to use it. What’s your advice? I believe privacy is like a currency for consumers. And nobody wants to have currency stolen from them. We all feel violated when that happens. But on the other hand, we don’t mind spending currency with people that we trust, where we feel we are getting a good exchange of value. E-commerce giants like Amazon prove this point. We give loads of information to Google or Amazon because both of them offer a much better experience if we provide this information. And the same would be true for any stationary retailer. Exactly and that’s precisely my advice to retailers. When they ask me what data they should be collecting and how, my answer is to think about it a different way. The question is not what data should you collect and how, but what distinguished and differentiated value are you prepared to deliver to the consumer? And in order to do that, what data do you need? That is the question. Let’s stick with Amazon. Your thesis that even Amazon might fail one day came as a relief for many retailers. You claimed that this could happen ten years from now, but how many retailers will Amazon put to the sword in that time. What’s your estimate? Many. I wouldn’t even have an estimate. It will be many, because it’s not actually Amazon killing them, but the new baseline of expectation that Amazon has created. What Amazon has effectively done is re-written the rules. It has completely changed consumer


THE LONGVIEW

“Amazon is completely re-wiring consumers’ brains.”

expectations for retail. Things like one-click ordering, free one or two-day shipping, and the sheer range of the assortment. I think that what Amazon is killing is the old-world expectation of consumers. Amazon is completely re-wiring consumers’ brains. What I am interested in frankly is what industries Amazon actually kills. Outside the retail sphere… When will governments start addressing the monopoly Amazon is creating? Whenever much smaller companies merge, it has to be approved by national or EU competition authorities - something that does not seem to apply to Amazon. I think that’s going to change. Whether it’s Europe that makes the first move against Amazon or whether it’s the United States, the growing sentiment is that Amazon is approaching a point where it will reach what one must regard as almost monopolistic behaviour - not only by virtue of its size. Jeff Bezos himself acknowledges the fact that we have to have faith in our governments, that we have to have faith in these large institutions that we depend on. So, he recognises that there’s a need for oversight. That doesn’t suggest that Amazon may not fight that, but I think it’s inevitable that at some point Amazon will be broken into smaller pieces. Regardless of Amazon, what does it all mean for retail employees? You said that they are changing from clerks to brand ambassadors. What do you think the future will bring for retail employees? Many of the operational tasks in retail are moving to technology. And the flipside of that is that the demands of consumers are now greater than they ever have been. 47 percent of consumers suggest they feel that they often know more about the product they are buying than the person who’s working in the store. And 67 percent feel that the information that they are getting from sales associates in the store isn’t accurate or even true. In the world of smartphones, there’s new expectations on the part of consumers. They expect that the person they are dealing with won’t just be well-trained and friendly to deal with, but also an expert at what they are selling. And this is a bit of a conundrum for retailers, because retailers have suppressed the wages of retail workers for decades. They’ve been trying, wherever possible, to disintermediate employees with technologies. To say it frankly, people in retail have started to act more like robots. I think we are looking at a new era, in which working in retail is something that people can actually do with pride again. They could feel that they are truly trained experts, are well-paid, have a sense of self-esteem, and can speak to their customers with a sense of rapport. That’s basically the way it was fifty years ago. A lot of people who worked in retail put their kids through school, bought cars and houses, and were perceived as respectable professionals doing their job. We went away from that and now we have to return to it. Certainly, employees are something that is key. What retailers need to do is to make a fundamental brand 076

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decision. Either they want to execute the customer experience through people and benefit from the dynamic nature of people, or they don’t. If not, they can rely almost solely on technology and equip consumers with the technology they need to have a great experience in our stores without the benefit of the people. But you can’t have it both ways. You have to decide. And if you are going on the side of human beings, you need to make sure that those people working in your stores are delighted to be there, that they feel cared for, that they feel properly trained and equipped to do their jobs, and that they are given an opportunity to make their customers happy. If you can provide this, you will have a transformational experience in your store. Thank you for the interview.

“The Retail Revival” and “Reengineering Retail” are the titles of Doug Stephens’ manifestos for the future of retail.


BLACK LABEL

visit us at: Premium Berlin Booth H3-J15

www.freedomday.it

Germany NUMBER8@D-tails info@number8.de, +498923077210 Austria Modeagentur Klaus office@modeagentur-klaus.at +436642006106 Switzerland François Bßche Modeagentur info@fb-m.ch +41448119911


DO BETTER DO


WHAT’S THE STORY

DO BET TER 1/GREENOVATION DO BET TER 2/RHY THM DO BET TER 3/ YOUTH DO BET TER 4/OMNITAIL DO BET TER 5/RENEWAL

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BETTER THAN EVER Perception vs truth: the fashion industry is in a damn good place right now. An opinion piece by Isabel Faiss

In 2017, the Germans spent more money on fashion than ever before. The fashion industry generated revenues of 35 billion Euros, a year-on-year increase of 2.9 percent. And there’s no sign of slowing down. Between 1970 and 1980, fashion consumption in Germany more than doubled. At 11.7 percent, the fashion segment tops the e-commerce volumes statistics by product group. According to a study titled “Pulse of the Fashion Industry 2018”, no less than 75 percent of global fashion companies improved their environmental and social responsibility ratings by 6 points from 32 to 38 (of 100) last year. Digital showrooms are replacing sample production, which spares resources and lowers logistics expenses. Technology advances have enabled Salvatore Ferragamo to introduce fibres made of citrus fruits that feel like silk and are biodegradable. In short: good news isn’t hard to find. Someone Said It, Finally… For the last 12 years, I have drafted an imaginary letter to the editor of the ARD (Arnulfstrasse 42, 80835 Munich) every evening at 8.16pm. Oddly enough, nobody has ever reacted to it. The subject: “And finally, the good news of the day…” But then came “Der Stern”. This is not a metaphor, but a German magazine. Or rather: then came author Walter Wüllenweber and his book with the title (loosely translated) “Great News: Humanity Isn’t Doing Well - But Better Than Ever”. He substantiates his thesis with sufficient facts and figures to make hormone lev080

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els rise. Example? Here goes: “Since 2010, scientists have been able to prove that the ozone hole is actually shrinking. […] Today, people are healthier, richer, safer, more educated, and more liberated than ever before.” We Are Doing Bloody Well Nevertheless, people are moaning and groaning more than ever. As mentioned earlier: perception vs truth. Our attention economy quite simply designates more space for bad news. A phenomenon that is well-known in the fashion industry. After all, e-commerce is utterly destroying stationary retailers, consumers are turning into over-informed bargain hunters, fashion fairs are being bought up by online giants, and sustainability is transforming into a mere marketing tool. In this industry, the unreasonable call for 12 collections per year makes the Dollar signs in Scrooge McDuck’s eyes spin. And then one is surprised that there is no demand. Well, it’s covered. How scary is that? Isn’t the unwritten rule that the next season can only be better than the last, even though everything was better back in the old days? Why do the numbers speak such a different language than the general perception? Today, nobody would dare to sell a t-shirt straight out of the box, because the shit is so hot that everyone wants it. Right? City centres are increasingly monopolistic. The establishment is being hounded by Fast Fashion discounters. There are, of course, global influences that turn statements such as “from LA, but without punitive taxes” into a selling point. And yet the industry is doing better than it ever has. One or two problems could be homemade, or owed to the fact that the industry is still sceptical of change while it is overtaken by said change in reality. Sources: www.bevh.org, Bundesverband E-Commerce und Versandhandel Deutschland; Pulse of the Fashion Industry 2018, Global Fashion Agenda, Boston Consulting Group.


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GREEN OVATION Is it a mere add-on that is nice to have? Or is resource sparing and environmentally friendly fashion a must-have? Leaving this decision to the consumer is nothing short of negligent. Sustainability is no longer optional. Our future is, after all, too valuable to be determined by bargain hunters at the rummage table. It should be determined by people whose horizons reach far beyond the discount frenzy. Biotech, smart fabrics, and digital solutions lead the way. Many of the innovations not only make the product better, but also the world.

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“WE NEED PEOPLE WHO ACT” He is Bangladesh’s answer to Gerd and Karl-Heinz Müller alike: Mostafiz Uddin is the owner of Denim Expert Ltd, a company that produces jeans. However, he is also passionately committed to the reputation and development of his homeland. To this end, he not only launched a denim trade show, but also organised a sustainability summit. He travels all over the world to talk about Bangladesh. style in progress sat down with a man who knows that change is only possible when initiative is taken. Interview: Martina Müllner-Seybold. Photo: Mostafiz Uddin

You are a tireless advocate of sustainability and the image of your home country as a production location. What drives you? Change is brought about by one individual standing up and acting. There weren’t many Gandhis; there was only one Gandhi. We need people who act. I’m tired of the whole discussion. The producers blame the buyers. The buyers blame the consumers for wanting low prices. Passing blame from one to another doesn’t get us anywhere - only taking action helps. Bangladesh has taken action. Five years after Rana Plaza, it is - in the words of Accord* CEO Rob Wyass - the safest developing country in which one can produce. Hats off! That was very fast. It took a mere 5 years. The key is a desire for change. If you tell a Bangladeshi that your business depends on him delivering on time, he will do his utmost to deliver on schedule. The people of Bangladesh are incredibly committed and engaging. You have made your factory, in which you employ 2,000 people, completely sustainable. Is sustainability a topic that enjoys the support of the local people? First and foremost, a factory worker is interested in having a good job, being paid fairly, and receiving his wages. He doesn’t really care about whether his wages are financed by cheap jeans or high-quality, sustainable products. I don’t see this as the factory worker’s responsibility. Those who are responsible are tasked with making sure that he doesn’t need to produce cheap jeans anymore. Theoretically, this wouldn’t be as complicated as everyone suggests it is. Trend researcher Lee Edelkoort only recently repeated her demand for an EU ban on low-cost jeans. A punitive tariff on fabrics made under exploitative circumstances seems just as feasible to the layman as a punitive tariff on US jeans. Exactly! As long as jeans for 15 Euros are on offer, someone needs to produce them. Why not say that jeans for less than 29 Euros are banned in the EU? You’re probably making a few more enemies in your homeland right now… Yes, that’s the side effect of commitment. Was it beneficial to my company that I try to improve the image of Bangladesh at 084

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congresses, trade fairs, and media panels all around the globe? No, on the contrary. I don’t do what I do with my corporate interests in mind. If you want to do business, do business. If you want to be charitable, be charitable. You can’t do both at the same time. Does this mean that sustainability will only work once it’s no longer an act of mercy, but a business model? That’s certainly true in the long term. Right now, one still needs to be able to forego and share. While wages in Bangladesh have risen by 263 percent, EU sourcing prices have fallen by 7.33 percent. Thus, one can discard the fairy tale that consumers or buyers are paying for better working conditions and sustainability. What should one do? Should I squeeze my yarn suppliers for a better price? Or exploit my people? No. As an entrepreneur, I simply need to live with the reduced margin. At least if I’m serious about sustainability… Who are you pinning your hopes on? The next generation… We won’t be able to change things anymore. We are too eaten up by greed and avarice. However, I have met young people who give me so much hope at conferences. Believe me, sustainability is no longer debatable for this generation! And until then…? I will continue to fight and try to raise awareness. I have talked to more than 300 journalists from all around the world. None of them has ever been to Bangladesh. The image of our country is outdated. The factories you see on archive images, which are still used in European and American newspapers, don’t even exist anymore. The new, clean, and safe factories aren’t in line with the western world’s image of Bangladesh. That’s why I launched the Denim Fair and the Sustainability Summit in Bangladesh. I want new pictures and voices from my country to be seen and heard. *Accord is the initiative that was launched to ensure building and fire safety following the Rana Plaza disaster.

Activist Mostafiz Uddin produces sustainable jeans in Bangladesh and travels around the world in a bid to correct the image of his homeland.


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THE MAGIC OF ACTION It started off as a conversation about god and the world - and how one could, at least, make the latter a little better. What came of it? The result is an Ecoalf pop-up store at Magazzin in Graz. It reflects reciprocal appreciation. Javier Goyenche, the founder of Ecoalf, and Kathi Bauer and Tini Köck of Magazzin sat down for a chat. Text: Martina Müllner-Seybold. Photos: Magazzin

What did you take away from the pop-up project? Javier Goyenche: It was fantastic to have the chance to interact on a personal level - not only with clients, but also with the amazing Magazzin staff. I was positively amazed to see the reaction of customers when they heard our background story. I always stress that we don’t tell stories, we invent them. And I had the distinct feeling that the customers understood the difference. Tini Köck: We can achieve great things together. Incidentally, we didn’t have much budget left. The agency helped us a lot, actually. We were able to present the entire collection: Primaloft jackets, jogging pants, sneakers, backpacks, drinking bottles, candles… Our customers were thrilled by the large range of recycled products. It afforded us an opportunity to test new

“Javier Goyenche, the founder of Ecoalf, attended the opening in person. His charisma and dedication to recycling added to the event,” says the Magazzin sisters Kathi Bauer (2nd from left) and Tini Köck (3rd from left).

items too. The collaboration with Ecoalf was terrific. The merchandising team from Madrid styled the entire pop-up store, which gave us completely new ideas in terms of product presentation. What surprised you more: the interest or the financial success? JG: The primary aim of the pop-up store wasn’t to sell products. We wanted to introduce our brand and its underlying concept. I believe the latter was a consequence of the first, so to speak. Customers started buying spontaneously. Kathi Bauer: We started building interest in the story early via social media and personal contact, thus introducing the concept to customers step-by-step. The media interest was sensational, ranging from newspapers to TV channels. This, in turn, attracted many new customers and - more importantly - customers with a certain level of awareness. The project has broadened horizons, spread positive vibes, and enabled everyone involved to contribute to a good cause. The additional revenue was merely a logical consequence. At a price of 179 Euros for a Primaloft jacket in a sporty, reduced look, we were sold out almost immediately. Fortunately, we were able to re-order. Javier, will Ecoalf rely more heavily on such popups in the future? JG: Pop-ups are fantastic, but they require time, organisation, and resources. You can only implement them with retailers as professional as Magazzin.

Ecoalf’s slogan is: “Because there is no planet B”. It is setting precedents.

An especially enthusiastic customer even asked Javier Goyenche to sign his raincoat.

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www.mooseknucklescanada.com


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THE GOOD NEWS

Although it is still a long way from the world’s second dirtiest industry to a white vest, the fashion industry has finally understood that sustainability is a completely logical strategy for the future. These businesses lead by example! Photos: Manufacturers

Shoes made of renewable materials can seemingly also create a unicorn. Allbirds is the irrefutable proof!

BAAAH The ladies in Stella McCartney’s shop window are destined for the compost heap: sustainable mannequins by Bonaveri.

BIO MANNEQUINS

Bonaveri. It is no secret that Stella McCartney is fully committed to environmental protection. Sustainability is a top priority at the new flagship store on Old Bond Street. The shop exclusively uses the completely biodegradable mannequins (dubbed “B Plast”) by Bonaveri. The leading Italian manufacturer relies on sugar cane derivatives. The mannequins are painted with yet another innovation: B Paint. It is a natural colouring made of organic and renewable ingredients. Bonaveri, Renazzo di Cento/Italy, bonaveri@bonaveri.com, www.bonaveri.com

STEP BY STEP

Allbirds. Silicon Valley is known for innovative technology and creative nerds. Recently, the IT stronghold started turning its attention to fashion. Sheep and unicorn lead the way. In this case, the latter doesn’t refer to the mythical creature, but to a start-up with a valuation in excess of one billion US Dollars: Allbirds. The shoe company was founded in 2015 and is committed to comfort, design, and sustainability. To this end, Allbirds relies heavily on renewable raw materials such as wool from merino sheep, sugar cane, and eucalyptus fibres. Merino wool shoes? An ingenious move: the material keeps the wearer warm, cools, and even protects from moisture. After all, the skin of sheep doesn’t get wet in the rain either. The average price for the wool runners is 95 US Dollars. They are currently sold via the brand’s own e-commerce channels and in stores in San Francisco, New York, and London. Allbirds, San Francisco/US, help@allbirds.com, www.allbirds.com

Martina Schmidl, Managing Director for Germany, Austria, and Switzerland at American Vintage “For American Vintage, we are currently working with a new certified jersey production facility in Portugal, as well as with newly developed washing machines that significantly reduce the incredibly high water usage during manufacturing. In addition, parts of our collection are already made of organic cotton. We also use glass bottles instead of plastic ones in our showrooms, refrain from using non-recyclable packaging for catering, and consciously reduce paper consumption. These are our first steps on a path that we want to follow consistently.” 088

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SEXY ECO-JEANS LIU JO. ITALIAN BRAND LIU JO IS MAKING A NAME FOR ITSELF WITH A CAPSULE COLLECTION CONSISTING OF SUSTAINABLE JEANS. IT WILL BE SHOWCASED FOR THE FIRST TIME AT THE PREMIUM. WWW.LIUJO.COM

ONTO THE COMPOST HEAP C&A. Who invented it? Probably some eco-warrior… However, one should at least respectfully acknowledge that a textile giant like C&A has decided to embrace cradle-to-cradle. Following the C2C shirt, C2C jeans were launched last autumn, as was a certification intended to enlighten consumers. www.cunda.com

More than just a friendly turn: Warm-Me ensures that its Nepalese production site works at capacity.

SHARING IS CARING

Warm-Me. Even sustainability multiplies when it’s shared: Theresa Steinbacher, the Brand Manager of Warm-Me, is an active networker in order to support the label’s Nepalese production site. For example, the Fine Edge knitwear collection launched a capsule in autumn 2018 that was manufactured in Nepal. Shared values, a corresponding understanding of quality, and - above all - the friendship between the two brands quickly proved that Warm-Me’s artisans are also a perfect match for Fine Edge. This is merely the beginning. On Warm-Me’s initiative, two other private labels have decided to utilise the Nepalese workshops. Warm-Me, Salzburg/Austria, theresa@warm-me.com, www.warm-me.com

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WANT IT

When sustainability becomes a matter of course - fashion brands that have a future no longer plan their success at the expense of others. There’s a different, better way.

WHEN WOMEN MOVE FORWARD, THE WORLD MOVES WITH THEM

ALOHA, SHOES!

OluKai. “Olu” stands for comfort, while “Kai” stands for ocean. The footwear specialist with Hawaiian roots is inspired by modern Hawaii and the island’s cultural diversity. This results in high-quality craftsmanship, modern aesthetics, and functionality. All these properties are embodied by the Nalukai boot. The leisure shoe is made of finest, smooth full-grain leather. The reduced design is underlined by cotton laces and decorative seams. In addition, the high-end lace-up is also equipped with a three-layer, anatomical EVA footbed and a non-slip rubber outsole for support on wet or smooth surfaces. The retail price for the Nalukai boot is 139.95 Euros. It can be purchased, for example, at Bergfreunde.de. A percentage of the company’s proceeds go to the Ama OluKai Foundation, which is dedicated to preserving the cultural heritage of Hawaii. Olukai, Hawaii/US, T +1.866.4679694, info@olukai.com, www.olukai.com 092

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Raven + Lily. The African proverb above forms the base for Raven + Lily’s business model. Launched in 2008 as an NGO by Kirsten Dickerson and Sophia Lin in collaboration with designers from LA, Raven + Lily was transformed into a corporation in 2011 and relocated to Austin, Texas. The label’s fair-trade fashion strives to empower women all over the globe. It encourages them to work, to learn, and - last but not least - to be economically successful. The label employs approximately 1,500 women in Mexico, Peru, Morocco, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Africa, India, and Malaysia, who manufacture the pieces in artful and traditional handcraft. Raven + Lily guarantees its women a secure job, fair pay, health insurance, and training programmes. The brand also enables them to participate in social entrepreneurship projects. At its headquarters in Austin, the team offers an Open Space Office as a creative meeting place for women. “We are not yet represented in the European market, but we would be happy to establish partnerships with like-minded people,” says Raven + Lily’s Katie Chaput. The label intends to expand its e-commerce and wholesale activities in 2019. Raven + Lily, Austin/Texas/US, T 001.737.2091072, sales@ravenandlily.com, www.ravenandlily.com

ROTTERDAM CONNECTION

The Good People. Ivo van Deyzen, the founder of the Rotterdam-based label, is quite obviously not a perpetrator of fast consumption. Quality, style, sustainability, and a positive mindset are core values of his menswear label. He creates uncluttered complete looks around the themes of jackets, shirts, knitwear, denim, and chinos. All items can be viewed in the flagship store in Rotterdam’s “Pannekoekstraat”. The philosophy of The Good People states that the product life cycle should have as little negative impact on humans and the environment as possible. Timeless design, partially organic materials from Europe, and production partners in countries such as Portugal and Italy ensure long-lasting quality. The label offers two collections per year, each consisting of approximately 100 pieces. Purchase prices range from 40 to 80 Euros with a 2.7 mark-up. The progressive menswear has convinced the likes of Schnitzler Münster, Adler Altona, Revier4 Frankfurt, Tide 12 Sankt Peter Ording, and Daniels Cologne. The Good People, Rotterdam/ The Netherlands, T 0031.651922220, ivo@thegoodpeople.nl, www.thegoodpeople.com


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FAIR, EXOTIC, LUXURIOUS

NEW LIFE FOR OLD SAILS

727 Sailbags. The climate change and similar issues have created a sustainability boom. 727 Sailbags is breaking new ground to stand out from the competition. The international label utilises recycled sails. Be it mainsails, gennakers, or spinnakers, each material tells its own story. The same applies to the Dinghy Backpack. This latest product is sewn by hand and impresses with functional features. Back reinforcement and shoulder straps ensure comfort. A recycled rope fastening allows easy access to the personal belongings stowed inside. A zipper provides quick access to the laptop compartment. Hidden compartments and a detachable section add extra volume. The Dinghy Backpack combines innovation and design. It is available in the colours amber, light grey, and black. Retail prices range from 250 to 275 Euros. The wholesale and retail launch is scheduled for spring 2019. 727 Sailbags, Lorient/France, T +33.6510.93975, Cfurber@727sailbags.com, www.727sailbags.com

Sana Jardin. The seven multi-faceted eau de parfums by Sana Jardin were created by IFF Master Perfumer Carlos Benaim and are based on the vitality of plants with highly concentrated natural perfume oils. They are free of artificial colours, parabens, and formaldehydes. The fragrances are free of animal ingredients and were not tested on animals. The brand, founded by Amy Christiansen Si-Ahmed, attaches great importance to social commitment and fair working conditions. “Starting with the pickers in Morocco, who harvest each flower by hand, Sana Jardin’s Beyond Sustainability movement overcomes limitations and empowers women both economically and socially,” says Gloria Massaro-Conrad, whose Premium Beauty Brands agency is the sales representative in the German-speaking market. “Sana Jardin won the Eco Beauty Award at the CEW Beauty Awards 2018.” Retail prices range from 95 Euros for 50ml to 185 Euros for 100ml - the mark-up is 2.0. The list of customers includes Harrods, Lodenfrey, and The Kitchener Switzerland. Premium Beauty Brands GmbH, Cologne/Germany, T 0049.163.251.9839, gloria@premiumbeautybrands.com, www.sanajardin.com

WHAT’S THE STORY

SUSTAINABLE LUXURY

Esemplare. Fulvio Botto and Francesco Martorella, co-founders of Pattern S.r.l., launched Esemplare in 2015. The duo decided to set a good example by developing water-repellent and windproof fabrics made of recycled PET bottles for their ultralight jackets. The materials are sourced in Italy, the pieces manufactured in Europe. The special feature: welded seams. “We have created the perfect blend of technical material innovation and urban design. Our reverse Y-construction of the fabrics allows us to give the structure a unique texture in terms of feel and comfort,” Martorella explains. Each jacket requires 10 to 12 recycled PET bottles. At a mark-up of 2.8, retail prices for the multi-seasonal pieces range from 300 to 700 Euros. The list of reference customers includes Saks Fifth Avenue in New York, Merci in Paris, and Lodenfrey in Munich. The collection consists of approx. 40 items for men and women, including sweatshirts. The range is on show at the Pitti Uomo in Florence and in the showroom of Agentur Klauser in Munich. Esemplare Showroom, Collegno/Italy, T 0039.011.4531597, info@esemplare.it, www.esemplare.com

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ACT NOW!

