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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture Undergraduate Catalogue 2014


Contents

www.shef.ac.uk/architecture @SSoA_News Cover Image A selection of MArch Projects The University of Sheffield School of Architecture would like to thank the technical and administrative team for their continued support and input throughout the year. In particular Peter Williams for his outstanding service to the school and we wish him a happy retirement. We would also like to thank all of our contributors, everyone involved in curating the exhibition and everyone involved in compiling this catalogue.

Foreword First Year  Second Year  Third Year Undergraduate Special Study

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Events and Activities Theory Forum 2013 - Thinking Resilience SSoA Forum 2014 - Retrofitting Neighbourhoods SUAS  Sheffield 1900 Study  Summer Schools Architecture Students Network Student Competitions

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Awards and Recognition

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Foreword Sheffield School of Architecture has an enviable international reputation for its social commitment to making a positive difference in the world. This catalogue of our annual exhibition is a testament to that ethos. From regenerating Zanzibar’s urban areas with raw natural materials to re-energising Heeley in Sheffield with potato power – our students’ imagination is as boundless and fertile as ever. I’d like to invite you to experience this creativity over the coming pages and enjoy the year’s work as much as we have. We started the year with a stimulating Summer School for Chinese students from Harbin Institute of Technology, who we have been collaborating with for the last three years. In London, we held another hugely successful Alumni Event with over 150 turning out to hear the likes of alumni Stephen Proctor, Jane Rendall, Andrew Groarke, Annalie Riches and David Cash talk about the challenging future for architecture. In February, over 300 of our students took part in the Whole School Event occupying empty shops and buildings in the heart of Sheffield for a series of twenty workshops exploring new ways to interpret and regenerate our own city.We were inspired by the urbanist and broadcaster Marcus Westbury, who travelled over from Newcastle, Australia to lecture to a packed audience on regenerating retail quarters through temporary use. New initiatives this year include the launch of a Masters in Digital Design and Interactive Built Environments and the development of an exciting MArch programme, ‘Collaborative Practice,’ which will allow students to study while in practice– a much needed alternative given the pressing debt problems that students now experience in the UK and beyond. Research is a driving force in the School and we continue to innovative in this area. This year we had two hugely successful parliamentary events on parking in housing developments and collective custom build as part of the ground-breaking ‘Home Improvements’ knowledge exchange project led by Flora Samuels. A major new interdisciplinary project on Designing for Well-being in Environments for Later Life is being led by Sarah Wigglesworth. Meanwhile our academics continue to build, publish and exhibit across the globe – from MOMA, New York to Leeds and from Ahmedabad, India to the London V&A. Our acoustics and lighting research is second to none and we excel in the humanities. Our staff and alumni swept the board at the Regional RIBA awards, taking no less than nine out of sixteen prizes and in addition five out the seven special awards. Masters student Fay al Khalifa won the RIBA President’s Award for Outstanding Master’s Degree Thesis in the RIBA President’s Research Awards 2013. MArch graduate Chris Parrott was the post graduate runner-up in the Global Architecture Graduate Awards (GAGA) 2013 which attracted hundreds of entries. It is for reasons like this that Sheffield was ranked second out of all 46 Schools in the UK National Student Survey for overall satisfaction and again scored strongly in the Architects Journal’s AJ100, being rated as the UK’s 2nd best architecture school by architectural practices. My thanks go to all the staff, students, visiting guests, reviewers, alumni and sponsors who help to make us probably one of the best Schools of Architecture in the world. No room for complacency though, with the biggest challenge of all – climate change – upon us. It’s time to act… our international Architecture and Resilient Neighbourhoods conference is in September 2015. We would also like to take this opportunity to thank AHMM, BDP, Bond Bryan, Bauman Lyons, Capita, Grimshaw, John McAslan, Hawkins Brown, HLM, HCD, MSMR, OMI, Proctor Matthews, Piercy + Co, RMA and SAPA for their support, sponsorship and donations. Fionn Stevenson Head of School


First Year Level One introduces students to a new and very different learning environment. The strong studio culture encourages collaboration and critical reflection. Studio projects introduce a variety of analytical and representational techniques, whilst seeking to broaden the students’ understanding of the cultural, social and environmental context they will be operating in. Alongside this, a wide range of workshops introduce the key skills and techniques which the students will need to successfully develop and communicate their ideas. The aim is to engender a culture of representation, enabling students to make appropriate choices as to how they represent their ideas at different stages of the design process.

Year Director Daniel Jary Deputy Year Director Howard Evans Studio Teaching Staff Taghi Amirhosseini Matthew Bradshaw Isabel Britch Sam Brown Masa Sorn Kim Trogal Workshop Leaders Pouyan Akbari Jules Alexandrou Sam Brown Amy Collins Daniel Jary Peter Lathey Alan Macdonald Kim Trogal Peter Williams BA Architecture Jordan Barrett Abraham Baucher Holly Beechener Dominic Beer William Beesley Jade Blanchard-Mckinley Vlad Bodogan Lebat Bujang Susannah Burton Alicea Chia Man Chung Samuel Collins Jessica Corns Amy Crellin Elizabeth Crook Anthony Currie Katherine Dauncey Katharine De Silva Jack Duberley Felicity Earp Sarah Edwards Meredith Farmer Hannah Faulkner George Fisher Stephen Fisher Rachael Gardner

Hannah Gaughan Zoe Georgiadis Anisha Ghosh Rachel Glenn Emilia Golebiewska Michaela Gomes Klaudia Gorak Edmund Green Anna Gregoriou Alexander Haines Holly Harcus Thomas Hattan Ethan He Eleanor Hill Marcus Hirst Marnie Hodgson Katie Hubbard Tom Hudson-Davies Ifigenia Ioannou Sanjukta Jitendhar Melissa Kirkpatrick Jeffrey Lau Jack Laurie Silvia Leone Sixuan Li Rebecca Liebermann Ya Liu Zoe Lloyd Jonathan Luke Kun Ma Peter Markos Kyle Mccracken Elizabeth Mcleod Aaron Mcloughlin Amelia Mega Travis Mills Sam Milward Holly Nicholls Duong Nguyen Elizabeth Nguyen Elizabeth Osborne Lucy Parker Yana Pavlova Tuomas Peippo Stephani Porfyriou Toby Preston Tom Register Jamie Rest Migena Salihu Jacob Sendall Mariam Shirley Francesca Sim

Ryan Sinnott Victoria Spencer Adam Spreckley Jagoda Struzik Yue Sun Ola Szwedo Adam Tarasewicz Louise Taylor Robert Taylor Abigail Verlaan Joe Wallbank Mark Waters Xuejun Xu Nik Yanev Lingge Yang Dovydas Zakarevicius Han Zhao Xutong Zhao BA Architecture and Landscape Antonia Alexandru Olivia Hellman Elizabeth Humphreys Emma Koch Kate O’Brien Toby Putnam Matthew Reece Lucas Williams MEng Engineering and Architecture Florence Browning Natasha Cleaver Timothy Evans Adam Fidler Laura Jamieson Clara Jordan Sukhdev Lota Bahnnisikha Misra Sheila Salvador Abad Hannah Smith Stephen Twentyman Hoi Leng Ung Katherine Wade Yicheng Wang Carolyn Wright Ki Ming Yip

Timber Group - P6


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

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Semester One Project 1 ‘Home Truths ‘ This project enables students to get to know each other, the studio as a work environment, and Sheffield as a place. Working in groups, the students begin by exploring an area of the city in order to identify a potential site. Using only rough physical models, the students are then asked to design a place where the group can live and work, exploring notions of privacy and communality. At the end of the project the students come together to discuss all the things they would need to know in order to further their design, developing a curriculum for a school of architecture. Project 2 ‘Room Archaeology’ Each group is assigned an existing space which they are required to analyse, record and represent in great detail. In the first instance the students are asked to produce a measured survey and photographic record for the space. Special thanks to Butcher Works, Castle Market, CADS, SKINN and the Sharrow Community Forum for their help with this project. Project 3 ‘A Sense of Place’ Working with the same room, the students are asked to analyse and represent the space using a variety of more subjective methods. One-day workshops introduce the students to a range of techniques such as mapping, photography, film-making, animation and collage.The project ends with a series of exhibitions; capturing and communicating the essence of the spaces looked at. Project 4 ‘Person, Activity and Space’ Each group is given one of eight types of domestic activities to analyse and represent using a number of different techniques – anthropometric analysis, collage and the creation of a physical object. The aim is to develop an understanding of the relationship between person and space, and to begin to appreciate the symbolic and ritual aspect of architecture. Project 5 ‘Making Space: An Urban Pavilion’ Semester one ends with the first piece of architectural design work. Working individually students are asked to design a pavilion to house the activity explored during P4, exploring the relationship between internal volume and external form, and between person and space. The group work produced during P4 acts as the conceptual starting point for a consideration of how the activity is transformed by being removed from the confines of the house and set within the public realm. Research Project R1 This introduces the students to the importance of precedent and the value of research, whilst allowing them to develop skills in verbal and visual presentation. Working in their studio groups the students are asked to research a building which uses a particular material in an innovative way, placing their study in the context of the architect’s body of work and other relevant examples taken from the world of contemporary architecture.

