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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

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www.shef.ac.uk/architecture

The University of Sheffield School of Architecture 2018

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Publisher University of Sheffield Editorial Design Samuel Letchford Antonia Alexandru Gulim Satekova Anakin Poon Editorial Design Staff Support Adam Eckworth Sara Lancashire Sponsorship Satwinder Samra SSoA Photographs Ralph Mackinder and students/staff members Printed in England by University of Sheffield Print Services (Print & Design Solutions)

www.shef.ac.uk/architecture @SSoA_News Cover Images John Chia Josie Dorling David Hodgson Holly Wilkinson Helen Galetti Minghe Ma Michael Neal Thomas Cunningham The University of Sheffield School of Architecture would like to thank the technical and administrative team for their continued support and input throughout the year. We would also like to thank all of our contributors, everyone involved in curating the exhibition and everyone involved in compiling this catalogue.

Copyright 2018 School of Architecture, University of Sheffield. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the publisher. ISBN:978-0-9929705-9-8 For a full range of programmes and modules please see www.shef.ac.uk/architecture School of Architecture University of Sheffield The Arts Tower Western Bank Sheffield S10 2TN Tel. +44 (0) 114 222 0305 Fax +44 (0) 114 222 0315 E-mail ssoa@sheffield.ac.uk Web www.shef.ac.uk/architecture Twitter @SSoA_news


Contents Foreword 

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Undergraduate 

4 6 12 18 30

MArch in Architecture 

32 34 38 42 46 50 54 58 62 66 70 74 80

MArch in Architecture: Collaborative Practice 

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Year One Year Two Year Three Undergraduate Special Study Studio Arrival City Studio Collaborative Production Studio Histories of Place Studio In Residence Studio Intergenerational Architecture Studio Landscape + Urbanism Studio Learning Culture Studio Material Amendment Studio (Re)-Activist Architecture  Studio Temporal Places  Live Projects MArch Dissertation

Postgraduate Taught Masters 

88 91 112 120 126

Graduate School 

132 134 136 137 138

Student Achievements, Awards and Activities 

140 142 144 145 146 148 149 150

Internationalisation 

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Celebrating Services Staff and Technical Team 

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In Memory of Mohammed Elashry 

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MA in Architectural Design MA in Urban Design MSc in Digital Architecture and Design MSc in Sustainable Architectural Studies Completed PHD Thesis Projects Research 2018 SSoA Manifesto/s PHD Conference field Student Awards and Achievements SSoA School Forum 2017 SSoA Theory Forum 2017 SSoA Student Exhibitions 2017/18 SUAS HAS Sheffield Society of Architects


Foreword Welcome to the Sheffield School of Architecture Summer Exhibition catalogue of 2018. This document presents the work produced by students from across our undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. The School’s ethos of social conscience and sustainability is a known strength and is evident throughout these outstanding and meaningful contributions. This can be seen in students’ projects from the Bachelor’s first year on rooms in the city, a community kitchen and a house, second year’s housing schemes, and third year’s diverse projects such cultural projects in Scarborough in semester one, while final studio projects dealt with an array of exciting briefs such as a national centre for tailoring, a Yorkshire guild of master crafts, and a national truth institute. Likewise our MArch continues to run the very popular and successful Live Projects to bring an understanding of social responsibility, and has this year put new emphasis on design enquiry to encourage students to explore a set of issues through design. MArch Collaborative Practice continues to grow and is anticipated to have a two-year offer next year. Our postgraduate taught courses in architectural design, urban design, sustainable architecture, and digital architecture and design, are very specialised and international, and align with the School’s ethos in addressing the social, economic, environmental and technological aspects of architecture. This academic year we have been successfully validated by the RIBA and the Board of Architect Malaysia. This is a huge achievement thanks to the dedication of our colleagues and students. This year we introduced digital reviews to reduce printing costs and explore new ways of presenting ideas and proposals. The School is committed to develop this further through investment in state-of-the-art equipment. We also welcomed our Graham Willis Visiting Professor Dr Grainne Hassett, Senior Lecturer at the SAUL School of Architecture University of Limerick, Ireland. While writing this foreword, the Guardian League Table for Architecture was published showing our School as the number one. This is a significant achievement, and for this I would like to thank our past and current students, academics, professional services staff, alumni, friends and families, and partners from the profession for their continuous support and encouragement. This is a noteworthy team effort that has made this School such as a special place to learn and work. Also special thanks to the School’s Architecture Society for their efforts with the guest lecture series and other School activities, and to the Catalogue team for the production of this publication. I hope you will enjoy this catalogue and the exhibition. Professor Karim Hadjri Head of School

Special thank you to our sponsors: 5plus AHMM Allies and Morrison Assael BDP Bennetts Associates Bond Bryan Architects Broadway Malyan Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Glenn Howells Architects Grimshaw GT3 Architects Hadfield Cawkwell Davidson Hawkins\Brown HLM Hutchinson and Partners Piercy and Company Proctor & Matthews Architects RMA Architects Seven Architecture Stiff + Trevillion


Undergraduate The BA Architecture course is a three-year honours degree that brings together a balanced university education with a professionally orientated course. It combines lecture based courses with a creative studio culture. Lectures develop a broad knowledge base ranging across sciences and humanities; this knowledge is then brought to the studio where it is tested and developed through a sequence of design projects. Lectures are delivered by staff who are all at the forefront of their own field of research, ensuring this information imparted is up-to-date and relevant. Within the studio, full time members of staff are joined by practicing architects, who bring with them topical ideas and skill from the world of architecture. It is this combination of a rigorous academic base and a creative professional direction that exemplifies architecture at Sheffield. The dual degrees in Architecture + Landscape and Structural Engineering and Architecture enable students to integrate their architectural design work with the wider landscape context and the discipline of engineering respectively. All courses offer opportunities to think about sustainability and sustainable futures in an interconnected and contextual way.