The topic has been on the agenda for quite a while. But how can the fashion and textile industries improve in the short and medium term in order to achieve a more sustainable textile chain? We put this question to various individuals who deal with this complex issue. Text: Ina Köhler. Illustrations: Claudia Meitert@Caroline Seidler

CHANGE THE INDUSTRY

Thimo Schwenzfeier, Show Director Neonyt at Messe Frankfurt “Sustainability needs to be followed up consistently. Fashion labels exhibiting at Neonyt must meet clear social and environmental criteria. It’s not enough to use a bit of organic cotton. Innovation power also plays a central role. However, it is clear that sustainable fashion labels must first and foremost address the fashionable zeitgeist in order to be successful in the long term. Our ultimate vision is to change the industry as a whole through collaboration and innovation, sustainability and technology. To this end, we have created Neonyt as a business and communication platform. Thus, we provide an even broader stage for sustainability and innovation and create a framework within which one can find new business partners, exchange ideas, and give each other new impetus. In January, we have decided to introduce a common focus topic for the very first time. This time the topic is water. The Fashionsustain conference, which is a central part of the hub, revolves around highly topical issues ranging from microplastics to water stewardship. What is discussed on the conference stage is made tangible in the exhibition area titled ‘Showcase of Change’. Beforehand, we plan to stage a two-day thinkathon.”

SUSTAINABLE ACTION IS A MUST

Georg Dieners, Secretary General of OEKO-TEX Service Group “The topic of sustainability is now being discussed widely. Sustainable action is a must in the face of global resource consumption. Processes and supply chains need to be optimised ecologically and made more socially responsible. In this context, the STeP label by OEKO-TEX® can be a helpful tool. With this certificate, we ensure that local labour standards in the production countries comply with the relevant legal requirements. The companies we certify guarantee freedom of assembly, allow unions, and rule out child labour. With the OEKO-TEX® Standard Made in Green, we combine the assessment of production sites and product testing. I’d also like to share my opinion on the so-called ‘Textile Alliance’. The initiative was launched in 2014 by Gerd Müller, the Development Minister of Germany, due to poor working conditions in production countries. I perceive the fact that all major industry protagonists were brought to the table and the issue of sustainability thus found a broader audience as a partial success. Now, however, concrete action must follow. OEKO-TEX® offers solutions for brands and retailers. It is now the turn of the companies to take action.” 094

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Floris van Bommel 9th generation shoemaker since 1734

Berlin: Premium, DĂźsseldorf: Gallery Shoes, Supreme, Mainhausen: ANWR messen, MĂźnchen: Supreme, Essenz, Salzburg: Schuh Austria 80 Saisonale und 30 NOS Modelle auf Lager - Kostenloser Versand | Customer Service (deutschsprachig), +31 13 51 36 930, vertrieb@florisvanbommel.com


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DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES AND CIRCULAR ECONOMY

Prof. Dr. Uwe Demele, Dean of Master Programme “Sustainability in Fashion and Creative Industries (M.A.)” at AMD Akademie Mode & Design Berlin “Future-oriented designers incorporate the entire value chain. This results in a circular economy that could reveal potential for cost savings and yield increases. Many start-ups are already pursuing this principle. They exclusively use renewable raw materials for textile production. Thus, the production process is eco-efficient with the lowest possible energy consumption. Transport routes are shortened and cause less emissions. The garments themselves are of high quality and durable, despite taking fair labour and social standards into account. An increasing number of customers demand sustainability management of this kind. Science contributes to this development by conducting research in the spirit of circular economy. Digitisation plays an important role: 3D scanning allows the production of individual, tailor-made garments. This results in less waste due to a sparing use of materials. Digital technologies inspire material research. A rapid prototyping process allows the production of vegan leather from mushrooms or plant remains. Such regenerable, natural raw materials are the basis for the creation of life cycle assessments utilising modern software. This enables designers to determine the most sustainable eco-footprint of a product in advance. Sustainable design includes considerations of longevity, recycling, and disposal. 3D printing allows, for example, the production of buttons with biopolymers. Furthermore, digital platforms facilitate the implementation of sharing and upcycling concepts. This is an area in which AMD Berlin is conducting research proactively.”

ACHIEVING MORE TOGETHER

Dr. Jürgen Janssen, Head of Alliance Secretariat, Alliance for Sustainable Textiles “Any company can - and should - demand and promote sustainability within its sphere of influence. Our textile alliance, however, is based on the idea that the enormous challenges of a global fashion and textile industry cannot be faced by one company alone. We can only achieve comprehensive changes to the benefit of all through concentrated influence and joint action. Currently, our alliance represents 50 percent of German clothing retail sales. The alliance’s social and ecological goals would, of course, benefit in the short term if those companies that are not part of the alliance yet would join too. Together we can achieve more than alone. The alliance members implement the principle of corporate due diligence. In the medium term, such an approach will become increasingly normal. Our recommendations: unite by joining the alliance, be aware of the risks within your own supply chain, implement corresponding plans of action, and - if necessary - adapt your respective business model. This also means learning from each other and taking joint action. In principle: stop waiting and let’s get started!” 096

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pitti uomo florenz | padiglione centrale ground floor | booth k7

premium exhibition berlin | hall 3 | booth d09


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“IT’S POSSIBLE TO CREATE MATERIALS WITH DRAMATICALLY LOWER ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT” As a professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, Theanne Schiros has made sneakers from algae and wool from human DNA. Surprisingly, it didn’t take a team of scientists to create these biofabrics. Apart from a lab, there was also a tepee involved. Interview: Petrina Engelke. Photo: Jon B

Theanne, how do you turn algae into fabric? All the fibres we work with are biopolymers, long chains of building blocks. Cellulose is the most common of them, but there are many others. You can extract the biopolymers from kelp and turn them into a yarn that you can knit or 3D print to shape. We made a zero waste tank top from kelp. You can put it on the compost, but it is not going to biodegrade on your body. We call that just-in-time degradability. Are there other materials? Of course! It is exciting to see microbes, fungi, and bacteria as the fabric factories of the future. For a project called Werewool, we even worked with proteins that my students extracted from their own cheek cells. Proteins are the factories of the cells, and in these proteins, function follows form. We demonstrated that protein sequences can be turned into fibres and you can programme functions at DNA level. That is meaningful for the future of fibres. Because there are more sequence combinations than there are stars in the galaxy. That sounds so much like science fiction! It does! And you have to keep in mind that this was not achieved by huge team of scientists. A few undergraduate textile development students learned the basic synthetic biology in my class, we teamed up with Sebastian Cocioba of Bionimica Labs, and in only eight weeks we went from cellular protein from a coral to naturally fluorescent fibres. Which obstacles did you have to overcome? We hit a wall when we started growing a kind of bio-leather from bacteria that you can use to make kombucha tea. The bacteria spin a mat of pure cellulose that will grow exactly to shape, but if you use this material in textiles, it gets brittle, it takes on water, for example from sweat, and it swells. So, to get to the necessary properties, we wound up using Native American techniques on the microbial cellulose, tanning it 098

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Chemical physicist Theanne Schiros works on a future of textiles that are independent of agriculture, fossil fuels, and livestock. She is wearing a zero waste kelp-based tank top and bacterial cellulose sneakers with a kelp and coconut husk fibre insole.

with plant and animal enzymes and smoking it in a makeshift tepee over a fire in my back yard. Much to our surprise, the material became water resistant, its strength and flexibility nearly tripled, and under a 2,800 degree flame, hot enough to melt metal, this material didn’t catch fire. How did you come up with combining synthetic biology with indigenous cultures? Our research is imitating the way nature makes materials. And the next closest thing to nature is the handbook of indigenous cultures who have a symbiotic relationship with their environment. What will it take for bio-fabrication to head towards mass production? Modern Meadow is already collaborating with Stella McCartney. Scalability will always be an issue you talk about, but most of all people will have to see that it is possible to create a material with a dramatically lower environmental impact.


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INNOVATE OR DIE

The fact that fashion in itself rarely has any novelty value has created space for materials, performance technologies, and smart fabrics to distinguish themselves as the true innovation factors. And to fully exploit their benefits for human kind and the environment… Photos: Manufacturers

A WOODEN SWEATER?

Ecco founder Karl Toosbuy was not merely keen on manufacturing shoes, he also wanted his own tannery. It has since made a name for itself with innovative and sustainable leather products. The latest coup: DriTan™.

THE FUTURE IS NOW

Ecco Leather. Who can look back on a 10,000-year history and yet still have one foot firmly planted in the future? Ecco Leather! The leather division of international footwear giant Ecco is based in The Netherlands and has a penchant for innovation. After inventing the first water-resistant, transparent leather in 2017, it introduced a water-saving tanning process dubbed DriTan™. Up until now, tanneries were considered extremely resource intensive. DriTan™ breaks with this paradigm by utilising the moisture already present in the skins. Ecco Leather is confident that the result does not differ from traditionally tanned leather in terms of quality, properties, stability, or delivery time. With the DriTan™ method, Ecco Leather saves 20 litres per skin. That’s equivalent to 25 million litres of water per year, which would be, according to WHO data, enough to supply more than 9,000 people for one year. Ecco Leather, Dongen/The Netherlands, info@eccoleather.com, www.eccoleather.com

Cumulative know-how: the Blue Ben team consists of production and fashion experts.

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Blue Ben. “The first sweater made of wood that gives more water than it consumes.” This is not merely a slogan that describes the ideology of the Berlin-based start-up founded by its current CEO Ali Azimi. It’s a provable fact. The textile specialist, who worked for vertically integrated fashion companies for many years, perceives Blue Ben as an appeal to the industry. He has developed a new manufacturing technique that processes modal (beech wood) finely enough to turn it into a sweat fabric that almost feels like cotton, yet requires 94 percent less water to cultivate. In addition, the label donates 10 percent of its profits to water projects in regions that are particularly affected by the consequences of fast fashion consumption, such as Bangladesh. Blue Ben was financed via a crowdfunding campaign. The first collection, consisting of four colours, was sold in spring 2018. The launch of an online shop is scheduled for February. It will offer unisex sweaters in numerous colours. The entire production process, from raw material to finished product, takes place in Portugal under fair trade conditions. Blue Ben offers its modal fabric to other companies via its NGO Drip by Drip. A circle that closes… Blue Ben, Berlin/Germany, ali@blueben.org, www.blueben.org

REVOLUTION IN YARN COLOURING

Coloreel. Joakim Staberg, a Swedish entrepreneur, dedicated nine years to the development of a machine for digital yarn colouring. Upon launch, it astonished the professional world. Previous machines of this kind can only dye the yarn in a solid colour before processing it. The Coloreel technology allows you to colour the yarn while it is being processed. To this end, the Coloreel machine is placed before an existing embroidery machine. The white yarn is dyed during the embroidery process, in all imaginable colours or colour gradients that were previously not possible. Sounds crazy, doesn’t it? It’s pretty clever too! It saves transport and storage costs, as well as resources. It also speeds up the production process and boosts creativity. It therefore comes as no surprise that Staberg received the Swedish innovation award SKAPA. Coloreel, Jönköping/Sweden, david.borg@coloreel.com, www.coloreel.com

Nine years of development work: Coloreel has revolutionised the embroidery process. The technology makes it possible to dye the yarn in exactly the right colour shade during production.


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M E S S E N HOT 1 Showroom Gusswerk Salzburg Supreme Women & Men Düsseldorf Halle B1, 3. OG, Stand 3A15 Fashion Premiere Showroom Gusswerk Salzburg Supreme Women & Men München Halle 5, 1. OG, Stand P501 Tracht & Country Salzburg Halle 1, Stand 214

Steiner1888 | Stolz Modeagentur | Gusswerk, Gebäude 2c | Söllheimerstraße 16 | 5020 Salzburg | AUSTRIA Tel: +43 (0)664 1533791 | Mail: off ice@hstolz.at | Web: www.steiner1888.com


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LEMON JELLY

ZERO WASTE The Portuguese Procalçado Group is one of the largest manufacturers of footwear components in Europe. Its repertoire ranges from outsoles and inner soles to shoe design and development. It also operates its own brands such as Lemon Jelly. From autumn/winter 2019, there will be a “Wasteless” line that recycles production waste. Text: Kay Alexander Plonka. Photos: Procalçado

José Pinto focuses on achieving sustainability by implementing innovative production processes.

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ustainable from the start. Procalçado has been thinking long-term since its foundation in 1973 - especially since the early 2000s, when numerous customers relocated their production to Asia. “Back then, many advised us to relocate to China too. But we have opted for the social and more sustainable path. We are proud that brands such as Birkenstock, Gabor, and Filling Pieces have chosen us as a production partner,” says José Pinto, the CEO of Procalçado Group. The company currently manufactures approx. 6 million sole pairs per year and generates sales of 25 million Euros. Sustainability is a daily concern for Pinto. Only recently, the company replaced plastic bottles and disposable plastic cups with glass bottles and porcelain cups. As early as 2017, 900 solar panels were installed on the roofs of the factory in order to generate most of the electricity required (approx. 5 gigawatts). “Renewable energy brought us a big step closer to our goal of CO2 neutral production. We had already reduced our water consumption by 60 percent through the implementation of a new cleaning process.”

The unmistakable Chelsea boots by Lemon Jelly are now made of recycled materials.

UPCYCLE & RECYCLE

“Plastic is not a bad material in principle, but problems arise when it isn’t recycled,” Pinto explains. This is why the topic is a top priority in the production facility. The aim is to make the manufacturing process completely waste-free by 2020. In additions, CO2 emissions are to be reduced by a further 90 percent and all materials used in shoe production are to be made of recycled plastic. This means constant research. “The technology we use today to manufacture new shoes from defective ones didn’t exist a year ago,” Pinto reveals. The company’s own rubber boot and shoe brand Lemon Jelly is leading the way in testing new technologies and has won numerous innovation awards. It was only recently certified as 100 percent vegan by PETA. “This means that our shoes are not only manufactured without animal 102

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suffering, but also that producing them causes about six to ten times less greenhouse gas emissions than identical leather shoes. We strive to show that there are more environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional production methods,” the CEO explains. Lemon Jelly accounts for one third of the group’s total turnover and is exported to more than 35 countries. The new “Wasteless” line, which currently consists of three models, will be presented at the Premium Berlin. Pinto is looking forward to another premiere in Berlin: “We are involved in a joint project that will introduce a sole for which the market was not yet ready 10 years ago in the Kraftwerk venue at Neonyt. I think everyone has finally understood that it’s time to act resolutely.”


H E A D S P O RTSWEAR WI NTER 2019/20


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RHYTHM One can no longer call it a pleasant merry-go-round. It’s more like one of those wild-spinning funfair rides that makes you dizzy before spitting you out with savagely dishevelled hair. Does it really make sense to crank the speed up even more? If we were actually at a funfair, we’d surely plant both feet firmly on the ground and turn our back on such rides for good! This approach could work in fashion too, honestly!

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CURSE OR BLESSING?

Short-term programmes, seasonless concepts, pronto and flash collections - do they really generate more sales for retailers? And do they really keep customers interested with a never-ending stream of new products? Or does the all-year order merely waste resources and increase the problem of too much merchandise on the sales floors? Does it primarily serve suppliers eager to increase order volumes artificially? This is clearly a controversial topic. Text: Isabel Faiss. Illustrations: Claudia Meitert@Caroline Seidler

TOTALLY IRRELEVANT

Michael Munz, Store Manager/The Listener “We collaborate with suppliers who plan the delivery windows and renewal on the sales floor by utilising artificial scarcity, management, and guidance. Thus, flash programmes are totally irrelevant to us. We map out the entire year with more than 100 employees and generally have no need for anything that can be produced and delivered at short notice. On the contrary, we rely on collections and products that are so limited worldwide that they can only be bought from us. The market doesn’t need more merchandise. I don’t perceive this as an additional service for retailers, especially not for multi-brand stores. It may help stores that are undecided in terms of collection planning. It only serves the suppliers, who can utilise their delivery capacity and generate additional revenue by subsequently increasing the planned budgets of their customers. As a result, suppliers determine speed, resources, inventories, and product range development. Retailers who know their customers well don’t need short-term flexibility. We order products with high inventory turnovers. They are sold out immediately and cannot be re-delivered. The market must be able to offer products that are not always available everywhere.”

LONG ESTABLISHED PRACTICE

Torsten Stiewe, Head of Buying Fashion/The KaDeWe Group “Generally speaking, it is very important for us to fall back on shortterm programmes. We decide on whether a flash programme suits our product range - and whether there is a need for it at all - on a case-by-case basis. This is usually a topic for the middle to cheaper price segments. Naturally, we talk to our partners about goodwill in terms of taking back or exchanging goods. The short-term programmes require flexibility from all involved parties, because we are taking a risk too. We started working with pre-collections that have very early delivery dates many years ago. As a major customer, we have the opportunity to buy them even earlier. That’s a strong argument for us. By utilising our experience with individual brands, we already allocate certain portions of the total budget in our annual plan. If I can integrate a flash programme and thereby compensate for something that hasn’t moved well, then I can create new excitement on the sales floor and offset a loss of sales in other product ranges. However, such programmes can also be integrated into pop-up concepts. The ability to react quickly is extremely important - not only because of e-commerce, but also because we are, in some segments, measured analogously to the vertical rhythms that we cannot and don’t want to replicate.” 106

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WHAT’S THE STORY

UNATTRACTIVE SIMPLY EASY MONEY

Nick Chiu, Co-Owner/Apartment Store Brisbane “This topic can really go both ways. It depends on the brand. You just have to be smart about the ones to bite on. Sometimes they really help if it’s a brand that performs much better than you projected. Obviously, it can go the other way and get you into a little trouble if you stretch the budget too much. Especially if the short-term collections sell at the cost of the main collection. No matter whether a brand offers two or four seasons per year, we usually just stick to the two main collections. It’s a balancing act between moving products that we really believe in and people get a lot of joy from and moving products for the sake of volume. It’s a tough one. We don’t need endless rotation and a rapid cycle of the new to keep people coming back. We like to think that the brands and products we sell have a level of quality and timelessness to ensure that they won’t be out of fashion in a mere six months.”

IT’S IN DEMAND

Benjamin Schinnenburg, Buying Director/Fashion ID GmbH & Co. KG, Peek & Cloppenburg KG, and Retail Buying GmbH & Co. KG “Generally speaking, flash programmes are a blessing in the sense that they afford us a great opportunity to react to trends at very short notice, especially for our online shop peek-cloppenburg.de. The order round of these collections becomes all the more important as our trend-conscious customers are made aware of trends much earlier through social media. They expect these trends to be available at stationary retailers and online immediately. In the process, we have also noticed that trend developments in terms of colours, shapes, and patterns assert themselves much quicker and have to be implemented swifter by our suppliers. All in all, our excellent purchasing structure allows us to handle short-term very well - provided the proportion of flash programmes remains manageable compared to regular orders. It is also helpful for limit arrangement when suppliers offer predictability in terms of number and volume of the flash collections within the order round.”

A CHALLENGE FOR BOTH SIDES

Kristin Versümer, Managing Director/Impressionen “I have been the managing director of Impressionen since April and I have no intention whatsoever of getting rid of our catalogue. I consider it to be the heart of the business. The customer wants content. She wants to be entertained and enjoy an experience - be it digital or haptic. The aim is to dynamically create and communicate shorter-term topics in relevant digital channels alongside the catalogue, which has a fairly long lead time in the conception phase and production. Our approach is to trigger desirability via the limited availability of a product rather than suggesting infinite availability. This makes the shopping experience, the quality, and the entertainment value of our offer more important than the topicality of the product. Market saturation is more present than ever. We simply cannot keep up with the actuality of vertical players. Accordingly, we have found our niche by offering special quality products that are made unique by their typical Impressionen character. Topical campaigns and collaborations could be an option for our online business in the future. Limited editions, special editions, and short-term collaborations are a challenge for both sides.”

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EVEN MORE DROPS!

Nikolai Goutzov, Owner/Superconscious Store “We are an independent store. In order to remain competitive, we need to react quickly, stay fresh, and be up-to-date. In this respect, short-term programmes are a blessing, as they allow us to offer new merchandise every two or three weeks. That’s what our customers expect. We have taught them to visit us often and discover new things. Close contact with customers and brands is extremely important to us in order to react swiftly. When we work with seasonal collections, we face the problem that trends may have changed several times between order and delivery. We have been working with brands that offer many smaller collections for quite some time. If something is sold out and we need to re-order, the products are delivered within a week. Generally speaking, we only order small quantities. We don’t order 150 of the same sweatshirt. That means more work, but also more freedom. Another advantage is that you don’t need to worry about financial advances in the form of deposit payments for months. Instead, you can plan your budgets flexibly.”

NO SOLUTION

Claudia Flessa, Owner/Modeagentur Flessa “I’ve seen several promising Pronto concepts in my time and I am no fan. Issues such as quality problems and surplus stock soon dampened the initial euphoria and I lost interest in the idea. We rely on brands that have a certain quality level and standards. Such products cannot be manufactured at short notice. There’s enough speed in the market for those seeking it. The whole thing really annoys me, even the whole online hype. We still need fashion. We still need emotional experiences and collections with multiple delivery programmes per year. What has become increasingly common is that customers re-order via the warehouse. That is a short-term flexibility I consider essential. Therefore, our customers don’t necessarily require shots from the hip. And those who have tried to utilise such a programme to obtain a range cheaper and faster were, more often than not, disappointed. Many delisted the flash programmes again. Pronto is certainly an option for some segments, but not for our regular customers who desire topicality with certain standards.”

LESS PRE-ORDER MORE FLEXIBILITY

Peter Eberle, Managing Partner/Konen “Curse or blessing? The answer is relatively simple. If the collections are good, they are an absolute blessing. It’s, however, a veritable curse that one never knows that in advance. Our buying strategy focuses specifically on brands that are capable of offering an exciting programme all year round. The trouble is that the brands of today are already proud of themselves when they reduce their production time from twelve to six months. That’s still far too long! At least for everything that doesn’t come from the dark-blue modular kit. Vertical players are overtaking us on all sides, even though we should succeed in keeping up with such concepts in terms of topicality. Today, there is no trend that lasts three seasons. You can only keep up if you’re fast enough. I would like to see more brands playing in this league, thus providing us with a wider choice of short-term programmes. System suppliers, who have what feels like 200 delivery dates, still need to create and develop their collections months in advance. The latest fashion developments are not reflected, which means we lack innovation on the sales floor. More often than not, the industry has started offering to take goods back. That too is a curse and a blessing. On the one hand, it ensures that one can artificially inflate buying volumes, because it doesn’t actually burden your budget. On the other hand, it ensures that the market is flooded with goods. The opposite would be better. Some are brave enough to address this. Basically, you need to cut back and order less during the classic pre-order phase. That increases your budget for short-term topics, thus allowing you to control the goods on the sales floor more directly and flexibly.” 108

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www.meinliebesglueck.de // IG: MEINLIEBESGLUECK

PANORAMA BERLIN 2019 I Halle 1, Stand 1.34


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ON DEMAND

The mantra of the coming years should be to turn the whole industry upside down by adapting production to demand, not vice versa. This also requires the self-confidence to realise that some pieces are sufficiently timeless to remain in a collection. Photos: Manufacturers

DATA COLLECTION PIONEER

Zara. Founder Amanico Ortega may not have invented the “product on demand” idea, but he certainly was among the first to have professionalised the concept on a large scale. From the offset, the collections were based on real-time market observations and the daily evaluation of the target group’s consumption behaviour. Mantra-like, the Spanish company’s communications office answers questions pertaining to its strategic approach to collection development as follows: “Every morning, all employees of our 7,000 stores worldwide attend a meeting that is observed by the designers in our headquarters. They evaluate their observations analogous to the sales figures.” The invaluable instinct of the employees on the sales floors is underpinned by the findings of Big Data generated by the online store. The most important finding: nobody is interested in which product is searched for most often, but in how often search queries yielded no results within the existing product range. The reaction time is a mere three weeks, by the way. www.zara.com Essentials as NOS programme: Filippa K keeps 70 percent of its collection in stock.