01 Group F1 R1, Dune House - Thorpeness, Suffolk 02 Group B2 P2, Butcher Works 03 Group C2 P3, Sharrow Community Forum 04 Group C3 P2, Furnace Park 02

05 Group B2 P3, Butcher Works 06 Group B4 P4, Bathe 07 Group E2 P4, Study 08 Vlad Bodogan P5, Eat 09 Adam Spreckley P5, Sleep

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10 Lingge Yang P5, Reflect 11 Elizabeth Mcleod P5, Grow 12 George Fisher P5, Reflect

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Semester Two Research Project R2 This project builds on the work undertaken for R1, whilst preparing the students for the work they will undertake in the P6 Matter Reality project. Each group visits a place where the material they have been exploring is extracted, fabricated or fabricated, before reporting on their findings to the year group. Project 6 ‘Matter Reality’ Technology in semester one is focussed on the materials used in construction, and the first project of semester two gives the students an opportunity to apply this knowledge. Through a process of playful exploration the students are asked to work in groups to design and make a ‘place for conversation’ using only a single given material. On the final day the finished structures are constructed in the public realm, giving the students an opportunity to see how the public react to, and interact with their design work. Special thanks to Sandra Barley at the Moor for helping to facilitate this project. Project 7 ‘A House of Sorts’ The final project of the year allows the students to bring together all their experience from both the studio course and the humanities and technology lecture courses into one integrated design project. The students first undertake a detailed analysis of the Furnace Hill area of Sheffield. A number of different potential scenarios are then identified for the project, each requiring a family house incorporating space for a particular business or activity. A creative process of brief development takes place before design work begins. The students are then asked to develop and present their proposals using a wide range of the techniques they have experimented with over the course of the year.

14 P6, Public Presentations The Moor, Sheffield 15 Glass Group P6 16 Brick Group P6 17 Metal Group P6 18 Timber Group P6

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19 Antonio Alexandru P7,Velocipede House 20 Adam Spreckley P7,Velocipede House 21 Jaime Rest P7, Skinn & Bone 22 Rachel Glenn P7, Seven Hills Bakery

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23 Lebat Bujang P7, Hands & Digits 24 Tuomas Peippo P7, Seven Hills Bakery 25 Han Zhao P7, House of Becoming 26 Joe Wallbank P7, Skinn & Bone 25

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Second Year The Second Year is comprised of three studio projects designed to provoke and to challenge, whilst steadily increasing the level of complexity. The studio is structured to engender further investment in the design process and consequentially a greater confidence in decision making. The primary driver for this is an extended experimentation with drawing methods and a heightened emphasis on the exploration of design ideas through rigorous testing in drawing and model making. This objective is supported through the critical analysis of design proposals in the ‘large group review’, intended to cultivate a relaxed and fluid exchange of ideas within the studio.

Director of Second Year Simon Chadwick Co-Director of Second Year Cith Skelcher Studio Tutors David Britch Simon Chadwick Cith Skelcher Ranbir Lal Ellen Page Mark Parsons BA Architecture Abul (Eddie) Al Farra George Allen Elliott Andrew Zuzanna Antczak Petros Antoniou Rachel-Ann Atterbury Naomi Bailey Chloe Barrow Oliver Berry Muhammad (Afif) Bin Muhammad Nandi Callum Brown Cristina Carcanescu Theodoros Chailis Byron Chan Manasa Chegu Dharmakumar Wei (Veronica) Chen John Chia Adelina Chiriac Wing (Karen) Chow Christina Christofidou Ruth Cook Tom Cronly Fanni Csepeli Laura Dunce Samuel Evans Christiana Giorgas Katherine Haycock Eirini Ilia Adam Johnson Serina Kitazono Ioulia (Julianna) Kitsiou William Kreibich Georgia Kritioti Yuefan (Esther) Kuang Kin (Gigi) Kwong

Alyson (Dawn) Lam Ka Man Lee Tobias Mackrill Ahad Mahmood Bianca Man Kieran Marsh Ashley Mayes Patrick McElroy Clare Mckay Sho Murayama Neil Nageshkar Samuel Naylor Ana-Maria Oprea Eniayo Oyebolu Theodora Paschali Gabriele Pauryte Lucia Pells Charles Perriam Claire Perry John (Yanni) Pitsillides Loizos Pontikis Alice Preston-Jones Maria Ramos Bryn Ray Jessica Reaney Timothy Rodber Richard Rothwell Lucy Sanders Alexandra Sims Mark Stancombe Hannah Towler Caroline Williams Joyce Yazbeck Claire Yu Weichen Zhang

MEng Engineering and Architecture Deborah Adler Maria Barnes Yunhao Chen Max Clayton Aimee Desert Matthew Gabe Grace Gallagher Boris Lazarov Chi (Ives) Ma Sam Paterson Gavin Pillinger Dominic Walker Holly Wilkinson Guest Reviewers James Halsall- Mae Architects Jonathan Boyle- STATESTUDIO Jacqueline Milham- Architectonic Design Karen Nugent- Page and Park Architects Sam Brown- Central Saint Martins Jim Dyson- University of Central Lancashire Alan Hooper- Mackintosh School ofArchitecture Emma England- RIBA Yorkshire Carole Latham- Journeyman Design Chris Boyce- Capita Matthew Hutton- Bond Bryan Architects Dean Shaw- Bryant Priest Newman Architects

BA Architecture and Landscape Jabir Ahmadu Eleni Elia Lishen Feng Ye (Maple) Feng Caroline Green Sani Lama Andrew Merrison Melissa Wood

Dominic Walker - P3


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

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Semester One P1.1 ‘Measure’ Each of the six tutor groups were required to make a 1:1 scale drawing study of their project theme: Astronomy; Bee Keeping; Caving; Cycling; Falconry; Kayaking. In addition to the drawing of the theme itself, students were encouraged to make a representation of the human form to further emphasise scale. P1.2 ‘Territory’ As an introduction to a site analysis, students make a large ‘figure ground drawing’ of their site. Each site is in a rural or parkland context which incorporates a threshold condition of some nature. P1.3 ‘Threshold’ Having measured the site and the component parts of their given project theme, students are required to design a small building to house the proposed activity. In addition to forming a response to the threshold condition and the wider landscape, the specific pragmatic demands of the theme of the project must be resolved. Students are asked to research component construction methods and to observe a notion of ‘impermanence’. P2.1 ‘Neighbourhood Study’ In the second half of Semester 1 the year group embarked upon research into community theatre. As a prelude to the design project, an analysis of the given sites was undertaken. Sites were identified in three small towns on the outskirts of Sheffield; Attercliffe, Darnall and Hillsborough. Students performed a Neighbourhood Study of the area to explore and analyse the fabric of the community in each location. P2.2 ‘Perform’ During a fast and furious day trip to London, Year 2 explored seven small theatre buildings. Upon our return to Sheffield, each student was asked to propose a specific ‘type’ of theatre, or target audience, based on their research of the subject. As a programmatically simple building, the ‘Perform’ project provided a first opportunity to attempt the design of a small public building and an urban façade.

01 Christina Carcanescu P1 02 Ahad Mahmood P1 03 Andrew Merrison P1 04 Christina Carcanescu P1 05 Fanni Csespeli P1

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06 Lishen Feng P1 07 Gigi Kwong P2 08 Patrick McElroy P2 09 Geogre Allen P1

‘Bridge’ The Bridge project is a week-long exercise working in collaboration with teams of first year Civil and Structural Engineering students. The project culminates in a ‘make and break’ event, where scale models of the footbridge proposals are tested to destruction.

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Semester Two P3.1 ‘Living Needs’ Students are asked to plan a dinner party. All elements of the evening must be documented from the purchase of the food to the washing up. With specific attention to dimensional analysis, this social event becomes a detailed critique of domestic space. P3.2 ‘Housing Precedent Study’ A rigorous group based study into the key aspects of a given housing development. The study is augmented by walking tours of housing projects in Manchester and Amsterdam.

11 Andrew Merrison P3 12 Lishen Feng P3 13 Melissa Wood P3

P3.3 ‘Masterplan’ As a contextual analysis of the project site, students were asked to explore the territory of the Woodside area of Sheffield, and produce a masterplan proposal. Inherent within the design project was an obligation for students to research and investigate the character and identity of the community.

14 Petros Antoniou P3

P3.4 ‘Housing’ The housing project brief offers an opportunity to explore the nature of shared space within small communities. Each student is required to design dwellings to house 6-8 families, with an element of additional accommodation to be individually determined. Students are invited to respond to one of six project themes which challenge architectural preconceptions through the investigation of domestic space. Students are encouraged to attempt an analysis of a front to back condition through the use of a sectional perspective drawing. This provokes studio debate on the architectural contribution to a streetscape and a neighbourhood.

