Plus Ultra | June 2020

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Plus Ultra June 2020 | St Peters Lutheran College Magazine

IT'S A BRAND NEW WORLD Welcome to Springfield's new Junior High Precinct

ART COMPETITION THE RETURN OF AFL AND A RISING AFLW STAR SPORT, MUSIC AND ACADEMIC UPDATES

REGULARS

HEAD OF COLLEGE MINISTRY SPOSA


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CONTENTS

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Cover: Changes are happening at Springfield. You can read all about their new Junior High Precinct on page 14.

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30

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Plus Ultra June 2020 incorporating SPOSA Bulletin Published by St Peters Lutheran College Editor / Designer Cassie Twemlow c.twemlow@stpeters.qld.edu.au Writers Cassie Twemlow, Kelsey Bricknell, Anthony Cox Photography Anthony Cox Advertising Enquiries Publications Office Telephone: 07 3377 6262 publications@stpeters.qld.edu.au St Peters Lutheran College CRICOS Provider: 00516E 66 Harts Road, Indooroopilly Qld 4068 Telephone: 07 3377 6222 reception@stpeters.qld.edu.au www.stpeters.qld.edu.au www.facebook.com/stpeterslutherancollege Š 2019 St Peters Lutheran College SPOSA Office 66 Harts Road, Indooroopilly Qld 4068 Telephone: 07 3377 6592 sposa@stpeters.qld.edu.au www.stpeters.qld.edu.au www.facebook.com/sposa45

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CONTENTS

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CONTENTS REGUL ARS

04 05 06

Head of College | What's in a name? Letter from the Editor Ministry

AC ADEMIC

08 10 11 12

Indooroopilly 2019 Results Springfield 2019 Results Starting university amidst COVID-19 Founding students celebrate 13 years at Springfield

AROUND C AMPUS

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14 16 18 20

Inspired learning and collaboration Language links Making way for innovation Pushing their limits pays off

THE ARTS

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Singing their way around Europe

SPORT

24 25 25 26 27 28 29

Serving it up to the rest of Australia Year 8 Boys Volleyball success Making a huge splash A national Netball prospect - one of our own On the right track This Aussie rules! We mark the return of AFL

BOARDING

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Boarding | Evolving for 75 years

SPOSA

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32 34 35 36 37 38 40 41 42

SPOSA President (including SPOSA Notices) The St Peters boy Jan Lewis: 40+ years at St Peters Respect, Empathy and the importance of having a good laugh Springfield alumni experiences US political tour of a lifetime Challenge accepted Founders Day Captains function Births, Deaths and Marriages

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HEAD OF COLLEGE

WHAT'S IN A NAME? As 2020 marks the 75th Anniversary of College commencement, I reflect on the history of St Peters and, particularly, how it acquired its name.

Pictured: Tim Kotzur, Head of College with 2020 College Captains (left) Julia Baird and Ben Roberton and, Vice-Captains (right) Zac Robinson and Alara Slattery.

TIM KOT ZUR

head of college

O

words to Peter in Gospel of Matthew 16:18 ne of the more interesting things I discovered reading through the minutes ‘And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell of the College Council back in 1944 and shall not prevail against it.' 1945 was that the College still did not have a name on that very first day of operation, As I reflect on the decision of the original 20 February 1945. The name of the College College Council to call our College St Peters, was only decided upon the night of the a number of things come to mind. 20th when the College Council met. At their meeting, a number of It reflects a literal truth names were suggested, that our College is built including Ross Roy upon rock. You only Lutheran College, have to look at the Luther College, St Pauls, Like buildings built rock walls of Mayer St Martins, Trinity, and Oval to know this. The on rock that can Jubilee. The name withstand the extremes rock across the site ‘St Peters’ was has made building of weather, these eventually chosen. challenging – yet it has firm foundations of According to Pastor meant that physically Gerhard Dohler, the St Peters enable it to our College is on firm founding Chairman of and sure foundations weather life’s storms the College Council (a which will stand across and challenges." role he filled for the time. first 25 years of the life Naming our College St Peters has also meant of the College) “St Peters found favour, not that metaphorically we are built on firm only because the building of Ross Roy is and sure foundations. These foundations founded on a rock, but especially because include the provision of a rigorous, holistic our experience has much in common with liberal education within a culture that values the experience and attitude of Peter. Christ learning, excellence, service, care and has said to Peter, ‘Thou art Peter, and upon community, underpinned by our Christian this rock I will build my church’.” ethos and values. Like buildings built on rock The name Peter is derived from the Greek that can withstand the extremes of weather, ‘Petros’, meaning ‘rock’. Peter was one of these firm foundations of St Peters enable the original 12 apostles of Jesus, and became it to weather life’s storms and challenges. It the first leader of the early Christian Church. is these firm foundations of St Peters that He is traditionally understood to be the first have been most evident during the current Bishop of Rome. This is reflected in Jesus’ COVID-19 pandemic. It’s these foundations

"

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REGULARS

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR C A SSIE T WEMLOW

editor

T that give me confidence and hope as we face unprecedented times in the history of the College. These foundations have underpinned the College’s response to the situation we face today. It is on these foundations that we will continue to build St Peters on when we come out the other side of this challenge. It is also Jesus’ words at the end of Matthew 16:18, ‘and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it,’ that provides a reassuring promise for our College and all in our community. The challenge that we face is unprecedented; it has caused much pain and there is more to come; it will alter how we do things; but we will overcome it together because of our sure foundations. In 1945 the founders of our College faced incredible challenges in establishing St Peters - the ongoing spectre of World War II, the hostility of anti-German sentiment directed towards Lutherans at the time, financial difficulties, the smallness of a minority church, and the relative isolation of many of the rural congregations. Our founders met the challenges of their time. We will too. In choosing the name St Peters for our College, the founders gave us a great gift. Our name is a daily reminder to return to our foundational underpinnings that have shaped us for 75 years; a name that guides us during this pandemic, and a name that will inspire us as we create the ‘new normal’ together.

o say it has been an interesting year so far, is quite the understatement.

In this edition you will notice a number of events and celebrations that usually take place, are missing. No Music concerts. No Sports games. No fundraisers, lunches, ribbon cuttings or community get-togethers. It's been a quiet and isolating semester, for some more than others. With the challenges of 'At Home Learning' and still providing our College community with a form of continuity, staff, students and families alike have been forced to face new realities head-on. As a result, we've tackled obstacles through technology. Zoom meetings; Facetime; online learning and videos, videos and more videos have poured out of all departments to keep up with the demand and need for immediate communication. With no sense of normality in the last few months, in this Plus Ultra we celebrate past achievements, current projects and future intentions. And these are definitely something to write about. We have sporting champions to celebrate in our Tennis, Swimming and Track & Field teams as well as individual achievements in our Old Scholars and Ironbark Award winners. Music acknowledge their December Chorale Tour to Europe and the SPOSA section of the magazine is packed with news of Old Scholar accomplishments and events. This year, Springfield honours the first students to complete thirteen consecutive years at the College in addition to their Netball star, Martina Reekers, who is on track for a position in the Australian Diamonds team. So, whilst the semester has been quiet on campus, there is still a lot to celebrate. Congratulations to everyone who appears in this edition!

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REGULARS

RE-SET: LESSONS LEARNED FROM LOCKDOWN

PA STOR THOMA S BÖHMERT

college senior pastor

H

ow are you all coping with the impact of COVID-19 and associated restrictions?

I have observed a variety of reactions and ways in which people have adapted to the unprecedented changes that we have faced as a society, ranging from real struggles to thriving.

When anticipating the return of the Prep, Years 1, 11 and 12 students in Week 4, I was excited at the prospect of some life being brought back to our beautiful campus again. It was very strange returning from long service leave to a virtually empty school. But as we return to some sense of normality, albeit a changed normality, I wonder if there are lessons we can take from this time of enforced slow-down. What have you learned through the last couple of months? Are there things you are thankful for? What will you take with you as you return to a more active life? Over the last few weeks I have noticed during my morning cycle rides how many people were out for walks – often in family groups, with children and pets. People seemed to have more time for each other, stopping to chat, maybe checking on a neighbour they barely knew previously. Some people told me how they appreciated the closer connection with their children, rediscovering board games and family meals. Others mentioned how much they appreciated not to have long commutes through clogged roads each day. It was interesting to read reports of lowered pollution levels, from Europe to Australia; the earth getting a break from our ceaseless activities.

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Of course, I am also aware of the price many have paid, from unemployment to mental health and, in some cases, hunger. In a recent article in the Australian Institute of Company Directors magazine the chairman of ANZ, David Gonski, noted that this crisis seemed to bring out the best and the worst in people – and we all saw that, from fights over toilet paper, to people giving their groceries to shut-in neighbours. Are there some of these 'best' aspects that we can encourage and promote into the future? We recently celebrated Easter, the feast of the resurrection of Jesus – with empty churches but lots of people worshipping, nonetheless. Easter is a reminder that God is the God of new beginnings; the God who brings life; the God who brings hope to this world. And this God is at work among us even in the midst of crises. Indeed, it was in the midst of a crisis that these words were recorded by the prophet Isaiah: See, I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the wilderness… (Isaiah 43:19). I believe that God is at work in and among us through this crisis and he will lead us beyond it. And I pray that he will give us eyes to see news things, new opportunities, new beginnings that are placed before us and take hold of them. Will you continue to spend more time with your children; maybe change your schedule and theirs to allow for that? Will you pay more attention to the many daily blessings that we so easily take for granted? What changes will you make? What changes should we make as St Peters community? Will we see the 'new thing' and God’s involvement in it?


Do you want to see your artwork to appear in the 75th anniversary Review? We need a number of section pages and want your artwork contribution! You can create any artwork - drawing, painting, digitial, charcoal etc - corresponding to any of the below themes: • The College (general) • Primary Years • Junior High • Senior School • Boarding

• Sport • Music • Other cocurricular activity • A College event • A College subject

Artwork should be presented on an A4 or A3 sized piece of paper/canvas. Artwork should be unique and created by hand (using pencils, crayons, markers, collage, paint etc). Excessive use of text (words, sentences) is discouraged. Attached to the back of the artwork and in clear print should be the student’s name, age, year level, and a school email address. To enter the competition, please submit your hard copy art work to: Communications Department, Review Art Competition at your sub-school reception. Alternatively, hand deliver to Ross Roy.