Data-based fashion collections: Zara was one of the pioneers in this field.

70 PERCENT CORE STYLES

Filippa K. A breath of even fresher air from Scandinavia: Swedish cult brand Filippa K quasi hoisted new sails overnight when it brought Filippa Knutsson back into the fold. Kristofer Tonström, a modern marketing and social media specialist, has been appointed as CEO. The course is set: Filippa K, currently the second most influential Scandinavian brand, is keen to claim the top spot. Two seasons ago, Ben Botas’ fashion agency Ben And became Filippa K’s sales representative in Germany. “The collection has returned to its roots. This has created a dynamic that is reflected in sales,” Ben Botas explains. The brand’s decision to offer the majority of its collection as NOS merchandise is, in his eyes, not only consistent in terms of strategy, but also in terms of content. It’s a logical response to the needs of the retail industry. “Regarding style and brand statement, Filippa K is a sophisticated and uncomplicated collection that can be worn on a daily basis. The market requires modern and perfectly implemented essentials that are always sellable and can be re-ordered at any time. Deliveries from the European warehouse arrive within a few days. The times when retailers defined their product ranges based on two pre-orders per year are definitely over. Our aim for the coming season is to generate 50 percent of our customers’ total budgets with core styles.” In the future, the required innovation and excitement will be generated by the remaining 30 percent. With this service, Filippa K focuses on maximum flexibility for its customers and market proximity. This is a cutting-edge approach that the extremely solvent company can afford as such. www.filippa-k.com 110

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ICONS

Strenesse. From May onwards, Strenesse’s B2B order platform offers 30 pieces from the Iconic collection, a range of luxurious essentials in colours that remain in fashion, ex stock. Prices range from 199 Euros for trousers to 899 Euros for a double-faced coat.


PANORAMA-BERLIN.COM

EXPEDITION 15—17 JANUARY 2019

FASHION | LIFESTYLE | ENTERTAINMENT | COMMUNITY


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AMERICAN VINTAGE

PRODUCT AND TIMING As a true ready-to-wear brand, American Vintage not only meets consumer demands, but also offers retailers a great deal of flexibility. But is this advantage exploited sufficiently? Text: Nicoletta Schaper. Photo: American Vintage

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lip it on and feel great. American Vintage of Marseille has embodied jersey in finest qualities, as well as a fashionable French effortlessness, for more than 13 years. “Our jersey competence is unique. Beyond that, our collection has undergone a significant trading-up process and we have transferred the cosy feeling of American Vintage to other product groups,” says Martina Schmidl, the Managing Director for Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Accordingly, the collection is now supplemented with casual coats, sweatshirts, blouses, and knitwear - all staged in lifestyle content in print campaigns and on social media.

BESTSELLER MANAGEMENT

While the product is the brand’s one strength, the other is its impeccable timing. American Vintage shoulders some of the risk during pre-production, which allows retailers to tailor their product ranges to their needs without tying up budgets too soon. “We are the only contemporary supplier that is 100 percent ready-to-wear, meaning that customers can order the collection a maximum of two months in advance and can re-order within 48 hours from the warehouse during the season. This ensures optimal bestseller management,” Schmidl adds. “Smaller retailers, in particular, take advantage of this, while larger customers are sometimes hampered by their corporate structure. If we, for example, supply retailers with thick knitwear in new colours during the high season of October/November, which is what consumers desire at that time, many larger retailers reduce prices as soon as December, thus missing out on an opportunity to sell the merchandise at full price for another eight weeks.” American Vintage enjoys a strong foothold in the German-speaking market with 400 points of sale, 14 mono-brand stores, and additional soft shop-in-shops at the likes of Breuninger and pop-up areas at the likes of Stand-by Lindner Dortmund. The numbers are equally impressive. The division in question is experiencing double-digit growth rates year-on-year. “Within just under three years, we have doubled the turnover in Germany and Austria,” Schmidl points out. This is also due to service and support. The team has grown to 14 employees, while a B2B portal, which was launched last summer, allows flexible orders outside normal business hours. “We offer the right product at the right time,” she adds. “The more the customer takes advantage of this offer, the more successful we can be together.”

American Vintage is presented impeccably via storytelling, both in print campaigns and on Instagram.

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L FA B R I C T R A D E FA I R M U N I C H FA B R I C STA R T

SPRING SUMMER 2020 W W W. M U N I C H FA B R I C STA R T . C O M


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LES DEUX

CURIOSITY AND ENTHUSIASM Les Deux is very Danish indeed - and very European. That’s probably why the brand is so successful. Kristoffer Haapanen launched the menswear specialist together with Andreas von der Heide. Haapanen sat down with style in progress to discuss why it is important to break rules and to have a clear brand statement. Text: Stephan Huber. Photos: Les Deux

“If we are excited about something, our customers should be able to buy it immediately - not six months later. For us, the consumer is the key”, says Kristoffer Haapanen.


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Les Deux is an extraordinary success story. What inspired you to start a fashion company? Kristoffer Haapanen: It all began with an idea. An idea to carve out a niche in the fashion industry based on the dualistic approach of combining two completely different styles. We had high ambitions and dreams, so we launched Les Deux without further thought. The first collection consisted of a simple white t-shirt, of which 500 were produced in a random size distribution. We had no grand master plan, just curiosity and enthusiasm. You both had no prior fashion experience? No. Andreas and I had no connection to fashion at all. There was a lot to learn. Was that an advantage, perhaps? I’m convinced it was. We followed our own path right from the start. We fundamentally questioned all the alleged rules of the fashion business. Some make sense, some don’t. Which rules did you break? We rejected the dominion of seasons. At the start, there were no pre-orders. There was only “straight to market”. If we are excited about something, our customers should be able to buy it immediately - not six months later. For us, the consumer is the key. Even though we understand that retailers still need seasons and pre-orders, we have our own approach. We always offer a high proportion of our collection immediately. We firmly believe that specialised retailers need this in the omni-channel reality of today. What does Les Deux stand for? The name not only sounds great, but also stands for our philosophy. Les Deux is the story of an intercultural relationship between a political refugee and preppy boy from the suburbs. Two personalities who inspire each other and celebrate diversity. The authenticity of this relationship is the core of Les Deux. We continue to develop this idea ceaselessly. The theme of our current collection is “Germany 1990”. Nobody needs a new fashion brand. It’s about reaching people with an idea. This is the only way to build a real community and to reach our customers on an emotional level. We will never deviate from what we do, but why we do it serves a greater purpose. We are in the process of building a business in which people come first, where we come together despite our differences. And there was another reason why we chose a French name. Freedom, equality, and fraternity are indeed valuable leitmotifs.

WHAT’S THE STORY

The driving force behind Les Deux, a brand that defies commonplace rules, are Kristoffer Haapanen and Andreas von der Heide.

Can such values be communicated via fashion? We’re not a political brand, but fashion is always a mirror of society and an expression of an idea. It starts with the fact that we perceive togetherness as something positive and indispensable, especially in terms of business. How did we manage to grow and remain successful? We have established partnerships with our customers. How can Les Deux expand into new markets? We team up with people who know these new markets and share our values. Which markets are you focusing on at the moment? Central Europe, but especially Germany and Great Britain… We expanded into four new markets in 2018. In 2019, we intend to launch in France and Switzerland. We have found great partners who will help us grow successfully in these markets. We need people who fit in with us and who are experts in their respective markets. Just like we’re experts in terms of Les Deux itself. I am trying to imagine how the theme “Germany 1990” can be translated into fashion. It was an exciting process. We want to convey a very positive message. It’s not about the Cold War or the East-West Conflict before the fall of the Berlin Wall. It’s about the euphoric mood that followed. German reunification had a huge impact on Europe. And we perceive this influence, despite all the friction such a monumental change may cause, as a gift. Our view is that of a young man born on the 3rd of October 1990. We see a Europe that has overcome its post-war history. You say “we” quite often… Because we can only be successful as a team… style in progress

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360CASHMERE

WELL-ROUNDED 360Cashmere has something for every taste. What makes the collection so successful, however, is customer proximity - also in terms of delivery rhythms. Text: Nicoletta Schaper. Photos: 360Cashmere

Claudia Flessa believes that 360Cashmere still has enormous potential.

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laudia Flessa has just delivered 360Cashmere’s holiday collection and is very enthusiastic about the feedback. “It’s amazing how well 360Cashmere is received. Many retailers have already placed repeat orders, because some items were sold out almost immediately.” COMPLETELY SOLD OUT

360Cashmere celebrates its tenth anniversary in January. Flessa’s eponymous fashion agency has been involved in establishing the collection, which is designed by Leslie and Bruce Gifford in LA, in the German-speaking market right from the start. “360 represents a circle that covers the entire spectrum of fashion from classic to athletic,” she explains. “Even the basics always have a certain twist that appeals to many women between 18 and 70 years of age. That’s certainly one of the secrets of 360Cashmere’s success.” Another success factor is the delivery rhythm. The three annual collections (autumn/winter, holiday, and spring/summer) are delivered on seven to eight dates. The spring/summer collection, for example, presents light cashmere in summery shades, as well as t-shirts and tops made of cotton and linen. In November and December, the holiday collection features fresh colours and thinner cashmere qualities - perfect for the transition. “Some customers were initially overwhelmed by the many delivery dates, but they soon changed their minds when they realised the benefit of being able to present new goods at all times. Retailers also appreciate the fact that they can re-inject merchandise flexibly,” says Flessa, who re-orders from LA every Friday. Customer proximity, however, already begins in the American family business. “Leslie and Bruce always have an open ear for the respective markets and pay close attention to our input on what is performing well and what is still needed,” Flessa gushes. The price is right, too. At a mark-up of 2.8, purchases prices for finest cashmere sweaters range from 80 to 130 Euros, while coats can cost up to 296 Euros. 116

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A brand to keep an eye on: 360Cashmere is among the most successful brands in the market.

EYE ON THE CUSTOMER

International retail customers include Saks Fifth Avenue, the Italian Follie Follie Group, and Selfridges. 360Cashmere has 150 points of sale in the German-speaking market, including Apropos, Jades, Reyer, Fidelio, Pesko, Breuninger, and Myclassico. “The brand still has potential, which is why we intend to expand sales selectively,” Flessa reveals. “We always have an eye on the customer, for example by informing two local retailers about what the other has ordered. We continue to focus on customer service and ensuring that everything runs smoothly. We believe in total customer proximity.”


08.01.-11.01.2019 PITTI IMMAGINE UOMO, Padiglione Cavaniglia, Area I-Play, Stand 23 15.01.-17.01.2019 PREMIUM BERLIN, Halle 4, Stand A 10 Distribution Austria & Germany: Die Hinterhofagentur, www.diehinterhofagentur.de www.bobcompany.it


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LIU JO

“THE DELIVERY RHYTHM AND GOODS AT THE POS MUST CORRESPOND TO THE SEASON” Italian premium label Liu Jo continues to grow in the contemporary segment of feminine womenswear. In an interview with style in progress, Marco Marchi, the brand’s CEO and Creative Director, explains how he utilises efficient time-to-market solutions to unlock the North European market and the German-speaking market in particular. Interview: Kay Alexander Plonka. Photos: Liu Jo

You have developed an NOS programme exclusively for the German-speaking market. You also recently started offering flash programmes in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. What’s so special about this development? With the flash programmes, we offer products that correspond to current trends and meet demands. If we discover that certain colours, materials, or silhouettes, which are not featured in our main or intermediate collections, are in demand, we develop them on a short-term basis and offer them to our retail partners via the Liu Jo B2B platform promising immediate delivery. We don’t follow a fixed pattern, however. A flash collection can consist of a pair of trousers in two, four, or six colours. It can also be a capsule with eight, twelve, or 24 pieces in just one colour. There are also no fixed dates for such flash collections. As soon as we identify a demand, we develop a programme and implement it swiftly. What changes have you made in terms of collection development in response to the needs of the market? We have significantly compressed the number of pieces and sublines within the collection for our wholesale customers and are now focusing our efforts on the three lines White Label, Denim, and Sports, complemented by our accessories line with a total of four delivery dates per half year. This allows us to offer our retailers a precise image that they can convey and communicate easily at the POS. It’s no longer sensible to deliver winter jackets in July. The delivery rhythm and the goods at the POS must correspond to the season. Nobody feels excited anticipation when buying a 118

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Marco Marchi, the CEO and Creative Director of Liu Jo, offers the right looks at the right time.

warm wool coat, a hat, or lined boots in August, just to stuff the pieces into the cupboard for months until they can be actually worn. The product range at the POS must be fresh, up-to-date, and needs-based at all times. Liu Jo introduced a menswear collection in Italy three years ago. Why is it not available in these parts? The men’s collection, produced by licensee Co.Ca.Ma from Nola near Naples, is highly popular and we’ve already received inquiries from the German market. The different fits in Northern and Southern Europe are a very important issue in the menswear segment. We address this issue very carefully. Only once the product and the sizing is 100 percent correct, will we start selling the collection in Northern Europe - most likely in 2020.


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LUCKY DE LUCA

MORE OF EVERYTHING (EXCEPT GOODS) When Valentino de Luca launched his shirt and blouse collection Lucky de Luca 10 years ago, he radically questioned many of the industry’s hitherto-established rules. Thus, he intuitively created his own characteristic and humorous design language. As a designer, he pays attention to even the smallest details. His speciality remains to tell it like it is. Text: Isabel Faiss. Photo: Lucky de Luca

It is no coincidence that Valentino de Luca specialises in cheerful fashion: Lucky de Luca has discovered and claimed a market niche.

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You demand more flexibility. Is your appeal directed at all protagonists in our industry? It’s quite simple. Today, you need to be faster and more progressive than in the past. That’s the standard I set for myself, first and foremost. I always try to look further ahead and to adapt to market changes. In my opinion, things are still too static. The panic caused among retailers and certain brands by a fairly miserable last autumn has once again shown that we need more flexibility from all sides. This applies particularly to retailers, who need to abandon their well-trodden paths and be bold enough to rethink certain aspects, especially delivery rhythms. Fortunately, my product group is not dependent on the weather. We can no longer rely on seasons? Why should we make products dependent on seasons then? It’s all about progressive collections, fast and flexible delivery rhythms, and the joint planning of the collection cycle throughout the year. Who offers that? We prefer to offer many small delivery windows instead of large seasonal trap doors that leave retailers with a vast amount of surplus merchandise. We don’t need additional collections or warehouses! How can you deliver innovation via a warehouse? The last thing the market needs now is more goods! The market is overtaking itself. We prefer to make items scarce instead of making them available infinitely. An institution of our industry is about to face its biggest challenge: the trade fairs. How relevant are they still? They’re still hanging in the balance. I think the future will be decided this January. The Premium has announced a major re-launch and now it has to deliver on its promises. It’s not enough to simply place the labels differently. The current monopoly of the trade fairs is under pressure from online showrooms and Düsseldorf as a heavily frequented order hub. Again, it’s about flexibility. Modern customers want to decide for themselves when and where to order, and which distances they are willing to cover in the process. For a regular customer, it makes more sense to view a collection digitally and to decide based on fabric samples. We have to create a corresponding offer and present our collections in a sufficiently sophisticated manner. Generally speaking, the Pitti Uomo in Florence is currently the strongest trade show. Personally, I see a large question mark behind the topic.


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YOUTH For many, young people between the ages of 15 and 25 seem like an exclusive community that excludes others. It feels as if they have cast a spell that keeps others out. It is, however, worth figuring out what they’re all about. And it’s worth putting oneself in their position to discover what one could offer them.

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WANTED! Coveted, yet hard to reach: the target group consisting of 15 to 25-year-olds follows its own rules in terms of cons­ umption and communication. As digital natives, they grew up differently than the previous generation. How does the youth tick? And how can brands and retailers reach them? Nicoletta Schaper investigates. Photo: Peuterey Plurals

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ewseum turns into a meeting place every Saturday. The concept store in Nuremberg attracts a young audience. One can hear hip-hop vibes and scraps of English. A number of people from Adidas in nearby Herzogenaurach regularly meet up for coffee here at the weekends. One can spot a group of young people taking selfies in new outfits in the spot dedicated to creating posts that can be shared online instantly. Store manager Nico Crämer has achieved what many dream of: he has turned Newseum into a destination for Generation Z. PLAYGROUND

This generation is a desperately coveted target group, but it’s incredibly hard to reach. It seems odd, especially as this particular generation is interested in fashion, as was proven last year in a study conducted by the University of Vienna. More than 2,000 ninth to twelfth grade students were asked what they spend their pocket money on. With 42.9 percent, clothing is among the top answers alongside food and activities with friends. “The importance of clothing is growing immensely,” Crämer agrees. “They now spend more money on fashion than on their mobile phones.” However, being relevant to the youth no longer has anything to do with what one used to call best practices. “Many would love to have them as customers, but nobody takes them seriously,” says Holger Petermann, the owner of Think Inc Communications. “Today, even 18-year-olds have an international network and have emancipated themselves with far greater brand awareness than before. Many older people simply cannot understand how they tick and what is important to them.” Winni Klenk, the owner of Abseits in Stuttgart, is curious. “The youth seems about as unorthodox as they have been since the 1980s. Their look can be utterly incomprehensible, even for a 30-year-old.” In November 2017, Klenk launched Frieder 39, a store that stocks 124

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Freed from convention and unmoved by the conventional: Gen Z has its own understanding of fashion.


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top-end brands such as Off-White, Ader Error, and Marcelo Burlon, as well as Champion, Misbhv, and Y-3. “I wanted to prove to the youth that we stationary retailers have something to offer,” Klenk explains. He seems to have been successful. In the past, the younger customers merely flashed a mobile phone image of the desired piece at him or his colleagues and left instantly if it wasn’t in stock. “Today, they look around and try things on, because we have earned their respect.” Klenk is a long-time professional in the business, but at Frieder 39 he gives his young crew free reign in terms of advice. He knows that they have better access to the target group in all aspects. “One has to let them do their work, perceive them as entrepreneurs within the company,” Klenk emphasises. “Young customers enjoy an exchange on equal terms in a store. Then they’re willing to listen to our advice,” store manager Christian Wiedmaier adds. “A connection is quickly established as soon as they realise that we know what we’re talking about and that we speak their language.” HIP-HOP FOR EVERYONE

Especially larger fashion houses are often too number-focused, not allowing enough room for new trends. Damian Scharping, the buyer for Men’s Premium, Contemporary, and Outdoor at Breuninger, has set himself the task of expanding the scope. “We’ve been focusing on change for the last two years, bringing in many new brands for a younger audience: among them Off-White, A Cold Wall, Heron Preston, and Comme des Garçons.” A limited-edition capsule by Off-White and Breuninger was launched in the latter’s flagship store in Stuttgart with streetwear influencers like Jean-Claude Mpassy and Willy Iffland on the 10th of October 2018. “The capsule was sold out in the Breuninger stores in Stuttgart, Düsseldorf, and Nuremberg, as well as in the online shop, within a few hours,” Scharping reveals. Apropos Off-White: Virgil Abloh has not only injected hip-hop into high fashion in the wake of Kanye West, but created a hype with an impact that extends far beyond the bubble. Crämer: “The topic is no longer a niche, but runs through the entire range of fashion from Stüssy to Louis Vuitton. This should not be underestimated.” Limited editions and collaborations, which combine what is generally considered incompatible, fuel the hype even more. This has created a resell market around Off-White, Supreme, and the like. It has little to do with sustainability, but all the more with desirability. “The

“We strive to create designs that appeal to the people and that they want to be a part of.” Albin Johansson, CEO of Axel Arigato

“The digital natives are the first generation not to apply make-up or dress up for face-toface encounters, but for the photographs they take of themselves and others of them.” Carl Tillessen, trend analyst

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“Young people are much more receptive for nature conservation and sustainability than many people think. North Sails, a client who is very committed to such topics, proves this.” Holger Petermann, owner of Think Inc Communications

“We don’t want to scatter a high-quality brand such as Balr. We want to build a market presence in a selective and sustainable manner.” Timothy Hoferer, CEO of Modeist Men

streetwear culture has become powerful and fast, boosted by social media,” Scharping says. This also changes the demands on fashion, which now first and foremost needs to be Instagram-compatible. “In order to be photogenic, clothing primarily needs strong colours, strong contrasts, and exciting proportions,” trend analyst Carl Tillessen stated during a lecture at Deutsches Mode Institut. “Once one realises that the thumbnail of an Instagram photo is merely two by two inches large on a smart phone, one understands why silhouettes are becoming more significant, why logos are becoming bigger, and why colour-blocking is becoming ever more striking. It comes as no surprise that pieces by Off-White, Palm Angels, and Supreme are adapting the look of traffic signs and flags. They are, after all, signals that are supposed to be clearly visible from a distance and in poor visibility.” A style that commercial brands have tapped into too, bought by those who don’t feel like spending 400 Euros on a Supreme sweatshirt. CONTENT AND COMMUNITY

Newseum boasts more than 9,000 followers on Instagram. Crämer posts a photo of a bumper car in front of his store or a funny photo that has absolutely nothing to do with fashion. But he also posts a photo of trainee Felix wearing a hoodie by Brain Dead. “We want to be perceived as real and ensure that our store has a unique profile,” Crämer emphasises. “This also means that we think twice about which trends we pick up and which brands suit our profile.” The makers of Na-kd are especially skilled at playing the game. Utilising a network of more than 300,000 influencers worldwide and numerous brand collaborations, the Swedish label drops fashionable styles on a daily basis - witnessed by 1.8 million followers on Instagram. “We need to know our customers and be wherever they are,” says co-founder Magnus Hjörne. As of this year, Na-kd’s fashion is no longer only presented by models, but also by influencers and customers. A brand-new app creates even more customer proximity. Every user can co-determine new styles based on likes. “It allows our customers to feel like fashion designers,” says Thorsten Baumann, the Wholesale Director at Na-kd. “Their own, unique look is becoming increasingly important to them, which we notice when they put together an outfit consisting of all sorts of styles.” “The brand has understood what the youth want right from the offset,” says Petermann


FALL/ WINTER 2019 BERLIN-PREMIUM 15.01.- 17.01.2019 HALLE 7, STAND J02

WHOLESALE INQUIRIES INFO@IQPLUSBERLIN.COM WWW.IQPLUSBERLIN.COM


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to the point. “As a brand that was launched digitally, Na-kd seems to have found the optimal way to connect with the target group faster than anyone else. And it’s making the best of this advantage consistently.” The same applies to Balr, a sportswear brand that was launched online by e-commerce professionals Juul Manders and Ralph de Geus with Dutch football star Demy de Zeeuw. Perfectly positioned in all social media channels, Balr presents itself as a premium brand linked to football. It grows via its fan base, be it in the US, Japan, or the Benelux states. “They are absolute marketing professionals and remain true to their image. I doubt anyone can do what they do any better,” says Timothy Hoferer, whose fashion agency Modeist Men represents the label in the German-speaking market. “Whether on Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, or our website, we not only create content, but also respond to and like the posts of our fans,” says brand co-founder Manders. “They are not just customers - they are our community.” While studying fashion management, Erik Scholz launched a blog titled Erikschlz.com. In May 2018, he won the About You Award for the most influential social media stars in the “Upcoming” category. Fashion is his passion. His most important sources of information are Highsnobiety and Hypebeast. “In the blog, I showcase my looks and sometimes publish some socially critical pieces,” says the 20-year-old with 82,000 followers on Instagram. “I think my followers appreciate the fact that I come across as a friend rather than an unapproachable role model. I’m someone they can relate to.” More importantly, his adoration for key pieces by Supreme or the Triple S sneakers by Balenciaga seems authentic, not bought. This is something that young consumers are very aware of these days. Are they also more conscious of sustainability, especially as they were born into a world of abundance? “Hardly, otherwise they wouldn’t flock to H&M,” says Phillip Ikrath, a Board Member at the German Institute for Youth Culture Research. “If a style looks good, sustainability has no impact whatsoever in the fast-moving world of fashion.” “I definitely sense an openness to sustainability-related

“Young people have become much more purposeful than they used to be when spending money on branded products. They are ready to dig deep into their pockets, because they promise social prestige.” Philipp Ikrath, Board Member at the German Institute for Youth Culture Research

“You need really good salespeople in the store. People who think independently as entrepreneurs within your own company.” Winni Klenk, owner of Frieder 39 Stuttgart

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“In the past, the George Gina & Lucy wave brought many young customers into our store. Currently, it’s the UGGs and Canada Goose jackets. These pieces allay the threshold fear a young girl may experience. And because we treat her well, she enjoys coming back.” Sari Heuser, owner of Bratfisch Giessen

“We want to transform the point of sale into a point of experience.” Damian Scharping, buyer for Men’s Premium, Contemporary, and Outdoor at Breuninger

topics,” Crämer argues. “If a well-known brand launched a corresponding capsule, it would provide us with an even better selling proposition.” LIVE FOR AN AUDIENCE OF MILLIONS

More than ownership, Generation Z is all about experiences. “This is yet another reason why music festivals are booming,” Petermann points out. “If you’re young, you want to have a choice. Should I go and see a band or go out for a meal? Should I simply chill? Young people don’t want to be dictated anymore. They no longer want one-dimensional experiences. This permeates all areas.” Even the computer games community meets offline. The Gamescom in Cologne, which took place in August 2018, was a real crowd puller for the youth. 370,000 visitors enjoyed the vibrant atmosphere. The League of Legends World Championship reaches an audience of millions. The first Fortnite World Cup is scheduled for later this year. Such events fill huge arenas and are streamed live to young people all around the globe. “First-hand experiences are becoming increasingly important in the age of digitisation,” says Albin Johansson, the CEO of Swedish clothing and sneaker brand Axel Arigato. The label is keen to conquer the German-speaking market with the help of fashion agency Ben And. “People are looking for authentic experiences. I would go even further and say that originality has become less important - in favour of authenticity.” The brand opened its first German store in Berlin in autumn last year. More will follow, accompanied by parties and sneaker customising events. “This is how customers connect with us as a brand,” Johansson explains. “I’m a huge fan of seeing and trying on fashion in a store. Online lacks the shopping experience,” Scholz argues. “Even that feeling of being handed a bag containing the coveted piece is unique to me.”