16 Ashley Mayes P3

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17 Eleni Elia P3 18 John Chia P3 19 Gigi Kwong P3

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Third Year Third year students undertake two design projects during the academic year, punctuated by a short group project which values enquiry and collective output and sets the intellectual framework for the final project. The studio comprises a range of parallel project briefs, underpinned by a social dimension, the process of making and recognition of the need for a deep understanding of the characteristics of place.The studio aims to encourage students to develop their own position within the contextual and thematic framework provided by project briefs, with emphasis upon the project as a whole as well as the end product, acknowledging the importance of both analysis and synthesis during the design process. Enquiry and experimentation in design are actively encouraged together with a wide range of representational techniques and the creative integration of technology which is viewed as a valuable contributor to the design process. The resulting variety of design approaches acts itself as a vehicle for reflective discussion and learning within the year as a whole. The excellent standard of work this year and the results achieved overall is testament to the energy, enthusiasm and commitment of this student group.

Director Mark Emms Co-Director Paul Testa Studio Tutors Bob Blundell Tony Broomhead Ming Chung Oli Cunningham Mark Emms Maggie Pickles Paul Testa Nick Tyson BA Architecture Ivan Andonov Easton Andrea Muhammad Azmi Charlotte Backshall Maria Bellou Sebastian Benson Benjamin Bradish Guy Bridgewood Daniela Caruntu Luxuan Chen Yu Chen Zhao Chen Gary Cheung Alex Clark Cameron Clarke Christopher Cooper Peter Cross Joel Cunningham Dora Dixon Telmo Dos Santos Osaki Douglas Bebhinn Egan Joshua Egglestone Harry Fox Panayiotis Hadjisergis Matthew Halton Ju Whan Han James Harrington Nigel Hassell David Hodgson Jack Hodgson Amanda Holden Estelle Jarvis Sophie Johnson

Simon Keeling Monika Klavins Aliz Kopenetz Sanjeev Kumar Zoe Laing Jonathan Lee Oi Liu Laura Mauger Mohammad Mazlan Imogen Mcgrath Rachael Moon Rebecca Nixon Hannah Osundina Jessica Pallot Chirag Patel Simona Petraityte Samuel Philpott Zhini Poh Louis Pohl Gabriela Pop Yue Jun Qian Rebecca Quickfall Nadiya Qureshi Banah Rashid Benjamin Rea Esme Rothwell Rohini Saddul Oluwadamilola Sanda Alexander Scally Aftab Shaikh Kseniya Sharin Pierre Shaw Hana Shibu Angus Smith Bartholomew Smith Edward Smith Taylor Rosanna Sutcliffe Roma Swords-Mcdonnell Kirsty Tipper Corina Thomas Andreas Tsestos Stefania Tsigkouni Danielle Vazquez Evgenia Vlachaki Simon Wells Morgan Williams Parnell Wanqing Wong Shunyuan Zhang Feifei Zhou Alya Zokari

BA Architecture and Landscape Alexandros Achniotis Mollie-Mae Dale-Collen Sophie Entwisle Joren Heise Robyn Kent Grace Laurie Maleeka Metteden Rebekah Russell MEng Engineering and Architecture Joanna Dicken Guillermo Dochao-Naveira Jack Flynn Amy Izzard Ekke Piirisild Leanne Robinson Ian Shepherd Georgina Stocks Joseph Walker Erasmus Nikolina Paunova Mathilde Remanjon Simon Rott Ioana Gabriela Simion Visiting Professors Andrew Groarke Greg Penoyre Visiting Architects and Urbanists Nick Berry Simon Branson John Brent Robert Evans Spencer Guy Rachel Haynes Jo Hodson Nick Hunter Simon Innes Andy James Pete Jennings Carole Latham Jacquie Milham Arran Pexton Annalie Riches Simon Robinson

Tom Rogers John Sampson Tony Skipper Hannah Smart Visiting Structural Engineers Amy Boulton Buick Davison Chris Gibbs Richard Harpin Susie Horsfield Steve Reynolds Sarah Shawe-Taylor Department of Landscape Tutors Andy Clayden Laurence Pattacini School Staff Irena Bauman Carolyn Butterworth Leo Care Holly Castleton Rachel Cruise Howard Evans Steve Fotios Aidan Hoggard Dan Jary Jian Kang Russell Light Satwinder Samra Fionn Stevenson MArch Students Holly Barker Edmund Harrison-Gray Amy Hill Neil Michels

Jessica Pallot - P2


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Project One Fabric, New Mills Maggie Pickles and Oli Cunningham This project explored fabric qualities and fabrication processes with proposals which respect heritage but embrace the change from textile industry to leisure and community use within the town and its dramatic gorge.

01 Peter Cross 02 Pierre Shaw 03 Gary Cheung 04 Edward Smith Taylor 05 Banah Rashid

01 Narrative Spaces, Hebden Bridge Tony Broomhead and Paul Testa This project started with the representation of a story and an exploration of narratives within the mill town of Hebden Bridge, culminating in a building to support the existing network of storytellers in the area.

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All The Fun Of The Fair, Ilkeston Mark Emms, Ming Chung and Nick Tyson This project explored permanence and transience in relation to context, technology and community and proposed a new home for the fairground archive in Ilkeston, with input from the National Fairground Archive currently based here at the University.

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Project Two Preliminary Studies

Individual Projects

01 Makespace, Northern Quarter, Manchester Ming Chung and Nick Tyson

Architecture and Landscape Making Communities, Furnace Hill, Sheffield Mark Emms

This preliminary study explored and developed skills in new fabrication technologies (laser cutting and CNC milling) through the production of prototype structures using single materials, dry fix assembly and component replication.

This project developed an understanding of the physical and social fabric of Furnace Hill Conservation Area in Sheffield and its place within the city, past and present. Proposals for new making facilities set within broader urban strategies included the design of landscape and buildings which add a contemporary layer of social, cultural and making activities within the historic context.

02 Seed, Liverpool Canal Link Maggie Pickles This study graphically explored the geometries of crop cultivation at a range of scales from cell structure, through glasshouse geometries, to the patterns of regional distribution infrastructures. 03 Scenes, Sheffield Tony Broomhead This study involved a series of short films exploring the confines and context of Mary Queen of Scots’s imprisonment in Sheffield using contemporary and archive footage.

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04 Data to Things : Things to Data, Saltaire Oli Cunningham For this preliminary study students researched, disassembled, analysed and categorized a range of (redundant) industrially produced physical objects principally concerned with the processing and digitization of data.

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05 Making Communities Furnace Hill, Sheffield Bob Blundell Group research for this study involved recording the physical and social fabric of Furnace Hill Conservation Area in Sheffield, both past and present. 06 Fast Slow, Keighley Paul Testa This study was comprised of collective and detailed mapping of visible and invisible context at multiple scales. 01

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Making Communities Furnace Hill, Sheffield Bob Blundell

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These design projects explore making processes and build upon the understanding of place to add a contemporary material layer of archaeology that supports new or continued social, cultural and making activities.

12 Pierre Shaw 13 Muhammad Azmi 14 Louis Pohl 15 Laura Mauger

11 Scenes, Sheffield Tony Broomhead

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These design projects are driven by related themes of isolation, community and reconnection and include residential and social functions on a variety of sites explored within films.

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18 Dora Dixon 19 Cameron Clarke 20 Benjamin Rea

Makespace, Northern Quarter, Manchester Ming Chung and Nick Tyson

21 Eugenia Vlachaki

These design projects respond to the emerging context of open access manufacturing and propose an architecture (fablab) that can host this new type of design and making activity.

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Data to Things : Things to Data, Saltaire Oli Cunningham

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These design projects focus on the culture and context of digital fabrication within the industrially produced World Heritage Site of Saltaire and aim to reconcile social and physical aspects of digital technology and relate traditional and emerging technologies.

27 Esme Rothwell 28 David Hodgson 29 Panayiotis Hadjisergis 30 Ju Whan Han 31 Corina Thomas

Seed, Liverpool Canal Link Maggie Pickles These design projects build upon this knowledge of particular crops to propose non-food crop innovation facilities with environments for growing, research and education as a way of regenerating urban hinterlands

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THE EVENING APPROACH

33 Christopher Cooper 34 Rebecca Nixon 35 Nigel Hassell 36 Bartholomew Smith

Fast Slow, Keighley Paul Testa These design projects consider recreation, health and wellbeing, inspired by the now imminent arrival of the Tour de France in Keighley, with projects exploring the social, cultural, recreational and competitive nature of a range of activities set within the town.

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Undergraduate Special Study The special study is an individual piece of work, allowing students to explore a particular aspect of architecture in some depth.Topics usually fall within the following subject range: architectural theory, architectural history, science and technology, structures, management, CAD and the digital realm, landscape architecture, or urban design. It offers students the opportunity to research, organise and produce an extended piece of mostly written work over the course of a year.