The closing date is Friday 16 October, 2020 (COB). Entries will be judged by the Communications Department, the Art Department and Tim Kotzur, Head of College. Eight winners in total will be chosen. Each winner will receive a $30 Amazon gift voucher PLUS their artwork will be published in the 75th anniversary Review. Winners will be contacted, via the email address supplied, during the fifth week of Term 4, 2020. All artwork will happily be returned to the artist before the end of Term 4, 2020. Competition open only to St Peters Lutheran College, Indooroopilly students. These rules form the terms and conditions for this competition.


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ACADEMIC

INDOOROOPILLY 2019 RESULTS The final year that Overall Postitions were awarded to Queensland Seniors and our St Peters cohort did a commendable job on their studies.

PETER MACDONALD

director of teaching & learning innovation

O

ur Year 12 2019 QCAA and International Baccalaureate (IB) students achieved outstanding OP or OP-equivalent results last year. Some highlights include: • 15% of our Year 12 students achieved an OP 1-2 or equivalent in 2019; • 40.2% achieved an OP or Diploma Score equivalent to between 1 and 5; • 78% achieved an OP or Diploma Score equivalent to between 1 and 10; and, • 98% achieved an OP or Diploma Score equivalent to between 1 and 15.

On 24 February, 2020, our 2019 Year 12 Scholars were invited back to be recognised for their excellent academic achievement. While it is wonderful to acknowledge the outstanding achievements of our 2019 Seniors, the Scholars’ Assembly provides inspiration for the students sitting in the audience. Well done to our Scholars for their excellent personal achievements and thank you for coming back and inspiring the younger groups of students. Again this year, it was wonderful to witness the excitement of our Scholars as they branded the Scholars’ Wall in the Academic Hub with their name. Our IB students continued to perform well in 2019. The students were a tight bunch with a strong sense of community. Everyone worked hard to support one another through the rigors of Higher Level (HL) curriculum and external assessment. It is clear to see that strong relationships develop between Mrs Ros Midgley, IB Diploma Coordinator, and each IB student. Mrs Midgley dedicates a huge amount of time to the IB students to ensure individualised care and attention

Plus Ultra | June 2020

is provided at precisely the right time. Mrs Sarah Thompson was assisting Mrs Midgley run the IB program during 2019 and together they made a wonderfully organised, professional and supportive team. 2019 saw the last of the QCS Tests. Again, the QCAA Year 12 cohort participated in three QCS lessons per fortnight led, in most cases, by their Year 12 English teacher. Additional to the work of the English teachers, the Mathematics Department stepped in during 2019 to assist with Short Response preparation; this work was proven to be extremely valuable considering the excellent Short Response results by the 2019 cohort. All in all the 2019 QCAA cohort did a fantastic job on the QCS Test – they are congratulated for their dedication and teamwork. This year our Years 11 and 12 students are undertaking the new QCE system. There were many challenges for our teachers and Year 11 students last year and I am proud to report that teachers and students alike have invested significantly in the new system and are positively positioned for the year ahead. At the end of this year, the QCAA students will receive an Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR), if eligible, instead of an OP score. Many months of planning behind the St Peters scenes have been invested in preparing for this significant change in senior schooling and tertiary entrance. Something that stays consistent between the two systems is the need for students to be organised, speak with their teacher, clarify their understanding and plan for success. To help with organisation, planning, seeking


ACADEMIC

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* The following statistics relate to students at St Peters Indooroopilly only. For statistics that relate to St Peters Springfield students, see page 10.

2019 AC ADEMIC RESULTS (IND)

188 students in the cohort.

47 Pictured: 2019 Old Scholars receiving their respective awards at the February Scholars Assembly

clarification and open communication between teachers, students and parents, St Peters has moved to continuous reporting for the Years 11 and 12 cohorts. Results, as they become available, will be visible on the Community Portal and marking criteria sheets will be available through Firefly. A significant advantage of this new system is that students will be able to view assessment information done in Year 11 when they encounter a similar assessment in Year 12. 2020 is an evaluation year for our International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program. This means that the IB will be making a visit to our school to review our programs. Along with inquiry-based learning an underpinning ethos of the IB is teamwork and collaboration for students and staff. During 2019 and early 2020, our Primary Years staff have been meeting in professional learning communities to further develop their understanding and alignment in areas such as assessment, curriculum programming, inquiry-based learning, contemporary learning spaces and now, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, ‘At Home Learning’. The collaboration and innovation that comes from these learning communities is not only inspiring to witness, they are ensuring we are consistently improving the learning experiences for our students. At all Year Levels, we are looking forward to the challenges of 2020 and are confident that our amazing learners will once again deliver remarkable achievements throughout the year.

100%

students undertook the IB.

were awarded the IB Diploma.

141 24

students undertook the QCAA.

(13%) of our Year 12 students achieved an OP 1-2 or equivalent in 2019.

40.2%

of St Peters 2019 graduates achieved a score equivalent to an OP 1-5.

98%

of St Peters 2019 graduates received an OP 1-15 or equivalent.

13%

of IB students received an IB Diploma score of 39-45, which is equivalent to an OP 1-2.

49%

of IB students achieved a score equivalent to an OP 1-5.

99%

of St Peters students who applied for a course through QTAC received an offer.

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ACADEMIC

SPRINGFIELD 2019 RESULTS CR AIG SCHMIDT

principal, springfield

A

cross the state the 2019 Year 12 cohort was a small, ‘half-sized’ cohort due to the changes to the school entrance age with the introduction of Prep in 2007. At Springfield, we had 21 graduates who were very close knit, travelling particularly closely through their learning journey with each other and with their school. All of our graduates received both a Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) and an Overall Position (OP). Of these srudents, 24% received an OP in the 1-5 range with 33% receiving an OP 1-6. We had the highest percentage of OP 1-5 students as a percentage of our graduating class in the Springfield area and the second highest in Ipswich. We are proud of the achievements of our students and that, as a result, they have been able to pursue their desired pathways. Of our 2019 graduates, 86% have proceeded to university and 14% to TAFE or directly to the workforce. The foremost university destinations were 37% to the University of Queensland, 21% to Griffith University, 21% to the University of Southern Queensland and 10% to the Queensland University of Technology. Twenty of our 21 graduates (95%) applied through Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre to continue their formal learning with 100% receiving place offers. One in four students received their first preference, with one in every two students receiving their first or second preference. Our tertiary bound graduates are pursuing a broad range of fields of study including nursing, aviation, human services, medical

* The following statistics relate to students at St Peters Springfield only. For statistics that relate to St Peters Indooroopilly students, see page 9.

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sonography, criminology & justice, information technology, sport & exercise science, engineering, arts, advanced science, clinical physiology, pharmacy, physiotherapy, marine science, health science, forensic science, law, education and computer science. We commend our graduates and thank our teaching staff for their diligence, expertise, support and advocacy of our young people. May God bless our graduates richly along the next part of their journey and give focus, direction and inspiration to our current students as they continue their studies and preparations for that which lies ahead. Of course, our 2020 Year 12 students will be graduating under the new senior schooling system involving both internal and external assessments which will lead to an Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR). Our Plus Ultra motto, ever higher - more beyond, captures the expectation that our students are committed to achieving their personal best. In so doing, they develop their God-given gifts and talents, capacities and capabilities, which they can then put to use through their vocations to be of service and blessing to others in community. God cares for others in our community and the world through people, through us, as we fulfil the vocations in which we are placed and to which we are called. Wherever we find ourselves, whether it is where we expected or planned to be or not, there we serve. As it is written, ‘Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord’ (Colossians 3:23).

2019 AC ADEMIC RESULTS (SFD)

21

students in the cohort

33%

students received an OP 1-6

86%

students proceeded to university


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ACADEMIC

STARTING UNIVERSITY AMIDST COVID-19 KEL SEY BRICKNELL

communications officer

I

n January, St Peters 2019 Old Scholars, Hannah Wheeler and Rupert Hoare, were getting ready to commence university on a high. Both had lived up to the College’s motto, Plus Ultra, by achieving great academic success. Following graduation, Hannah received a QCE Achievement Award (placing her in the top 0.09% of students in the state) and a University of Queensland (UQ) Excellence Scholarship to study a Bachelor of International Studies. Rupert was awarded a Ramsay Undergraduate Scholarship to study a Bachelor of Humanities/Bachelor of Laws (Honours) at UQ. Their university studies commenced normally. While a little nervous, they both embraced campus-life with passion, revelling in the opportunity to attend O-Week and sign up to a range of clubs and activities. Rupert toured the Queensland Supreme Court, joined the Law Orchestra and maintained his St Peters connections by joining the St Peters 2019 Social Netball team. Hannah got to know the campus well, making the most of the UQ environment. “It was easy to spend a lot of time there outside of my classes,” she told us. “I even went in on my days off and sat in an archaeology lecture with my friend, because, why not?” Hannah was able to hone her true passions in the first half of Semester 1. Her French course, while a slight step up, was not as difficult as she’d been expecting and her Politics subjects were really interesting too—a true sign, she said, that she’d picked the right degree. Similarly, Rupert had a sense that he was in the right field—a feeling that stemmed from their approach to Years 11 and 12. In their Senior years, Hannah and Rupert selected subjects based on their strengths; ones that most interested them. They also drew on all the resources available at the College and regularly sought out feedback from their teachers, mentors and

Pictured: University scholarship recipients (top) Rupert Hoare and (bottom) Hannah Wheeler.

the Academic Hub. Perhaps, then, that’s why when, in March, they had to make the transition to online learning due to COVID-19, their drive to learn and succeed was not dramatically dampened. “Obviously it’s not the same as being in a classroom,” Hannah said. “But given the circumstances, I think it’s a viable alternative.” To counteract the threat of losing motivation while learning at home, Hannah has developed a range of systems to keep herself accountable. Both she and Rupert count themselves lucky to still have their studies to occupy them during the pandemic. “While I would appreciate being able to see my friends again,” Rupert said, “I am still able to study and, as my degree is five and a half years long, I have plenty of years ahead to attend campus!” Rupert continued by stating that St Peters set him up exceptionally well for university (even a university that, at the moment, exists predominantly online). “St Peters places a high demand on independent learning, creative problem solving and self-organisation,” he said. “It also gave me a holistic education, an appreciation for other’s points of view and a desire to do my best.” Given their Plus Ultra attitude and history of great achievements, we have no doubt that Rupert and Hannah will achieve anything less.