Undergraduate Programme Director Simon Chadwick Dual Architecture and Landscape Architecture Director Howard Evans Dual MEng in Structural Engineering and Architecture Coordinator Richard Harpin


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Year One The main intention of Year One studio is twofold: We want students to learn basic skills, allowing them to communicate their design ideas to others, and we want students to critically reflect on their own work and consequences of architectural interventions. The building (or any other spatial intervention) is a node within a broad network of forces and actors. We want our students to start seeing architecture in this highly contextualised way. The Year One ethos is built on notions of collaboration, social engagement and inclusivity. While students learn how to design a building, they simultaneously ask why anything should be designed and build at all? Who will benefit from this particular spatial intervention? How will the building influence its location and surroundings?

Year Director Dr Krzysztof Nawratek Studio Tutors Moinak Basu Matthew ‘Brad’ Bradshaw Isabel Britch Ahlam S Harahsheh Jen Langfield Steve Martlew Alexander AE Maxwell Wei Shan-Chia Wen-Shao Chang Sheng Song Anya Sutton Department of Landscape Tutors Andrew J Clayden Howard Evans Thomas White BA Architecture Alia Alalaweyat Luke Alcock Shiraaz-Mohsin Ali Ed Allan Long Tin Au Olivia Bailward Florence Barbour Joseph Bass Bethany Bell Georgia Boyes Joshua Burge Emma Carpenter Jennifer Chan Michela Charalambous Wen-Hao Chen Heng Chew Jen-Huei Chiang Ben Cruddos Viktoria Dang Thi Tassia De Paula-Yarmohammadi Annie Ditchfield Victoria Doxey Ana-Maria Dragomir Barnaby Dulley Hannah Eley Mariarosa Evans Xiaobin Fan Delshad

Forouhar Hannah Gibbs Victoria Glistrides Joao Gosende Latini Sanskriti Rajesh Gupta Forouhar Delshad Gibbs Hannah Delshad Forouhar Hannah Gibbs Victoria Glistrides Joao Gosende Latini Sanskriti Rajesh Gupta Krisha Gurung Iona Guthrie Benenson Alexander Harrison Oliver Hartley Chih-Pei Hsu Chuyue Hu Jiaming Hu Vencel Huiber Basant Ibrahim Lucie Iredale Yufan Jin Karni Jury Ivana Kafedjian Sohail Khalil Aisha Khan Joey Khou Moonhyung Kim Killian Kruczko-Cousins Yik Kuik Calvin Kumala Hoi Lam Sin Tung Lau Charles Leather Jennifer Lee Xiaoying Li Prawrawee Lim Rachel McMahon Matthew Mcgregor Ziyu Men Martha Minton Minh Nguyen Maranatha Obasi Karolina Olszewska Syn Wei Ong Lara Pacudan Edward Paisley

Nicholas Phillips Constance Pidsley Amber Prust Julia Remington Sarah Rhule Isabel Roberts Patricia Sangalang Amelia Sarles Sylwia Satora Sahar Shahiyamchlo Laurel Spencer Josephine Sproson Cameron Stuart - Burgess Xiao Chun Tay Thien Hee Tey Laurel Spencer Josephine Sproson Cameron Stuart - Burgess Xiao Chun Tay Thien Hee Tey Xavier Thanki Milo Thomas-Cooney Yoana Todorova Chun Tse Roxana-Gabriela Ungurenus Duncan Urquhart-Hawkins Martin Veselov Santiago Wagner Velez Jenna Ward Nayrouz Wefati Maria Wood Callum Woodford Mingxian Xiang Qirong Xu Jasmin Yeo Yuchen Zhang Yu Zhang Xianing Zhou Yinuo Zhou Sarah Zimmerman BA Architecture and Landscape Coles Amelia Diorazio Amy Acland Elizabeth Larkin Emily Chan Ho Guthrie Benenson Iona

Deakin Joseph Luckett Kathryn Amos Lucia Abou Fakhr Nadine Carson Sarah Ali Shiraaz-Mohsin Zheng Shuang MEng Engineering and Architecture Rhea Balmforth Leanna Bradbury Ying Chian Ka Chiu Yan Chiu Katherine Emmett Sean Feary Rachel Haven Tara Johnson Damien Poblete Stephen Rettke-Grover Georgina Smith Sam Sommerville Asha Vickers Aidan West James Whiteley School Staff Karim Hadjri Akpezi V Ikede Mark Meagher Visiting Reviewers Rachel Britch Faith C Ng’eno Lena Emanuelsen, AA Matthew Forbes-Yandi Nivin Daoud PhD and PGT Students Yusuf MEDM Abu-Shama’a Yahia T Ali Esra Can Intisar Husain Amro AA Yaghi


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester One Glow in the dark paint mapping light pollution