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“THE YOUTH HAS ITS OWN BULLSHIT FILTER!”

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WHAT’S THE STORY

How does Generation Z shop and how can I win them over as a target group? Trend researcher Tristan Horx of the Zukunftsinstitut sat down with style in progress to take a closer look at relevant consumer behaviour. Text: Nicoletta Schaper. Photo: Klaus Vyhnalek

Mr Horx, can we call what we have today a youth culture? We definitely cannot speak of a homogenous youth culture, because the megatrend of individualisation has ensured it is as heterogenous as ever. However, it makes no sense to even think in categories such as youth. Target groups are dead. It’s all about lifestyles. In this context, we can see that the younger generation continues to differentiate itself. Isn’t the great diversity also caused by digitisation? Technology is more the means to an end. The driver of individualism is a purely human need. In the 1980s and 1990s, groups such as the Poppers, Punks, and Eco-Warriors defined the youth. These groups are even more differentiated today. However, today’s punk lacks the original anarchist mindset. We are doing pretty damn well, so what should the youth rebel against? Everyone is stuck in their own mini-rebellion. This is why fashion is influenced by the hyper-individualisation trend. Accordingly, brands are generating less revenue with mass products. That’s why H&M is struggling with its image as a mass producer. Fashion has become cheap and we own a lot of it, which is why the consumer prefers to buy three expensive t-shirts instead of ten for five Euros each. Less is more. Everybody is aware that producing fashion is not sustainable. This increasing awareness is, however, countered by the strong urge to individualise. What does the youth spend money on? They spend more on experiences than on things. This means that the primary driver of consumption has changed fundamentally. The focus has shifted from ownership to experience. The latter’s social value is reified by the corresponding social media post. So, is fashion becoming less important? On the contrary, fashion is on top of the youth’s agenda, especially as social media attaches such a high value to the visual aspect. But given that the young generation grows up

in an over-digitised environment, it has developed its own bullshit filter. The youth is quick to identify advertising that is driven by algorithms and to notice that an influencer who constantly posts about Nike sneakers is merely an advertising tool of the brand. I tell the companies I consult to forget influencers. As soon as they gain a certain reach, their authenticity drops significantly. Local bloggers, on the other hand, are more beneficial, because they are more tangible and credible. What’s your conclusion in terms of fashion consumption? Given the massive choice of brands and styles, retailers with a well-individualised range can experience a renaissance. Many young people are overwhelmed by the oversupply. However, retailers still need to realise that the value of good advice is a real opportunity. Has digitisation handed power to the consumer? We have reached the point where companies such as Amazon and the like are trying to hack into our psyche and consumption behaviour. But we consumers won’t let them get away with that forever. A backlash is building up slowly. People want to share their experience with their closest friends, not with 5,000 friends on Facebook. How can one reach the youth as a target group? How can we bypass the aforementioned bullshit filter? I hear that question at times, especially in connection with marketing measures for a young target group. The simple answer is to offer a good product! Anyone who strives to be perceived as authentic should take consumers seriously and make every effort to understand them. Consumers have a huge choice! They’re gone at the first whiff of bullshit…

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OMNITAIL Retail is all-encompassing. Given that boundaries and limitations are disappearing, it is important to utilise old strengths in new channels. None of the channels changes the basic laws of successful trading. We buy where we are treated in a friendly, competent, reliable, and fair manner. Shopping is fun where consumption becomes an experience - no matter where that is.

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THE LIST

“WE ARE MOBILE FIRST” If Germany needs a new figurehead for entrepreneurship, the country should look no further than this man. Andreas Skorski, originally from Nuremberg, founded The List, a marketplace for stylish luxury, in Dubai. He is now challenging the more established names in the business. Text: Martina Müllner-Seybold. Photos: The List

Andreas, is it fair to describe your business model by calling you the Mr. Farfetch of the Middle East? I suppose so. Our business model is similar; we are a marketplace. The List connects retailers from all over the globe with consumers. The customers are still primarily from the Middle East, but we deliver to 190 countries. The business model is scalable; we are now taking on the European market. We strive to thrill customers with our mobile experience. Nobody has managed to create a truly genuine mobile experience - and founded a real mobile business - before us. Mobile is where the customer is. More than 80 percent of our traffic comes from mobile devices. The List curates the best merchandise from the best stores worldwide, but much more dynamically. We utilise micro-moments. We try to suggest the right products through personalisation, embedded in content that is also tailor-made for the respective products and brands. Does the fact that you also use external content, at least to a certain extent, enhance the shopping experience with entertainment value? Exactly. Customers have no interest in switching between channels or apps. They want to read a Vogue article and then buy the product in question immediately. The same applies to videos. We strive to offer the right products to the right people at the right moment. I understand the principle, but others are attempting the same thing… How do you ensure that The List does it better? Our marketplace model means that we offer an incredible range of products, more products than an e-commerce company that buys and stocks. We are more agile and faster. When something exciting surfaces in LA, New York, or Moscow, we can present it on our platform three weeks later. How do you define luxury? Luxury is not defined by a price tag. We are a curator and aggregator of cool, individual products. It goes without saying that we also offer classic luxury brands, but always in combination with products that are hard to find. Who decides which products of a retailer’s range make it onto The List? If basic conditions are met, the retailer decides. These conditions range from product quality to a check whether the retailer is authorised to sell the brand online. We perceive 134

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The business was started in a living room. Today, The List has offices in Dubai and Lisbon. The aim of Andreas Skorski, the founder of The List, is to be the luxury shopping destination offering the best mobile experience.

ourselves as consultants. We provide data that enables stationary retailers to buy more precisely for the needs of our customers. Please describe how the integration of a retailer works… Once an agreement has been reached, we analyse the inventory in order to determine the depth and width of the product range in question. A certain depth of stock is important for our business model. We sell products quite quickly and are keen to avoid sold-out items. We have teams that take care of data preparation. Most retailers and brands simply don’t have product data in the form we need it to be in order to describe and present the goods in a context appropriate for e-commerce. We handle that aspect for them. From a technological point of view, the merchandise management is integrated via an interface. As soon as the products are online, the sale and all promotional measures begin - controlled by us. When an item is sold, the retailer merely needs to pack it. We handle everything else: the correct pricing for every market, customs, shipping service providers, and returns. For which you charge a small fee, probably in the same range as Farfetch. What’s your so-called winning point over the top dog? Our compensation model is a little more favourable; our take-rate and service fees aren’t as high. Our target audience is younger, our average shopping cart value is higher, and our return rate is lower. Seeing that we aren’t as large, we offer individual solutions for our retailers. Moreover, fashion is only part of our business. We also collaborate with watch, art, and interior design dealers. How did you convince your investors? And what is the ultimate goal? All the points mentioned above and our team… Some great people from large competitors have joined us. They are eager to prove their mobile expertise. We don’t look at a ten-year-old website and wonder how we can optimise it for mobile use. We are what is called mobile first. We are the first genuine mobile brand in this segment and we strive to earn a permanent place on our customers’ home-screens. Our goal is to establish ourselves as the luxury fashion platform in the mobile sector.


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MARTIN LINDSTROM

“SPEND AT LEAST TWO HOURS A WEEK WITH A RANDOM CONSUMER” Martin Lindstrom has a surprising way of doing research for his brand consulting firm. He visits consumers at home, spending a lot of time with them. He even looks into their bathroom cabinets, under their beds, and flips through their photo collections. In his book “Small Data”, Lindstrom describes how lots of tiny bits and pieces of information turn into a concept to improve a business. We wanted to know how this approach can be applied to the fashion industry - and ended up talking about religion, privacy, and mirrors that outshine Snow White’s stepmother’s magic arsenal. Interview: Petrina Engelke. Photos: John Abbott

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ister Lindstrom, your research means analysing the smallest observations, thus finding hidden clues to improve businesses. Let’s break this down so everyone can understand the process. I think the first and most important question a business owner needs to ask is: When did I last spend time with a consumer, a random person you don’t know? For most people, the answer would be: never. However, you cannot, under any circumstances, establish a solid impression of the consumer’s mindset based on a report. I’m pretty sure you would not select your partner based on filling out an excel spreadsheet and implementing a scoring system before deciding if you want to marry that person or not. But that is a little bit like what we are trying to do in a business setting. How does this insight relate to smaller businesses in comparison to the big brands you work with? The reason why small business owners and entrepreneurs are good in the beginning is because they typically had a need themselves and invented a solution to their own private need. But as the company grows, either that need may

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change or disappear, or the people in charge are too busy dealing with bureaucracy to remain in touch with recent developments. As a rule of thumb, I would say one should spend at least two hours a week with a random consumer, and your entire management team should do the same. This “small data” quite often sheds light on something completely different, yet still incredibly important, that no one else has found out yet. Whereas conventional research focuses on “big data”, which results in everyone finding the same answer. In fashion, one of the terms people are questioning is “authenticity”. First of all, let’s define authenticity. It has to be real, it has to be a ritual, it has to be relevant, and it has to be a recital, meaning part of a storyline. I think fashion has a tendency to very quickly grasp only one dimension of authenticity, forgetting about the rest. But the need for authenticity is not necessarily met when things look hand-crafted or a product has a piece of history or is one-of-a-kind. Authenticity is a whole package, just like there is a package when you go into a church. The church is the ambiance, the acoustics, the speeches, the candlelight - all those different things. What is the desire behind authenticity? People today are looking for something that creates a sense of belonging with like-minded people, because the world is too big. The issue in our world is too much transparency. The more transparency there is, the more I can see what other people have that I don’t have - the unhappier I become, the more I feel I’ve been losing out. That’s also the reason why “local” has become so big right now. In order to feel safe, we fall back on our local community, we create our own language which only a few people understand. As human beings, the more we are under pressure, the more we feel unsafe, the more we want to sink back to our roots. So we are seeing an increasing number of consumers adopting rituals now, because they create a frame of trust and safety around our world. All of that comes back to authenticity. And you cannot just take one dimension out of it. You have to understand the whole package, which is basically a religion. So, we have to start a fashion religion. Wait: in a way, fashion already is a religion! It is! Just look at United Colors of Benetton back in the days. They had a very strong view of the world, as did Diesel for a while. But some brands abandon that aspect the moment they are more inclined to follow where the revenue stream is, rather than being true to what they stand for. And this is what the consumer can sense today. They couldn’t sense it in the past, because in the past the logo and the design were the determining factor for why I would choose a certain fashion item. Today, many other factors come into play. They are equally important, if not even more important.


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WHAT’S THE STORY

Branding expert Martin Lindstrom is the author of seven books, among them “Small Data” (2016) and “Buyology” (2008). His team has visited thousands of consumers in their homes to get to the core of their needs and desires, working on behalf of brands like Maersk, Burger King, and the Dubai-based Mall of the Emirates for Majid al Futtaim.

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Another recent development in fashion is that many retailers are trying to reduce waiting times by offering a self-checkout, telling staff to run around with tablets, or by offering one-hour delivery online. Do you think that will really make customers come back for more? No, definitely not. To think that consumers want rational behaviour, or that they want a transaction to be over as quick as possible, may be correct when you buy socks, but it is certainly not correct when it comes to a lot of other categories in the fashion industry. Retailers have to understand one thing: You need to be true to the channel you use. When you want a quick transaction, you go online. If you have a brick-and-mortar store, use the strength it already has. You can explore, you can discover, and you have a sense of anticipation. How would you use these strengths? As a retailer, you can create a community feeling. We spend time with a lot of people with our thumbs up. I like you and you are my friend, but we all know that, in reality, it is not a community. In the future, fashion stores will be increasingly defined by building communities that allow like-minded people to come together. Their clothes will be one of the things they celebrate, but that just serves as an amplifier for the community to become stronger. Secondly, retail stores will become increasingly sensory, thus appealing to our five senses. I saw that in Dubai the other day, where there’s a bar and a restaurant that also happens to be a clothing store. And there, people like to have time to walk around, to explore, and to feel important while receiving outstanding service. There will be two types of transactions. One is when you can buy clothes that everyone else can get hold of online. The second is when you offer a special limited collection which is only available in the store and you can’t buy it online. It may come at a premium price, but it gives you access to certain locations in the retail environment that no one else has. Thus, you feel special. How about technology that helps gather information about customers, especially when you combine online and offline channels? In my view, privacy is going to be the number one factor in the future. At the end of the day, the successful brands will be those that have a very strong stand on this upfront and act on it. There will be a phase when a lot of shortcuts based on data access allow you to serve customers quicker and more accurately, and you will make a lot of money on the back of it for a while. But at some stage the consumers will burn their fingers, because the data will be leaked, sold, or abused one way or another. Companies pursuing that path cannot dab into it for fun. They have to establish very strong ethical guidelines internally, which define the future of the brand. If you don’t and you just let the IT department dabble around in this and hope for the best, you end up destroying the entire brand. What is your take on shops that use facial recognition to reduce staff, like Amazon Go does in the US or Jack & Jones/Vero Moda does in China? These technologies will catch on, but only in very distinct pockets of communities and countries. We will see a whole new generation that is increasingly insecure. For example, the number of young people committing suicide in the UK has increased by 25 percent in the last couple of years. The fashion and cosmetic world is going to try to compensate for insecurity by making you feel that you are not alone and providing the answer for you to feel more secure. And I think that will then be linked with what we see in 138

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China now. A digital mirror will tell you that you have to change your look to be more accepted. It will earn you more “thumbs up” for your next Snapchat photo. This type of technology will be very prominent in certain regions of the world, for example in China, where the definition of privacy is very different from how you and I define it. It may gain some prominence in the US too, but it will really struggle to establish itself in Europe. So, if that’s not really the best model for Europe, what would you say is crucial for customer relations management in European shops? Well, I think it’s very simple. You have to build a culture. Today, the staff in offline retail stores couldn’t care less if they work at H&M or Zara. You need to build cultures that are so strong that you feel like you are part of a cult when you walk into the store, where the staff is really passionate about the brand, what it stands for, and its ethical guidelines. If I return and they say: “Hey Martin, welcome back! Look, I put this aside for you, because I know this is your style”, then I will return again and again. The online equivalent allows me to plug into communities; the brand helps me to connect with other like-minded people. And these two dimensions will have to merge. That’s why I think that a lot of retailers will become community centres in the future. Instead of us going to church or whatever, the clothing store actually could be a community centre where you buy your drinks and so on, as well as where you buy the uniform for your community or tribe. At least in the US, many so-called minority groups say: “representation matters”. One can see a slight impact in Hollywood, for example. Is that also something that will affect the future of the fashion industry? Definitely. Fashion needs to have very strong views about what is right and what is wrong. Fashion brands that try to be everything at once will die. They cannot survive. There will, of course, always be exceptions, but people want to buy things that reflect a strong opinion about life and who they are. Because people desperately need an identity…

“Fashion brands that try to be everything at once will die. They cannot survive.”


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WHAT'S THE STORY

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BASIC NET

THE BUSINESS NETWORK

The fact that an Italian group has been a pioneer in digitisation since the mid-1990s may be surprising. But for Marco Boglione, the founder and chairman of BasicNet Group from Torino, it has always seemed logical to wring the greatest possible benefit from technology. Now the family business, which owns brands such as Kappa, K-Way, Superga, and Sebago, is considering opening the marketplace previously reserved for licensees, where producers and distributors interact on a global scale, for other brands. Text: Kay Alexander Plonka. Photos: Basic Studios

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e has created an ideal ecosystem for cult brands: Marco Boglione, who had the courage to take over the insolvent company he had worked for in 1994. He got BasicNet going again by focusing on football merchandise. The next step was truly unique. The international expansion of the Kappa brand took place in the digital sphere right from the offset. Boglione created a modular network of more than 300 companies, all connected via a data exchange platform. He used the same system when BasicNet acquired the French brand K-Way in 2004. Three years later, Superga came into the fold. In 2017, BasicNet bought the license for Sebago from US group Wolverine. FELLOWSHIP

The strength of BasicNet is based on community spirit and the idea of effective industrialisation of processes. “We have connected many smaller companies, thus multiplying the synergy effect. All important information, trademark rights, and designs come from Torino. The audited production sites then implement the needs of worldwide distributers in direct consultation. We guarantee smooth production and financing processes in exchange for a service fee of 30 percent,” Boglione explains. Between 2007 and 2017, the annual turnover of BasicNet Group, which collaborates with more than 120 distribution partners on all five continents, rose from 275 to 541 million Euros. Bernhard Aschauer’s CMH - Consulting, Management und Handel GmbH represents Superga, 140

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Marco Boglione, the founder and chairman of BasicNet, has created a B2B platform that is a highly efficient system for production and distribution on a license basis.

K-Way, and Sebago in Germany and Austria. Kappa Deutschland GmbH is managed by Cornelia and Peter Schmidt. SCALING

“Our real-time based web business system makes scaling particularly simple and allows complete online management of all phases of the production process. In order to remain up-to-date, we are constantly developing the system further and implementing the best IT technologies available,” Boglione says and adds: “Now we’re considering opening up the system to external brands. It’s a highly effective software that is mature and has been fully functional for years. Thus, the digitisation of all processes is possible without major investment.”


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WHAT’S THE STORY

A sportswear icon that is en route to becoming the “next hot thing” thanks to BasicNet’s brand resuscitation skills: Kappa benefits from the current logo mania.

Italian design icons: Superga 2750 and Fiat 500.

Successfully revived: K-Way.

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BASIC NET

THE RESURRECTION LICENSE Lorenzo Boglione, the Vice President of Sales at BasicNet Group, reveals what it takes to revive a brand successfully. BasicNet has acquired diminishing brands and breathed new life into them. What’s the secret? There’s no secret. Our company has two different approaches. One follows algorithms and the rules of the market. It’s all about straightforwardness and punctuality, like a high-speed train. The second approach is the exact opposite. It focuses on soft skills and sensitivity, the feeling for the brand and offering the right products at the right time. My father has an extraordinary instinct for it. We don’t introduce a collection and its products to the market until they are one hundred percent satisfactory. What are the criteria you look for in brands that you acquire? It requires passion, willingness to invest, and firm belief to be able to rebuild a brand. Ultimately, we only buy name rights. When we choose a brand, we are not guided by business plans, EBIT data, or turnover speculations. We study the history, heritage, and potential of the products very carefully. With the exception of Sebago, all the brands we bought were actually bankrupt. In the case of Sebago, we were convinced by the talks we held with the former owner. Once we owned the brand, we reactivated the original production facilities. License models often ruin or dilute a brand’s image. How does your strategy differ? Brands are like beautiful vintage cars. One cherishes them, cares for them, and enjoys them. One doesn’t treat a genuine brand like a rental car that is returned after use.

Lorenzo Boglione is the Vice President of Sales at BasicNet.

Loft offices, showrooms, and a rooftop garden have been set up on the roof of the historic factory buildings.

THE BASIS OF SUCCESS The history of the companies from which BasicNet has emerged dates back to 1916. It features a romantic love story and a sock factory destroyed in the Second World War. BasicNet has been true to its heritage, as is proven by the fact that much of the company’s headquarters is historic in nature. The first manufacturing facility, a former stable building dating from 1860, is now a restaurant and the preferred lunch destination for employees. The former factory halls now serve as showrooms, offices, film and photo studios, a factory outlet, a cafeteria, and a fitness studio. The premises include a bank branch, a multi-storey car park, a cleaning service, and a mini-mart. www.basic.net

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INTERNATIONAL FASHION TRADE SHOW

January 26 – 28, 2019 Showroom Concept January 25 – 29, 2019

INTERNATIONAL TRADE SHOW FOR SHOES & ACCESSORIES

AREAL BÖHLER | DÜSSELDORF GALLERY-DUESSELDORF.COM

We are international order-oriented trade shows for fashion, shoes and accessories with a mix of young and established brands based in Dusseldorf!

March 10 – 12, 2019

AREAL BÖHLER | DÜSSELDORF GALLERY-SHOES.COM


WHAT'S THE STORY

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Creative instinct? Na-kd’s design is based on dependable internal and external trend forecasts.

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NA-KD

NEED FOR SPEED

On the move at top speed, but always with deliberation - the Na-kd fashion brand proves that speed is something that can be planned meticulously. To this end, Na-kd has upgraded its management once more. Text: Martina Müllner-Seybold. Photos: Na-kd

Internally they jokingly call him the Messiah - Mike Mikkelborg complements the Na-kd management perfectly. He says “speed to consumer” is his passion.