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ACADEMIC

FOUNDING STUDENTS CELEBRATE 13 YEARS AT ST PETERS SPRINGFIELD The number ‘13’ is considered a lucky number for some, and this can be said to be true for founding Springfield students graduating in 2020. Springfield's Renée Michalkow, sat down with the four students and asked them about their time at the College.

RENÉE MICHALKOW

marketing and events officer, springfield

O

pening in 2008, St Peters Springfield welcomed 96 founding students. With a dedicated team and the support of the Springfield community, the College has since moved to its purpose-built facility and is now home to over 600 students and over 70 teachers and staff. Proud to be the first students to complete 13 years of continuous education at the Springfield campus, founding students, Hannah Couch, Tiernan Neil, Renieke van Jaarsveld, and Naomi Duong share their experiences of their learning journey at St Peters Springfield. Hannah It’s an honour to be part of St Peters Springfield from when it first started. One of the things I like most about the College is having small classes as it’s an opportunity to know classmates better as well as teachers. My time at Springfield has been memorable and the school has provided us with many activities we will never forget such as camps, the Year 8 production, and formals. A memorable moment for me would be from Ironbark. I remember hiking on day two, my group was in front and we decided to draw arrows and pictures with sticks in the ground for the two groups of girls following us. They ended up getting lost and didn’t get back until very late, so they were walking in the dark. When we were all reunited, they said those arrows were a sense of hope and excitement for them to know they were on the right track.

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Teachers also make sure we are on the right track by encouraging us to participate in different opportunities outside of school. This is so we can see what pathways we’d be interested in pursuing once we graduate. I have been part of many cocurricular activities such as Netball and Softball and extra-curricular activities such as Debating. It provides an opportunity to know some of your classmates better as well as students from Indooroopilly. When graduating this year, I will be very sad to leave it behind since it’s been part of my life for so long and I’m used to the routine. But I will be excited to start a new chapter in my life. I’m looking forward to starting university next year and meeting new people – confident that any challenge will always be tackled with Plus Ultra in mind. Tiernan There’s a sense of pride being a founding student and being here since the beginning. It’s nice to see how the school has grown from under 100 students in the first year to now. The school has personally taught me the core values of Care, Dignity and Respect. They uphold every student to those values and it helps shape who we are. One of my most memorable experiences is from Ironbark. We were taught to own our mistakes and all the boys became more of a brotherhood together. While I haven’t figured out exactly where I want to be, I do plan to continue my education. I am currently looking at learning through TAFE next year. I’m still on a voyage of self-discovery.


ACADEMIC

Naomi St Peters Springfield has always been a place I felt safe. It is a community that makes me happy and content. I like the teachers and my classmates, and the community is full of friendship and kindness. The many opportunities, provided by St Peters, have allowed me to see my strengths and the path I would like to take in the future.

Pictured: (above) Renieke, Tiernan and Hannah in May; (below) Mrs Debbie WestMcInnes with Renieke, Hannah and Naomi back in February.

There are activities for everyone here at the College to suit all kinds of interests from Debating to Robotics. Starting in 2018, I began helping Mrs Boase run the ‘Knit and Natter’ Club. It is where students from all groups can come to the hub and learn how to knit or crochet during lunchtime. It’s a great way for students of different age groups to get to know each other and strengthen our community. St Peters Springfield has given me many skills throughout my years as a student. In particular, it has taught me the lessons of perseverance and understanding. To connect with the kindness of others, to accept my mistakes, and to remember the three core values of Care, Dignity and Respect. As I go out into the world as a full-fledged adult, I will take these values with me and apply them to everything I do. After graduating I will miss seeing my friends, classmates and teachers every day. It will feel strange and different to finally leave the school that I had been in for 13 years of my life. I’ll be proud to be an Old Scholar of my school.

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Renieke I have loved being a part of the St Peters Springfield community from the start. It has been incredible to see the growth of the school over the past few years. My favourite thing about the College would be the close community aspect. Everyone is familiar with each other and as a Senior, I have gotten to know just about everyone. You can walk past a Prep student and they will up and greet you and know who you are. An unforgettable moment for me was during Ironbark. During our hike, on day three, to the next camp for the night, the hiking packs were painfully heavy on our backs and our entire group was exhausted from walking the entire day. All we could think about was our next meal and being able to get some rest. As we continued to venture on, my group approached the most beautiful, peaceful creek. We all decided to put down our heavy packs and take a rest but also embrace the moment by playfully splashing each other. I clearly remember how we were all enjoying ourselves after a long, hard day of travelling and the cold water was super refreshing at the time. At that moment I had never been more grateful for my friends and the bonds we had built throughout Ironbark. To completely top off this moment the rarest and beautiful turtle swam by brushing past our feet; the moment was something quite special. I have been fortunate to be part of piano private tuition, dance troupe, QDU Debating, and Netball. These cocurricular activities, combined with my academic goals, have enriched my life and helped me develop into the positive person I am today. After graduating this year, I will feel sad to leave the College community that I have been part of for 13 years. However, I’ll forever cherish all of the memories and good times I’ve had with my peers and teachers at St Peters.

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AROUND CAMPUS

INSPIRED LEARNING AND COLLABORATION Springfield students rejoice—the innovative Junior High Precinct is ready and waiting, with Stage 2 plans on the horizon.

C AROLYN JACOBS

enrolments registrar

T

he St Peters Lutheran College Springfield community is delighted at the completion of their new Junior High Precinct which features prominently in the Springfield Central landscape. The new facility with its seven classrooms, individualised learning hub and state-of-the art iSTEAM laboratory will cater for over 200 students and accommodate continued growth at the College. Principal, Craig Schmidt, says the agile design learning environment will inspire students. “There is an abundance of writable surfaces, and agile learning spaces, for small groups through to whole cohorts. The new facility will be superb for developing the essential skills and capabilities our young people need for the future as effective collaborators and communicators, critical and creative thinkers and influential leaders. We are delighted by

Plus Ultra | June 2020

the design work of McLellan Bush Architects and the work of our building contractors, Evans Built. It was exciting to see the joy on teachers’ faces when entering and establishing themselves in the new building. I am looking forward to when our Junior High students return and the building really starts humming with teaching, learning and school life.” The iSTEAM (innovation, Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Mathematics) laboratory is a creative design hub which will enhance delivery and development of our Robotics, technology and STEAM programs including Engineering, Digital Solutions and Design Technology subjects. Special attention has been paid to lighting, acoustics and temperature control in order to create an optimal environment for


AROUND CAMPUS

learning. Mr Schmidt says, “we expect our students to be committed to our Plus Ultra motto – ever higher, more beyond – just as we are as staff. This means paying attention to both the bigger vision but also the details and the personal connection. We are always looking towards what’s on and over the next horizon, because we are committed to obtaining the best outcomes for our young people both today and tomorrow.” The caring community is considered to be foundational to students flourishing both academically and personally at St Peters. In the new precinct students will enjoy a large flexible learning area, locker facilities, kitchenette and dining area, gallery, and indoor and outdoor spaces. The precinct provides opportunities to bring students in Years 7—9 together in new ways that will enhance their sense of belonging in Junior

1515

High and celebrate life and learning. Mr Schmidt explains, “we are now even better placed to honour our young people, and respect and meet their individual learning and developmental needs, whilst providing them with increased responsibility and leadership opportunities.” At the end of Term 1, international leader in educational innovation and learning environments, Professor Stephen Heppell, visited St Peters Springfield and toured the new building. He described the Junior High Precinct as the best new building he has seen in Australia, a “fabulous building for learning.” A second stage is already planned for the Junior High Precinct which will add additional classrooms, learning spaces and amenities.

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AROUND CAMPUS

LANGUAGE LINKS Languages have always played an important role at St Peters. Given our heritage and Lutheran foundations, the German language program has long been a College staple.

ROGER GANDERTON

german teacher

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anguages and language teaching have always played an important role in the College’s development. As a Lutheran school, St Peters has been known for its German heritage and strong background in German language teaching from its inception 75 years ago. Today, that tradition continues, with innovative and continuous programs from Prep—Year 12 in the language of its founders. However, German is now just one of five modern languages taught alongside English in the high school years. In all of the College programs in German, French, Mandarin Chinese, Japanese and Spanish (ab initio from Year 11), our students are developing communicative and intellectual skills to equip them for the multicultural and multilingual world they now live in. In 1945, it was German and Latin that formed the languages element of the curriculum. This was very much in keeping with the school’s heritage, the community background at the time, and the focus on rigorous academic study that formed part of this heritage. Through the 1950’s and 1960’s, the German link remained current, in particular through having children of German missionaries from Neuendettelsau, Germany, but based in New Guinea - attend boarding school at St Peters in Brisbane. This link was strengthened into the 1970’s and 1980’s with the formation of a special German school within the College that offered the German high school curriculum and prepared these young people for further study back in their homeland.

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Regarding the German language program as a whole, this traditional link is not just a historical curiosity. In 2006, a student group visit to Neuendettelsau and a meeting with so many former students of St Peters from that era led to the establishment of an exchange program with the local high school. Even as current restrictions on international travel put such programs on 'pause', our students are able to connect electronically and share each others’ language, interests and insights. From the 1980’s onwards, our language programs have grown and developed through Primary language learning, immersion-based curricula, computerassisted language learning and community schooling, as well as the introduction of more European and Asian languages into the school curriculum and more innovative approaches to language teaching. These include the highly successful Accelerated Integrative Method (AIM) French program, and the Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling (TPRS) approach employed in Mandarin Chinese. Teachers of all these languages have established links with partner schools and institutions in the target countries and fostered proficiency development at an advanced level with our students. More recently, for example, students of German in Year 11 were able to sit the Deutsches Sprachdiplom I (German Language Diploma) examinations, that are recognised in Germany and allow admission to preparatory colleges in Germany.