Project 1 ‘Our Sheffield’ This project explores a basic techniques for analysing and representing urban space, mostly using a ‘cognitive mapping’ approach (see Kevin Lynch, The Image of the City). Students negotiate their own personal (‘subjective’) understanding of the city with their colleagues(‘social’) views. There are three main ways how architects understand and work with space: - personal / subjective / emotional / phenomenological: when architects engage with a notion of ‘place’ - geometrical / neutral / Cartesian: when architects engage with a notion of ‘(neutral) space’ (GPS, CAD/ GIS software) - legal / physical: when architects engage with a notion of territory (defined by physical or/and legal boundaries) This project should represent the tension between these three perspectives. Project 2 ‘Room in the City’ This project explores a range of different techniques for analysing and representing architectural space, moving from objective methods to a more subjective approach (and vice versa). Students work both collectively (in the studio) and individually to capture the particular qualities of individual rooms and their connection(s) to the wider world in a variety of ways. Over the course of this project students are expected to develop a profound understanding of their own rooms – revealing and representing multiple layers of interest and meaning. Students also work on a wider context of this particular place (spatially – as a part of a building, culturally, socially etc.) Every particular space exists in a wider context – this project should represent it.

01 Joseph Bass P1 - Section 02 Victoria Glistrides P1 - Mental Map 03 Joey Khou P1 - West Street Analysis 04 Izzy Roberts P2 - Movement Exploration 05 Luke Alcock P2 - Diagram 06 Sylwia Satora P2 - Heat and Lighting Map 07 Elizabeth Acland P2 - Axonometric 08 Ivana Kafedjian P3 - Axonometric 09 Joey Khou P3 - Sequential Drawing

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10 Lucie Iredale P3 - Model photos

Project 3 ‘Community Kitchen’ Through the design of a small building in an urban context, this project allows students to develop an understanding of the relationship between internal spatial layout, external form and the ways in which the particular characteristics of a site (context) affect the design of architectural space. This project has two stages. Stage one focuses on collecting data, analysing site and the process of food preparation and consumption. Stage two of the project aims to use these collected information as a foundation for design of the building. This project helps students to understand architectural space beyond an architectural object (building) in a wider (urban, social, cultural) context.

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To explore and merge the shared and individual experiences we had in Sheffield, we produced a video, superimposing our drawings and interests of Sheffield onto one sheet. In doing so some similarities became clear, such as the correlation between student areas and noise pollution, as well as the juxtaposition between noticing small details to use as way points and having a fast paced, transport oriented view of the city.


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester Two Project 4 ‘House as a Garden’ Not far from the centre of Sheffield, by the banks of the Porter Brook, lies Sheffield General Cemetery, last resting place of the city’s departed citizens for 150 years. Now the cemetery and its buildings struggle for their own continued existence against the assembled powers of nature: the wind, the rain, the brook which one day is a trickle and the next a torrent, and the plants whose roots split the graves and prise apart the stones in the monuments. Alongside this oasis of life and death lies the site for a new landscape and building. This will enable the repair and maintenance of the cemetery monuments and provide a new growing space for the propagation of a species of plant, which will be in some way particularly important to the users, the site, the region, or the wider environment. The clients will therefore be a stone mason and a horticulturalist. They form part of the small extended family who will live here, and operate the new facilities, engaging others to share in their work, their produce, their knowledge, and their aspirations.

01 Martin Veselov P4 - Axonometric

Project 5 ‘House for an Artist and a Fox’ This project is about living alongside animals in the city, creating a unique and comfortable home for a specific family of 3 people, which will include studio space, and encourage wildlife. The house will be for Angie Thompson and her family, she is an illustrator who focuses on nature and is especially interested in foxes and birds. It is about making architecture that engages with its surroundings and explores the conflicts or potential opportunities of living close to animals and people. The project explores issues of urban and suburban living, of family and community and of coexistence with the natural world. Designing for individuals and for the generic, exploring living conventions and bespoke habitats.

06 Joshua Burge P4 - Site plan

Project 6 ‘House as a Public Space’ “For a man’s house is his castle, and each man’s home is his safest refuge” Sir Edward Coke, The Institutes of the Laws of England, 1628. This project is intended to challenge the notion of the house as an introverted building. You will be designing a house which both creates private spaces for its inhabitants AND creates new space for the local community. The brief is to create a dialogue between the private house, home to a screen printer and his extended family, and the “community” function which is for you to define and propose. Sited at the heart of the Creative Industries Quarter in Sheffield City Centre, it will be important to consider the needs of both public and private clients, and how the interaction of the two will manifest at the boundary between the two spaces. Project 7 ‘House as a gift-giving machine’ This project proposes a new house functioning as a weather research station exploring the relationship between architecture and climate. It houses weather instruments to record different elements of the weather, as well as a small classroom/laboratory for educational and research purposes. The house is a home to a live-in researcher and his or her family.