‘Re-Invent’ Metaxourgeio: An Investigation On The Phenomenon Of Gentrification Stefania Tsigkouni Extracts From Introduction

Studies this year have ranged from the mastery re-mapping of Athens by Stefania Tsigkouni on ‘Re-Invent’ Metaxourgeio: An investigation on the phenomenon of gentrification, to the scholarly study of the surviving letters of Elizabeth Shrewsbury by Ruth Jennings on The Architectural Authorship of Women in Elizabethan England:Was Elizabeth Shrewsbury the Author of Hardwick Hall? Contemporary topics included examinations of The Under-represented Body in Architecture (Wanqing Wong), Changing Perceptions: Towards an Intercultural Collaboration for the Future Architecture of Uganda (Rebecca Nixon), and How Has Thatcherism Affected Housing in the United Kingdom (Guy Bridgewood).

David Harvey1, in his work Rebel Cities2, positions the city in the centre of two contradictory values: the spatial organisation of a city produced by the intersection of capital flows into land development on the one hand, and the reproduction of labour power on the other. Cities have a strong correlation with production and their morphology is an apparent reflection of the structure of capitalism. He analyses the city as a process of surplus production and capital over-accumulation as well as a place of resistance and class conflict. One of the concepts Harvey investigates, under the lens of this conflict, is that of the right to the city3: the collective right to change the city by ‘exercising a collective power over the process of urbanisation’. Yet this is one of the most neglected human rights. A by-product of this omission is the phenomenon of gentrification.

These works offer a flavour of the richness, rigour and variety of the Special Study, and the wide range of research methodologies, analytical and presentation techniques that are deployed.

The concept of gentrification, which is the essence of this essay, as an inner city process has been thoroughly discussed for almost half a century. Neil Smith writes that gentrification is ‘a highly visible spatial process, deeply rooted in current patterns of social and economic differentiation’4. This trajectory of urban development is a product of the constant ‘patterning and transformation of the city landscape’. The continuous transformation of the city is a perpetual structuring and restructuring of urban space; a result of the ‘advent of capitalism’5.

Co-ordinator Chengzhi Peng Stephen Walker

As this process applies differently depending on the specific socioeconomic background of each city, this study will investigate the emerging dynamics in the city centre of Athens, focusing on a former working class neighbourhood, Metaxourgeio. With the city of Athens trying to recover from the economic recession, the elaborated research question is whether, through the underlying forces that are changing the urban and social tissue in this inner city district, we are about to experience another incident of gentrification. It becomes crucial to value the impact of this phenomenon on the production of urban and social space, which reflects the middle class preferences of resettling in the city centre. The objective of this essay is an attempt to assess the immediate direction and consequences of this urban restructuring. How substantial will the changes be in this specific district of Athens? What kind of urban character will the area have in the immediate future? What are the effects of the process on the current residents of Metaxourgeio? The dissertation will also explore the specific aspects of this case study, what differentiates it from other examples of gentrification within the European Capital (i.e. Berlin, London6) and its position in the wider context of the phenomenon.Yet most importantly, this study aims to challenge the idea that gentrification is a natural process that follows the flow of the city and will intent to address the bigger question: Can gentrification be prevented, through a process that prioritises the right to the city and its remaking ‘after our heart’s desire’7? 02 ...The democratisation of housing is crucial for Metaxourgeio. The revocation of spatial boundaries and fear, liberated flow and action in the area need to replace the crackdown of immigrants and the investment plans aiming at the eviction of working-class layers, and the colonisation of the neighbourhood by the new and creative middle class. Otherwise, this active pocket within the city will be skinned and transformed into another sterile area of entertainment and delight. The research question that this study endeavours to give answers to has no general course of action towards a solution and it would be ignorant to argue that any sort of study can provide a particular path to prevent the process of gentrification in cities successfully, without the process of trial and error. Having said that, there are directions that can be followed-set out by precedents (i.e. IBA Berlin) and the speculative propositions of this study (yet not limited to that): within this work a groundwork is set in place to build upon. I consider this study to be the beginning of further research, rather than an end; an investigation aiming to explore ways that architecture can revolutionise peoples’ everyday lives. Following Lefebvre, ‘revolution has to be urban’, in the broadest sense of both terms, ‘or nothing at all’7 and architecture can provide the framework as well as the means for its realisation.

1. David Harvey is a Human Geographer, Marxist and Social Theorist 2. Harvey, D., ‘Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution’, Verso Books: London (2012) 3. The right to the city has been argued extensively by Henri Lefebvre, who first proposed the idea in his book Le Droit a la ville, (1968)

03 01 Stefania Tsigkouni Re-imagining Metaxourgeio as a network of communities

4. Smith N., Williams P.,’Gentrification of the City’, London: Unwin Hyman Ltd, (1986), p. 206 5. Ibid. p.206 6. Gentrification in Berlin took place in Prenzlauerberg after the reunification of East and West Berlin (1989). Suggested Reading: Bernt M., Holm A., ‘Exploring the substance and style of gentrification:Berlin’s ‘Prenzlberg’ ‘, Gentrification in a Global Context’, Routledge: New York (2005), p. 106. London has been an ongoing process of continuous gentrification, since 1964. Suggested Reading: Lees L., Slater T., Wyly E., ‘The Gentrification Reader’, Routledge: New York (2010)

02 https://inlovewithlife.wordpress.com/2007/05/29/57/ Millerou & Germaniko squat 03 Stefania Tsigkouni The Building Fabric of Metaxourgeio, Athens

7. Harvey D., ‘The Right To The City’, New Left Review (2008) p. 2

04 http://popaganda.gr/ligi-agapi-gia-tin-odo-iasonos/ Exempler neighbourhood conditions

8. Lefebvre, H., ‘The Urban Revolution’, Writing on Cities, Minneapolis, Minnesota University Press, (2003); Oxford, Blackwell, (1996)

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BA Architectural Studies

The architectural authorship of women in Elizabethan England: Was Elizabeth Shrewsbury the author of Hardwick Hall Ruth Jennings

It is possible in the Third Year to follow an alternative course of study to BA Architecture. This replaces the design studio and technical design modules with credits in unrestricted modules and with a major special study, allowing students to follow through an area of interest and specialisation. This course does not lead to exemption from RIBA Part 1, but does give students the opportunity to develop an area of study to high academic standards. This course leads to the award of the degree of BA Architectural Studies which is not validated by the RIBA or prescribed by ARB, but is a full University degree.

Extracts from Introduction Hardwick Hall has always held a commanding presence in its elevated position above the Derbyshire hillside, now located between Junctions 28 and 29 on the M1 Motorway. It was built between 1590 and 1597 under the patronage of Elizabeth Shrewsbury, known in this study, and to history, as Bess of Hardwick, and is instantly recognisable by the blatant and shameless E.S strapwork detailing that appears eighteen times in total, on the top of its six towers1. This study aims to question the role its patron, Bess, had on orchestrating the build, citing her gender as a major factor. As Hardwick Hall is a building of a bygone typology, era and society, it is important to understand the surrounding socio-historic and economic context.The architectural climate of 16th century Tudor England was unique to Britain and the buildings it produced intrigue and fascinate me. Henry VIII’s monumental decision to break ties with papal Rome in 15342 isolated and severed England from the full extent of the Italian Renaissance and the re-birth of the classical orders. Thus, the English country house that ensued at that point, established a new building typology3, and is interesting in its varied attempts at bridging the stylistic gap between medieval and renaissance classical eras. […] Although Elizabeth I did not directly build, she indirectly influenced others to do so on behalf of her and her travelling court, thus transferring the cost of building onto her subjects; the noblemen of England eager to win the heart of their Virgin Queen4. The lack of any centralised royal attitude about the direction of architecture5 therefore enabled country houses to take on the expression and character of the patrons who commissioned them, resulting in an eclectic, varied style that became known as the English Renaissance. [… ] At the beginning of the sixteenth century Hardwick, Cavendish and Thynne were all relatively insignificant family names, but by 1600 were names “cemented” in history by the building of vast country houses, built by their pragmatic and successful heirs6. […] To history, the reign of Elizabeth I has been dubbed “The Golden Age7 ”,a time when the British Empire was generally at peace and enjoying the former successes of Henry VIII. As a time of celebration, under the reign of an unmarried female monarch, the topic of women was thrown to the forefront of court gossip, speculation and romantic hope. Timothy Mowl describes the reign of Elizabeth I as one long marriage proposal8, as the country discussed the role and prospects of a woman monarch, whilst speculating to whom the Queen would, and should marry. It is within this context that scholars and historians have studied women in the 16th century. Women as wives, mothers, daughters, mistresses, have all been discussed at length, but little has been written about these women’s roles in relation to household decisions and architectural patronage. Whereas women of the 16th century naturally fell into such titles as mother and wife, they rarely fell into the role of patron. Despite a female monarch, 16th century England was still a male dominated society, at least at face value. As the lesser sex, wives were denied the right to own their own property. The influence of the female is therefore hidden from sources, as all official records of payment, accounts and receipts were typically written and signed off by the head of the household, usually the husband and man of the house.