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The limits of my language mean the limits of my world. Ludwig Wittgenstein

Pictured: (clockwise from top left) Primary students learning German; Japanese exchange; a French exchange in Paris; German exchange students at Christmas markets; current students at a Chinese speaking competition.

Right now, the importance of a global outlook, alongside a local one, has never been more apparent. We are very privileged to be part of a College community, where such an outlook can be fostered, not just through our multilingual teachers, but also through our multilingual community. The plethora of languages alongside English that are spoken include, not just global languages, but also many local Australian languages. The long overdue recognition and support of the importance of these will form part of the many challenging but exciting developments ahead for us all over the next 75 years!

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MAKING WAY FOR INNOVATION KEL SEY BRICKNELL

communications officer

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hether you’re a member of a current St Peters family, an Old Scholar, or staff member, you may have heard that big changes are taking place at St Peters Indooroopilly. In fact, if you live, work or study on campus, you quite literally would have seen and heard the changes taking place at the start of this year. So just what’s going on and why?

Location, location, location! The location of B Block and Luther House is integral to the St Peters Lutheran College Masterplan. Designed to ensure our College continues to meet the needs of our next generation of students, the Masterplan is future-focused. Technology and innovation are integral to learning at this point in the 21st Century and that’s why a ‘Centre for Learning and Innovation’ has been proposed.

Well, for starters, B Block has been demolished and Luther House (currently The Centre for Learning and Innovation will home to our Senior School Reception) is up replace general learning areas and provide next. These two buildings have served the flexible teaching and learning spaces for College well over the years—they’ve housed our P-12 students. It will span four stories classrooms, administrative offices, mail rooms, on the site of B Block and Luther House printing & IT equipment, Boarding devotions, and boast a design that speaks to elements College assemblies, social activities and more. of both the Langer Library and the College Set next to the Langer Library at the far end Chapel, tying the whole Campus Heart area of the Chapel Forecourt, the buildings are, or together visually. were, unmissable members of the College’s ‘Campus Heart’ buildings.

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A Fond Farewell History is important. To honour it, we’d planned a Decommissioning Service for the buildings, but were unable to follow through due to COVID-19. Instead, we went on a walk down memory lane with our Old Scholars on Facebook— we were blown away by all the stories they shared! Luther House was built in 1947, just two years after the College opened. The memories of it go back 73 years and include scholarly accounts, tales of mischief, tales of community and tales of love. Of all the stories we’ve been told over the last few months, we thought we’d share this one with you—one of love and Luther: the perfect image to leave you with. As far as St Peters ties go, Prof Bill (AM) and Margaret Curnow (Neumann, 1960), are well and truly attached. Between them they hold titles of College Councillor, Chairman, Old Scholar, SPOSA Committee Member and Past Parents (just to name a few!). Margaret was also the first Old Scholar to be married at Luther House—a location she and Bill chose for the way it represented their history and their love that’s focussed on Christ. Bill and Margaret tied the knot at Luther House on 19 December, 1964 with Old Scholar, David Larsen (1954) performing the ceremony. On 22 December, 2019, they

returned to celebrate their 55th Anniversary and reaffirm their vows. Their service was attended by family, friends and Old Scholars, including St Peters’ third chaplain and Old Scholar, Pastor Reinhard Mayer (1950), who conducted the blessings. The love that Bill and Margaret share for Luther House is truly special and we’re so glad that it can live on through their photos and stories. For more St Peters memories, be sure to follow our SPOSA page on Facebook facebook.com/sposa45/.

Pictured: (facing page, clockwise from top left) Going...going...the demolition of B Block commences; Luther House 1950; Margaret and Bill Curnow outside Luther House after their 2019 marriage reaffirmation; Gone...B Block, demolished. (this page, clockwise from top) Bill and Margaret's wedding ceremony in Luther House in 1964; in the Chapel with Pastor Reinhard Mayer reaffirming their vows last December; After the Curnow's wedding on the Luther House steps.

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PUSHING THEIR LIMITS PAYS OFF When 2019’s last Year 9 group (LM) set out for their Ironbark journey in November, they never would’ve guessed that their experience would be one of the most eventful five weeks in the history of Ironbark.

ANTHONY COX

graphic and web designer

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t the time of the LM group departure, Australia hadn’t seen rain for a very long time. Fires were breaking out in other states and it was only a matter of time before Queensland would start reporting similar cases. The reality presented to the LM group was that they would return to school in the second week of the program, not knowing if Ironbark would still be standing for them to return. Recently, we spoke with Rachael Brown and Daniel Kotze, members of the LM group, about what Ironbark meant to them. Rachael and Daniel are also the most recent recipients of the ‘Ironbark Excellence Award’. What were your feelings about Ironbark leading into Year 9 and what were your first impressions? Rachael – I began my St Peters journey in Year 9 and was excited and eager to experience Ironbark. I had heard many stories over the years of this great program from family friends and arriving at Ironbark armed with these helped with learning what I would need to do over the next five weeks. Daniel – I was very excited to go to Ironbark and, like Rachael, l had time to hear many stories from fellow students, as well as knowledge from my older brother who had been to Ironbark in 2016. What did you like most about the program? Daniel – Ironbark was an unforgettable experience; one that has impacted me profoundly. The morning and afternoon farm jobs were amongst the most fun things to do, as well as living closely with my friends and the making of new ones. You had some challenges to overcome with the threatening bush fires. How did you deal with that?

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Rachael – We received the news we would be evacuating in the middle of the night. We had to get out of bed and quickly pack our day pack with enough things for a few days. As we packed our things onto the bus, smoke filled the air. We felt concerned that our home was under threat and we all hoped that the beloved staff and animals would be safe. From the safety of the bus, we could see the fire front on the mountains. It was a little scary and uncertain but the whole time the staff made sure we were all okay and safe. We made it to the camp an hour down the road in Toowoomba where we would stay for the night before being told we would return to the College. When they returned to the College the following week, the group remained together. Thanks to Mrs Tetley-Jones, Acting Deputy Head of Junior High, and others, they enjoyed a range of activities that, in many ways, reflected the Ironbark program’s core values. At the end of the week, the students received the exciting news that the fire threat had been contained, and that they would return to Ironbark on the weekend. The students were thrilled! The ‘Ironbark Excellence Award’ exists to recognise those students who demonstrate a consistency of effort, commitment and service across all aspects of the Ironbark program, whether it be community living, helping around the farm, in the kitchen or playing an active role in the outdoor adventure pursuits. Ironbark staff nominate students for the Award at the end of each group’s visit. From this pool of students, the top achieving male and female in the whole Indooroopilly Year 9 cohort is awarded.We spoke to Mr Mathew Sullivan (Director of Ironbark) and asked for his thoughts on 2019’s Award winners.


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Pictured: (above) Ironbark Award winners Rachael Brown and Daniel Kotze; (right) activities held on College grounds during the bush fires at Crows Nest.

“Both Rachael and Daniel were selfless contributors to the experience, not only for their own development but for others and Ironbark in general,” Mr Sullivan told us. “We thank them for how they approached the challenge of Ironbark.” What did receiving the ‘Ironbark Excellence Award’ mean to you? Rachael – Being awarded the ‘Ironbark Excellence Award’ came as such a surprise and I felt so honoured that I had been selected. Being away from the school environment in a smaller group, making strong connections with other classmates, teachers and the animals felt like a privilege. I enjoyed working with others, helping and supporting fellow students as required and working as a team to complete challenges. Do you think the Ironbark experience is something that will assist you in your development as a person? Daniel – Ironbark has produced many unforgettable experiences and skills that will stay with me for the rest of my life. These

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include leadership, practical skills like doing farm jobs, going long periods of time without technology and no immediate contact with family and friends. It’s also further increased my interest in agricultural science. Do you have any advice for students preparing for their Ironbark experience? Rachael – Ironbark is what you make of it. If you don’t put 100% into everything you do and try new things and face your fears, it won’t be as enjoyable or rewarding as it could be. Ironbark is all about self-development. It’s important that you try your best, have fun and always remember to be yourself. Due to their sudden departure from Ironbark in Week 2, the LM group missed the opportunity to experience the five day hike (a vital component in the graduation of the program). They returned to Ironbark in Term 1 of 2020, and completed their hikes, would you believe it, in the rain! Congratulations to Rachael, Daniel and the entire LM group, teachers and staff. You all showed amazing resilience and perseverance in a challenging and changing environment.

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THE ARTS

SINGING THEIR WAY AROUND EUROPE The last tour to take place before the worldwide lockdown was the annual Chorale Tour of Europe. St Peters Chorale members sang their way around England, Belgium, Germany and Denmark, delighting Christmas crowds with their beautiful voices.

CHRISTINE TAYLOR HEAD OF CHOIRS AND TOUR DIRECTOR

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n the European tour, St Peters Chorale was invited to sing services in some of the world’s most iconic Christian buildings - the Cathedrals of St Paul's London, Bristol, Wells, Christ Church Oxford, Coventry and St Albans. These opportunities enhanced student understanding of the context and acoustics for which much of their repertoire was originally composed. One Chorale member reflected, “It was intimidating at first but gradually I found myself immersed in the acoustics under the magnitude of the dome of St Paul’s Cathedral.” Another said, “in Chapter House of Wells Cathedral, we sang For the Fallen standing in a circle around the room…The sound that we produced was probably my favourite for the whole tour.” St Peters Chorale gave concerts throughout England and Europe including the Brandenburg Choral Festival of London and performances at Ypres in Belgium; Wurzburg, Coburg, Dresden, Leipzig in Germany; and

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Copenhagen in Denmark. For many, the experience of singing at the Menin Gate in Ypres was particularly significant. “The sheer number of names written on the walls of the gate was incomprehensible. We will never sing The Parting Glass as well as we did then,” explained a Chorale member. The Chorale’s performances were enthusiastically received, often with standing ovations, and the Australian repertoire was particularly enjoyed. Glowing press reviews included comments such as, ‘powerful, fresh voices delighted the listeners with their excellent versatility’ and, ‘everything rhythmically, dynamically and vocal perfectly balanced’. It is a tribute to the international standard of performance reached by the Chorale that it was invited to sing at all Cathedrals, including St Paul’s, again. Many students listed billeting as a special part of the tour. One wrote, “Another highlight was being able to experience the different


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cultures of the places we travelled to by being hosted with families. All the families were so open and lovely making us all feel at home.” Congratulations to all the students in St Peters Chorale Tour and thank you to the staff – Kathryn Morton (Chorale Director), Phillip Gearing (Chorale Accompanist), Barbara Morton (Tour Administrator), Kristian Scott, James Taylor, Daniel Dempster (Chorale Tutors), Amanda Saffery (Music Administrator) and Dr Ryan Williams (Tour Doctor). As a Chorale member concluded, “We all gained something from this tour – a new appreciation of choristers, cathedrals, music, and each other. We learnt about the history of countries and about new cultures and different people… I have made great friendships with people from different year levels and have also learnt a lot about myself in the process. I know that these memories made on this tour will stay with me for the rest of my life.”