02 Joseph Bass P4 - Model photos 03 Aidan West P4 - Section 04 Mariarosa Evans P4 - Model 05 Ed Allan P4 - Environmental analysis

07 Lucie Iredale P4 - Design process 08 Victoria Glistrides P4 - Environmental analysis 09 Group work P5 - Space hacking

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Project 8 ‘Socially Inclusive House’ A house is a building which is typically seen as an extremely private and intimate space. This project is intended to challenge (at least partly) this perspective – it is a house that equally creates private space for its inhabitants and serves local community.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Year Two Year Two is a fast paced programme of three projects structured to engender fluidity and confidence in the design process. The course delivery relies heavily on the strength of the studio culture. Academic enquiry and reflection is sustained through investment in the ‘large group review’, designed to expand critique and discourse within a supportive social environment. Each of the three projects incorporates specific drawing or model making tasks intended to extend experimentation and exploration of design ideas through a rigorous methodology. Students are encouraged to become more prolific in the testing of their ideas within the world.

Year Director Catherine A Skelcher Studio Tutors Yussur Al-Chokhdar Brad Bradshaw Esra Can Ian Hicklin Ranald Lawrence Alan MacDonald Mark Parsons Jing Qiao Aiman Rashid Cith Skelcher John Paul Walker Department of Landscape Mel Burton Andy Clayden Sally O’Halloran Laurence Pattacini BA Architecture Jacob Ashton Holly Atkinson Kallistheni Avraam Joseph Bayley Max Bridge Nial Brimacombe Grace Byrne Eleanor Catlin Huiling Chen Thitiphol Chokkanapitak Rachael Cowan Calin Craiu Eugenia Davidson Luzelle Davies Alem Derege Gabriela Di Castro Calderon Mengyi Ding Andreea Dragos Tom Dyvig Emma Dziemianko Matthew Feetham Ruby Flanagan Anna Fulcher Alexander Furness Cassandra Golding Deepa Goswami Hannah Graves Antonia Headlam-Morley Holly Hearne Nathan Hill Sally Hodgson Esther Holland Paige Howard Benjamin Huckstep Nathalie Hurlstone

Sophia Hutchinson Emma Huxtable Razvan Ivanov Bonnie JacksonSung Kang Hyo Kim Rosalyn Knight Gloria Kostrzewa-Seyoum Agni Kouzari Arun Kowcun JacquesLachetta Stuart Lanigan Vincent Las Marias Genevieve Leake Kallum Lightfoot Charmaine Lin Amelia Little Yiming Liu Jennie Lua Minghe Ma Holly Macmahon James Maidment Lily Markey Imogen Mason-Jones Maria-Monica Maxim Jessica Meech Matthew Meeson Kemba Mitchell Ilias Muckli Ella Murrell Deepti Nayar Petros Nikolaou Keren Obiuzu Kacper Pach Fenella Pakeman Pannatorn Pavapanupong Maria Perikleous Tobias Phillimore Maria Pinte Hoi-Phone Pong Mawee Pornpunyalert James Prickett Yizhen Ren Florin Roman Diana Savin Kathryn Sedgwick Slavena Simeonova Marnie Slotover Andreea Stanuta Dawid Starosta Maria Stavridou Alanna Stevenson Glenn Strachan Haemish Subhash Joseph Syrett Baiji Tao Gabrielle Taylor Rebeca Thomas Alec Thomson

George Thornton Ane Torgard Deividas Vaitekjanas Christoph Ventom Cecelia Vincent Rebecca Wallace Jun Wang Ben Warren ZimingWeng GeorgiaWhitehead Anna Wiliwinska Lewan Yazici Zhuoer Yu Olga Zakrzewska Dimitar Zhelev Haonan Zuo BA Architecture and Landscape Sabelle Adjagboni Daniel Codd Isabel Grandcourt Samuel Harris Alice Jenkins Aleksandra Korneeva Jack Saunders Peter Tomson Emmeline Trenchard-Mole Hallam Woodhouse Xinyue Xu Yile Zhang Yilin Zheng MEng Engineering and Architecture Suzanne Johnsen Yin Lam Polly Natynczuk Nina Scholey Mubaraka Shamsuddin Freya Williams Leah Wright Erasmus and Study Abroad Brianna Braukmann Xin Du Kerry He Sherry Goh Junyoon Lee Huiyung Li Jia Xian Tan Kevin Yuen Zhiyuan Zhang

Visiting Reviewers Tony Broomhead James Longfield Abi Can Hoorebeek Jacquie Milham Adam Booth Peter Mitchell Elizabeth Baldwin Gray Dennis Burr Simon Tucker Jessica Trickett Anna Gidman


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester One P1.1. Measure The students worked in groups to investigate a given subject or pursuit and collect all data necessary in preparation for their design project. Working in pairs, a series of measured studies were made, including a 1 to 1 drawing of a key component or process contextualised using the human form. P1.2. Territory Each subject typically corresponds to a given type of landscape found in and around Sheffield (woodland/river valley/moorland/ peak). Through the creation of a large ‘figure ground’ drawing and use of other mapping techniques, the students explored the physical and ephemeral characteristics of their site.