06 1. The Hardwick Estate features two ‘Halls;’ Old Hardwick Hall, the birthplace of Bess of Hardwick, and renovated by her between 1587-1595, and New Hardwick, a house constructed completely anew. This study focuses on New Hardwick Hall, as it is easier to see the architectural interventions made because it was conceived as one. For studies on Old Hardwick Hall, please refer to Worsley. L: Hardwick Old Hall (English Heritage 1998) and Durant. D: The Smythson Circle (Peter Owen 2011) p. 99

This study therefore takes Hardwick Hall as its subject and aims to discuss the themes of womanhood and patronage within its context. The formation of this study entertained the notion that history had overlooked Bess of Hardwick in the design process of Hardwick Hall, based upon her gender. This study hopes to identify, discuss and subsequently answer the following key questions:

2. http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/research-guides/dissolution-ofthe-monasteries.htm accessed 14-04-2014: 1534 being the Act of Supremacy which declared Henry VIII as head of the Church of England, devolving power away from papal Rome.

1. What picture does the surviving correspondence from Bess of Hardwick paint as to what kind of person she was? How did Bess’ life experiences shape her architectural ambitions? 2. How did the Elizabethan domestic circle work for women of the period? Is there any evidence within the interior planning at Hardwick Hall that the head of the household was a woman?

3. Friedman. A: House and Household (1989) pg. 11

3. Is there any evidence in the architectural form of Hardwick Hall, indicating that Elizabeth Shrewsbury commissioned it? 07

5. Mowl T: Elizabethan and Jacobean Style: The Proxy Palaces of Elizabeth (Phaidon Press 1993) p. 71

Definition of terms:

05 http://www.luminarium.org/encyclopedia/bessofhardwick2.jpg Elizabeth Shrewsbury in later life

Whilst it may be well established that Bess of Hardwick was the patron of Hardwick Hall, this study hopes to differentiate between ‘patron’, and ‘author.’ A dictionary definition indicates that the two differ in meaning; a patron being “a person who gives financial or other support to a person, organisation, or cause;” an author being “the originator of something10 ”, It is undeniable that Bess purchased and financially upheld the building of the New Hardwick Hall, and her ability to do so will be become apparent in Chapter Two. However, was she the originator of Hardwick Hall? How firm was her architectural hold on the build in comparison to her male counterparts; did she leave it to others to design, and did her gender have an impact on the build?

06 Ruth Jennings Hardwick Hall, East façade detail

4. Durant. D: The Smythson Circle (Peter Owen 2011) p. 75

6.White. G:The Nature and Purpose of the Original Furnishings and Decoration of Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire (2005) p. 36 7. http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk 8. Mowl T: Elizabethan and Jacobean Style: The Proxy Palaces of Elizabeth (Phaidon Press 1993) p. 71

07 Ruth Jennings Hardwick Hall, East façade

9. Patron and author definitions: Oxford English Dictionary found at http://www. oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/author?q=author

08 Ruth Jennings Extract from Account Book 05

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Events and Activities A wide variety of activities take place outside of courses, with both students and staff participating in a range of events locally and internationally. This year’s Whole School Event was the largest to date with over 300 students taking part.The Sheffield University Architecture Society (SUAS) runs a vibrant array of activities with the popular SUAS Lecture series sparking discussion within the school.


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Whole School Event - Designs on Our City On 12 February 2014 the entire student body of Sheffield School of Architecture participated in our Whole School Event, the largest to date. 300 students took up residence in empty shops in the city centre to participate in 18 workshops led by practising architects, creative practitioners, urban strategists, and UoS academics from architecture, law, town and regional planning, landscape and the enterprise team. The students came up with innovative strategies and proposals for creative uses, and produced work that transformed shop fronts ‘live’ through film, slogans, poetry and photography as evening fell. A public exhibition was held in the old Woolworths department store on The Moor and was attended by city councillors and local civic organisations, as well as intriguing many passers by.

Wednesday 12th February 2014 - SSoA Whole School Event

Designs

@ former Lynne’s Warehouse, Waingate

@ Union Street

Beauty in the City – Mark Emms with Tony Broomhead Carparks in the City – Satwinder Samra with Nick Bax Castle in the City – Dan Jary with Steve Pool Co-working in the City – Leo Care with CADS & Common People Cycling in the City – Paul Testa with Scot Fletcher Enterprise in the City - Ed McCann with Chrissie Elliot, USE Film in the City - Lakshmi Priya Rajendran & Ruxandra Berinde with Magic Lantern Film Club Greening in the City – Howard Evans with Jeff Sorrill Inhabiting the City - Mark Parsons & Ranbir Lal with Jon Orlek Instagram in the City – Russell Light Mediation in the City - Maryam Fazel & Sukainah Adnan Almousa No Rules in the City – Florian Kossak with Andy Inch Open Data in the City – Mark Meagher & Phil Langley Play in the City – Rosie Parnell & Masa Sorn with Dead Earnest Shopping in the City – Teresa Hoskyns with Sarah Blandy Testing Pop-ups in the City – Irena Bauman & Guy Moulson with SKINN & Sue Ball Who lives in the City? – Greg Penoyre with Ellen Page Words in the City – Simon Chadwick & Cith Skelcher

Beauty in the City Mediation in the City No Rules in the City @ Castle House, Co-op

Enterprise in the City Film in the City Inhabiting the City Open Data in the City @ former Woolworths store, The Moor

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Our City

Play in the City @ Winter Gardens

Satwinder Samra with Nick Bax from Human1 03

The Car Park is a mundane yet everyday part of the city. Cycling in the City Words in the City @ former Halfords store, The Moor

We will work to reasses and develop opportunities for these ‘generic and mundane’ places.

Greening in the City Instagram in the City Shopping in the City @ former Poundland store, The Moor

We will observe, record and speculate as a group throughout the day. Nick Bax has produced artwork for Warp Records, Grand Theft Auto and Warehouse project. He is a fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts. www.humanstudio.com

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But most of all – thanks to all the students who worked so hard with such energy, passion and endurance to produce so many ideas on such a stormy wet day!

01 Whole School Event Poster

07 Carpark in the City Workshop Poster

02 Projections on The Moor

08 Beauty in the City Workshop Poster

03 WSE Ambassadors

09 The day starts in Woolworths

04 Inhabiting the City Workshop in Woolworths

10 Play in the City Workshop in the Winter Gardens

05 Castle in the City Workshop Poster

11 Presentation in Halfords

06 Who lives in the City Workshop Poster

12 Projections across the Moor by the ‘Castle in the City’ team

in the city…

SSoA Whole School Event Wednesday 12th Feb 2014

Carparks in the City Co-working in the City

Gill Valentine, Pro-Vice Chancellor for Social Sciences said “this was a hugely successful event organised by, and involving, the whole School of Architecture to begin work on envisioning new ways of understanding and re-engaging with key challenges in Sheffield. Many congratulations to all those involved for such an inspirational start to the semester.”

With thanks also to all our staff members, creative partners and visiting professors who led such fantastic workshops:

CAR PARK

@ Victoria Quays

Castle in the City Who lives in the City?

The event was part of a week-long programme hosted by The University of Sheffield, Sheffield City Council and Doc/Fest, bringing Marcus Westbury, Creative Director of Renew Newcastle, to Sheffield. Students were inspired by the work Marcus has done in Newcastle, Australia, reinvigorating the central business district by helping small, independent artists, makers, and individuals set up shop in vacant premises.The purpose of his visit was to encourage the Council, the University and local independent businesses and creative organisations to collaborate on a resilient model of home-grown regeneration of the city centre.

WSE organised by Carolyn Butterworth with thanks to Leo Care,Aidan Hoggard, Melvyn Broady, Barra Mac Ruari, Fionn Stevenson,Vanessa Toulmin, Sandra Barley and Marcus Westbury.

Testing Pop-ups in the City

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Theory Forum 2013 - Thinking Resilience

SSoA Forum 2014 - Retrofitting Neighbourhoods

Society is facing major challenge of climate change and resource scarcity. Both will lead to shocks and our society needs to develop resilience in order to withstand them and transition to a sustainable and just society.

This years School Form was delivered in partnership with SUAS, BLR and Agency as another event in the series of Building Local Resilience Platform.

Architecture and Urban Design straddle many disciplines and require synthesis of many variants.This makes architects especially well placed to contribute to the understanding of resilience. However, much of the research so far has focused on mitigation strategies to the problems rather than adaptation strategies to develop resilience.

This lecture series draws together practitioners from across the UK and beyond to discuss their work and reflect on how we actively retrofit our neighbourhood to make them more adaptable, more liveable and more sustainable in the times of change. The emphasis of the series was on practice-based research. In particular we discussed the social and cultural engagements of architects in making resilient neighbourhoods.