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SPORT

SERVING IT UP TO THE REST OF AUSTRALIA

SHAUN NODWELL

director of sport

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he St Peters Tennis Program, led by Head Coach, Mark Lewis, can now lay claim to being one of the strongest in Australia after the triumph of the 2019 season.

It was another hugely successful AIC and QGSSSA Tennis season in Term 3 of 2019. The Boys were again crowned the Aggregate AIC Champion School and 1st IV Premiers for the eighth straight year, a success that is unmatched across all AIC Sports. The year also saw significant development in the Girls Program with the Open Girls placing second in the QGSSSA Competition with the youngest team of all ten-member schools. Throughout the term, both the 1st IV Boys and Open Girls teams also entered the 2019 Australian Schools Tennis Challenge. Both teams had to progress through Regional (Metropolitan West) and State qualification, which they did with the 1st IV Boys team winning the gold medal and being crowned State Champions, while the Open Girls won the Silver Medal at the State Championships in Rockhampton. This included unbelievable wins over rival schools, Brisbane Boys' College and Kelvin Grove College, in various stages of the competition. This State success guaranteed both teams qualified for the National Schools Final, held in Albury, New South Wales in late November.

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At the National Schools Finals, both teams played incredible Tennis over four days of intense competition. St Peters was one of only three schools in the country who had teams in both the Boys and Girls divisions of the event. At the conclusion of the event, the Open Girls placed seventh in the country and the 1st IV Boys placed third nationally, earning the Bronze Medal. The Boys Team, remarkably, also won the Tennis Australia ‘Fair Play’ Award, meaning they will have the opportunity to travel to the John Newcombe Tennis Academy in Texas, USA, and train for a week under the watchful eye of top-level international coaches. Mark attributes this success to many years of constantly improving and providing a competitive training environment in every session for all students, regardless of their ability. The St Peters Tennis Program has a focus on enjoyment and participation at the base level and consistent improvement and tactical awareness for those who are the high performing players who have ambitions to play Tennis at a higher level. This success includes huge participation numbers which continues to grow every year. Success in the AIC and QGSSSA Competitions has also led to St Peters Students earning scholarships to a variety of Colleges in the United States for their ability on the tennis court.


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YEAR 9 BOYS VOLLEYBALL SUCCESS SHAUN NODWELL

director of sport

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he amazing run of the Year 8A Boys Volleyball has continued with success in late 2019 and again as the 9A team in the 2020 AIC Volleyball season. At the Australian Volleyball Schools Cup on the Gold Coast in December, the team had a remarkable week of performances and experiences to be victorious, winning the Gold Medal in Division 1. This event is the largest school sporting event each year in Australia and has hundreds of entries from all over the country. Such an achievement cannot be understated as this means the team is one of the strongest for their age in Australia. In the school AIC Season in Term 1, the team claimed their third Premiership in three

years by defeating all other AIC Schools to be the undefeated 9A Premiers. This run of success is unprecedented for the College and demonstrates the strength of this age group in Volleyball. The team was so dominant they only lost one set for the entire AIC Season. This team is coached by current parent and former Olympic Volleyballer, Shane Van Beest who has had a profound impact on the St Peters Volleyball Program. Congratulations Boys!

MAKING A HUGE SPLASH ANTHONY COX

graphic and web designer

The official St Peters swimming season has drawn to a close, but it hasn’t done so quietly. In early March we saw the 2020 AIC and QGSSSA Swimming Championships take place at the Brisbane Aquatic Centre, Chandler. For our girl's team, St Peters came home with their seventh (7th) consecutive Championship title. With loud support from the stands, our Girls Swimming Captain, Olivia Collins (Year 12), broke the 50m Freestyle QGSSSA swimming record (previously held by Ariarne Titmus herself!) and Mollie O'Callaghan (Year 11) broke BGGS alumni, Eliza King’s, record in the 100m Freestyle. The St Peters Boys team faired just as well, taking home the Senior and Open Swimming Championships titles - their fourth (4th) consecutive win! With 37 wins from 123 races and 11 records broken, St Peters' super swimmers did us proud. We all can relate to and appreciate the euphoria which surrounds a great win.

Irrespective of what that win may be, the achievement and accomplishment leave us feeling good, elated about what we did, have been a part of or, just witnessed. Well done to each and every one of our swimmers at the AIC & QGSSSA Swimming Championships, the Inter-Lutheran Swimming Carnival and the various meets and training that have gone on throughout the season. Your dedication and ability to show up, again and again, at the swimming pool is highly commendable. It is not just about the swimming performances on the day. Thanks must be given to the parents who fed the students each week; the endless hours of coaching and training; the months of coordinating and organising and, it is also very much about the swimmers who did not get a swim on the day. Behind the scenes, the hard work, guidance and expertise of the coaches Dean, Maxine, Scott, John and Stewart came to fruition and we can not thank them enough.

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A NATIONAL NETBALL PROSPECT – ONE OF OUR OWN The sky is the limit for 16-year-old St Peters Springfield student, Martina Reekers. This Year 11 student has embraced all the College has to offer, is a valued member of the St Peters Open Netball Team and was recently selected in the 2020 St Peters Open Basketball team.

ANNE-MARIE CHAMPION

girls' sport coordinator

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artina commenced her Netball journey at the age of 12 and instantly fell in love with the game. After enjoying many years of dancing in her childhood, Martina, with the support of her parents, decided to give Netball a go. Blessed with the physique and athleticism required, together with the determination to continue to improve and succeed, she soon became the number one goaler for her age in Queensland.

Martina is described by St Peters Performance Netball Coach, Patti Farrell, as a, "young athlete who is dedicated, committed, enthusiastic and prepared to apply herself in pursuit of her goals.” Martina has already enjoyed immense success with her Netball career. She was an integral member of the Queensland 17 Years team at the 2019 National Netball Championships. Her efforts throughout the tournament saw her rewarded with selection in the Australian 17 Years squad. A rare achievement considering Martina was 15 years of age at the time. The ongoing improvement in the strength of the St Peters Netball program has seen Martina, along with fellow St Peters students Olivia Roberts, Kiara Condon and Larika Malagaoma, gain selection in the 2020 U17 Queensland Netball team. The state team was due to play at the National Championships in Tasmania in April this year but was cancelled due to COVID-19. Another outstanding achievement has been the selection in the U21 Australian squad to play in the Youth World Cup in Fiji

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in 2021. With the prospect of an Australian team selection and the QGSSSA Netball season going ahead in Term 3, Martina has continued to train hard at home during the pandemic. When asked of her short- and long-term goals, from a school perspective, winning the QGSSSA competition and the Vicki Wilson Cup were on the top of Martina’s list. Selection in the U21 Australian Netball team and the Brisbane North Cougars Sapphire team are other important goals. Long-term goals include selection in a Suncorp Super Netball team and playing for the Australian Diamonds. The success of the St Peters Netball Program can be attributed to our Head Coach (and Old Scholar) Tracey Bruce who, together with Patti Farrell, played a huge part in bringing Martina to the St Peters Community in 2019. Martina credits both Tracey and Patti and her U14 coach Karen Toppy as important influences in her development thus far and she looks forward to continuing these valuable relationships. While a fierce competitor on the court, Martina’s warm and pleasant personality, while courteous and considerate, endears her to her peers and all who get to know her. With the love and support of her parents Jane and Martin, together with the guidance of Springfield Sport Coordinator, Jeremy Lohe, Martina has flourished in all aspects of her St Peters schooling. St Peters is proud to play a small part in Martina’s journey.


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ON THE RIGHT TRACK

SHAUN NODWELL

director of sport

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t Peters has a proud history of Track & Field success with past students including Dane Bird-Smith, Damian Marsh, Chris Noffke and Melanie Kleeberg having represented Australia at various Olympics and World Championship events.

Continuing this success in 2019, one of the highlights of the St Peters Sporting year was at the National Schools Track & Field Championships in Perth in December, where it was announced that the College had the most students competing of any individual school in Australia. This event saw eight St Peters students qualify and represent Queensland in individual events and the Intermediate (under 16) Girls Team qualify and compete in the National Teams ‘Nitro’ event. The highlights of the National All Schools included the performances of Year 9 student, Gabby Schmidt (1500m – first and 800m – second), but it was the performance of Year 11 student Hilal Durmaz (1st Place – 100m), that was the standout performance of all athletes at the meet. By running 11.54 seconds in the 100m, Hilal broke the National Meet Record, becoming the fastest ever female to run in the 100m for females under the age of 16 in Australia. She broke the record of Jess Thornton, an Australian Olympic Athlete at the 2016 Rio Olympics. This unbelievable performance

earned Hilal (who represents her native country Turkey), qualification for both the European Under 18 Championships and the Under 20 World Championships. With the postponing of the Tokyo Olympics to 2021, Hilal has her sights firmly set on qualifying for Turkey and competing at the Olympics. Hilal backed up her individual success by leading the St Peters Intermediate Girls Team to the Bronze Medal in the National Nitro Teams Event. Qualifying for this event for the first time since 2010, the team consisted of nine girls across Years 8-10 who competed in a range of Track & Field events, each earning points to contribute to the overall team score. Being the youngest team with limited experience at such an event, the St Peters Girls surprised themselves by placing third and winning a medal. The experience obtained by these girls was invaluable with seven of the girls eligible to again contest the event for the College in 2020. This success was indicative of an outstanding year for St Peters Track & Field in 2019, with the QGSSSA Track & Field squad rising to third Place in the QGSSSA Championships in September and the AIC Squad rising to finish as runners-up (second place) at the AIC Championships in October. This was the College’s highest ever placing and proves that St Peters Track & Field is on the right track for the future years ahead.