01 Alem Derege, Max Bridge P1.3. Walker’s Refuge 02 Hoiphone Pong, Vincent Las Marias P1.3. Cycle Centre 04 Gloria Kostrzewa-Seyoum, Kathryn Sedgewick P1.2. Territory 05 Sam Harris, Hal Woodhouse P1.1. Measure 01

P1.3. Threshold – Observatory/Walker’s Refuge/Cycle Centre/ Caver’s Retreat Having becoming experts in their given projects, the student pairs were then required to design a small building in a landscape. They were asked to locate their building in relation to a threshold that they had identified on the site. Their proposal must support all of the practical requirements of the subject whilst responding sensitively and creatively to the landscape in which it sits. Exploring the relationship between architecture and landscape, the students must develop their own conceptual and theoretical design approach in response to brief and site. P2.1. Urban Study The students worked in groups to investigate two neighbouring areas within Manchester – Ancoats and the Northern Quarter. The students explored the social and physical fabric of each area, collecting a range of data, both factual and anecdotal, in order to form an authentic understanding of the constraints and opportunities of each area. P2.2. Library/Theatre The students were tasked with designing a small community library or theatre to serve their given neighbourhood. A precedent study field trip to Liverpool supported the development of a proposal for a specific ‘type’ of library or theatre, and the design of a public building tailored to both audience and place. The project provides the students with their first opportunity to design an urban façade within a streetscape.

06 Slavena Simeonova, Andreea Dragos P1.3. Walker’s Refuge 07 Haonan Zuo, Keren Obiuzu P1.3. Caver’s Retreat 08 Vincent Las Marias P2.2. Library/Theatre 09 Diana Savin, Zhuoer Yu P1.3. Observatory 10 Jacob Ashton P2.2. Library/Theatre 11 Luzelle Davies P2.2. Library/Theatre 12 Lily Markey P2.2. Library/Theatre 13 Minghe Ma P2.2. Library/Theatre 14 Huiling Chen P2.2. Library/Theatre 03

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester Two P3.1. Precedent Study As a prelude to the semester two housing project, the students work in groups to study a range of seminal housing precedents, producing a library of housing typologies. Using drawing, modelling and film making as tools to investigate and critically appraise their precedent, the students undertook a detailed critique of the project’s spatial, material and environmental qualities and the extent to which it meets the living needs of its inhabitants. P3.2. Manifesto

17 Deepti Nayar P3.4. Housing 18 Cecelia Vincent P3.2. Manifesto 19 James Maidment P3.4. Housing

We opened the project with a debate, inviting a range of academics and practitioners to share their views and experiences and encouraging the students to engage with the live issues – social, political and economic, that provide the context for their housing project. The students then developed their own housing manifesto, which would be the programmatic driver for their own design project.

20 Lily Markey P3.4. Housing

P3.3. Neighbourhood Study

22 Max Bridge P3.2. Manifesto

The students were tasked with producing a contextual analysis of their project site, located within the Sheffield neighbourhood of Burngreave. Exploring master planning techniques, the students worked in groups to produce speculative proposals considering alternative futures for Burngreave. This provide a means to understanding the character and identity of the area – its needs and aspirations. P3.4. Housing Each student was required to design dwellings to house 6-10 families, with an element of additional accommodation to be individually determined and informed by the student’s housing manifesto. The design of housing, unlike the single house, offers an opportunity to investigate the realm of the shared, the street. Each site provoked a response to the notion of the street and students were encouraged to attempt an analysis of a front to back condition through the use of a sectional perspective drawing. The housing project is supported by the study trip to Amsterdam and Rotterdam during the Easter Break, which is a fantastic opportunity to further explore a range of radical public and housing project.

17 21 Haonan Zuo P3.4. Housing

23 Vincent Las Marias P3.4. Housing 24 Yizhen Ren P3.4. Housing 25 Minghe Ma P3.4. Housing

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26 Marnie Slotover P3.4. Housing 27 Nathalie Hurlstone P3.4. Housing 28 Sherry Goh P3.4. Housing 29 Huiling Chen P3.4. Housing 19 30 Rebecca Wallace P3.4. Housing

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Year Three Third Year students undertake two design projects during the academic year, punctuated by a short group project aimed at the development of enquiry and research through a collaborative group output. This sets the intellectual framework for the final project. Studios are comprised of a range of parallel project programmes. Throughout their studies, students are actively challenged to consider the social, political, and typological characteristics of place, in order to develop a critical position within the thematic framework of the project brief. Each programme is rooted in a deep understanding of place, structured by a rigorous site and precedent analysis. Enquiry and experimentation within the studio framework is encouraged through the use of a wide range of representational techniques as well as the creative integration of technology into the studio programme. Throughout the year, students are supported by a dedicated staff of Sheffield School of Architecture and visiting critics, ranging from world renowned architects, structural engineers, and various design professionals. The exceptional work produced by our students is testament to the rigour, enthusiasm, and critical reflection of the student group and their commitment to the spirit of the Year 3 Studio.

Year Director Simon Chadwick Year Co-Director Russell Light Studio Tutors Robert Blundell David Britch Simon Chadwick Adam Eckworth Melanie Goode Russell Light Maggie Pickles Department of Landscape Tutors Howard Evans Laurence Pattacini BA Architecture Rebecca Acheampong Fatimah Adnan Elina Andreou Alice Appleby Azrah Asif-Jussab Manraj Bhogal James Black Luke Brennan-Scott Cameron Carrington Wei Chew Kiran Chhatwal Oana-Cristina Cioploiu Chloe-Anne Clacy Hadley Clarke Paul Connolly Angelina Constanti Amirhossein Daryoushnezhad John Davis Shipra Dawar Oliver Dorrington Ran Duan Rebecca Earnshaw Oluwarantimi Ehinmola Francesca Frangiamore Aoife Gilchrist Marcus Goff Rianna Grant Holly Harbour Madeleine Hill Ziai Huang Rubi HusseySandu Thisaranee Jayasinghe