Na-kd is run by a young and agile team that lives in the here and now. Co-founder Magnus Hjörne was there when it all began.

“S

ale statistics are per se a window to the past. A brand like ours, which offers numerous editions per season, cannot be measured by the classic backward-looking seasonal sales rates anyway,” says Magnus Hjörne, who is part of the original founding team of Swedish fashion brand Na-kd. Why should a brand like Na-kd be interested in the past anyway? Collecting data that supports the Na-kd procurers in all future decisions - now that would be quite an achievement! It therefore comes as no surprise that the Swedish brand opted for hiring the man who is capable of such wizardry. Mike Mikkelborg has worked for many major fashion brands, ranging from Gant to fast fashion specialists such as Mr Price and New Look. “To be perfectly honest, I was bored to death after 25 years in the business. I wanted to leave the fashion industry, because there was nothing new on the horizon. In terms of change, the fashion community tends to talk the talk rather than walk the walk,” the Swede analyses. “When I first met Jarno Vanhatapio, the founder of Na-kd, it became apparent immediately that we see enormous potential in each other.” No wonder, since Mikkelborg had recently set up the consulting firm Pilot Digital, which enables buyers of large brands or retailers to optimise their supply chains in more organised, intelligent, and - above all - digital processes. This is the kind of entrepreneurial spirit that Na-kd loves: radically future-oriented. Given that Na-kd always goes all in, Mikkelborg joined the brand on the 1st of July 2018, without further ado. “He’s one of the most important assets in our young history,” Hjörne argues.  OP OF THE CLASS: THE NEW ZARA WITH T AMAZON VIRTUES

The time-to-market benchmark that Na-kd wants to reach with Mikkelborg’s help is clearly defined: Zara. In terms of planning, it looks like Amazon is the most likely role model. Jeff Bezos is not known for being a margin fetishist. The proverbial golden rule is to have the right volume of a product rather than suffering write-offs due to surplus. Hjörne puts it this way: “What good is the best piece if you only have 30 of it, but could actually sell 3,000?” Brands face unpredictability of this kind on a daily basis. However, the dilemma can only be solved by those

who are close to their target group in terms of Big Data. “Marrying this kind of mega communications machine, which connects Na-kd with its target audience, to the bestin-class internal planning system is an incredible opportunity. It allows us to be more agile and quicker than anyone else in the market. Making trends accessible for consumers as fast as possible has been my passion throughout my career. But for the very first time, I am presented with the perfect conditions to unite all aspects. The top performing companies have a clear focus on ‘speed to consumer’. This means they have less discounts, less surplus, and much happier customers. And we can now marry it all with the ability to inject fresh ideas constantly, which is part of the business model. We are capable of anticipating trends as successfully as communicating them - an enormous advantage.” Na-kd’s lead is particularly evident in its anticipation skills. “We can plan demand on the basis of external data - not merely internal data, which is highly subjective. We now have an outside view, so to speak. We can analyse how the market is developing, what influencers are doing, and which trending topics and trends prevail online.” Sounds like Big Data rocket science, you say? Well, that’s exactly what it is. But the young brand is the perfect vessel to harness such innovative ways of thinking and acting. “The whole team is young and agile, everyone has the absolute will to be better, smarter, and faster. This is extraordinary,” Mikkelborg reveals. MAGIC RETAIL FORMULA

Nobody expects the retail trade to understand all the technical details of the magic machine that is Na-kd. Hjörne: “The promise we can give our retail partners is that Na-kd will use a large amount of external and internal data to have the right product on the sales floor in the right quantity at the right time. We work on perfecting our approach every day.” Mikkelborg is highly ambitious: “I dream of 30 days ‘time-to-consumer’.” style in progress

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“WE OFFER KNOWLEDGE, CONTACTS, AND BUSINESS” With an exciting programme, #Fashiontech Berlin affords the industry an opportunity to prepare for the challenges of digitisation. Michael Stracke discusses the conference’s highlights. Interview: Stephan Huber. Photo: #Fashiontech Berlin

#Fashiontech Berlin addresses the fashion industry in a phase of disruptive change. Can such an event help shape this change? Of course! That’s why #Fashiontech Berlin was initiated four and a half years ago. As the Premium Group, we have an interest in ensuring that the fashion industry remains competitive. We connect decision-makers from the fashion and tech industries. We strive to show the industry how important digitisation is. In my opinion, any company - regardless of its size - that does not address the issue now, will not be able to survive in the long term. We strive to communicate that digitisation is an opportunity - and fun. Is our industry having a particularly hard time dealing with digitisation? In my opinion, the fashion industry is lagging behind other industries by a few years. One of the reasons is the fact that many companies from the fashion sector are medium-sized enterprises, which often find it difficult to cope with change. Of course, there are also some exciting businesses that have shown how it’s done. The extent of change at Otto Group in recent years is second to none. About You, which perceives itself as a tech company, is an incredibly exciting best case. That’s why we invite C-level representatives from these companies to the main stage: to show what’s possible. In which areas of a company must adaptation processes take place in order to keep pace in the age of digitisation? With increasing digitisation, the requirements profile for employees changes too. This is why we address the Future of Work as a topic in January 2019. Digitisation creates new job profiles that control digitisation centrally within the business - along the entire value chain. In addition, every company in the fashion industry needs to consider how it can attract employees in the field of digitisation. The demand for competent employees in the technology sector is on the rise. Currently, developers often prefer to launch their own start-ups or are lured by the big payslips offered by the tech giants. But what’s pleasing is that everyone loves and needs fashion. This is exactly why the industry is so exciting for start-ups. #Fashiontech Berlin is a fairly young format. How satisfied are you with the development? We are extremely satisfied with the development. This is proven - above all - by the fact that we receive requests from all over the world. It seems that word has got around that we offer an opportunity to exchange ideas with the relevant decision-makers in the fashion and tech industries. Our speaker panel is 146

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Michael Stracke is responsible for the content of #Fashiontech Berlin. He is proud of the internationality of the event, which provides high-quality input on fashion and tech in lectures, masterclasses, and an exhibition area.

unparalleled in Europe. The fact that we are able to attract fashion icons from the US to #Fashiontech Berlin shows how relevant we are on an international level. Even Jerome Lambert, the CEO of Richemont, has informed us that he will personally ensure that all Richemont Fashion & Accessories Maisons are present. Sadly, he cannot attend due to time constraints. But that makes us proud, of course. The Exhibition Area has tripled compared to July. The number of masterclasses has also been increased and now offers a particularly broad spectrum of discussion topics. Berlin is the number two on the European start-up heatmap, beaten only by London. Have politicians already grasped how important it is to be a leading technology and AI location? Politicians must consider whether the current regulations for companies are still up-to-date. On the positive side, politicians have definitely understood how important it is to address the issue of digitisation. Dorothee Bär and Angela Merkel invited the Fashion Council Germany to the Federal Ministry for a good reason. Ultimately, it has to be said that Berlin is Germany’s digital capital, mainly due to the innovative strength of start-ups, and is on par with European metropolises such as London and Paris. Politicians must create appropriate conditions to ensure this remains the case. Programming should be added to the curriculum of schools. The so-called Generation X, for example, has mostly taught itself how to code. Just imagine what a huge step forward would be possible if one teaches coding to children. The upcoming event presents a number of changes. What can visitors expect? All Premium Group visitors still have free access to the Exhibition Area and the masterclasses. What’s new is that there is a 240 Euros admission fee for the keynotes by the international C-level speakers. In this context, I’d like to point out that we are still 2/3 cheaper than our competitors, even on an international level. We have also created more space for networking. At the end of the day, the benefit of conferences is that they not only offer new insights, but also new contacts, inspiration, and business. Why visit #Fashiontech Berlin? We are international and offer a great programme. One can say that a C-level executive can learn more about digital transformation and the challenges of the future in one day at #Fashiontech Berlin than would be possible in everyday working life over an entire year.


WHAT'S THE STORY

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“AI WILL CHANGE EVERYTHING” Vahe Taamazyan is an expert in the fields of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. In 2015, he launched Sizolution with two business partners. The AI start-up offers innovative Omnichannel solutions for the exact determination of size and fit, as well as personalised customer contact. In Russia and the CIS states, Sizolution successfully co-operates with partners such as KupiVip, Decathlon, and Bask. 2019 marks the start of partnerships with renowned retailers in Germany and the EU. The new headquarters of the start-up will be in Berlin. Interview: Martina Müllner-Seybold. Photos: Sizolution

Artificial intelligence and machine learning will be the most disruptive innovation we will ever experience. To what extent do you think it will change our approach to fashion? On the one hand, AI and machine learning are just the logical next step in a long process of automation that started centuries ago. On the other hand, it is indeed very disrupting and is going to affect all industries. It standardises the whole automation process. One merely needs to collect enough relevant data, deduce the right machine learning algorithm, and train it. AI is based on data, not pre-programmed algorithms. That’s the game-changing difference. And this difference now makes it possible to automate things that are too complicated for humans, such as making decisions based on vast amounts of data. As a technology, AI is merely an enabler for better automation and new opportunities, for business models that were considered impossible before. That’s why it will reshape the fashion industry, as well as every other industry. Ultimately, AI will change everything. What will improve for the consumer? There are so many benefits; it’s hard to pick just one. It’s similar to thinking about what kind of benefits computers would bring 40 years ago. AI will improve products and allow more personalised service. In short, one can say that that consumers will feel much more satisfied, because their needs will be more optimally met. Sizolution, for example, solves the most painful problem of fashion e-commerce: size and fit, as well as returns caused by inaccurate sizes and fits. Such problems can only be solved by vast amounts of data and very well-trained AI algorithms. Moreover, AI assists consumers in using the tool, as it is capable of predicting human body measurements based on height, weight, and a body photo. The benefit for consumers is clear: increased order confidence and less hassle with returns. 148

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Sizolution founder Vahe Taamazyan considers artificial intelligence and machine learning to be the logical consequence of centuries of automation - and he believes the development is groundbreaking.

WHAT’S THE STORY

Can you pinpoint a benefit for brands? I’m aware this is an equally vast field… The most important thing for every business is to make the right decision at the right time. And for that, you need to have the right data and be able to process it correctly. It’s very hard to do this well, especially for a large company and on all levels. This is where AI can help. With AI, it is possible to make better decisions at all levels, ranging from optimal garment shape and size tables to the individualisation of the offer for different regions - possibly even for different individuals. If you know your customers better, you can optimise the whole supply chain. You know who the customers are, what they like, and how this may change over time. All this leads to more revenue and fewer expenses. How does AI improve the customer journey? One of the strongest trends of recent years is customer experience personalisation. This is something that is beneficial for customers, retailers, and brands alike. Customers will spend much less time searching for what they want and what would fit them well. Therefore, the customer experience will be much more enjoyable. They’ll be satisfied with the products they purchase. Each of us is unique, has a unique body shape, and a unique taste. Knowing our tastes and treating us as unique individuals wasn’t possible without AI. Now it is. One of the services Sizolution offers, for example, is that products that fit the customer best are always displayed first. Which human factor in fashion can AI not replace? Some would argue creativity, but then Amazon is already an AI-based fashion designer… Much in fashion is about emotions, context, and the story behind the product. This is something that is still difficult to replace. It doesn’t mean that AI won’t be able to replace it one day, it just means that there’s still a niche for products designed by humans - at least for some time. AI can help validate the design. It leads to accurate sizing tables and a realistic rendering of products on model photos. However, let’s wait for another 100 years and see whether there’ll be anything left for humans to do. How can AI help solve the industry’s downsides such as overproduction, surplus stock, and incorrect buying decisions in wholesale and retail? All the problems you mentioned are related to making sub-optimal decisions despite the presence of vast amounts of data. For example, numerous start-ups that help retailers manage their warehouses more efficiently already exist. Or let’s look at one of the largest e-retailers of fashion, incidentally one of the pioneers in fashion personalisation. Stitch Fix has developed a set of algorithms that analyse available products and predict what items are missing - a blue cardigan in a certain size, for instance. This significantly improves the buying process.

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TEXTILEREI MANNHEIM

START-UPS GENERATE FREQUENCY Desolate neighbourhoods, an exodus of industry, retailers, and customers - many cities face very similar challenges. Mannheim has decided to do better. Incubators promote start-ups and invest in urban development. Text: Ina Köhler. Photos: Textilerei

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annheim takes action. A company called Mannheimer Gründungszentren GmbH, a subsidiary of the municipality, has started establishing target group specific business start-up centres. They don’t merely focus on the fashion and textile industries, but also on music, tech, medical technology, and other subsectors of the cultural and creative industries. A total of 28,000 square metres have been made available. Today, this centre alone supports approx. 300 young businesses. Nico Hoffmeister, the Community Manager of Textilerei, joined Startup Mannheim in 2015. Back then, the founding and competence centre for the fashion and textile industries opened in a listed building in the heart of the city. Eleven companies on 400 square metres - that sounds a little cramped at first glance. The focus is, however, on bundling know-how and developing infrastructure. Hoffmeister and two consultants cover the fashion segment. The consultants were made available by the gig7 competence centre for women in business. “More often than not, founders don’t know where and how to start. We can support their self-marketing measures by offering knowhow, workshops, and seminars, as well as conveying trade contacts. They can sell their products at Textilerei and we help them, for example, with trade fair appearances, as well as in terms of marketing and sales.” Hoffmeister benefits from his many years of professional experience in the fashion industry at Falke and, most recently, at Sixty Group. Textilerei offers workshops and machinery for the manufacturing of products in small batches. Another vital factor is the development of networks with local companies and retailers such as Quartier Q6Q7, Engelhorn, Trendfabrik, and Luxury Loft. The support of Textilerei is, however, limited in time. Leases run for two years and cannot be extended beyond five years. This ensures a healthy rotation of start-ups. After all, every business model should be scalable to guarantee that the founders can eventually stand on their own two feet.

Start-ups rejuvenate retail areas. In addition to pop-up concepts such as those in Mannheim’s Q6Q7, Textilerei also operates its own concept store.

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Nico Hoffmeister’s extensive industry experience enriches Textilerei’s start-ups with real expertise.

“WE HAVE ESTABLISHED OURSELVES AS A CONTACT POINT” Nico Hoffmeister, the Community Manager of Textilerei, sat down to chat with us. Textilerei is an initiative of Mannheim’s creative industries centre C-HUB. Photo: Thommy Mardo

How does Mannheim differ from other cities in terms of urban development? Mannheim decided to create thematic contact points for founders and to promote specific areas at a very early stage. In addition, the decision paths are short. There are central contact points for founders. We have very close ties to the city administration. Mannheim takes economic and structural support very seriously. Our mission to create a healthy and vibrant start-up ecosystem in Mannheim comes with the responsibility of stimulating urban development. How has the launch of Textilerei changed Mannheim? The project has been very successful and has become more professional over time. Our initial focus is to provide an impetus for individual companies and to create a network for them. We did a great job in some cases; we maintain a large network that reaches far beyond Mannheim. In addition, our incubators - above all the resident companies and individuals - contribute to urban development. We perceive ourselves as a kind of engine in this respect. The Jungbusch district, which is where the creative industries hub C-HUB is located, used to be considered a “problem area” with a high crime rate. This has changed very much for the better. It is now a trendy district known for its nightlife. We utilise the infrastruc-

ture of the various hubs, as well as the cultural and creative players, to create events, occupy social spaces, and organise pop-up galleries and installations at places one wouldn’t expect them. It’s all about changing perceptions. How do you cooperate with the “real” economy? We have managed to establish ourselves as a contact point for both sides: the real estate industry has realised that the “creativity” concept works. In Q6Q7, we were afforded an opportunity to use 500 square metres for a pop-up project titled Hometown Glory. It offered a lifestyle mix consisting of fashion, jewellery, beauty, art, and cuisine. It was so successful that we replicated the project in autumn 2018. Today, I get calls from centre managers who tell me about temporary vacancies and offer those spaces to our labels at reduced rental fees or even free of charge. This benefits both sides. In some cases, it results in long-term partnerships. The Liebesglück label, for example, has been in its initial pop-up store for two years now. What does the future hold? We intend to further strengthen our role as a competence platform and interface for retailers. We are keen to increase awareness for young, creative impulses in the retail industry and to position our labels as supra-regional businesses. We also strive to accelerate the integration of the cultural and creative industries, as well as our own infrastructure, within the city. This should make Mannheim even more attractive for young and ambitious start-ups from all over the world. www.startup-mannheim.de, www.textilerei.de

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MADE IN MANNHEIM

Backed by the city and coached by a team with fashion industry experience: textile start-ups that have emerged from Mannheim’s Textilerei.

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TRAUTH FABRIKATE

What does Vienna’s “Neni am Naschmarkt” have in common with Berlin’s “Coda Dessert Bar”? Both teams wear aprons from Mannheim. Gabriel Franz-Trauth, the son of a Palatinate winemaker, developed basic aprons for cooks and baristas inspired by his father’s working aprons. All materials are rock solid: Scottish fabrics, vegetable-tanned cowhide, and metal eyelets. It didn’t take long for famous chefs and restaurateurs to take notice of the chic aprons that can be customised. Trauth thus occupies a niche for which he received the “Gastro-Vision-Award” in 2017 and an award from “Kultur- und Kreativpiloten”. www.trauth-fabrikate.com

KALAIKA

Nets replace jute. Tina Cetrez’s label Kalaika has developed fashionable shopping bags made of nets in many colours and materials. The bags are crocheted by small family businesses. Her accessories range also includes bamboo bags, gold pendants, necklaces, bracelets, and key chains. She has attended the Fashion Week in Berlin four times. The label’s own online store completes the business model. www.kalaika.berlin

MIZAAN

KATRIN LEIBER. The idea of the inventor: shoes and bags with interchangeable heels and fronts. All shoes are manufactured in Italy. The heels are individually produced utilising 3D printers. www.katrin-leiber.com

Meriem Lebdiri launched her label in 2012. Mizaan is a collection for women who want to dress fashionably in a subtle and muted manner, regardless of skin colour, origin, or religious affiliation. “Modest Fashion” was a topic long before top model Halima Aden posed for the cover of Vogue. Fashion shows dedicated to this booming sector led newcomer Lebdiri to Frankfurt, Munich, London, and Washington. Nico Hoffmeister secured an area in Mannheim’s Q6Q7 for the launch of the label’s collection and online shop. Furthermore, Mizaan received an award titled “Kultur- und Kreativpiloten Deutschland 2018”, an initiative of the German government for young founders. www.mizaan.de

PIAF & PONTI. Made in Germany: this children’s collection is manufactured in one of Textilerei’s workshops. The first concept store opened in Mannheim’s city centre with additional products for kids. www.piafponti.com

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g a MADE IN ITALY a

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PREMIUM BERLIN 15 - 17 JANUARY HALL 4 | B 12

www.barboneitaly.com

www.barboneitaly.com


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SEARCHED ON THE NET, FOUND IN THE STORE

Over the last two years, mobile Google searches with the “close by” filter have tripled. These three business models, which aim to show you online where you should go offline, prove that online forums, search engines, and apps harbour enormous potential for stationary retailers. Is the Internet the retail trade’s new best friend?

insurance. It also provides the host with an individual webpage. At the end of the day, everyone benefits. AirBnB, London/UK, www.airbnb.de/help/contact_us, www.airbnb.de

THE LINK TO THE STORE

“With us, you’re exactly where your target group is looking for you!” - Findeling is the online service for the offline shopping experience.

“WE SHOW ONLINE WHAT THE CITY OFFERS OFFLINE”

Findeling. How can a stationary retailer be found by those who aren’t local yokels? How can the store be found by tourists seeking independent stores, recommendations, and insider tips? The app-based answer to these questions was launched in 2015: Findeling. Founded in Hamburg by Florian Schneider and Katharina Walter, the app is now also available for Berlin, Munich, Düsseldorf, Cologne, Stuttgart, and Frankfurt. Stores can sign up for the Findeling service for 8 Euros per month. The app not only integrates shops into virtual shopping tours, but also offers tools such as search engine marketing and allows the posting of current sales campaigns and news. “Every store should be able to participate. Parallelly, we finance ourselves via the B2B platform Fairling, which regularly proposes new international and local brands to our partner stores,” explains Katharina Walter. The app operates interactively. It boasts an integrated brand search engine and shopping tours sorted by topic with information on current events and promotions. In addition, the Findeling team has launched the so-called Shop Local Day. “There is a day for everything in Germany, but not for shopping locally. That’s absurd.” Findeling, Hamburg/Germany, hallo@findeling.de, www.findeling.de

AIRBNB IN THE STORE

AirBnB. As an AirBnB host, you can offer discoveries as well as accommodation. The website defines it as follows: “activities by and with locals that go beyond traditional tours”. This can be a postcard scavenger hunt in Oakland, Vinyasa Yoga in an antique chapel, or shopping tours with real insider tips, walkways, and stores that cannot be found in any travel guide. “Discover Munich’s most beautiful stores with a fashion stylist,” offers Heide Wetterauer, the founder of the shopping tour portal Stylefinds. In her capacity as a personal and online stylist, she regularly organises various tours through Munich. Everybody can become a host in their city and negotiate special discounts or services with the stores they’d like to collaborate with. AirBnB handles payment, customer service, and liability

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Feed Dynamix. Google’s relationship with the stationary retail industry is mediocre at best. However, technology is doing its best to mend fences. Local Inventory Ads no longer list online stores as the top options for users searching for a particular product, but suggest nearby stationary retailers that have the product in stock. To this end, the programme links up with the merchandise management system of the participating stores. It doesn’t do so automatically, only after the store owner has set up accounts with Google’s Merchant Center, MyBusiness, and AdWords. Furthermore, the product range needs to be uploaded. By entering the individual articles’ master data, the store allows Local Inventory Ads to access its product range and stock levels. At the same time, the programme independently determines which products it can promote. Feed Dynamix, headquartered in Frankfurt am Main, helps store owners to prepare, optimise, and use the marketing tool. The company also handles data processing. Feed Dynamix, Frankfurt am Main/Germany, info@feed-dynamix.de, www.feed-dynamix.de

Searched on Google, found in the store: the search engine’s Local Inventory Ads provide the address of nearby stores.

Via AirBnB, stylists and locals offer guided shopping tours through their hometowns - a very personal “best of” local stores.


www.goldgarndenim.de // IG: Goldgarndenim

MIT LIEBE ZUM DETAIL!


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LIVESTREAM TO THE CUSTOMER Modern retailers have access to a data volume that allows them to evaluate customer behaviour via Big Data. Communication strategies and online tools prove that this could mean unheard-of possibilities for the retail industry. The best example is the influencer marketing phenomenon. What can the offline world learn from its online counterpart? Anna Höweler, the CEO of Cover Communications, provides answers. Interview: Isabel Faiss. Photo: Cover Communications

It’s almost impossible to separate online and offline these days. Many online tools can be extremely efficient when applied to the stationary retail industry too. Your area of expertise, namely strategic influencer marketing, is the best example. What’s the added value for retailers? First and foremost a direct, personal, and timely discourse with customers. Those who involve their customers in decision-making processes consistently and actively will ultimately not only benefit from their proximity to the relevant target group, but also from the enormously valuable information provided by online tools. That’s why stationary retailers are so keen on influencer marketing, because the benefits are so obvious. How does it work exactly? Live Stories on Instagram are probably the best example. An influencer uses his smartphone to film how he walks across a sales floor. The Instagram voting tool allows us to ask the influencer’s target group - which ideally matches your own or targets new customers directly: “Hey, how do you like this new brand? What do you think about this colour theme? How do you like this collection?” We can then analyse the success and effect of such a marketing measure in detail. By mapping out various mechanisms, we can extract an enormous amount of information about the customer. At the same time, the customer doesn’t feel like he or she is being evaluated. One bypasses topics such as data protection and questionnaires, thus not only giving your target group a voice, but also creating the drive-to-store effect that leads directly to the shop via the online tool. Naturally, one cannot immediately affect the product range that the buying department defined months before, but one has a seismograph that is very close to the customer. Influencer marketing primarily curates an offer, which is actually the core competence of the retail trade. Can that be combined somehow? 156

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Anne Höweler is the founder and CEO of Cover Communications. She and her agency’s team primarily advise companies from the fashion and lifestyle industries on topics related to strategic influencer marketing and develop targeted 360-degree marketing measures.