In Thinking Resilience we explore some of the current research undertaken by academic staff in SSoA to examine how it informs our understanding of resilience at different spatial scales. The Theory Forum is one of the events run by Developing Local Resilience Research platform: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/architecture/research/resilience/thinkingresil

01 Architecture of Resilience 1: Retrofitting Neighbourhood and Goodwin Trust - Jonathan Wilson and Peter McGurn Organiser of the Forum Irena Bauman

01 2013 Theory Forum Poster

Chairs Irena Bauman Florian Kossak Satwinder Samra

02 Discussions at the Victoria Centre

Speakers Nishat Awan Peter Blundell Jones Carolyn Butterworth Leo Care Prue Chiles Teresa Hoskyns Lucy Jones Phil Langley Mark Meagher Chengzhi Peng Doina Petrescu Fionn Stevenson Kim Trogal Sarah Wigglesworth Organisation, publicity and catering Holly Barker Joanna Beal Aimee Yu Beichen Dovile Botyriute Sam Brandt Nicola Dale Richard Fennell Jie Gao Joanna Hansford Toby Hyam Ross Jordan Peter Lathey Alex Maxwell Charu Shila Mohan Yun Wing Ng Charlie Palmer Adel Sutcliffe Jet Swan Kim Swan

02 Architecture and Theatre Set Design - Nissen Richards Studio 03 Hybrid City - Elizabeth Sikiaridi and Frans Vogelaar of Hybrid Space Lab, Berlin

03 The students who cooked 3 meals for 140 people on the day

04 A Kind of Practice - Oliver Smith of 5th Studio

04 Preparations for the candlelit dinner

05 Facit Homes and Collective Custom Build - George Legg and Sam Brown

05 Candlelit dinner and film screenings

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06 Other Ways of Doing Architecture: Smokescreen or Real Change? Tatjana Schneider of Spatial Agency

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SUAS The 2014 committee has worked hard to develop links with alumni and broaden the society’s outreach across SSoA to include staff, PGT and PhD students. With over 360 members, SUAS is now the largest it has been in the society’s history. Once again,Thursday nights have seen SUAS host a diverse and inspiring series of lectures in the Well. Collaborating with AGENCY and BLR (Building Local Resilience), the continued success of these events is a testament to the lecture team and committee members who have worked hard to put on the events. From practicing architects to theatrical set designers, this years speakers have included Paul Williams (Stanton Williams Architects), Pippa Nissen and Ifigeneia Liangi (Nissen Richards Studio) as well as Sheffield alumni Pol Gallagher (ZAP Architecture) and Alastair Parvin (00:/ Architecture and Wikihouse) to name but a few. Following the hugely successful SUAS launch in the Well, this year’s social calendar began with the time-honoured tradition of the fancy dress social – a much anticipated event that gave everyone the opportunity to get creative with their costumes.This was closely followed by the legendary Bakewell Pub Crawl which saw over 120 students descend upon the Peak District for a night of merriment in the traditional Yorkshire pubs. The annual summer ball ‘the SUAS Carnival’ took place in June to celebrate the end of the year. Another night of festivities and an opportunity to get creative, this year’s SUAS Ball was the biggest and best yet. 2014 has seen SUAS launch Life Drawing classes and a new student journal ‘ASPECT’. The graphics team have worked hard to develop a new brand for the society and the inter-year mentoring scheme has again been hugely popular. Lunchtime Specials, talks that are given by students to students, are now in their eleventh series.This year the Lunchtime Specials series has focused on the world of practice, offering undergraduate students insights into the nature of different practices, applying for jobs and some of the diverse career opportunities available that lay beyond that of the traditional architect.

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My thanks go to all the students, staff and committee members that have worked tirelessly to make SUAS 2014 a year to remember. Emma Low, SUAS President

02 SUAS Commitee 2014 President Emma Low Vice Presidents David Hodgson Estelle Jarvis Treasurer Andrew McKay Secretary Lucy Greaves Ball Co-ordinator/ Undergraduate Publicity Morgan Williams Parnell Social Team Emma James Olivia Radford Publicity/ Branding Emma Graham Alex Maxwell Inclusions Officer Bébhinn Egan SUAS Shop Robert Wilson Ethan He

Lecture Team Mike Horswill Kalpana Gurung Kseniya Sharin Stefania Tsigkouni Tom Walker Lunchtime Specials Team Emma Low Rory Chisholm Jessica Haigh Andrew McKay Matthew Pearson Kelly-marie Rodgers Tom Walker

Ball Team Morgan Williams Parnell Serina Kitazono Gabriele Pauryte Mari Shirley Kyle McCracken Lucia Pells Agelos Lc Hannah Towler Lucy Sanders Petros Antoniou

Aspect Journal Team Bébhinn Egan Hannah Griffiths Charlie Palmer Purdie Whitting Life Drawing Ruth Jennings 01 SUAS Launch Party 02 SUAS Lecture

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Sheffield 1900 Study

Summer Schools

During the spring semester of 2014, the 1900 historical model of Sheffield grew by a further five squares, encompassing the area stretching north from Broad Lane, passing through Furnace Hill, Shalesmoor, Green Lane and finishing at the River Don weir at Kelham Island.

The Sheffield School of Architecture Summer Programme takes place over a week in August each year. http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/architecture/initiatives/summerschool

Making Cities

This year’s study was conducted by twenty-seven students from MArch, PGT and undergraduate levels. Led by Peter Blundell Jones and Jo Lintonbon, the group attempted to explore and analyse the Sheffield urban context through its form, use and historical development. Each of the study areas is a 200m x200m square, modelled at 1:500 scale and accompanied by a supporting research folder. In order successfully to reconstruct the urban fabric circa 1900, extensive research into the built form and social history had to be carried out, and valuable research skills were honed and developed. Students became familiar with the formalities of archival work, alongside model making. The research this year unravelled a vibrant and colourful narrative much focused on the industrial history of the city. The studied area embraced many building typologies, including industrial works, working class housing, churches, schools, and pubs. Although some significant buildings still survive as signposts to the area’s past, most of the low quality housing was removed in the early 20th century as part of a bid to clear slums.

Tutors Peter Blundell Jones Jo Lintonbon Students Y4 Rory Chisholm Aditi Ashok Lande Charu Shila Mohan Shilin Patwa Wei Zou Z4 Chaojing Chen Tingting Dong Ruth Jennings Ling Zhou Yuting Rao Z5 Zhaofang Chen Bin Guo Bochen Lu Yibo Yang Yaqi Yuan Yishu Yao Z6 Chang Hao Fang Hao Jie Hu Yun Li Manqing Lin Yiming Ran Z7 Alex Gilbert Christopher Hall Joseph Moss Farouq Tahar Lucy Tew Wijaya Yapeter

01 2013 - Big Buildings, Small Buildings and the Spaces In Between

02 2014 - Making Cities

The 2013 Summer School hosted 12 students from Harbin HIT - it was our pilot for the summer school planned for 2014.

We are delighted to announce a 6 day programme of events designed to examine the fabric of the City Centre of Sheffield and propose solutions to vacant, underused and underdeveloped sites within the city. This is an ideal opportunity whether you have an interest in architecture or design, are a prospective student, an international student or from another university. Participants will gain first-hand experience of the design process whilst working with leading practitioners.

Four days of summer school were spent exploring the issues of place making and how large and fine grain building and their uses impact on places. We made site visits to the large footprint, single use developments such as Magna and Meadowhall, and to fine grain, multiuse ones such as Portland works. Students worked in two groups to develop options for the same site - they then presented to each other and reflected on the schemes collectively. The 2013 Summer School was led by Irena Bauman and Simon Chadwick with guest tutors: Anna Holder, Lorenza Casini and Julia Udall. It was inspiring to see the design talent of the students and their excellent language skill. It was a pleasure to teach them.

SUMMER SCHOOL 15th-20th SEPTEMBER 2014

The Making Cities Summer School will bring together both Schools of Architecture in Sheffield, the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University, giving participants a chance to develop your interest in Architecture in a fascinating city with many challenges and opportunities. The Summer School takes place during the Festival of the Mind, an event which promotes collaboration between the University of Sheffield and the City in an 11-day festival where we share our most exciting research in inspiring and creative ways.

DESIGN TEAM LEADERS

Each morning participants will choose from a series of skills sessions including collage, perspective drawing and life drawing workshops. These will be designed and run by some of Sheffield’s leading academics and educators in the field of Architecture: Florian Kossak, Satwinder Samra, Russell Light, Julian Marsh, Leo Care and Mark Emms. Afternoons will be spent in one of 3 design studios on floors 16 and 17 of the Arts Tower. The 3 studios will be run and themed by one of the Team Leaders, Martin Mayfield (Engineer), Irena Bauman (Architect) and David Cotterrell (Artist). The studios will be supported by Simon Chadwick and Cith Skelcher of the University of Sheffield, School of Architecture, and Julian Marsh of Sheffield Hallam University, School of Architecture. Studios will be encouraged to test their ideas in 3D within a giant city model, which will be situated at the heart of the Arts Tower on floor 16.