Jayasinghe Mudiyanselage Francesca Jebb Frank Kalume Rania Kapitani Amy Kinsella Jameille Labis Alice Latham Hui Ning Lau Yip Lau Jack Laurie Aaliyah Lawal Shan Li Natalie Liow Ethan Loo Stephanie Ma Thelma Mbewe Jiarong Miao Kwan Mo Nurul Nabilah Mohd Rosdi Kyriacos Mouzouris Michael Neal Jack Osmond EloisePiper Thomas Pool Yui Chit Poon (Anakin) Harry Prema Perdita Ratsma Lugain Rfidah Claire Sanderson Gulim Satekova Fiona Sawers Georgina Scott Jay Singh-Gelling Chin Ching Siu (Ginny) James Smith Luke Smith Ryan Smith Charlotte Staton Fanzhe Sun Lawrence Tang Andreea Triscaru Jacqueline Tsang Theodosia Tsikkou Raluca Turcu Ayushya Uppal Ana-Maria Vasilache Ivan Velev Pengnanxi Wang Eleanor Wells Alice Wildgoose Chiu Ho Wong (Anthony) Ching Hung Wong (Julian) Eleni Xenophontos

Edward Yan Abigail Yeboah Shuning Zhu BA Architecture and Landscape Japhet Goodburn Natasha Jackson Ella Macleod Thomas Ruff Zifei Xie MEng Engineering and Architecture Joshua Adjodha Henry Baker Leonora Bela Pilakoutas Lily Bell Lewis Birkbeck Edward Daniels Bethany Fenna Carlo Gagliani Tegen George Joseph Hicks Matthew Holmes Crystal Mason Henry McBrien Jacob Smith Seren Thomas Wai Ken Tsang Alec Wells Benjamin Westphal-Reed Matthew Woolhouse Erasmus and Study Abroad Matthew Bellomy Antonia Bohn Cedric Lomeier Panphila Pau Visiting Professors Sue Emms, BDP Architects Neil Gillespie, Rieach & Hall Architects Andy Groarke, Carmody Groarke Greg Penoyre, Penoyre and Prasad Architects Stephen Proctor, Proctor & Matthews Architects Annalie Riches Mikhail Riches Architects Helen Roberts, Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

Tony Skipper, 5plus Architects Guest Critics Prue Chiles, Chiles Evans & Care Thomas Corrie, Hopkins Architects Oli Cunningham, Sheffield Hallam University Robert Evans, Evans Vittori Pol Gallagher, Zap Architecture Sarah Green, Another Architecture + Interior Alex Griffin, Oblong Architecture Sarah Hollingworth, Architecture 00 Tom Hudson, Hawkins Brown Architects Naomi Kelsall, Kelsall Architects Carole Latham, Journeyman Design Andrew Lees Emma Low, MSMR Architects Andrew Matthews, Proctor and Matthews Architects Stuart Mckenzie, CSMSA Jacquie Milham, Architectonic Design Alex Mingozzi, Bond Bryan Architects Lucy Plumridge, HLM Architect Gareth Puttock, Evans Vittori Simon Robinson, Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Stephen Ryan, University of Brighton Su Stringfellow, Harrison Stringfellow Architects Rebecca Taylor, JTP Architects Gary Thomason, GT3 Architects


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Semester One Taking the Waters, Scarborough Russell Light, Maggie Pickles The bath house, a place historically pervasive in most (if not all) cultures, has traditionally been a complex space laden with nuanced social customs. The studio will provide students with an opportunity to contextualise the notion of a contemporary pool in Scarborough. Students are encouraged to develop their own appropriate interpretation of the bath through a careful study of their chosen site’s environmental and social dynamics, while positioning the project within a larger global narrative. Constructing The Image, Scarborough Robert Blundell, Adam Eckworth This project explored photography and how we construct and frame images. It also explored the specific relationship of t he history of photography to the once very fashionable seaside resort of Scarborough, which had the distinction in the mid-nineteenth century of the being the location of Oliver Francois Xavier Sarony’s photographic portrait studio, at the time purposed to the largest in Europe. The project proposed a new centre for photography in Scarborough, `including an archive of historical material, gallery space, studios and workshops. The Poet and The Peacock David Britch, Melanie Goode The theme of the project is poetry and identity - challenged by the eccentric Edith Sitwell 1887-1964, a female aristocratic poet who was penniless for much of her life, whose work was concerned with sound as much as words and whose public persona defined her as much as her work. The purpose of the building is two-fold: to house her collection of work and personal possessions. Hotel/Stay Simon Chadwick, Ruth Hudson-Silver

01 Amirhossein Daryoushnezhad P1 - Taking the Waters 02 Anthony Wong P1 - The Poet and the Peacock 03 Julian Wong P1 - Taking the Waters 04 Ran Duan P1 - The Poet and the Peakcock 05 Charlotte Staton P1 - Hotel/Stay