It combines quite well. Every city has “local heroes” and influencers that can be temporarily incorporated as style icons. They can, for example, select individual looks from a range and present them in a shop window showcase or in a specific area of the store. If you think this idea through to the end, you can develop a great story and then even turn it into a campaign. It can be shared via relevant social media channels and doesn’t require a huge budget. With the right face, which has a certain relevance and reach both in the city and online, you can achieve a great deal. But it’s a new approach that also harbours risk. I believe the risk is worth it, especially as it coaxes the new, younger target group, which is always in touch with the latest trends, into your store.


www.silk-sisters.c om


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DO BETTER

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RE NEWAL When, if not now? Questioning and repositioning a business is always a visionary decision - and the timing couldn’t be better. Both our society and markets are in the midst of a breath-taking transformation process. Those willing to adjust the right setscrews now are ready for the future.

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CPO Susanne Schwenger and CEO Dieter Holzer reflect on the roots of Marc O’Polo in order to move the brand forward.

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MARC O’POLO

“WE WANT TO REKINDLE THE FLAME”

Following major changes, Marc O’Polo is ready for the future. The ambitious goal is to regain the leading position in the premium casual market in terms of product, marketing, and technology. CEO Dieter Holzer and CPO Susanne Schwenger explain the strategy in an interview with style in progress editor-in-chief Stephan Huber. Text: Nicoletta Schaper. Photos: Marc O’Polo

Let’s start with a look back at 2017, when Marc O’Polo celebrated its 50th anniversary and introduced far-reaching structural changes. Were the changes a way to prepare for the next 50 years? Dieter Holzer: That was the idea, yes. It requires constant change if you want something to stay the way it is, to paraphrase Marc O’Polo owner Werner Böck. The market has changed rapidly, as has the competitive environment. Marc O’Polo has moved into a different environment, consciously or unconsciously. What were the most important decisions in this first phase? Dieter Holzer: The most important thing was to remember and focus on what the brand stands for in terms of product and quality. At the same time, we need to address new issues and push ahead with current topics such as digitisation. The challenge is to move forward in deliberate steps, without addressing everything at once. Our first focal points were product and marketing. Our product excellence has been dominant for many years, especially in terms of women’s premium casualwear. But it’s not enough to defend that position. We must extend the lead. We are very glad that we were able to win the vastly experienced Susanne Schwenger back. Is it a homecoming? Susanne Schwenger: Yes! And it’s a really interesting challenge. I have lived with and for this brand almost 20 years now. The last two and a half years away from Marc O’Polo have been a great experience and it has been highly interesting to follow the brand from a distance. Now I am happy to return. My heart lies in the premium segment and I feel like I have unfinished business here. I am eager to inject more value and modernity into the product. Product first! But there is no product without the brand. At Marc O’Polo, this goes hand in hand. Had this unity been lost? Susanne Schwenger: I would have done some of the steps that have been taken recently differently. The first measures have got us back on track and are already showing initial signs of success. Dieter Holzer: We asked ourselves where our opportunities in the market lie. We strive to inspire existing and new customers alike! The fact that we have already achieved this shows how strong and sought-after the brand is. If we meet the sympathies in the market with the right product, the result is exhilarating! The men’s collection style in progress

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still has enormous potential. Since May, we sensationally jumped up between 10 and 25 percent in terms of sales floor performance. Since late September 2018, the women’s collection has grown significantly too. We want to lead the market again with our claim as a premium casual brand. Does this decision ultimately lie with the consumer? Dieter Holzer: We are keen to make the personal approach and appreciation of customers, which Marc O’Polo has always embodied, tangible again. Despite moving forward in many areas, we have reflected on our approach and shifted the focus back to the customer. Especially as consumers no longer allow any conventions and trends to be forced upon them. Susanne Schwenger: Our advantage is how appreciated we are in the market. We have fans who love the brand and have established a bond with it. This flame must be rekindled. One of our first initiatives with this in mind was the launch of the Black capsule as a counter-model to the Black Friday discount campaigns. Our capsule offers modernity and an excellent price-performance ratio. The launch was backed up with personal letters to our top customers and a digital campaign. The Black capsule went through the roof! We were almost sold out online on the very first day. For me, this proves two things. Limitation is important. On the other hand, seasons are increasingly irrelevant for customers. Dieter Holzer: That’s right! It also shows that we need to be braver in terms of “trial and error”. Not every innovation can be successful immediately. But the courage to innovate paves the way into the future. How is this courage put into practice? Susanne Schwenger: By living the brand’s values 100 percent again, because our motto “Back to the Future” means that we are moving forward and reflecting on our roots simultaneously. The key values of naturalness, simplicity, personality, quality, and innovation remain our most important guideline, which we now pursue with even more passion and consistency. We also want to highlight the Scandinavian spirit of the brand given that it was founded in Stockholm. It lends Marc O’Polo freshness and modernity. We don’t have to invent an exciting story, but we need to tell it more - in the collection, in the stores, in the communication measures. In addition, we rest our brand architecture on three pillars. Marc O’Polo Denim embodies our young contemporary casualwear with a high fashion level and denim competence. The Marc O’Polo Casual collection remains the most important pillar in the company with the highest level of competence in terms of quality and innovation. Last but not least, Marc O’Polo Pure reflects our core competence in jersey and knitwear. Our range is of the highest standard, manufactured exclusively in Europe. Dieter Holzer: We have also decided to switch all jersey and knitwear pieces from our core product range to organic cotton. This was an enormous challenge in terms of sourcing and also causes considerable costs. We will not pass on these costs to the consumer. We perceive this as an investment in the added value of the product and in the standing of the brand. Susanne Schwenger: In addition to the main line’s vertical capsules, we are also starting with a vertical collection ratio of 20 percent at Marc O’Polo Pure. We intend to continuously increase this ratio. We have shortened the lead time to four months. Where will the focus lie in the future: co-operation with retail partners or increased verticalization? Dieter Holzer: We remain a strong partner for specialised retailers, as they are our most important sales channel. Given that we are in the middle of the omnichannel era, we are equally keen to connect our retail stores, franchise stores, and online shop with each other. The complexity of the task is a huge challenge. It means that we dissolve respective data silos in order to offer the customer an optimal service and perfect shopping experience, seamlessly across all channels. Omnichannel is the buzzword of the hour. Can you expand on its implementation? 162

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Dieter Holzer: Our aim is to transfer the strengths of the individual sales channels to the other channels as well. An example would be to transfer the non-binding nature of an online purchase to the stationary retail segment. Soon we will open our very first cashless store in Munich. Customers no longer need to make a final decision in the store, don’t need to visit the fitting rooms, and don’t have to pay. With the invoice, they receive a return slip for the event that they decide against keeping all the items. The final decision can be made in the comfort of their respective homes. By transferring online mechanisms to stationary points of sale, we simplify the product process across all channels and make it more transparent. As a result, the stationary retail trade can benefit from the knowledge acquired through online purchases and is all the more secure in its choice of goods to present to the customer. This is the modern version of the follow-up sale and enables an even more personal customer approach. The store also falls under “trial and error”. We’ll have to wait and see how the customers react, as we are breaking new ground. But that is a key requirement in all businesses. We will undoubtedly learn a lot for the future from this pilot project. Does this path end in a tech company? Dieter Holzer: I perceive it as a huge opportunity! Amazon has become the world’s largest retailer without even running a single retail store. Airbnb is the largest tourism company, despite not owning any hotels. Uber is the largest taxi company without taxis. That was two years ago. Today, Amazon is starting to run its own stores, Uber is investing in autonomous vehicles, and Airbnb is designing its first hotels. Because all these companies lack the human touch… Dieter Holzer: While this personal connection is one of Marc O’Polo’s strongest assets. As I said, it’s about bringing together the best of all these worlds. Back to brand architecture… For a brand that has historically grown so strongly with its young target group, Marc O’Polo Denim is a very important topic for the future. How can one create a contact point for young consumers in this context? Susanne Schwenger: By targeting retailers with a younger product range. Marc O’Polo Denim is not a hipster collection, but it has a certain coolness, with styles and fits that also appeal to younger consumers. A lot of inspiration comes from Scandinavia. The collection always remains Marc O’Polo, we don’t want to bend. Anyway, we can build on the great advantage that our name has a very positive connotation in the market. Dieter Holzer: With Marc O’Polo Denim we are deliberately addressing younger consumers in order to introduce them to the brand. We give space to the collection accordingly and also invest in design in order to further develop the style on an international level. Will there be own Marc O’Polo Denim stores? Dieter Holzer: Yes. The first store will open soon in Munich Riem, not far from our headquarters in Stephanskirchen. This allows us to try out many things. Marc O’Polo Denim will also be promoted via its own social media campaign. Nevertheless, the separation of the lines should not be dogmatic. A sweater, a key product of Marc O’Polo, is also available in the main line. It can be found at P&C in the premium department or as Marc O’Polo Denim sweater in the young section alongside other denim brands. What exactly is on the agenda for 2019? What are the expectations for the year? Dieter Holzer: 2019 will be the year in which our focus on product excellence begins to bear fruit. It’s going to be very exciting! Our efforts over the past 15 months have also created scope for continuous further development. The Futurestore is just one of these topics, the transfer of technology into the company another, without losing view of the product. We want to stay curious and try things out, but not do everything at once. That’s a lesson from the past. We prefer to take small steps so that we do not lose sight of our goal of leading the market as a premium casual brand.


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Marc O’Polo strives to create desire in its collections with a clear identity and a commitment to brand values.

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CHEVIGNON

THE COMEBACK OF A CULT The fact that Thierry Henry, a style icon and the manager of AS Monaco, and Jamie Hewlett, a member of the Gorillaz, wear Chevignon jackets is a statement in itself. Anyone who witnessed the era of the great brand cult in the 1980s knew that its comeback was only a matter of time. This year, Chevignon is celebrating its 40th anniversary and is looking to the future progressively. With a highly motivated team under the direction of Hélène Viot Poirier. Text: Isabel Faiss. Photos: Chevignon

Ever since Hélène Viot Poirier took the reins at Chevignon, the brand has been performing well.

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wo and a half years ago, Uwe Deinert’s Cuore Tricolore became Chevignon’s sales representative for the German market. He believes the collection is on the right track, an opinion which is underpinned by numbers. “New materials make it possible to re-interpret the iconic jacket models from the archive. At the same time, the collection is focused on its core competence: Upper Body.” To mark its birthday, Chevignon is not only celebrating treasures from its richly filled archive, but also its own success story that is now really gaining momentum. CEO Hélène Viot Poirier has a clear vision. Hélène, Chevignon is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year - a sign of consistency, one might say. However, that’s not the reality experienced by the company over the last few years. The frequent ownership and management changes have hampered the brand quite significantly. Where do you stand now? Since the last change of management 18 months ago, the brand has performed encouragingly by recovering with growth and reducing costs at the same time. In addition, we have already managed to convince the 18 to 35-year-olds to return to our stores. This target group now represents 40 percent of our customers in stationary stores and 50 percent online. We have renewed our collections, decreased the number of references, and drawn inspiration from our archives. We even relaunched the women’s collection with a small capsule collection consisting of leather and down jackets, complemented by t-shirts and sweatshirts for autumn/winter 2019. According to our retail partners, Chevignon is back among the top three in terms of sales increase. Thanks to this strong recovery, the brand has created excitement and attracted new premium collaboration partners such as Antonia of Milano, 032c Lifestyle Magazine, and The Good Life Magazine. Others will follow to mark our 40th anniversary. When creating an anniversary collection, it can be tempting to look back. Will it be a tribute to the iconic Chevignon jacket models of the 1980s and 1990s? 164

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Fond memories: Chevignon has earned the right to be called a cult brand.

The autumn/winter 2019 collection - the anniversary collection - will be filled with stories and memories of mythical inspiration sources such as cowboys, soldiers, and adventurers in pieces that made the brand famous: down jackets, fly jackets, and teddies. Our know-how will be highlighted in a transparent jacket, as well as in a combination of a gummed leather jacket and a down jacket. We will also communicate the origins of Chevignon: a French brand created in Paris and born in the streets. What are your goals for the start into the next 40 years? In the coming years, our growth will rely on wholesale, as well as digital and international development. Upstream work has started already by designing specific products with a strong DNA and reinforcing our network of partners. The 40th anniversary is an excellent opportunity to communicate, work with a growing number of influencers on social media, redefine the brand, and the image territories. Chevignon is working on several significant collaborations for winter 2019.


mehr Raum für ....

Showroom Cuore Tricolore Karlstraße 16 40210 Düsseldorf showroom@cuore-tricolore.com www.cuore-tricolore.com


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IL BISONTE

UP-TO-DATE TRADITION Since the takeover of Il Bisonte by Palamon Capital Partners, the Tuscan brand’s leather bags and accessories have developed into modern lifestyle pieces under the careful management of CEO Sofia Ciucchi. In an interview with style in progress, she reveals how the traditional brand is being promoted internationally while still preserving its ‘Made in Italy’ tradition, as well as how it is made attractive for new target groups. Text: Kay Alexander Plonka. Photos: Il Bisonte

What is the status in terms of brand rejuvenation and awareness on an international level? We’ve been working hard to “rekindle” the brand. In addition to our fundamental values, we are keen to present our “artisans with hippie hearts” identity in all areas - in our new showroom in the historic Palazzo Corsini in Florence and our new flagship store in Milan, for example. Our latest digital photo project (#1box10shots) has also been received very well. We have opted for remaining a niche brand with a marked personality. Nevertheless, we are becoming increasingly global by expanding distribution and investing in improving the quality of our sales process. In 2018, we completely renewed the corporate section of our website and invested in online sales. In 2019, we intend to launch a new e-commerce platform and to further strengthen our in-house digital team. Our sales growth over the last two years is already impressive: from 21.1 million Euros in 2016, to 27.2 million Euros in 2017. The sales forecast for 2018 is approx. 35 million Euros. How has the design of the collection changed over the last two years? Il Bisonte has always been a casual chic brand with unconventional design and solid traditions. Our leather handbags and accessories are an emblem of accessible and timeless luxury. Even our iconic products are still up-to-date. The seasonal collections are created by a young in-house design team and implemented in a traditional man-

Sofia Ciucchi, the CEO of Il Bisonte, has managed to preserve traditions while increasing sales at the same time.

ner by our long-standing production staff. In 2019, we intend to shift our focus to the further development of our products for men. What were the biggest challenges in the renewal process? Definitely driving innovation forward without straying too far from tradition while remaining competitive in international comparison… It was equally challenging to maintain our extremely short supply chain consisting of more than 40 companies within a radius of 30 kilometres around our production, warehouse, and logistics facilities in eastern Florence - despite generating growth. Apropos international expansion: What is the status quo since the takeover by Palamon Capital Partners? In Europe, we opened two new mono-brand stores in Milan and Paris. We also re-designed all direct sales areas. In addition, we have established two new sales areas in Hong Kong - the first we manage ourselves in Asia. This is the start of further activities in the Chinese market. In Japan, we have been represented by our distribution partner for more than 30 years. The more than 40 mono-brand stores in that country account for 50 percent of our sales. Growth rates in Korea are also above average. We intend to open our own store in New York in February. And last autumn we re-established a corner at Bergdorf Goodman. Towards the end of the year, an Il Bisonte store in Los Angeles will open its doors to the public. However, we are primarily interested in co-operating with established department and multi-brand stores. What about the positioning of Il Bisonte in the German-speaking market? Sales in this area have grown considerably in the last two years, now representing almost 14 percent of our wholesale turnover. In Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, we are exclusively represented at multi-brand retailers. This year, we intend to further increase our sales in the most important cities by means of branded sales areas or pop-up stores. We firmly believe that our high-quality products are particularly suited for the German-speaking market.

Timeless and beautiful: Il Bisonte’s bags impress with their perfect workmanship and outstanding leather quality.

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LAMBERTO LOSANI

THE SLEEPING BEAUTY IS AWAKE Lamberto Losani was beloved and respected, but never unleashed its full potential. The epitome of Italian knitting art applied the kiss of life to itself. Many strategic reforms have set the course for the future. Barbara Signori, the Sales Manager of Lamberto Losani, explains the comprehensive re-launch of the brand. Text: Martina Müllner-Seybold. Photos: Lamberto Losani

Lamberto Losani is a typical product specialist. What are the plans for the future of the brand? Lamberto Losani has always embodied the essence of Italian cashmere - essential style to the core. It has combined craftsmanship, experience, creativity, and innovation for 75 years; it’s the perfect balance of elements. Delivering a great, authentic product is the focus of our growth strategy. Saverio Palatella, our new Creative Director, is one of the true knitwear titans and has helped build brands such as Gentry Portofino, Malo, and Loro Piana. Our men’s and women’s collections are now contemporary in the best sense of the word. We play with the contrast created by very reduced design and the incredible creative abundance that the archives of this company yield. Many things are new… Yes. We have opened a new showroom in “Via della Spiga 2”, located in the heart of Milan. We have also hired a new in-house sales team and established a worldwide network of first-class agents and distributors. These are all people for whom the most important aspect is to be part of the Lamberto Losani family. Because that’s what we are, a family business through and through. We have invested heavily in our headquarters in Magione on Lake Trasimeno - and continue to do so. We strive to produce everything in-house. Among the only things we still procure externally are special yarns required for product highlights. Our supplier is Lanifico Cariaggi, one of the best spinning mills. What can retailers expect from Lamberto Losani? They can expect very high quality standards, paired with a contemporary and urban style. Every time I show the collection to someone, I receive the same feedback. Everyone says that it’s exactly what the market lacks.

Contemporary knitwear for women and - for one year now - also for men. Lamberto Losani is keen to evolve from a beloved product specialist into a respected knitwear brand.

Beauty isn’t everything. With which hard facts can you impress? We offer comprehensive customer service that starts with the B2B order and a possibility to re-order bestsellers. Each customer can also re-order individually, because we can manufacture anything that isn’t in stock in just three weeks - without minimum volumes and in all 60 shades on our colour palette. Our customer service department really deserves the reputation it has earned. We have someone who speaks the local language for each of our export regions. Our customers from the German-speaking countries can converse with their contact person in their native tongue, which is an important prerequisite for us to establish a trusting business relationship. style in progress

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Daniel Hechter is eager to embellish its ready-to-wear range with fresh ideas and functionality.

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DANIEL HECHTER

FRIENDSHIP

Daniel Hechter questioned everything during its latest brand and strategy evaluation process. The conclusion is that the brand’s traditional values are wonderfully suitable for the future. Text: Martina Müllner-Seybold. Photos: Daniel Hechter

“P

lease don’t tell us what you think we want to hear,” was Philipp Aulbach’s assignment to the brand and strategy partners he had brought on board with his brother Stefan Aulbach. There was no urgent reason for this move. Ever since the Miltenberg-based textile dynasty Aulbach was given the chance to rise from licensee to the owner of the brand in 1998, many things have been going very well for the Franco-German company. It handles a total of 50 Daniel Hechter brand licenses in 65 countries. “As a former licensee, we knew exactly which adjustments we had to make to get the best out of each partnership,” Philipp Aulbach says. The brand is as well-ordered as the company itself. And yet: “We had never questioned Daniel Hechter as fundamentally as we did,” Stefan Aulbach adds. “Collection, presentation, B2B and B2C relationships - everything was placed under the microscope.”

With Daniel Hechter, the brothers Stefan and Philipp Aulbach manage a discreet global group. It sells its products on all five continents. The brand’s womenswear and menswear is sold in 700 stores and at 2,900 multi-brand retailers.

IN PARTNERSHIP

Given that market conditions have changed, the brand must change, distinguish itself, and show attitude. The management took time to think and analyse the situation in depth. The result can be seen, for example, in the Daniel Hechter Racing Suit and a Suit Separate programme. The latter utilises a high-tech material called 37.5, which was developed in co-operation with the Renault Formula 1 Team. The promotion involving a Formula 1 racing car (or an F1 simulator) was so successful that retailers became quite enthusiastic. A project to Aulbach’s taste, especially as changing the brand is not an end in itself. It is the company’s contribution to a prosperous future for both sides. Or rather: the laying of the foundation for such a prosperous future. What is particularly exciting is that the strategy evaluation

process unearthed that the term “friendship” is often used when talking about Daniel Hechter, both internally and externally. “This begins with the Franco-German friendship that we live and breathe within our company, which is manifested in corporate offices in Miltenberg and Paris. But the word ‘friendship’ is also often used by external partners,” Stefan Aulbach explains. Daniel Hechter is a company with handshake quality that has built up deep competence in all processes from design to sale. It is committed to partnership, but also knows that it’s only friendship when both sides benefit. The brand’s credo shows how modern this approach is: #together. style in progress

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Do B e t t e r – R e n e wa l

STRENESSE

FEMININE AND EASY

Strenesse hopes to return to old strength with a new owner and new players in all key positions. It seems to be working, as the collection plugs a gap in an otherwise saturated market. Text: Martina Müllner-Seybold. Photos: Strenesse

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he new Strenesse prefers quieter tones. Financier, management, designer nobody is eager to seek the spotlight or make headlines. Maybe because the fashion experts in Nördlingen know that light comes with shade. Thus, they enjoy their success in silence. Everything has come together beautifully; the brand can draw strength from this. “We have preserved the DNA of Strenesse, but re-interpreted it in a contemporary manner. Quality, purism, and femininity remain, but we have freed ourselves from everything that no longer meets these criteria from today’s perspective,” says Micaela Sabatier, the CEO of Strenesse New GmbH. UNDERSTANDING WOMEN

Instead of embodying one “super-woman”, Strenesse is now keen to embody women in all their diversity. “The typical Strenesse women according to conventional attributes probably doesn’t exist. We don’t address a specific class or age group. We want to serve a lifestyle. Our target group is self-confident and smart. She is a power woman who proudly emphasises her femininity and is fashion-conscious. She wants to be perfectly dressed for all occasions, but never over-dressed. Our commitment to femininity, as well as the claim to offer optimal fits and cuts, takes this into account. It makes no different whether our customer is 25 or 65,” Sabatier adds. The brand itself also avoids compartmentalisation quite deliberately. “We don’t want to occupy a niche; we strive to be a brand for all who live this lifestyle, value quality, appreciate the finer things in life, and enjoy aesthetics.” DRESSING WOMEN

What these women have in common is that they have found their style and are capable of skilfully varying it with a wardrobe consisting of two elements: timeless favourites and seasonal highlights. These two categories make sense for 170

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Micaela Sabatier, the CEO of Strenesse, can draw from years of industry experience and knows how her clients think.