Engineer Irena Bauman Architect David Cotterrell Artist

VISITING PRACTICES SHEFFIELD ACADEMICS AHMM Simon Chadwick Carmody Groarke Leo Care Hawkins\Brown Russell Light Penoyre & Prasad Julian Marsh Riches Hawley Mikhail Satwinder Samra 5th Studio Cith Skelcher

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Each evening we will offer a talk, walking tour or design review hosted by one of our highly renowned invited guests from some of the UK’s best practices: AHMM, Carmody Groarke, Hawkins\ Brown, Penoyre & Prasad, Riches Hawley Mikhail and 5th Studio. Many of whom trained at the University of Sheffield, School of Architecture and also employ our graduates. The closing event on Saturday 20 September provides a special opportunity to exhibit participants’ work mounted within the giant city model in Tudor Square, in the city centre, amongst the events of the Festival of the Mind, signalling an open invitation to the citizens of Sheffield, Sheffield City Council, Sheffield Society of Architects and Sheffield Civic Trust. 02

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Architecture Students Network

Student Competitions

Architecture Students Network, Lines Drawn Conference, March 2014 SSoA represented by Ruth Jennings and Adam Tarasewicz

Students at SSoA have taken part in extra curricular design competitions, consistently winning and being shortlisted against other students and practicing architects on national and international platforms. This year the school has seen numerous successes in a wide variety of awards, ranging from international awards, to local enterprise and sketching competitions.

The future of architectural education is once more at the forefront of debate between the RIBA, UK schools and architectural practices. As such, the Architecture Students Network (ASN) and The Centre of Alternative Technology wished to find out the thoughts and opinions of architecture students from across the UK. This was disseminated through the Lines Drawn Conference, hosted by CAT in Machynlleth, Wales during mid March, and was attended by representatives from twenty two schools, Olly Wainwright, (architecture and design critic at The Guardian) and Will Hunter, (executive editor of the Architectural Review and Director of The London School of Architecture.) The conference was split into a series of small discursive workshops, which ran over two days. Subjects included the value of Parts 1, 2 and 3 under the current system, the aspirations of a flexible education system, the EU directive legislation proposals, and future of ‘the profession.’ Conclusions from the conference, in response to these workshops, can be read in detail on the ASN website. One major success of the conference was the opportunity to meet other architecture students from across the UK. It provided a networking platform from which to share ideas and enjoy a variety of architectural thought and teaching, unique to the UK and its architecture schools.The ASN therefore has a potentially divisive role in encouraging open dialogue and debate surrounding education and practice, “students don’t value the amount of weight which they have. If students came together as a collective great things could happen.” - Alex Maxwell, 6th Year SSoA and ASN representative.

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The conference received a good level of publicity and was immediately reported by ArchDaily. It shall be interesting to see what direction architectural education takes in the coming months, and whether the voices of students are heard in any decisions made. At the SSoA, ‘Reflections on Architectural Education’ is an annual PGT option module, led by Dr Rosie Parnell and George Lovett. This year’s study group comprised of ten students from MArch, PGT and undergraduate levels. Many of the broad issues and conclusions made at the Lines Drawn Conference were discussed during the yearlong module, in addition to the exploration of learning and teaching techniques.

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03 01 United Nations Habitat Revitalisation of Mass Housing International Competition 2014: UK Winner

03 Women in Property National Student Award for Yorkshire and North East Region 2013

Andreas Papallas Zak Nicoll Simeon Shtebunaev

Rebecca Nixon

The UN Habitat competition ‘Revitalisation of Mass housing’ aimed to render monolithic mass housing into more socially, economically and environmentally sustainable areas by integrating mixed uses, improving densities and mobility and reducing their eco-footprint.

The Architecture Students Network (www.theasn.org) is an independent network of UK based architecture students. It aims to support and promote architecture student events and harnesses student opinion. The next ASN event is to be held at the Kent School of Architecture, so keep your eyes peeled for details in the future if you wish to be involved.

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Our entry focused on the Gleadless Valley housing estate in Sheffield, arguing that it is estates like it which are the predominant type of the mass housing stock in the UK and which deserve to be high on the policy agenda. The estate has build a reputation of a no-go area and is simply referred as a ‘long established housing community’ in the Local Plan for Sheffield, with no future plans or vision described. Through our proposal we strived to develop a strategy of how residents in the Valley could propose small change through existing policies, which could form the basis for a more comprehensive master planning at later stages. We strived to provide a wellresearched proposal which could be used a tool in future policy making processes. We were happy to learn that we have won the UK arm of the competition with the regional winners for Europe and the world winner to be announced on the 7th of April at the UN Habitat Annual forum. Now that the anonymity requirements have been lifted we will be looking to go back to the source and disseminate our proposal ideas in Gleadless Valley.Thanks to Irena Bauman and her studio 17 for the research which has been conducted by them in Gleadless Valley.

Rebecca was awarded the Women in Property National Student Award for Yorkshire and North East Region, winning £300 and a trophy. 04 RIBA Charrette 2014 - A Northern Soul, Newcastle upon Tyne Left to right: Joren Heise, Lucas Williams, Alex Achniotis (all Architecture and Landscape students) with Russell Light Attended by over 60 students from Northern Schools of Architecture the project brief for this national student design competition focused on re-imagining the Stephenson Quarter, an important historic area within Newcastle upon Tyne. Each design team was formed of students from different Schools of Architecture, with Alex Achniotis’ team winning overall.

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05 The Scottish Ecological Design Association (SEDA) Krystyna Johnson Award 2014: Nominated George Allen The Krystyna Johnson Award encourages second year architectural students to bring ecological thought to their work from the outset. George’s second year housing project was nominated from SSoA along with projects from five Scottish Schools.

02 West Yorkshire Society of Architects Dennis Mason Jones Award for Freehand Sketching 2013: Winner

01 Ruth Jennings and Adam Tarasewicz

Nikola Yanev 02 Encouraging dialogue: The Icebreaker

The judges enjoyed the tremendous 3D quality without loosing the freshness of this well observed architectural sketch.

03 ASN representatives

Commendations go to Bochen Lu, Sam Milward and a Special Mention to Adam Tarasewicz.

04 Olly Wainwright opens the conference 15/03/2014 04


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Awards and Recognition This year has seen many successes within the department, with numerous students receiving prestigious awards for their design work.

01 RIBA Yorkshire Student Awards 2013: Part 2 Silver Award RIBA President’s Medals 2013: Part 2 Nominated 3DReid Student Prize 2013: Shortlisted Guy Moulson A Theatre for a New Scientific Age Tutor: Russell Light A Theatre for a New Scientific Age is an investigation into the development of an architectural language that represents a critical form of theatre. Brechtian Theatre, or more appropriately Epic Theatre is adopted by this study in order to provide a structure with which to develop a suitable architectural language. The language of a theatre, as a building type, can be dissected and redefined in order to reflect the intentions of the material shown within. It’s metaphysical aspirations, of narrative, observation, montage, social being and inquiry are represented by the tectonic arrangement of parts, and the revealing of the otherwise concealed elements of a theatre. 02 RIBA Yorkshire Student Awards 2013: Part 2 Bronze Award Nick Hunter Startup EAST Tutor: John Sampson Startup EAST is about new ways of working - both in education and enterprise – and a paradigm shift in civic architecture and development. The project evolved through a critique of the economic vulnerability of speculative delivery – a system which has left vacant asset-driven buildings throughout British cities and failed to deliver regeneration projects through times of economic hardship. Startup EAST is a proposal for an economically resilient development paradigm, driven by the growth of small and medium enterprises. The project’s building proposal is the foundation capital project that starts this new development process. It revives the historic light industries of East Newcastle, whilst providing new civic and community facilites for the local community: a new public library, an enterprise incubator and a construction school. The building overlaps circulation and usable space to create a vibrant collective learning environment and workplace that helps develop future collaborative relationships. 03 SSoA Marcus Humphrey-Gaskin Memorial Prize 2013

04 RIBA President’s Medals 2013: Part 2 Nominated Global Architecture Graduate Awards 2013: Runner-up Chris Parrott All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace Tutor: Carolyn Butterworth

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This project is situated in Neepsend, Sheffield and concerns the transgression of societies relationship with technology. The HQ of SHED, The Sheffield Hacking and Electronics Division, inhabits the site of an old brewery - a live lab for technological skills. Part civic learning centre, part technological market hub. The site is used as an urban test bed, construction through 3D printers, laser cutters, CNC mills. Everyone is part-time builder, designs evolving on the spot. SHED becomes a building that is always under construction. 05 RIBA President’s Medals 2013: Part 1 Nominated Edward Crooks The Theatre Of Progress Tutor: Ranbir Lal The Theatre of Progress, based at Chatsworth House, aims to deal holistically with the wider political, social and environmental context affecting the estate. The building adopts the programme of an audience-participatory theatre; sampling, compressing and simulating elements of the existing house in order to develop a stage set around which society can change the way we perceive and interact with Chatsworth. Drawing influence from Rem Koolhaas’ description of Coney Island, the extension acts as an incubator for future themes and mythology at Chatsworth, continuing a long heritage of illusion, playfulness, communication and influence. The building itself is not a revolution, but is the rehearsal of a transformation to be played out within Chatsworth House.