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The hôtel became synonymous with other similar terms such as hôtel de ville, the hotel for the town, which we now understand as the town hall and hôtel-dieu, the hotel of God, the original term for hospital. Today, so as not to confuse the term hôtel, the French refer to the townhouse as an hôtel particulier, again reinforcing this relationship between hotel and home. The home either becomes a particular kind of hotel or the hotel becomes a particular type of home.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester Two: Preliminary Studies 01 The Data Base Ruth Hudson-Silver The initial research project for the design of the National Institute of Truth explored the world of data and its associated capabilities as well as its inherent dangers in today’s society. The resultant installation focused on the issues of truth and lies as a product of the ever-expanding internet. User participation was the principle interaction of the exhibition, exploring the ambiguity and misuse of information as presented in the digital world. 02 The Yorkshire Guild of Master Crafts Adam Eckworth The project focuses on a careful observation of prominent civic public buildings and their elevations in Sheffield. The exhibition contains a series of careful 1:20 detail facade drawing and model studies. 03 City Hall Simon Chadwick The project focuses on the facade and entrance of public buildings facing the public square in Leeds. The initial study was completed by making 1:50 facade models and detailed elevation drawings. 04 ‘Equal = Equal’ Melanie Goode The exhibition piece will be based on the thematic of ‘Equal = Equal’ and the Mission Statement of the Women’s Equality Party (established 2015) with specific reference to Women in Architecture. Cross connections and social reform are part of the agenda. 05 The Revealing Maps David Britch

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When you fold something, you reveal the underside of the plane that is folded, which has echoes in the making of a tailored suit. Ridges and valleys are created, and a new form is revealed. Using a variety of techniques, students were revealing something about thenature of mapping and their understanding of place. 06 City as a Living Organism Robert Blundell A study of the city as an organism by striping away the physical urban fabric and look at the hidden worlds of control and decision making systems within the city, analyse the evolution of analog and digital infrastructures that have shaped and continue to influence the city, and look at how the application of artificial intelligence and machine learning may create a future ‘smart city’. 07 The Walled Garden Maggie Pickles Starting with an analytical studies to inform, exhibit and reveal the nature of this research project in the city across a range of scales, and in particular the architectural parameters of the distinct climatic zones of the facility (seed processing and storage; researcher study and meetings; fruit propagation and ripening). 08 The Gallery of Galleries Russell Light The project involved the study of historic and contemporary precedents that have shaped our understanding of what an art gallery can be and the specific qualities of galleries designed to display sculpture. Beyond that, a group of students designed and curated their own gallery of galleries.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester Two: Main Projects Solids and Voids, Barnsley Russell Light The premise for this design project is that the artist Rachel Whiteread gifts a significant proportion of her artworks to the nation. Yorkshire has been gaining a reputation as one of the key destinations in the country for viewing contemporary sculpture. The new gallery for Rachel Whiteread is intended to act as an urban outpost to Yorkshire Sculpture Park, sited in the heart of Barnsley, close to the main rail line and providing a good connection to Wakefield and Leeds. National Truth Institute, Liverpool Ruth Hudson-Silver The programme is to create the Head Quarter for The Truth Institute in Liverpool. Their main purpose is to establish a means for UK citizens to opt in or out of their information and data being shared, in order to cope with the dramatic increase in cases challenging the misuse of information, data and fake news. Students have opted to take their own interpretation of the concept of “the truth” in order to define their own strategy. These include themes such as identity, oral history or forgery. National Centre for Tailoring, Manchester David Britch The proposed building has 2 distinct parts, firstly a ‘college’ made up of teaching spaces for 16-18-year olds to learn the arts of tailoring. Somewhere between apprenticeship and guild, the school is for about 150 students. This project is an opportunity to create some meaningful spaces that engage with the cities context but also offer the correct setting for the “rituals of existence” for the users and visitors to the building.

01 Fanzhe Sun P2 - The Yorkshire Guild of Master Crafts 02 Panphila Pau P2 - The Yorkshire Guild of Master Crafts 03 Ivan Velev P2-The Yorkshire Guild of Master Crafts 04 Frank Kalume P2 - The Yorkshire Guild of Master Crafts 05 James Black P2 - The Yorkshire Guild of Master Crafts

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06 Jiarong Miao P2 - Solids and Voids 07 Jay Singh-Gelling P2 - Solids and Voids 08 Kyriacos Mouzouris P2 - Solids and Voids 09 Gulim Satekova P2 - Solids and Voids

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The Yorkshire Guild of Master Crafts, Sheffield Adam Eckworth The project seeks to establish a new representative body for artists and craftsmen and women in Yorkshire. The Yorkshire Guild of Master Crafts is located in Sheffield and acts as a governing body to represent the broader professional ‘umbrella’ of artists and craftsmen and women. The project includes several significant components including a civicelevation, special interiors and a new ‘public ground’, a public space on to which your project will face.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

The Institute of Artificial Intelligence Ethics & Yorkshire Automanton Museum Robert Blundell

10 Michael Neal P2 - City Hall

The studio has been developing proposals that explore the history of automata, whilst also considering contemporary developments in the field of Artificial Intelligence, the potential impact on society of these developments, and the ethical considerations that may need to be addressed. Projects are based around two parallel schedules of accommodation, the first for a new Yorkshire Automaton Museum, and the second for an Institute of Artificial Intelligence.

11 Ellie Wells P2 - City Hall

Equal = Equal. HQ Building for the Women’s Equality Party, Sheffield Melanie Goode This project explores the themes of ‘equal=equal’, women’s interaction with space through history and the representation of the human body, both male and female, in the built landscape. The Women’s Equality Party suggest that ‘equality for women isn’t a women’s issue. [...] Equality means better politics, a more vibrant economy, a workforce that draws on the talents of the whole population and a society at ease with itself...’