Do B e t t e r – R e n e wa l

WHAT’S THE STORY

Strenesse too. Sabatier: “Parallel to our pre-order round, we launched a new programme dubbed Iconic, which is a set-up of luxury essentials. It includes timeless, fashionably interpreted classics in purist designs and clear lines, yet with very soft and feminine proportions. They are easy luxury pieces with soul.” There’s sufficient room for extravagances and “wow pieces” in the main collection. Sabatier clarifies: “The collection has been streamlined to communicate a clearer message.” It is divided into four order cycles, complemented by various ready-to-wear capsules with up to eight delivery cycles. KNOWING WOMEN

“In order to meet the demands of modern customers, one needs intelligent designs that don’t look over-designed and exude an effortless nonchalance that underlines personality. Sprezzatura in fashion, if you like,” Sabatier explains. The new team spirit has paved the way for a new decision-making process, especially in terms of design. “In the design procedure, interdisciplinary teams collaborate with approaches from the design thinking process. This results in more precise collections that are leaner and more exciting, in optimal quality and fit.” The internal processes have been streamlined too. The CEO continues: “We are transforming the company into a modern organisation with lean processes and interdisciplinary teams, not merely in order to be able to react quickly to market demands, but also to react quickly in terms of our own quality standards.” CONQUERING WOMEN

Now it’s time to spark new loves and to rekindle old ones. The growth targets have, however, not merely been defined quantitatively. Sabatier: “Sales growth at all costs is not our goal. Like the entire industry, the company has bad memories of such targets.” The focus is on partnerships at all levels. “First of all, we plan to significantly increase sales at specialised retailers again. We rely on the retail trade’s consulting expertise and are eager to exploit this channel primarily on a national and international level. At the same time, we are working on an e-commerce concept in which we can integrate specialised retailers. We expect this project to generate significant growth too.”

“Our target group is self-confident and smart. She is a power woman who proudly emphasises her femininity and is fashion-conscious. She wants to be perfectly dressed for all occasions, but never over-dressed.”

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WHAT'S THE STORY

Marianna Rosati, Drome’s Creative Director and Head of Design, blends the company’s traditional know-how with avant-garde design.

Drome lends leather the look and feel of fabric, thus creating lightness that makes leather attractive across all seasons.

DROME

PASSION FOR LEATHER Ferrero Rosati’s family business has been the epitome of innovative leather for decades. Located in the epicentre of Italian designer brands around Florence, Drome has embodied luxurious, progressive prêt-à-porter fashion for ten years. Text: Isabel Faiss. Photos: Drome

“Drome is an insider tip. We have approx. 50 customers in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, which is very good for such a sophisticated collection. The special handling of leather, the constant research of new materials, and the processing and changing of structures make the pieces so unique. Drome always succeeds in re-interpreting the topic. Our top sellers are the super-soft leather leggings and extremely light lambskin reversible coats in an almost inexhaustible range of colours. Drome appeals to high fashion customers who are looking for high-class prêt-à-porter fashion for men and women,” says Claudia Flessa, the Managing Partner of fashion agency Modeagentur Flessa. She has been working together with the company since 2004, when it was still producing the Santacroce collection. A restructuring of the business in 2009 resulted in a new company called Factory Srl and launch of the label Drome. With six collections per year and fast delivery rhythms, Drome is capable of offering its customers a sophisticated programme throughout the year. At a mark-up of 2.7, purchase prices range from 250 Euros for stretch leggings to 600 Euros for lambskin coats. Drome is not only a symbolic representation of the dream that Marianna Rosati, the Creative Director and Head of Design, has realised by launching the label. Ferrero Rosati’s daughter blends the company’s traditional know-how with avant-garde design. 172

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Marianna, leather is a passion. Are there any limits in terms of design? Leather is a very interesting material. It’s very luxurious and sophisticated, but not easy to apply in an innovative manner. For me, it’s very interesting to expand the concept of leather by pushing it beyond its limits, finding new ways of interpreting it, and creating garments that are both innovative and appealing to contemporary women. What are the five criteria that a prêt-à-porter collection has to fulfil? Innovation, comfort, urbanity, sophistication, and sensuality are five words that are very important to me during the design process. The market for high fashion brands is very international. Where do you see the most potential for Drome? Asia is an important landmark for us, but so is the rest of the world. Much depends on current economic and political circumstances, which have been influencing the market significantly over the last few years. I’ve always intended Drome to be quite transversal. In my eyes, Drome is an attitude that relates to the soul of its customers. The fashion industry is changing rapidly. This poses new challenges, even for long-established brands. Where do you see Drome in five years? I see Drome growing every season, becoming more complete and more mature as a brand, and thus expanding its boundaries. I hope that Drome will have received more recognition and expanded its product range.


design by wundergestalten.de

agentur.de www.diehinterhof


WHAT'S THE STORY

In the coming autumn/winter season, Lightning Bolt will once again reflect the lifestyle of surfers - in touch with nature and with its heritage in mind.

LIGHTNING BOLT

CULT COLLECTION

Lightning Bolt fulfils the longing for nature and adventure with a casual surfer lifestyle that is credibly and competently translated into fashion. This means the brand is in an excellent position to grow in Germany and Austria. Text: Nicoletta Schaper. Photos: Lightning Bolt

Stories like this are popular. It was in the summer of 1971 in Hawaii that passionate surfers and shapers Gerry Lopez and Jack Shipley realised their vision of revolutionary surfboards by launching Lightning Bolt. Combined with t-shirts and boardshorts, Lightning Bolt embodies surfing as a life philosophy. Its coolness, paired with an astute awareness of nature, quickly won over fans, even outside the surfing community. SURFING AS A WAY OF LIFE

The “hardware + fashion” model still exists today. Both segments are evolving gradually. The fashion collection is manufactured under license by Lightning Bolt Europe SA in Portugal, in premium quality due to own production facilities and always with the brand’s heritage in mind. The bi-annual collection features t-shirts with large-format prints, sweats, hoodies, and fleece styles, as well as bomber jackets and shirt jackets in checked flannel and cord. The range is comple174

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mented by trousers and accessories. Common to all styles is the spirit of Lightning Bolt, which also applies to the women’s collection. The brand is currently in the process of expanding its range for women. Retail prices range from 99 to 129 Euros for sweats and from 49 to 79 Euros for boardshorts. The latter are a regular part of the summer collection. T-shirts cost approx. 49 Euros. Lightning Bolt’s philosophy of life is not only communicated in advertising campaigns and via social media, but is also promoted with appropriate visual merchandising measures at retailers. Moreover, the brand is environmentally aware, which is proven by the fully integrated production company in Portugal. It uses organic cotton and recycled polystyrene, as well as biodegradable packaging. In terms of social commitment, Lightning Bolt co-operates with voluntary initiatives such as Surf Addict and Surfers Healing, which teach adults and children with health problems how to surf. This consistency has established Lightning Bolt as a global brand in its home market in the US, as well as in Japan, Australia, Latin America, and Europe. Currently, the focus is on Germany and Austria. Dominik Meuer’s Hinterhofagentur started representing the brand in July 2018. The list of renowned retail partners already includes 14oz and Dreist in Aachen, as well as Bailly Diehl and Daniels. “The brand not only embodies heritage and craftsmanship, but is also a premium collection reflecting a casual lifestyle,” says Meuer. Hinterhofagentur intends to expand the distribution network selectively.


WHAT’S THE STORY

Alessandro Squarzi, a brand creator, agent, and style model, travels the world to indulge in his passion for vintage and to recover new treasures for Fortela.

Fortela pays little attention to seasons and trends. Even the fabrics have character and are manufactured in line with aged traditions.

FORTELA

“IT’S NOT ABOUT CLOTHING, IT’S ABOUT CULTURE”

Italian brand Fortela is something like a bulwark of excellent - yet quite extraordinary - taste. Brand creator Alessandro Squarzi brings plenty of style and several decades of experience as one of Italy’s most influential agents to the table. Text: Martina Müllner-Seybold. Photos: Fortela

Fortela was launched three years ago. Where does the brand stand now? Fortela is evolving constantly. We break with many rules the fashion industry imposes on itself. For example, you will never see a pair of Fortela trousers with stretch. Stretch is for women; men don’t wear stretch. We have developed and expanded the collection continuously. We marry, so to speak, classic Italian virtues with American workwear. In addition, we have the Japanese passion for everything that concerns heritage. We manufacture our chinos and denim, incidentally Fortela’s latest expansion, on machines from the 1930s and 1940s. You repeatedly emphasise that Fortela is more than just a brand. Dare I call it a lifestyle? The term must be at least as repugnant to you as stretch…

That’s right! Fortela is an attitude, a way for a stylish man to dress. As a man, you can’t wear much of what’s considered fashionable today, at least if you don’t want to look like you’re about to do gymnastics. We are about to open a Fortela House, consisting of six individually furnished Fortela Suites, in Milan. These suites reflect me as a person, my way of living. I like calling it the gypsy classic style. Welcoming guests into this world is something I am really looking forward to, because I perceive Fortela as an invitation to like-minded people. True, you also seem to enjoy co-operating with other brands… Yes, I love to recover treasures, to discover brands that manage to impress me with their history and expertise. We currently have three co-branding capsules. The first is with Italian cashmere brand Kangra, a traditional knitwear specialist. The best there is in Italy, as far as I’m concerned. But instead of settling for a simple, dark blue V-neck pullover, we decided to co-develop a cashmere sweatshirt. The second collaboration is with Ragno, a traditional Italian business that has been making underwear and knitwear since 1879. It even supplies the Italian military at times. The third brand partner is Maerz Munich, another company that impresses me with its history and expertise. One could say that we always look for the “best-in-class”, but not always the obvious ones. The obvious doesn’t interest me. Are you the role model for the brand? You see, I have spent so much time in this industry, building and popularising brands like AS 65 or Dondup. I have an unerring sense of style - and I have principles. I believe, for example, that a man wearing a beautiful coat will always look better than a man in a bright red down jacket. I like classic things, but one wouldn’t necessarily call my style classic. Fortela has the same attitude. It will never fail to excite me when stores emerge that pay homage to products and understand their culture, especially outside Italy. When you buy trousers at the Fortela Store in Milan or Forte de Marmi, you can rest assured that these trousers will still be relevant five years later. That is sustainability as I understand it. style in progress

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FASHION

Volume Formula More is more. When fashion seeks more space, it results in new avantgarde silhouettes, wide cuts, futuristic designs, and oversized knit looks. This season, almost everything revolves around the word “more”, both in terms of cuts and materials. There is also no restraint regarding colours and prints. Forget the squeamishness of pastel and nude! Embrace leopard prints and acid neon colours! Wide trousers, jumbo down jackets, XXL cashmeres - “oversize” is the catchword under which the season celebrates its big appearance. Editorial: Isabel Faiss. Photos: Brands

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FASHION

Print Inc

Leopard & Co are about to make a big leap forward. Safari prints meet robust colour blocking. New are minimals and all-over prints on delicate qualities such as cashmere and silk. However, fake fur is quite capable of withstanding the pressure too.

Liu Jo

Moose Knuckles

Lucky de Luca

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FASHION

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360Cashmere

Steffen Schraut

Alessandra Chamonix

Barb’one

Fil Noir

HTC Los Angeles

Drykorn

Marc Cain

Na-kd


FASHION

Trend Spotting

Karolina Landowski is a fashion journalist and trend consultant at Fashion Trend Pool, an international network of footwear and fashion experts. With her trend reports and lectures, she offers creative input for designers and decisive order support for buyers. She has agreed to map out the trends of the season for style in progress.

Marc O‘ Polo Pure

Karolina, what are the focal topics of the autumn/winter 2019/20 season? It’s going to be a season full of contrasts. Fashion is following a variety of trends: expressive and provocative, classic and nostalgic, multicultural, transgressive, and - of course - many sportive impulses. The reflection on tradition and tailoring is a counter-movement to the fast pace of our time. Which materials are most significant? The focus is on fabrics with character that hover between nature and high-tech. Surfaces with structure, fancies with striking motifs, and digital printing techniques are on the rise. A recurrent theme is the combination of woolly volume and functional

high-tech. In addition to fluffy wool, lush fake fur, soft plush, velour, and cord, favourites include striking jacquards and alienated patterns such as checks and hounds-tooth. What’s happening in terms of outerwear? Sport, outerwear, protection, function - the boundaries continue to blur. This is primarily caused by the fusion of high-tech with technical, innovative, and smart qualities. The most conspicuous manifestation is the emergence of voluminous puffas in the form of jackets, coats, and blousons. Oversized models come in bold power colours, sometimes even patterned. Which new silhouettes can we expect? It’ll be hard to overlook the influence of the 1980s. Architecturally over-cut shoulders and cocoon shapes define the new silhouettes. What’s happening in the trouser segment? Trousers will be significantly wider. The waistband rises, while the waist itself is often highlighted with wrapped belts. One can sense that the oversized shapes of the 1980s are making a gradual comeback in this segment too. Trousers are complemented by casual trench coats or classic woven fur coats. Which shoes complete the new looks? The new lengths and silhouettes pave the way for a comeback of long-shaft boots. Sneakers are a given. The influence of technical, functional materials is still rising! This results in many hybrids. The transition to the hiking boot is fluent. Western boots remain a strong topic too.

Bloom

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Jumbo Down

Voluminous down jackets and coats take the shape of XXL puffas, bomber jackets, and field jackets. But the real action is happening on the surface: elaborate material mixes featuring nylon and leather, fake fur, and tech twills, as well as paper and dry touch elements, lend the classic quilted jacket a new, matt look.

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Quartz

Peuterey Plurals

Sportalm

Peak Performance

IQ Berlin

Brumal


FASHION

Colmar AGE x Shayne Oliver

Parajumpers

Marc O’Polo

ADD

Daniel Hechter

Handstich

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Coolotte

The focus in womenswear is shifting back to trousers. The culotte is fashionably re-interpreted with high waists, extreme widths, and XXL lacings on the waist. Flares and girlfriend cuts are also in the mix. Particularly striking are lengths that often end above the ankle.

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AT.P.CO

Closed

Dolores

Drome

Strenesse

Levi’s


FASHION

Liu Jo

Marni

Nili Lotan

FTC Cashmere

Postyr

Pomandere

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Laid Back Hero

Formal wear for nonconformists, relaxed casual looks, and robust outdoor outfits - the lone wolf is loosening up a little. Clean no-brainer basics meet high-quality workmanship and fine materials. Calm, earthy colours underline the naturalness of the relaxed silhouettes and cuts.

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Closed

Schneiders

Digel

Edward Copper

Weber+Weber

Floris van Bommel


FASHION

Les Deux

Phil Petter

Luis Trenker

Marcel Ostertag

Mey Story

DL1961

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FASHION

Oversize Softness

Delicate cashmeres in glamorous volumes with XXL stitches and patterns prove how refined knitwear can be. As rich unis or with ingenious structures, exogenous silhouettes stage the material dramatically.

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360Cashmere

Falconeri

Marlino

Phil Petter

Ella Silla

Essentiel Antwerp


FASHION

Lalo

American Vintage

Mac

Maiami

Silk Sisters

Lamberto Losani

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FASHION

Tech(no) AvantgardE

Function meets constructed volume; strongly exaggerated architectural cuts take shape in unusual material combinations. This athleisure wear thrives on strong colours such as acid orange and colour blocking.

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FTC Cashmere

C.P. Company

Marc O‘Polo Denim

Drykorn

Save the Duck

Lala Berlin


FASHION

Lemon Jelly

Chevignon

K-Way

Woolrich

North Sails

Sportalm

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BIG POW WOW

In decorations and patterns the season celebrates the creative mix and match of different ethnicities and cultures. Indian embroidery meets coarse leather patches. Boots meet coarse knitwear in the form of ponchos and XXL cardigans.

Alpha Studio

Sportalm

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Marni

Ivko

Powderhorn

Drykorn

Colmar AGE x Shayne Oliver


FASHION

Alberto

Tassel Tales

Sun 68

Lucky de Luca

Wunderfell

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IN STORE BECAUSE TAKING ACTION IS ALWAYS RIGHT

It requires joy, passion, and maybe even a dash of obsession to ensure that the stationary retail trade remains the very first contact point for customers, despite the shift in sales towards the online segment. We have compiled a list of exemplary store concepts for you…  Text: Isabel Faiss, Martina Müllner-Seybold, Kay Alexander Plonka, Nicoletta Schaper, Veronika Zangl. Photos: Stores


IN STORE

Blue de Gênes/Hamburg

Photos: Blue de Gênes

BLUE BLOOD Owner Stefan Kudla has arrived in Hamburg’s city centre after opening a new store in “Kaiser-Wilhelm Strasse”. In 2014, he opened the world’s first store of the Danish denim label in Elmsbüttel. Four years later, Kudla decided that the time was ripe to move into the heart of the Hanseatic city. “We have expanded the retail space by approx. 100 square metres and changed the furnishings: the rugged style has given way to a more relaxed look. After all, our customers have changed. While we catered for the hipster with a full beard, raw denim, and lumberjack shirt years ago, we now cater for the advertiser with stretch jeans and white sneakers.” What remains unchanged is the love for product heritage, the dark walls, loving details such as the workbench made of machined wood, and the vintage scooter. Beautiful leather accessories, whiskey, and hats by Stetson complement the product range of this “gentlemen only” store. “Menswear is what I do best,” says Kudla. His sales agency represents some of the labels stocked by the store, including The Good People from Rotterdam.

Blue de Gênes Kaiser-Wilhelm-Strasse 47, Hamburg/Germany Owner: Stefan Kudla Opening: 2nd of July 2018 Sales area: 180 sqm Brands: ABCL, Blue de Gênes, Bleu de Chauffe, Castañer Espadrilles, Glerups, Stetson, Schlesinger Hamburg 1842, The Good People, Welter Shelter, Wolverine 1000Mile, von Dutch, Zespà Aix-enProvence, 40WEFT

The home of casual mens­wear: Stefan Kudla focuses primarily on heritage products that he also distributes.

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IN STORE

The clean look of the entrance area is deceptive: Urban Speed is full of surprises that are just waiting to be discovered.

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IN STORE

Florence, complete the product range. “Everything shares a common energy,” Donkov points out. “No piece is as simple as it may seem upon first glance.”

Let me entertain you! Sabina Perfetti and Emil Donkov have a very subjective idea of the type of fashion they want to present at Urban Speed.

W

hat is this place? Is it a private separeé, a gallery, or maybe even a fashion store? Urban Speed raises questions. This first impression is quite deliberate. It prepares customers for the fact that Urban Speed is not a standard fashion boutique with a run-of-the-mill product range.

Urban Speed/Vienna

EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED Photos: Urban Speed, Markus Oberndorfer

The creators of Urban speed are crazy about fashion and not scared of taking risks. Their risks pay off due to a store that is wonderfully special, idiosyncratic, and surprising.

CURATED CHAOS If you think that shoes and bags spread out all over the floor, as well as clothes seemingly carelessly thrown over armchairs and tables, are a sign of chaos, then think again! Every alleged chaos is carefully curated as a surprise and inspiration. The product range needs to be explored and discovered. “We never asked ourselves what kind of concept we have,” says Emil Donkov, who created Urban Speed with his partner Sabina Perfetti. “We don’t have a concept. We just sell beautiful things.” Nothing is left to chance: neither the turquoise horses made of recycled cardboard, nor the inflatable penguins in the fitting rooms. Urban Speed strives to be a stage for objects, design, and fashion. For example, it’s a stage for cool womenswear with daring cuts by Ports 1961, high-end streetstyle by Kolor of Japan, and contemporary elegance by No 21. The womenswear is complemented by men’s fashion including knitwear by Roberto Collina, casualwear by Dondup, and hand-crafted red boots and suits with a twist by Paul Smith. Accessories, such as jewellery by Radà and synthetic crystal-ware by Mario Luca Giusti of

AGAINST THE MAINSTREAM Urban Speed reflects a highly subjective view of fashion and is a clear statement against the mainstream. “This seems to provoke some people. We certainly aren’t to everyone’s taste,” Donkov muses. “Others, however, are really enthused. Like us, they enjoy trading ideas and trying on things they haven’t seen before.” Sabina Perfetti launched Urban Speed at the address “Werdertorgasse 15” twelve years ago. Back then, the store focused on sporty streetwear and jeans. Two years ago, the shop relocated to the more central “Palais Batthyany”, a listed building in “Herrengasse”. Since 2008, Perfetti and Donkov have been developing Urban Speed as a team. “We hardly ever agree during the order process. We argue constantly. That’s what we’re known for,” Donkov smiles. It’s probably this clash of minds that gives Urban Speed its momentum and spirit. “It’s not enough to merely provide clothing. There’s so much choice today,” he adds. “In contrast, people will always love surprises and fun. We may not be able to compete, but we can be better.”

Urban Speed Herrengasse 19-22, Vienna/Austria www.urbanspeed.at Opening: October 2006 Owner: Sabina Perfetti Employees: 1 Sales area: 200 sqm Brands for women: among others 5Preview, Avant-Toi, Ahirain, Beyond, Borsalino, Cecilie Copenhagen, Dondup, Flower Mountain, Harris Wharf, Leather Crown, Kolor Japan, Marco Rambaldi, Maison Flaneur, Markus Lupfer, Mes Demoiselles, Mexicana, No 21, Paul Smith, Pierre Louis Mascia, Ports 1961, PE Nation, Roberto Collina, Rocco P., Sharon Wauchob, SJYP, Shrimps, Suzusan, Stand, Stella Pardo, Sold-out, Thomas/Victoria Brands for men: among others Albero Fasciani, Antonio Marras, Avant-Toi, Ahirain, Borsalino, Dondup, Flower Mountain, Harris Wharf, Hosio, Kolor Japan, Laneus, Limitato, Maison Flaneur, No 21, Paul Smith, Roberto Collina, Rocco P., Transit Accessories brands: among others Frame Chain, Eye-Petizer, Monies, Muun, Numero10, Orciani, Radà, Stee

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IN STORE

Decelerated and reduced to essentials: Slowear is an antithesis to mass consumption.

Slowear/Munich

“If you buy better, you buy less” is Roberto Compagno’s motto. Munich’s “Brienner Quartier” is the perfect location for Slowear’s first store in Germany.

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The choice of location in Munich’s quieter, yet very elegant, “Briennerstrasse” is no coincidence. It is calculated and a logical extension of what Slowear already stands for. Slowear most definitely isn’t about the pace set by the commercial pedestrian zones and fashion chains. It’s about taking the time to develop a product that satisfies a demanding clientele. Slowear, an Italian family business, manufactures all four brands stocked by the store. Designer, CEO, and owner Roberto Compagno chooses every single accessory himself. Every piece needs to reflect his vision of the perfect presentation of Slowear’s menswear collection in settings inspired by the chic of the 1970s and 1980s. There’s a specialist for every product group: Incotex stands for elegant, sharp-cut Italian trousers, while Zanone specialises in finest knitwear collections. Montedoro is known for jackets and coats, Glanshirt for shirts. High-end leather accessories and shoes are provided by Officina Slowear, as well as numerous other products such as scooter helmets, earphones, and vinyl records under the name Emporio. Slowear operates 29 stores worldwide in locations such as Milan, Tokyo, Seoul, New York, and Paris. This is the first store in Germany.

Slowear Briennerstrasse 7, Munich/Germany www.slowear.com Opening: October 2017 Sales area: 85 sqm Brands: Emporio, Glanshirt, Incotex, Montedoro, Officina Slowear, Zanone

Photo: Slowear

BUY BETTER, BUY LESS


IN STORE

The Bespoker/Düsseldorf

A MAN’S WORLD

Photos: The Bespoker

The lettering on the front door of The Bespoker suggests: “Tell only your best friends!” This statement is, however, not an attempt to exclude, but a recommendation among friends. “There was no pre-defined concept as such. The whole project grew organically,” says Virgile Bourgueil. After completing his training as a tailor, he worked as a buyer at Unger in Hamburg. He then joined P&C as the head buyer for the exquisite Premium Menswear segment. “Wherever I was, I learned a lot about service, customer proximity, and products in general,” Bourgueil adds. Custom tailoring is the heart of The Bespoker, complemented by pieces that could appeal to the store’s demanding clientele - not in bulk, but carefully curated. The range includes wonderful knitted blazers by Maurizio Baldassari, casual wool suits by Weber + Weber, and jeans by Re-Hash, as well as sneakers by Zespa, shirts by Luigi Borrelli, and Cabans by Camplin. Gin by Jacquemain and fish-shaped carafes by Gluckigluck, which were first designed in the late 1870s, are also true insider tips. Bourgueil loves connecting people. He loves it when his customers engage in conversation and discover similarities, thus inspiring each other. This strength is also reflected in the events. In December, customers met in front of the store for the so-called Christmas Corner. There were hot sausages and mulled wine to enjoy. And customers were given the opportunity to donate for a good cause. Be it a book reading or the 19/22 New Thursday Late-Night Shopping, Bourgueil always serves his selection of fine and exciting menswear.