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06 RIBA President’s Medals 2013: Part 1 Nominated Mohammed Syafiq Hassan Jubri Manufacturing of Urban Idiosyncrasies - Facility For Sheffield’s Digitally Fabricated Bicycles Tutor: Oli Cunningham

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07 RIBA President’s Research Awards 2013: RIBA President’s Award for Outstanding Master’s Degree Thesis

Jessica Pallot Founded in 2011, this prize was established to commemorate the life of Marcus Humphrey-Gaskin, a student of the School of Architecture who died during the second year of his course in 2011.

Fay al Khalifa Supervisor: Professor Peter Blundell Jones The award was given for her dissertation entitled ‘An urban healing agenda for reform in Bahrain: where the dweller falls into the urban gap and the sailing boat hits the skyscraper’, which was completed as part of her MA in Conservation and Regeneration course at SSoA.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

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Sheffield Society of Architects Established in 1887 the Sheffield Society of Architects is in the middle of one of it’s busiest years. So far, a strong core committee have already delivered a Design Summit with local Architects, associated professionals and students looking at the future of Sheffield’s retail quarter. The exciting output of which has been presented to Sheffield City Council and should positively influence the upcoming master plan. Currently, we are busy putting together events for RIBA Yorkshire’s week-long Love Architecture festival, which is a core part of the inaugural Sheffield Design Week. The highlight of this week for us is the launch of our Dear Sheffield postcard exhibition at Moor Markets; a project we started in 2012 to celebrate 125 years of the Society. Dear Sheffield is a fascinating collection of memories of places and spaces from the people who love and live in Sheffield. This project has been successful in reaching out to the general public and received a great response. We will be working with Sheffield City Council, RIBA Yorkshire, Sheffield’s two schools of architecture and other partners to deliver events for Sheffield Urban Design Week in October 2014. We are also assisting RIBA Yorkshire and Sheffield Civic Trust with Sheffield Design Awards 2014, the winners of which will be announced during Urban Design Week. Going forward we want to further strengthen our ties with Sheffield’s architectural students and academics and other partner organisations to help promote architecture and enable debate about our great city and the design issues/opportunities it faces. We are always keen for new members to strengthen our committee. If you would like to become involved or find out more about the Society and it’s events please email us at sheffieldsocietyofarchitects@gmail.com

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122 Arlington Road London NW1 7HP

info@piercyandco.com www.piercyandco.com

Telephone +44(0)20 7424 9611

01 Dear Sheffield invite postcard 02 Dear Sheffield record collector entry from Alfie Golland 03 Dear Sheffield cooling towers entry from Nigel Bendle 04 Teams working hard at the retail quarter Design Summit 05 Design Summit team 7 looked at temporary uses 03

Kew House, London © Jack Hobhouse


Morelands 5-23 Old Street London EC1V 9HL T 020 7251 5261 info@ahmm.co.uk www.ahmm.co.uk

AMRC Apprentice Training Centre

Burntwood School Client: Wandsworth Council


John McAslan + Partners is a leading architectural practice based in London, with offices in Manchester, Edinburgh and Doha. Our extensive portfolio of international award-winning projects includes infrastructure, hospitality, commercial, residential, education, cultural, heritage, urban design, and landscape sectors. The practice’s most recent success has been the acclaimed transformation of King’s Cross Station in time for the 2012 London Olympics, which has won more than 20 international awards. We are currently working on the Crossrail Bond Street Station, while other UK projects include luxury residential developments, schools, masterplans and a number of high-profile projects for leading cultural institutions. In Doha, Qatar, we are designing the Cultural Forum, a Mandarin Oriental Hotel, Heritage House Museums and a Mosque, while in Russia we are working on five multi-modal Transport Hubs, a significant commercial development in St Petersburg and the redevelopment of the historic Bolshevik Factory site.

Other international projects include the Anand Vihar Transport Hub in New Delhi, a masterplan for the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria, Canada, and the British School in Rio de Janeiro, as well as a new community settlement west of Nairobi, the Kigali Memorial Centre in Rwanda (commemorating the 20th anniversary of the genocide) and school projects in Malawi and Uganda. The practice has won over 90 international awards, including 20 RIBA Building of the Year Awards and three European Union prizes for cultural heritage and has been named Architectural Practice of the Year on a number of occasions. John McAslan + Partners is an equal opportunities employer. We offer a competitive salary and generous benefits within a supportive company. This is a dynamic and creative environment and we look forward to hearing from you. www.mcaslan.co.uk


IMAGE \ ST SILAS PRIMARY SCHOOL, BLACKBURN

CAPITA

The Observatory, Chapel Walks, Manchester, M2 1HL Christopher Boyce / Design Director chris.boyce@capita.co.uk

Sapa Building System is proud to support The University of Sheffield School of Architecture and its associated students.

@mrboyce / @capitaproperty

Aluminium Facade, Window & Door Systems For more than 50 years, Sapa Building Systems has been leading the way in providing aluminium fenestration solutions for the commercial, health, education, leisure and residential sectors, including refurbishments and social housing. Our aim from the beginning has been to add value and architectural excellence to every project. As part of the world’s largest aluminium extrusion group we are committed to working with architects to help create buildings that are innovative, energy efficient and environmentally sustainable. Trust us to make a material difference. Sapa Building System Ltd, Severn Drive, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire. GL20 8SF T +44 (0) 1684 853500 F +44 (0) 1684 851850 www.sapabuildingsystems.co.uk

1 Angel Square, Manchester The Co-operative's new Head Office building BREEAM rating: “Outstanding” - 95.16%


Defence Sixth Form College, Welbeck

www.hlmarchitects.com

Architecture • Interior Design • Landscape & Urban Design • Environmental Design

Proud sponsors of the University of Sheffield School of Architecture www.grimshaw-architects.com

ARCHITECTURE | URBAN PLANNING | INDUSTRIAL DESIGN


RMA Architects The Old School, Exton Street London SE1 8UE T +44 (0)20 7928 6767 info@msmrarchitects.co.uk www.msmrarchitects.co.uk

are pleased to support the

The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

RMA are a dynamic design led practice based in Camden, with a 32 strong team (8 of whom graduated from SSoA) and 6 partners (4 of whom graduated from SSoA). We share the same highly creative approach, pragmatic attention to detail and commitment to place making fostered by SSoA and demonstrated by their high performing graduates.

020 7284 1414 www.rmaarchitects.co.uk

photograph Š JZA Photography


The Home Office UK Border Agency, Riverside Exchange: The first office building in Sheffield to be rated BREEAM Excellent.

Hadfield Cawkwell Davidson Limited 17 Broomgrove Road Sheffield, S10 2LZ www.hcd.co.uk


Photography Š Cloud 9

Supporting the University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Image - Park Hill, Sheffield Photograph: Daniel Hopkinson

Wishing all students and teachers a moment of contemplation...but not for too long!

www.baumanlyons.co.uk


Creating places for people recruitment.north@bdp.com for Sheffield, Manchester and Birmingham Studios.

recruitment.south@bdp.com for London and Bristol Studios.

6 UK and 5 International Studios www.bdp.com enquiries@bdp.com @bdp_com

Publisher University of Sheffield Editorial Design Ranbir Lal Seรกn McGee Andrew McKay Olivia Radford Kelly-marie Rodgers Sponsorship Satwinder Samra Photography Peter Lathey Printed in England by University of Sheffield Print Services (Print & Design Solutions) Copyright 2014 School of Architecture, University of Sheffield. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the publisher. ISBN: 978-0-9576914-9-0 For a full range of programmes and modules please see www.shef.ac.uk/architecture School of Architecture University of Sheffield The Arts Tower Western Bank Sheffield S10 2TN Tel. Fax E-mail Web Twitter

+44 (0) 114 222 0305 +44 (0) 114 222 0315 ssoa@sheffield.ac.uk http://www.shef.ac.uk/architecture/ @SSoA_news


ÂŁ10 www.shef.ac.uk/architecture ISBN: 978-0-9576914-9-0

ISBN

978 - 0 - 9576914 - 0 01000 >

9

780957

691490

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School of Architecture Undergraduate Catalogue 2014  

First Year Second Year Third Year Undergraduate Special Study Events and Activities Theory Forum 2013 - Thinking Resilience SSoA Forum...

School of Architecture Undergraduate Catalogue 2014  

First Year Second Year Third Year Undergraduate Special Study Events and Activities Theory Forum 2013 - Thinking Resilience SSoA Forum...

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