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SPORT

THIS AUSSIE RULES! With the growing popularity of AFLW and the return of AFL to St Peters, we highlight and reflect on our great Aussie Rules players.

C A SSIE T WEMLOW

publications officer

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reta Bodey (2012) is one of the newest recruits to the Brisbane Lions AFLW team and she has just completed her debut season.

1, and it was against the reigning Premiers, the Crows, so there was lots of hype and we were very much the underdogs.”

Bodey played Football for her five years of school at St Peters and she continued to play for UQ whilst studying her degree in Physiotherapy. After graduating, Bodey moved to Cairns for work and was keen to continue playing Football however, it didn’t quite turn out that way.

Not only did the Lions go on to win this away game, Bodey kicked a cracking opening goal.

Football wasn’t as prominent in Cairns and Bodey’s flat mates, at the time, were members of the local AFL team. After an initial introduction to the sport, Bodey ultimately made the transition to AFL and hasn’t looked back. She started playing with the Cairns Saints in March 2019. In less than a year, Bodey has gone from university Football player to Lions AFLW recruit which was ‘unexpected and very sudden’. “It’s been exciting but overwhelming,” she says. “A bit of a whirlwind.” Bodey played in the AFLW Winter Series and impressed with her run-and-carry and ability to win a one-on-one contest. From there, she was drafted into the main team and commenced pre-season training in November last year. She was part of the first AFLW team that were permitted to play on the Gabba (against the Gold Coast team) during the 2019 off-season. The season kicked off in January and Bodey made her AFLW debut in the Lions' Round 1 game against Adelaide on 8 February. “My debut game was so much fun. I was stoked to even be making my debut in Round

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“It was just really exciting to be a part of a big win and singing the team song after the game was an unreal experience.” After playing Football for so many years, Bodey explains how the sporting culture is quite different between the two codes. “In AFL everyone gets behind the entire club, not just the team. So, people who normally support the men’s Lions also support us [women’s team].” Being a woman in such male-dominated sports, Bodey understands she and her team will always be competing with the men. However, she says that the support seems to be greater in AFL. “When I was playing [Football] in Brisbane, because we were the only women’s team we would have to fight hard to get recognition.” She loves being in a team environment and explains the Lions team itself has been very welcoming. Bodey is now back playing for UQ, in AFLW, and in 2019 won the Coaches Award for her consistency. “I guess it was a bit strange because I felt a bit new and like I was always learning each game so, I was pretty shocked to win an award.” At this point, there is no chance you’ll see Bodey back on the Football field. She loves the fast pace of AFL and getting her hands on the ball even if the thought of having to tackle someone ‘freaks me out’.


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Pictured: (left) St Peters 2008 AFL Premiers; (right) Mr Chris Johnson flanked by Rex Liddy (left) and Cameron Mitchelhill (right).

WE MARK THE RETURN OF AFL MARK HOLMAN

afl coordinator

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t Peters Lutheran College commenced participating in the AIC AFL competition in 2005 with an Open and Under 15 boys' team. It proved to be extremely popular with 100+ boys at trainings each week. Games were played each Monday afternoon in Term 3 with finals to conclude the season played at Coorparoo Oval. In 2006 an official partnership was formed with AFL QLD. Through this partnership, boys were offered opportunities to come to St Peters from as far away as North Queensland. The boys boarded at the College whilst pursuing their dreams of making it to the elite level and completing their secondary education. In that time, three boys went on to be drafted to AFL clubs - Peter Yagmoor (Collingwood), Rex Liddy (Gold Coast) and Adam Spackman (Brisbane Lions). From 2007-2009, St Peters was fortunate enough to acquire the services of three-time premiership player, Chris Johnson, of the Brisbane Lions. Chris went on to coach the St Peters Open boys to premiership in 2007 and 2008. After a hiatus from the AIC competition, St Peters recommenced playing AFL in 2020 with a combined Years 8/9 team.

Pictured (top left-bottom): Greta Bodey kicks for goal in Round 2 against Geelong; avoiding a tackle against GWS; Signing for her admiring fans. Photos courtesy of David Layden Photography.

With the re-emergence of the Brisbane Lions and entry of the Brisbane Lion’s Women’s team in the AFLW over recent years, the popularity of AFL in Queensland is at an all-time high. This is being reflected at a community level, which St Peters is very much a part of.

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BOARDING

BOARDING | EVOLVING FOR 75 YEARS House locations, dormitory layouts, social activities and multiculturalism—a lot has changed within St Peters Boarding over the years and now they’ve had a pandemic thrown in the mix!

C A SSIE T WEMLOW

publications officer

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n February 1945, St Peters Boarding opened with 56 students housed in Boys and Girls dormitories. Whilst the location of the dorms has moved a number of times over the years and the numbers have grown, the values, lessons and pride that boarders carry with them have not changed.

When the College first opened, boys and girls were not permitted to talk to each other outside the confines of the classroom. Even boarder siblings remember having their first conversation with each other in ages when they arrived back home on the holidays! These days, boys and girls socialise with each other regularly over meals, touch games and other weekend activities. Gone are the days where girls took their turn on laundry or kitchen duty and food was smuggled in by ‘day bugs’ to facilitate midnight feasts hosted in the broom cupboard. Manual work like sweeping and gardening, which was once encouraged, have now been scrapped. Queues for the two landline phones to call home have now been replaced by personal mobile phones.

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Kim Holman has been Girls Boarding Coordinator for the last 15 years. She has noticed significant changes over the years. “Now everybody has a phone. You didn’t have that 15 years ago. Parents couldn't call you back if there was an issue because it was so expensive from overseas. Now, with FaceTime, they can call straight back—they can see their kids’ emotions and know that they're okay, so we actually get less phone calls from parents.” If you visit boarding today, you will find that younger students share a cubicle – two to a room – whilst Seniors are allocated a cube each. This is a far cry from the ‘four bunks per room’ that used to house boarders pre2000’s. However, this also has to do with the change in our boarding population. At the height of its boom, the St Peters Boarding capacity stood at over 400 students. Today, Girls and Boys Boarding, combined, houses under half that. The demographics have also changed with the number of kids from country Australia and Papua New Guinea dropping (at one stage, 250 of the 404 boarders came from PNG),


BOARDING

to growing in numbers from Indigenous communities, Asia and ex-pats.

Boarding students, however, have handled this well.

“It’s like a little United Nations,” Kim says of the diversity of boarding. “People send their kids to St Peters because they know they’re going to experience something different.”

“The rural and remote kids have had to deal with distance education for years and now it’s the case of, ‘Oh, I’m back doing my distance-ed’,” Stuart explains.

This culture of diversity brings a new experience for everyone in boarding. From Indigenous cultural performances to sharing a ‘home-cooked’ ethnic meal, multiculturalism is embraced and celebrated.

For the students who were unable to return home, the changes have been a little more significant.

“It’s admired and enjoyed by everybody,” Kim iterates. Stuart Delaney, Boys Boarding Coordinator, explains that the kids that come to boarding from community living often thrive in the environment. “When our [boarding] kids go to Ironbark they don’t have any worries at all because they’re so used to living in a community. It’s first nature to them. No technology…no worries.” Kim concurs, saying that the boarders just seem “to thrive, because they’re already away from home” and that you can always tell a boarder from a day bug at Ironbark. With the recent pandemic affecting all parts of life, boarding has been no exception.

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“We’ve had to allocate girls a specific toilet and shower for use,” Kim says, reflecting on the challenge the pandemic has posed. The separation of the Girls and Boys Boarding buildings has been in place for the last 75 years, making social-distancing a little easier to deal with initially but, in the Masterplan, to be rolled out over the next decade, that is all set to change. The Masterplan includes a relocation of Boys Boarding to the Harts Road Courts. Here, a purpose-built premises will combine and house both Boys and Girls Boarding. At this stage it is unclear whether the current restrictions and measures in place at St Peters Boarding will continue into the future. If they do, the layout of the houses may change yet again. For now, we will have to wait and see!

Pictured (from top): Girls boarding - 2019; circa 1980; circa 1964; Boys boarding - 2018; circa 1978. (Background image) The opening of Girls boarding 1962.

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SPOSA PRESIDENT “Study the past, if you would define the future": Confucius

LLEWELLYN JONES

sposa president

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ollowing tradition, we elected a new 2020 – our 75th anniversary year – was shaping SPOSA committee at the Reunion Weekend up to be action-packed and full of events. We last September. We are fortunate to have did manage to squeeze in one or two activities a team with a good representation of new before the pandemic came to town. and continuing members. A healthy balance Founders Day was auspiciously memorable of past experience and new ideas. Former with a wonderful parade of students Collegians from almost all the decades of our modelling the uniforms of yesteryear school’s history-to-date. I wish to thank the through the ranks of the Indooroopilly previous Committee, our outgoing President, assembly. It was a privilege to have St Peters' Jan Hogarth, and the good work of all the first student, Neville Stallman, tell us about members throughout the past year. This those first days in the 1940s, along with was evident during the other Old Scholars and Reunion Weekend with teachers describing their the willing teamwork respective decades. that ensured successful Who knew that so many activities that honoured They are generous, teachers are also Old and connected our SPOSA Scholars – (like Pam open-hearted and members. supportive classmates Carden) As we closed out who are sure to be At the Founders Day the school year, we lunch, we were treated catching up at many observed other to an eloquent storyfuture reunions in the traditions that support telling from well-loved the current student years ahead." St Peters personality – body – presenting the Jane Greenwood. Her SPOSA Bursaries at awards ceremonies and artful description of school life almost inducting new Old Scholars at Springfield upstaged by an impromptu anecdote from and at Indooroopilly. The class of 2019 are Keith Radke who gave his earthy account of a wonderful group of young people who the school’s first toilet block. Memorable have already made their mark as superb stuff indeed. ambassadors for the values of our school. The next day, we welcomed back former They are generous, open-hearted and School Captains for a special function supportive classmates who are sure to be on a balmy Friday evening on the Chapel catching up at many future reunions in the Forecourt. It was a sharing of observations years ahead. We are delighted to welcome and reminiscences between past student them as SPOSA members. leaders that covered all the decades of

"

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the school’s history. And yes, history was re-lived with several past Captains stepping up to the microphone on the Chapel steps one more time, to tell us how it was, how it is, and how it should be! These included: Alan Cameron (1955); Lesley Stainkey (1975); Peter Honeycombe (1983; pictured right); Natasha Coventry (1994); Ella Hussey-Simmonite (2019); David Radke (1978). Bless them. While other events to mark the 75th Anniversary of the school are to be rescheduled, SPOSA will continue to support members of the current student body and our Old Scholars with tutoring, mentoring,

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and connecting. We are undertaking the considerable task of digitising the records and archives to guarantee their longevity and improve their searchability. Our heartfelt thanks to our hard working Alumni Officers, Sasha McCarthy and Rowena Lester, and archives volunteers. As we move with the times to progressively modernise and update our SPOSA systems, facilities and processes, we do so with respect, ensuring we honour and preserve the records and artefacts of our history and the spirit of the College and its founders on whose shoulders we stand today. Best wishes to you all.