The Bespoker Wildenbruchstrasse 41, Düsseldorf/Germany www.thebespoker.de Opening: March 2015 Owner: Virgile Bourgueil Employees: 2 Sales area: 96 sqm Brands: Briglia, Baldassari, Camplin, Cruciani, Circolo, Les Garcons Faciles, Luici Borrelli, Re-Hash, Weber + Weber, Zespa Accessories brands: Deumer, Gluckigluck, Jacquemain Gin, Leander Riedl

Owner Virgile Bourgueil has realised his concept with sensitivity and a sense of style.

Highly recommended: The Bespoker offers a well-curated selection of brands and niche products.

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IN STORE

A bright interior and a generous layout invite customers to linger at Roya’s.

A Roya’s bei Motzigkeit/Hannover

INTIMATE CONNECTION Alvin Motzigkeit opened a store specialising in men’s trousers in the heart of Hannover in 1952. In 1991, his son Rolf continued the business. 20 years later, Frank Winkler, a long-standing employee, took over the store, which then specialised in premium sportswear, and modernised it once more. Now, for the first time in the company’s history, the Winkler family has added womenswear to its concept.

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s the capital of Lower Saxony, Hannover is not only a shopping destination for neighbouring cities such as Wolfsburg or Braunschweig, but also has an above-average intake area. Immediately adjacent to the Market Hall and the Market Church in the city centre, one finds the store Motzigkeit in the same location as when it was opened more than 65 years ago. It is currently being run by Frank and Roya Winkler, the third generation. The menswear store covers approximately 160 square metres and stocks brands such as Daniele Fiesoli, Circolo 1901, Mason’s, and Phil Petter. The adjacent area for the new women’s concept was added by breaking through a wall. Thus, the two stores share the same front door. After returning from a short baby break, Roya Winkler, who came

to Germany from Afghanistan at the age of 13, implemented the concept with her husband Frank. “Many women who accompanied their husbands repeatedly asked us for a womenswear store based on our concept for men,” Roya Winkler explains. The range of Roya’s is broad, yet exclusive. As of the autumn/ winter season, brands such as No.1 Como, Blonde No. 8, Paul x Claire und Grace have been added.. The Winklers believe that the Panorama and the Premium are the most important trade shows. The orders are traditionally placed in Düsseldorf. Roya’s offers all product groups including knitwear, t-shirts, tunics, jeans, chinos, dresses,


IN STORE

Inseparable: Frank and Roya Winkler manage both stores as a team.

Photos: Maria Brinkop

blazers, and jackets, as well as indispensable accessories such as scarves, belts, and bags.

Motzigkeit GmbH. Karmarschstrasse 40 Hannover/Germany, www.motzigkeit.de Opening: 5th of February 2018 Owner: Winkler family Store manager: Roya Winkler Employees: 3 Sales area: 58 sqm Brands: Aeronautica Militare, Barbone, Better Rich, Bianco, Blauer, Cambio, Candice Cooper, Colmar, Cute Stuff, Della Famiglia, Duno, Frogbox, Greywire, Ilse Jacobsen, Jun&Juli, Lucky de Luca, Mason’s, Miss Goodlife, P448, PJS, Sevendaywonder, Soulkantine, True Religion

WHAT BELONGS TOGETHER… “Most of my customers are seasoned, active, and attractive women above 30. They know what suits them and what they want to wear. Many of them are businesswomen, self-employed, doctors, or lawyers; most of them are married with children. They have a clear fashion style in mind. They combine chic basics to create a refined casual look with a touch of femininity and complement the outfit individually with jewellery and accessories. My regular customers prefer sporty, elegant, and casual looks. Some know what they want, others allow us to advise, surprise, and inspire them,” says Roya Winkler, herself the mother of a 4-year-old daughter. On the respective social media channels, which are operated in-house with the assistance of a photographer and an advertising agency, the customers are not only inspired, but also informed about regularly staged promotions and events. “We offer tapas and drinks every

weekend. We usually have a DJ and sometimes a barkeeper serves cocktails or we present seasonal specials. We create a living room atmosphere in which customers feel comfortable, a location they enjoy returning to, albeit sometimes for no more than an espresso and a quick chat,” Roya Winkler explains and adds: “It’s important to me that the product range of Roya’s adapts to our menswear store Motzigkeit. When couples visit our store, they should match visually in terms of fashion.”

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Style & Select/Bochum

DIRECTLY OPPOSITE The meeting point is Bochum Stiepel, about 10 kilometres from the city centre. This is where Stephanie and Bernd Gräwe opened their store named Style & Select 12 years ago. Five years ago, they launched Style & Select Man directly opposite. Bernd Gräwe jokes that one can wave at each other through the windows. The location, far from the turbulent, traffic-plagued city centre, is appreciated greatly, especially as the stores no longer rely on passing trade. Those who know Style & Select, have become accustomed to the free parking spot at the entrance. Stylistically, the owners’ relaxed attitude is reflected in their product range. Bernd Gräwe abandoned the idea of formal suits a while ago. He now focuses on sporty casual looks that orbit around the two core collections by Dondup and Stone Island. He believes that the world of men is defined by personal atmosphere: “We have customers who make appointments well in advance or simply stop by when they’re in the area. We enjoy having a beer with our customers. Sometimes we offer them a curry sausage. The football table is in the store for a reason,” the owner says. He is truly passionate about his business, which he is hoping to pass on to his son someday. In Stephanie Gräwe’s women’s boutique on the opposite side of the street, family atmosphere plays an equally important role. If possible, she invites her employees along to all order appointments - mostly in Italy. She strongly believes that decisions should be made together. In terms of product range, this translates into fashionable looks that combine the Italian elegance of brands such as Bazaar Deluxe with sporty elements from collections like Closed to create an expressive style. “I myself am quite sporty, but I strive to address the wishes of very fashionable customers too,” says Stephanie Gräwe. The Gräwe family has - quite literally - made a name for themselves that reaches far beyond Bochum’s city limits.

Stephanie Gräwe tends to find collections with a special fashionable twist in Italy.

Style & Select. Kemnader Straße 334, Kemnader Straße 327-329, Bochum/ Germany, www.styleandselect.de Opening: 2006 und 2013 Sales area: approx. 50 sqm and 100 sqm Employees: 3 Brands: American Vintage, Bazar Deluxe, Brigitte Herskind, Closed, Colmar, Destin, Dondup, Essentiel Antwerp, Faliero Sarti, Harris Wharf, Hugenberg, Ivi, Jumper, Nice Brands, Nine in the Morning, Paul x Claude, Philippe Model, Roqa, Semi Couture, Tagliatore, Zanellato 200

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Photos: Style & Select

Common cause, separate stores: Stephanie (left) and Bernd Gräwe (right) operate a women’s and men’s store respectively. Spatially, they are merely separated by a street.


IN STORE

The concept store Cabinet shows style and attitude for a clientele that is as financially potent as it is consumption-critical.

Cabinet/Zurich

Photos: Cabinet

STAGES OF THE WORLD Zurich is considered bourgeois and dignified, possibly even a little too posh. This definitely doesn’t apply to the Cabinet concept store in the city’s Westend. The space itself has an abundance of charm. The viaduct arches, built into a more than 100-year-old bridge, have a special aura defined by old stone walls and a vault with a height of up to nine metres. Jeroen van Rooijen and his wife Nina van Rooijen are evidently the right people to breathe life into this location. “Our product range is full of surprises and peculiarities from all over the world. We import merchandise that appeals to us from almost every continent and hope that the spark will ignite among our customers,” says Jeroen van Rooijen, who made a name for himself as a menswear style expert and journalist long before opening Cabinet. “We like products with a strong character and a surface that isn’t too smooth and perfect.” In terms of clothing, both entrepreneurs attach great importance to comfort and everyday life compatibility. Nina van Rooijen’s own collection, which interprets typical masculine styles in a feminine context, is an excellent example. The store also stocks casualwear by Humanoid Arnhem and relaxed menswear by Man1924. “In addition, we offer everything from organic soap by Sukha of Amsterdam to glass domes containing butterflies by Christoph Klein,” Jeroen van Rooijen explains. He and his wife are responsible for buying and strategic decisions. They are the figureheads of Cabinet and tend to be in the store together, especially on Saturdays. That Jeroen van Rooijen can be seen sitting at a sewing machine from time to time appeals to the customers. It contributes to the decelerated concept, as does the fact that customers are quite deliberately given space and time to explore. “We stage our products with great effort and dedication,” Jeroen van Rooijen stresses. “We don’t pursue a mercantile logic or commercial impetus. We focus on a style, a feeling, and an attitude.” Cabinet thus has little in common with the typical luxury shops in Zurich’s “Bahnhofstrasse” and “Storchengasse”. Jeroen van Rooijen: “Inner-city rental fees leave very little room for experimentation. Our landlord, a foundation dedicated to affordable residential and commercial premises, deliberately keeps the rent low. We couldn’t do what we are doing here in the city centre.”

“People appreciate our product range and spirit of discovery,” says Jeroen van Rooijen, who runs Cabinet with his wife Nina van Rooijen.

Cabinet Store Viaduktstrasse 83, Arch 2, Zurich/Switzerland www.cabinet-store.com, Instagram: @cabinetzurich Opening; December 2015 Owners: Nina and Jeroen van Rooijen Employees: 4 Sales area: 150 sqm Brands for women: among others Atelier Sukha, Black Crane, Horror Vacui, Humanoid, I Love Mr. Mittens, Nina van Rooijen, The Loom Brands for men: among others Bevilacqua, Hannes Roether, Man1924, Roberto Collina, SNS Hering, The Chino Revived Interior and accessories brands: among others Aeyde, Arno Wolf, Ay Illuminate, Bella Ciao, Blue & True, Butts & Shoulders, Canal St. Martin, Charlotte Wooning, Coral & Tusk, Fair Trade Originals, Foulalà, Future Archive, Jars, Lola Hats, Lovat & Green, Muun, Mismo, Studio Corkinho, Sukha

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IN STORE

Sany styles every woman individually. If it makes sense, some pieces are even worn back to front.

Sany/Wiener Neustadt

Sabine Raab leaves sufficient room for creativity.

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“We wanted a small and refined store, manageable and comfortable.” Sabine Raab and Conny Reindl found such premises in Wiener Neustadt, where they opened their womenswear boutique Sany. “People keep on asking us when we’ll open a store for men,” Raab smiles. “We redecorate our shop window on an almost daily basis. We change and rearrange it constantly. Our customers are very enthusiastic about the concept. Our mobile phones ring even outside business hours; people beg us to reserve the pieces on display. Even our furniture never remains in the same spot for long. This creativity is also reflected in the product range. We stock brands such as Schella Kann, Odeeh, and American Vintage. We even design pieces ourselves, if necessary. We don’t allow larger competitors to put us under pressure; we love fashion too much. That’s what we pass on to our customers.”

Sany. Brodtischgasse 15, Wiener Neustadt/Austria www.sanylooks.at Opening: March 2017 Owner: Sabine Raab Sales area: 45 sqm Brands: 7 for all Mankind, 8 PM, ADD, American Vintage, AOS, Larens, Max Mara Leisure, Odeeh, Schella Kann, Semicouture, Stand

Photo: Sany

CREATIVE FASHION DUO


IN STORE

Stories/Salzburg

Photos: Stories

ITALIAN LIFESTYLE “Women love shopping, which is why I want to make the experience as comfortable as possible. Shopping is only fun when certain conditions are fulfilled. And this fun is what I care about most.” Store owner Sonja Clodi-Kathriner has a clear vision for Stories. She opened her boutique, located in the heart of Salzburg, in June 2018. It was a spontaneous decision. “A friend had been urging me to open a store for ages. In February, I stumbled upon the premises in Palais Küenburg in ‘Sigmund-Haffner-Gasse’. I knew it was the perfect location the moment I saw it. We opened our doors to the public in June.” Clodi-Kathriner, who also manages a fashion agency called SCK, is known to be spontaneous and purposeful. “I’m not trying to be a high-end store. I focus on creating special moments: wearable, classic, Italian, trendy, and a little ethno. Marella and iBlues by Max Mara, which my agency represents, are performing especially well. That’s why they are the core brands in my store.” “In a city like Salzburg you need to take advantage of an Old Town location because of the many tourists. In addition, the ‘Sigmund-Haffner-Gasse’ has a kind of forecourt that invites people to linger. It’s very pleasant in the summer. We have a seating area where customers can enjoy a drink. This is how shopping turns into the experience I talked about earlier. It’s very important to me. I don’t want anyone to feel under pressure in Stories. I want customers to relax and enjoy themselves.” Clodi-Kathriner furnished the store herself. She reveals: “I have 20 years agency experience, but I pursued a career in interior design initially. As Palais Küenburg is a listed building, we based our design on the historic stock. The old terrazzo floor in the 60-square-metre store is beautiful, but also a little restive. That’s why I combined it with furnishings in the style of the 1960s and a mirrored counter. The elements correspond wonderfully and are perfectly complemented by the vault.”

At Stories, customers can browse through lovingly and carefully selected fashion in a relaxed atmosphere.

Stories. Sigmund-Haffner-Gasse 16, Salzburg/Austria www.welovestories.at Owner: Sonja Clodi-Kathriner Opening: 27th of June 2018 Sales area: 60 sqm Brands: Arma Leder, Gimo’s, Hemisphere, iBlues, Maliparmi, Marella, Max Mara Leisure, White T, Yoga Jeans

Owner Sonja Clodi-Kathriner quite deliberately chose an Old Town location for Stories.

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IN STORE

26-year-old Medo Diet focuses Homegirl on what she loves: casual styles, hip-hop, art, and a relaxed atmosphere that leaves sufficient room for creativity.

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IN STORE

“I

was surprised by how open-minded and accommodating even larger brands such as Mads Norgaard were during the first order,” says Medo Diet. She found most of her brand set-up for the Homegirl launch at the end of October 2018 at the trade shows Premium, Bright, and Seek in Berlin. Laughing, she admits: “I based my orders on sympathies.” Everyone who is familiar with the 26-year-old, however, knows that she always backs up her gut feeling with well-founded know-how. Medo Diet previously worked for various international streetwear brands; she was, among other duties, responsible for production monitoring. “How brands produce is important to me. I have no interest whatsoever in selling fashion that has been produced in horrific conditions. I don’t see myself in the ‘Fair Trade’ corner though. Maximum prices ranging from 250 to 300 Euros simply cannot be reconciled with this segment. My production experience has, however, taught me exactly

Homegirl Store/Munich

“I’M NOT A YES-WOMAN”

Photos: Homegirl

A message with rarity value: the Glockenbach district has welcomed a young, progressive fashion store. Homegirl not only has close ties to the local music and event scene due to its owner Medo Diet, but is also a platform for creative ideas, displays an extraordinary brand and style mix, and offers a relax zone for chats with like-minded people. In short: this is not a WE vs YOU kind of store.

where to look. That’s the reason why I decided to open my own store. E-commerce per se is not as ‘fair’ as it is often portrayed. Customers quickly lose a sense for the product and its price.”

and fashion into a grounded and authentic experience. Medo Diet says: “Shopping is the most beautiful thing in the world.” Homegirl invites you to do just that…

THE CONCEPT: FLEXIBLE AND VERSATILE Medo Diet’s service approach is unconditionally honest. “Anyone who asks for my opinion, can expect an honest answer.” Her aim is to ensure that every customer feels at home and well-advised in her store. Accordingly, the product range is very versatile. Scandinavian business chic is combined with fashionable street styles and clean casual looks, thus appealing to a broad spectrum of customers ranging from an edgy It-Girl to a working mother. Alongside collections such as Nümph, Yaya, Mads Norgaard, and Lemon Jelly, Medo Diet also stocks smaller local brands which - in her own words - “may not fill the store, but are something special.” The furnishings in the entrance area of the narrowly tapering store in “Reichenbachstrasse” is sufficiently flexible to change its appearance at will. The 3.80-metre walls offer enough room for events such as exhibitions or vernissages involving local artists. Medo Diet is keen to establish close ties between Homegirl and the local community, which she perceives as her core target group, via Instagram and the store’s website. In addition, she collaborates with stylists, press agencies, carefully selected bloggers, and online platforms such as Findeling and AirBnB. In her own way, she has managed to develop a very unique recipe for blending her passion for hip-hop, streetwear, street art,

Less is more: Homegirl Medo Diet is no fan of visual excess. She reduces her product range to the essential: excellent products.

Homegirl Store Reichenbachstrasse 30, Munich/Germany www.homegrl.de Opening: October 2018 Owner: Medo Diet Employees: 1 Sales area: 42 sqm Brands for women: Akjaerbede, Apres Ski, Heaters, Le Bonnet, Lemon Jelly, Mads Norgaard, Majune, Native Youth, Nümph, Shanghai Tofu, Tango, Yaya

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IN STORE

“The collaboration with Heikaus was great from beginning to end,” Sari Heuser says in praise of the architects and implementers of the complete conversion of the 500-square-metre store.

SPECIAL STATUS “Actually, everything apart from the mannequins is new,” says owner Tilo Heuser about the conversion of the fashion house Bratfisch. “Mind you, they aren’t very old either.”

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I

f you would like to see common theses of economic prophets, trend researchers, and consulting firms refuted, we suggest a trip to Giessen. The city, located in Central Hesse, has 86,000 inhabitants and is one of seven cities enjoying a special status within the federal state. In the heart of Giessen yet not in a prime location - one finds Bratfisch. This is where one would, instinctively, like to place an exclamation mark behind the term “special status”. Since the conversion in the summer of 2018, it should be three exclamation marks - one for every floor of the fashion house, a family business since 1911. “We have modernised the store regularly, but eventually it has to be done properly,” Tilo Heuser says.

GOING THE WHOLE HOG Sari and Tilo Heuser took over the business in 2008. Each in their own unpretentious, yet very passionate, manner. “My favourite part is still interacting with customers,” Sari Heuser says convincingly. She ambitiously introduced the women’s department to the store and pushed it to new heights season after season. In terms of turnover, the women have long since surpassed the men. In terms of image and brands, Sari Heuser has achieved her interim target. “This conversion was the starting point for

Photos: Bratfisch

Bratfisch/Giessen


IN STORE

another trading-up phase. The aim must be to further increase receipt values by selling higher quality pieces.” The passion for their profession, as well as for entrepreneurship, has turned the Heusers into a power couple. The business is as healthy as can be and the owners would never dream of adding their voices to the industry’s usual lamentation. Bratfisch has created its own economy, is a brand in its own right, and binds customers of all age groups with competent advice. But how? “Through hard work,” Tilo Heuser states dryly. And now that the dust of the conversion has given way to the splendour of the new store, the Heusers will do just that: work. They’ll ensure that a few more experts, who have declared cities like Giessen the death zone for upmarket fashion retailers, have to scratch their heads and think. Bravo!

Tilo and Sari Heuser’s Bratfisch has demonstrated that detailed work on all setscrews of entrepreneurial success pays off.

Bratfisch Neuenweg 17, Giessen/Germany Conversion: Summer 2018 Owner: Tilo Heuser Employees: 14 Sales area: 500 sqm Brands for women: among others AG Jeans, Brunello Cuccinelli, Dorothee Schumacher, Fabiana Filippi, Herno, Hogan, Moncler, Otto d´Ame, Odeeh, Parajumpers, Santoni, Tagliatore, Ugg, Woolrich Brands for men: among others Better Rich, C.P. Company, Eton, Etro, FTC, Kiefermann, Moncler, Officine Creative, Phil Petter, PT01, Stone Island, Sun68, Tiger of Sweden, Windsor, Woolrich, Zanone, Z Zegna

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EDITOR'S LETTER

ABOUT US

Publisher, editorial office, advertising department and owner UCM-Verlag B2B Media GmbH & Co KG Salzweg 17, 5081 Salzburg-Anif Austria T 0043.6246.89 79 99 F 0043.6246.89 79 89 office@ucm-verlag.at www.ucm-verlag.at www.style-in-progress.com Management Stephan Huber

Do Better

Editors-in-chief Stephan Huber stephan.huber@ucm-verlag.at Martina Müllner-Seybold

“Retail is Changing” was already a popular and hackneyed headline almost 30 years ago. I have decided to dig it out again today, completely unironically. It feels like it’s never been more fitting. Digitisation, crypto currencies, artificial intelligence, cashless stores… more than a few self-proclaimed and actual experts paint a downright dystopian picture when they outline the future of the (stationary) retail trade.

martina.muellner@ucm-verlag.at

I have delved into this topic very often, more often than not right here in this magazine segment. My view has always been fairly positive, fully aware that we may need to use the “it-word” of the hour, namely disruption, to describe the impact and speed of this change. I mean I am positive as far as the future of the stationary retail trade is concerned, more specifically, as regards the importance of the brick-and-mortar channel within the omnichannel reality of a market determined by consumers. (see Editor’s Letter in style in progress 4/2018)

Contributing writers

Art direction/production Elisabeth Prock-Huber elisabeth@ucm-verlag.at

Petrina Engelke Isabel Faiss Ina Köhler Kay Alexander Plonka Nicoletta Schaper Veronika Zangl

But there is a limitation to my optimism, and it’s not exactly insignificant either. In the current climate, it simply isn’t enough to merely go with the flow passively in the hope of muddling through. The “good old days” that many have invoked will not return. Doug Stephens words it even more drastically in this issue’s Longview: “Until we let go of the past, it is very difficult to embrace the future. The era that we are moving into looks nothing like the old era. Until we let the old era die, we can never move successfully into the new one.”

Image editor Johannes Hemetsberger Advertising director Stephan Huber stephan.huber@ucm-verlag.at

While I agree, I would like to add something I consider essential. The new era of which Stephens speaks - and it has long since begun - doesn’t require everything to be reinvented or done differently. In many respects, it’s rather a matter of a return to self-evident values that have increasingly faded in an economy almost exclusively driven by revenue.

Publisher’s assistant, distribution Sigrid Staber sigrid.staber@ucm-verlag.at Christina Hörbiger

The big picture: The free market economy, as the foundation of a democratic society, must be defended against its enemies from within - by all of us! The enemies are those who deliberately undermine this foundation by constantly repeating the nonsense that freedom means there are no rules. The small, more personal picture: Service, service, and more service! It really doesn’t matter on which channel. Make the effort to actually take customers seriously! Storytelling. Investments in personnel!!! Be open for employees’ ideas, also - or especially - for young ideas. Be brave enough to question well-trodden paths, for example in the context of product ranges. Only buy what you can sell! But remain open to new and surprising ideas. Finally understand that digitisation presents an opportunity! Actually take customers seriously! (That’s right, I already mentioned that. But one can’t stress it often enough.) In short: Simply do better! This is what the new era demands of all of us. And we’re going to make it! Yours Stephan Huber stephan.huber@ucm-verlag.at 208

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christina.hoerbiger@ucm-verlag.at English translations Manfred Thurner Printing sandlerprint&packaging 3671 Marbach, Austria Printing coordinator Manfred Reitenbach

Next issue 23 April 2019


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