SPOSA NOTICES Call for Volunteers Have you ever considered becoming a Volunteer? SPOSA are looking for Volunteers to assist from their homes, or onsite at the College. Volunteers needed for: • Marketing and video making • Journalist interviews of Old Scholars • Web site development and management • Archiving, and • Database management. For more information, or to register your interest, contact SPOSA Office on +61 7 3377 6592 or email SPOSA@stpeters.qld.edu.au.

SPOSA Events 2020 SPOSA has postponed all reunions, events and workshops scheduled to occur in the remainder of 2020. We have considered the advice from government authorities in relation to the COVID-19 situation and to ensure the health and safety of our Old Scholars and their families, as well as the staff and students of the College, all face-to-face functions are postponed. If you are able, we encourage you to keep in touch with your peers during this time. Please contact SPOSA Office on +61 7 3377 6592 or email SPOSA@stpeters.qld.edu.au, and we will help you connect with others in the SPOSA community. Thank you for your understanding and support. We wish you all health and happiness in 2020.

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THE ST PETERS BOY Neville Stallman is St Peters' oldest, and one of the original scholars. His siblings and own children attended the College and now his granddaughters attend. In this poem, SPOSA have captured Neville's momentus history.

SA SHA MCC ARTHY

sposa alumni and archives officer

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rom near and far they called us, from near and far we came. To build a school in Ross Roy House, a school in Luther’s name. We flocked to Indooroopilly, in sleepy Brisbane town. Our country life behind us – we now were city bound.

The first time that I saw her, such grandeur I’d not seen. Her open fields, a sportsman’s dream, to a boy of just fourteen. The gabled roof and stained-glass panes, a beauty to behold. A canvas of opportunity from which our school would grow. We worked until each day was done, upon the sun-soaked land. With heaving chest and sweating brow, the hammers left our hands. ‘Til finally the work was done, ‘the seeds are sown’ they cried. Dohler gave an approving nod, our hearts were filled with pride. The river breezes cooled us, as Schneider rang the gong Our College was now open – our schooling had begun. In suit and tie we gathered – a cohort fresh and new Where dreams became realities and lifelong friendships grew. For many years I listened, as she played her teachers’ tune. Like birdsong, it would fill the air, as a waft of sweet perfume. Music drifted from her eaves, and the giggled rise of play. O how her sweet, sweet company, it warmed our hearts each day. Then summers’ sun awoke me, and I looked upon a face Where the school-aged boy had grown up, and a man stood in his place. A beautiful woman I had now, and a family of my own Life’s journey had been kind to me – a fortune well bestowed. So, to me there was no question, as my father had before My children, and their children too, should walk her blessed halls. O daughter how you grew there, I watched with smiles wide As you journeyed ever higher – Plus Ultra in your stride. As I walk beside the Chapel now, where young men’s feet once trod. My heart it swells, for Langer’s dream – O! What it has become. You feel it strong, the College heart, as it beats among the trees. The sandstone high, and higher still – a place of blessed peace. Now the years have aged me but my heart it overflows With the memories of my College days, and the smell of perfumed rose. Ross Roy, she will remain with me – as my stories surely show From on that house, Upon the Rock, a St Peters boy was grown. Pictured: Three generations of St Peters' students (left to right) Neville Stallman (1949); Fiona Stallman (1983) and Matilda Newman (Year 12).

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JAN LEWIS: 40+ YEARS AT ST PETERS From student, to AV Librarian and, now, Senior Librarian of the Langer Library, Ms Jan Lewis has achieved a career status few can compete with!

C A SSIE T WEMLOW

publications officer

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eloved Langer Librarian, Ms Jan Lewis, celebrated 40 years as a St Peters staff member last year. However, Ms Lewis started at St Peters as a student in 1969 and graduated in 1974. She then went on to complete degrees at UQ, QUT and travelled overseas before commencing work as the St Peters AV Librarian in 1980. "The first thing I remember was having to use a U-matic video tape machine and then being shown the open tape reel to reel film unit in the physics classroom—they were considered hi-tech in those days," Ms Lewis says. During this time, St Peters graduated from two U-matic machines to a networked video distribution system linked throughout the Middle and Senior School classrooms. The Primary School’s Library automated system was initiated in 1989 and then rolled-out to the Langer Library in 1990. Ms Lewis remained in charge of the Audio Visual Department until the end of 1992 and the following year accepted the role of Senior Librarian in the Langer Library, which is where we find her today. After being a St Peters student, Ms Lewis returned as a staff member because, "it’s a great place with a lovely community." Ms Lewis says she enjoys working with and assisting the staff and students and that no day is the same.

"It’s not just research but teaching a love of reading and having fun doing it. With support from the administration staff, we have continually changed and updated the ambience of the Library, working in a beautiful building with a lovely outlook to the gardens." Having been a part of the St Peters community for over 50 years, Ms Lewis has seen thousands of staff and students come and go over the years. Helen Palmer was the Librarian from the late sixties to 1992, which meant Ms Lewis interacted with her as both a student and colleague. "She was a very traditional librarian who built a fantastic library collection and who became a wonderful mentor and friend." Other long-standing colleagues include brothers, Greg and Gary Evans, Russell Haug, Wolf Steutzel and Chris Chapman. Students and staff would be lost without Miss Lewis' daily guidance and help in the Langer Library. After being here so long, we asked what advice would she give to her younger self. "Life does go past in the blink of an eye,” she said. "Enjoy what you are doing." Her advice is particularly relevant at this point in time. Congratulations on your career milestone, Ms Lewis!

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RESPECT, EMPATHY AND THE IMPORTANCE OF HAVING A GOOD LAUGH World-travelled and incredibly accomplished, Brody Warren (2007), Senior Legal Officer and Attaché to the Secretary General in The Hague, says he has St Peters to thank for skills that serve him every day.

C A SSIE T WEMLOW

publications officer

The Hague is a long way from Brisbane, yet this is where Brody Warren (2007) has spent the last six years, ever since being awarded a six-month intern scholarship with The Hague Conference on Private Law (HCCH) in 2014. After finishing his final year at St Peters, Warren spent the next year juggling a few part-time jobs, including returning to the College as a coach and tutor, before travelling around India and then Europe. Upon return to Australia, university in Canberra beckoned and this is where he completed his degree. Nowadays, “I’m still working at the same organisation [HCCH] and still very much enjoying life in the Netherlands,” says Warren. Warren is currently Attaché to the Secretary General and a Senior Legal Officer within the HCCH’s secretariat office. “As Attaché I am essentially a legal and policy advisor to the head of the organisation, the Secretary General, and as a Senior Legal Officer I also work in one of the teams responsible for monitoring the operation of one of the ‘Conventions’ (treaties) in particular,” Warren explains. His role means that on any given day Warren is in contact with people from many different countries all around the world, whether it

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be responding to queries from governments, conducting research about new legal topics, giving promotional presentations, or preparing for, and participating in, international meetings and negotiations. Clearly, the latter decidedly more when the world isn’t in varying degrees of lockdown! This accomplished young man regards his St Peters education as playing an essential role in the skills he has learnt that still serve him every day. Warren looks back fondly on sports training, drama rehearsals, Herbsfest and his daily class routine. However, like a lot of Old Scholars, Ironbark was ‘a truly unforgettable experience.' “It was particularly memorable because we were evacuated due to bushfires. Taking shelter in the Crows Nest Church Hall on high jump mats from the local school made the Ironbark experience all a bit dramatic, but I think it was even more of a bonding experience for our group!” Bronwyn ‘Miss J’ Jamieson also holds a special place in his heart. “Not only did I learn a lot from Miss J about juggling different tasks and prioritisation, but also about respect, empathy and the importance of having a good laugh.” And what is more important than that?!


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SPRINGFIELD ALUMNI EXPERIENCES US POLITICAL TOUR OF A LIFETIME

Pictured: On her UN Political Tour Kalyee visited the United Nations General Assembly, Supreme Court, Capitol Building and the Pentagon, among others, as well as spend time with 'Teens Take Charge' students reps.

C AROLYN JACOBS

enrolments registrar

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n January 2020, former Springfield School Captain (2019) Kaylee Neil, was selected as one of only 16 Australian student leaders to participate in the United Nations (UN) Youth Political Tour of the United States.

Jeremy Bernton, International Monetary Fund (IMF) Economist, David Vannier, and the Permanent Representative of Australia to the United Nations, Mitch Fifield.

During the tour Kaylee was impressed by This unique four week program allows student led movement ‘Teens Take Charge’ students to experience, firsthand, the fighting for educational equity in New York interaction between local, state, and federal City given that African American and Latino politics in the US. The tour group visited cities students represent only 10.6% of students at including New York, Boston, Washington and elite public high schools. San Francisco taking in monuments, museums, The political tour reaffirmed Kaylee’s love and memorials to understand the intricacies of history and the study of politics. “I’m and history of American politics. adamant now that I have chosen the Kaylee says, “I genuinely had the most correct field of study. I am wholeheartedly incredible time over the course of the month. committed to one day having a career in the If I had to pick one highlight it would probably field of international affairs.” be the 9/11 Memorial in New York. It was At this point in time, Kaylee is interested undoubtedly the most powerful and painfully in becoming a diplomat or federal public exquisite exhibition I have ever visited.” servant. “My dream job would probably be The group met influential people throughout working in the Australian mission to the UN the tour including former Obama Advisor, in New York, Geneva or Vienna.”

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CHALLENGE ACCEPTED Old Scholar, Lisa Daunt (Andersen, 1994), is not one to shy away from a challenge. While at St Peters she did well in Maths and Science, was awarded Dux for Art and obtained an OP1 to cap off her Senior year. Lisa graduated with the ideal skillset for an architect—she was creative and technical; driven and passionate.

KEL SEY BRICKNELL

communications officer

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fter completing her Bachelor’s degree in 2000, Lisa enjoyed an impressive career, working for small and large architectural practices and the Queensland Government.

“To be an architect is an exciting job,” Lisa shared. “Very exciting buildings can emerge from what starts as only a few words on paper.” The puzzle of providing solutions to client briefs; the creative and technical process of the drawing phase; and bringing projects to life with builders provided career variety for Lisa for 15 years. She counted herself lucky to be in an industry where the results were tangible. “Some jobs just create paper and computer files. Not many result in something as significant as a building that might last decades or centuries.” In 2016, however, the call of a new challenge drew Lisa back to study. She commenced PhD research at the University of Queensland one month before the birth of her first child and, there, expanded on her undergraduate thesis to focus on the development of modern church architecture in Queensland between 1945 and 1977. While not a conscious decision

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at the time, her research led her, if just momentarily, back to St Peters—specifically the St Peters Chapel. The St Peters Chapel was designed by Dr Karl Langer (the namesake of our Langer Library). Dr Langer was an influential architect in post-war Queensland, designing three key churches: St John’s, Bundaberg in 1960; St John’s Ipswich in 1961; and our Chapel in 1968. As stated in one of Lisa’s co-authored papers, From Austria to Australia: Three Lutheran Churches by Karl Langer (2019), Langer inspired a host of contemporaries with his modernist style. He also significantly contributed to the renewal of church architecture in the postwar era. While a component of her research, Langer’s three churches have not been the only buildings Lisa’s focussed on during her PhD candidateship. In fact, her thesis documents 5,300 religious buildings, saw her conducting 300 site visits and discusses 90 of Queensland’s post-war church buildings. “The PhD has given me the opportunity to look at some very interesting designs…and ones that are often misunderstood and undervalued,” Lisa said.


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Pictured (clockwise from far left): St John's, Bundaberg external and internal (immediate left); (below) Lisa inside St Anne's Catholic Church, Duren, Germany (Photo courtesy of Mark Hogan).

Church buildings, to Lisa, with their need for religious functionality, ritual, symbolism, identity, agency and community, provide an interesting architectural typology to examine. Her PhD studies have allowed her to complete these examinations, all while improving her writing and presentation skills and raising a family. Over the last four years she’s presented locally, interstate and abroad; has published six double blind peer reviewed papers and four other pieces; and has juggled caring for her two children while doing it all. Lisa’s thesis is due for submission in the coming months. The journey, from full-time work to a nearly-completed PhD, she says, would not have been possible without her partner and kids. “They were the catalyst for me to shift my mindset,” she said. Post-doctoral research positions are now on the cards for Lisa, but she’s also open to seeing what opportunities present themselves. Whatever direction she does choose to go in, we know that one thing’s for sure—it’ll definitely be a case of “challenge accepted!”.

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FOUNDERS DAY C A SSIE T WEMLOW

publications officer

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he 75th Founders Day, on Thursday 20 February, kicked off with breakfast outside Ross Roy where current staff enjoyed a meal with their colleagues. At 8:30am, students, staff and Old Scholars met in the Chapel Forecourt for the annual Founders Day service. Under the glorious sun, hundreds of people were serenaded by Symphonic Winds before Head of College, Tim Kotzur's, welcome. Past Head of College, Mrs Sally Chandler, gave an address before an amusing Dr-Whoinsprired skit was unleashed by Mr Chris Chapman. Not one to do things by halves, he came equipped with his own Tardis before introducing various Old Scholars and quizzing them on their own experiences as St Peters students. The morning wouldn't have been complete without the new staff installation as well as blessings from Pastor Michael Mayer. Finally, each student was presented with a 75th Anniversary commemorative badge and a cupcake!

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CAPTAINS FUNCTION C A SSIE T WEMLOW

publications officer

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n Friday 21 February, over 60 Old Scholar Captains gathered in the Chapel Forecourt for an evening of reminiscing and catching up with old friends. All College and Boarding Captain Old Scholars were invited back for a 75th Anniversary Cocktail Function and were entertained by solo musician Old Scholar, Akash Rooney (2016), before plenty of mingling and speeches from various past cohorts. One of the College's first scholars, Cliff Kajewski (1945) attended with his wife,

Dorothy (nee Wolski; 1946) whom he met whilst studing at St Peters. Current College Captains along wtih Alan Cameron (1955), Dr Lesley Stainkey (1975), Peter Honeycombe (1983), Dr Natasha Coventry (1994) and Ella Hussey-Simmonite (2019) delighted the crowd before a toast from David Radke (1978) and a vote of thanks from Llewellyn Jones (1983). It was a lovely evening full of laughs and the chance to take a trip down memory lane.

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BIRTHS, DEATHS AND MARRIAGES Births Edith (Edie) Estraviz was born on 27 November 2019 to parents Sophie Pigdon (2007) and Paul Estraviz.

Levi Kim was born on Friday 10 April to Year 4 Teacher Sunny Kim and her husband Patrick.

Henry James Dyce Nodwell was born at on 24 February to proud parents Caron and Shaun Nodwell (Director of Sport).

Ari Davie Blackwinn, was born on 4 January, weighing in at 4.63kgs and 57cms long, to proud parents Kelisha Winn (Venues Manager) and Dan Black.

Marriages

Danielle Appleton (2012) and Daniel Tucker (2012) met in their Year 10 St Peters English class (thanks Mr Stewart!) and started dating a year later. These high school sweethearts have been inseperable ever since and finally tied the knot on 6 July, 2019 in Brisbane city.

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Dual Old Scholars, Meg Thompson (2010) and Mitchell Bertram (2010), were married on 26 July, 2019 at the Brisbane Registry Office. Special thanks to Meg's mother, Jan Hogarth (1976), for making her wedding dress.

Old Scholar Samantha Mason (2008) married Andrew Ball on 3 August, 2019 at River Deck Restaurant, Noosa Marina. Grant Mason, Samantha's father, worked in the St Peters Music Department for many years.

On 4 October, 2019, Old Scholar Lucy Rosa (2007) married Jesse Braid at Broadway Chapel in Woolloongabba.


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We remember Dawn Borgelt (Hoffmann, 1949) 10 Oct 1931 – 19 Oct 2019

Ronald Herse (1955) 12 November 1936 - 26 December 2019

A Founding Scholar, enrolled in the Scholarship class, Dawn was the recipient of the 1945 Keenness Award. When her youngest sister Lynn was born, however, she was kept at home to help on the farm as she had already proved she was capable. She had always wanted to ‘be someone’ like a nurse or a teacher and was disappointed not to complete her schooling.

Ron was enrolled at St Peters as a boarder on scholarship. He came from Dagun via Gympie. Ron sat for, and achieved, his Junior Certificate in 1953, winning the College Proficiency prize. He worked for many years at the Heck family sugar mill.

Dawn met her husband, Ivan, at the Lutheran Mission in Hermannsburg in Central Australia. She and Ivan were married in 1954 in Toowoomba. They moved around because of Ivan’s work, and ended up back on the family Kilburnie farm to help Dawn’s father who was unwell. When the property was sold, Ivan and Dawn bought a nearby mechanic’s garage in Haden and lived there for a decade. During these early years they had six children: Jennifer, Lois, Mark, Barbara, Carolyn and Alexia. In 1970 they settled in Crow’s Nest, moving to Toowoomba in 1980. Ivan died in 2016. Whilst Dawn did not achieve the ambitions of her youth, to be a teacher or a nurse, she found deep joy in seeing her family achieve their ambitions. Her proudest achievement was maintaining connections with her family. Her grandchildren describe her as a strong, steadfast, caring, and loving woman who was a great role model. She leaves 15 grandchildren and 24 great grandchildren and two more on the way. "Mum, we have been truly blessed by knowing you. You really ‘were someone," Jennifer Cavanough (daughter). Alamine Gray (1950) 15 April 1932 - 13 March 2020 Douglas Opperman (1952) 8 November 1933 – 4 May 2020 Formerly of Mt Alford, Douglas passed away on 4 May, 2020, aged 86 years. Douglas attended St Peters in 1948 in the Scholarship (Year 8 primary) year. Don Hoffmann (1953) 14 February 1936 – 29 November 2019 Don was enrolled at St Peters in sub-scholarship in 1948. He was taken down on the 3am train to Brisbane by the father of Frieda Stiller (who was to become his wife), with three other Guluguba students. He left St Peters after his scholarship year.

Clyde Eggert (1957) 24 April 1939 – 3 October 2019 From Kalbar, Clyde was enrolled in and passed Scholarship in 1953. He and his wife Pam farmed cane in the Alberton region until their retirement to Pleystowe in 2004. Clyde’s brother Bevan also attended St Peters. Lloyd Magdalinski (1959) 18 December 1941 – February 2020 Lloyd was first enrolled at St Peters for his scholarship year in 1955. A fine sportsman, he participated in Cricket, Football and Athletics and was Captain of both the Under 15 Tennis team and the Cricket 1st XII. Lloyd began his teaching career as a Primary School teacher, but ended it as a Secondary HPE teacher, both in Australia and Canada. Roy Elliott (1960) 22 Feb 1942 – 1 Aug 2019 A day scholar, Roy was enrolled in Year 5 in 1953 and left after Junior in 1958 to complete Senior Central Technical College at night school. He graduated from the University of Calgary in 1972 with a BSc Physics and Maths, and spent his working life as a geophysicist in the oil industry. He married Annie in 1978 and raised two sons who produced five grandchildren for them. Mark Harris (1964) 22 August 1947 – 15 January 2020 Mark was a sportsman without parallel. After excelling in Rugby and Athletics at St Peters, he went on to become an outstanding player for the Sydney Roosters Rugby League team.

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