12 Natalie Liow P2 - City Hall 13 Charlotte Staton P2 - City Hall 14 Francesca Jebb P2 - HQ Building for the Women’s Equality Party 15 Georgina Scott P2 - HQ Building for the Women’s Equality Party

City Hall, Leeds Simon Chadwick

16 Ryan Smith P2 - The Institute of Artificial Intelligence Ethics & Yorkshire Automanton Museum

‘The architecture conveys the importance of good political dialogue and decisions, by design.’ The programme is to create a building for democracy that houses an existing democratic function, or propose a development, enhancement or reorganisation of current democratic processes in the UK. An essential part of the project is the relationship of the building to the adjacent public space in Leeds.

17 Julian Wong P2 - The Institute of Artificial Intelligence Ethics & Yorkshire Automanton Museum

Northern Fruit Future Exchange, Liverpool Maggie Pickles Set in the near future, the scenario anticipates that changes in UK/ EU trade, and in climate, will incentivise an increasing interest in domestic fruit cultivation. Containing specialist environments for horticulture from seed to fruit, a fundamental part of the brief is to respond to the site orientation and to provide thermally mediated controlled environments, whilst encouraging public invitation.

18 Shan Li P2 - HQ Building for the Women’s Equality Party 19 Edward Yan P2 - HQ Building for the Women’s Equality Party 20 Penganxi Wang P2 - The Institute of Artificial Intelligence Ethics & Yorkshire Automanton Museum 21 Alec Wells P2 - The Institute of Artificial Intelligence Ethics & Yorkshire Automanton Museum 10

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

22 Jacqueline Tsang P2 - National Truth Institute 23 Lawrence Tang P2 - National Truth Institute 24 Anakin Poon P2 - National Truth Institute 25 Ayushya Uppal P2 - National Truth Institute 26 Chloe Clacy P2 - National Truth Institute 27 Holly Harbour P2 - National Centre for Tailoring 28 Ranti Ehinmola P2 - National Centre for Tailoring 29 Madeleine Hill P2 - Northern Fruit Future Exchange 30 Natasha Jackson (KK13) P2 - Northern Fruit Future Exchange

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31 Shuning Zhu P2 - Northern Fruit Future Exchange 32 Ethan Loo P2 - Northern Fruit Future Exchange

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Undergraduate Special Study The Special Study is an individual piece of work that allows students to explore a particular aspect of architecture in some depth. Topics cover a wide subject range, including architectural theory, architectural history, science and technology, structures, management, CAD and the digital realm, landscape architecture, architectural teaching and practice, and urban design. The Special Study offers students the opportunity to research, organise and produce an extended piece of mostly written work over the course of a year. Studies this year have ranged from a study of the role of architectural meaning, authenticity and pastiche in the past colonial and contemporary casino complexes of Macau by Ethan Loo, to an investigation of daylight in art galleries and its effects on the visitors’ experience by Gulim Satekova, and from Lugain Rfidah’s social history of Martyr’s Square in Tripoli, Libya through differing political regimes from the 1930s until today, to Michael Neal’s critique of gated communities in the docklands of London. These works offer a small flavour of the richness, rigour and variety of the Special Study, and the wide range of research methodologies, analytical and presentation techniques that are deployed.

Co-ordinator Russell Light Featured Dissertation: ‘Reading the Past and the Faraway’ Simulation, Meaning, and Macau Ethan Loo

01 “ This piece began with a personal love of and obsession with Macau (or Macao in historic references), in large part because of the wonderful strangeness of the cityscape: in its reproduction of the Portuguese Baroque in the old city, and the excessive material glamour on display in its casino-resorts. Coupled with this are fond childhood memories of weekend visits from neighbouring Hong Kong, when the question of meaning never presented itself and the sights were enjoyed purely as a sensory experience... ”

01 Inside the dissertation Photograph by William Chew 02 Binding Photograph by William Chew 03 Book cover Photograph by William Chew 04 Replica of St Mark’s Campanile outside the Venetian Photograph by Ethan Loo 05 The uncertainty of the architectural promenade in Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye From Richard A Etlin, ‘A paradoxical avant-garde’

06 Plan of level three of the Venetian Macao, showing a layout which at many points provides a meander. Further it is difficult to discern the plan from the interior elevations, leading to many surprises Drawn by Ethan Loo, from a pamphlet distributed at the Venetian Macao 07 Dome above the entrance to the Parisian, modelled on Napoleon’s tomb Photograph by Ethan Loo 08 Shift by Richard Serra. This landscape sculpture loses its potency when photographed from the air, and hence comprehended as a whole. The importance lies in the relationship of the walker to the work and its gradual unfolding, argues Yve-Alain Bois, not unlike the experience walking through the Venetian’s shopping arcade From Gianfranco Gorgoni, ‘Richard Serra, Shift, King City, Ontario’

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Reading the Past and the Faraway Simulation, Meaning, and Macau Ethan Loo

Simulation Wonderland Modern man…like his baroque predecessor, faces a fragmented and puzzling world with no guidelines save those of his own making. JP Hill, introduction to Baroque Poetry The new casino complexes in Cotai (a portmanteau of Coloane and Taipa) offer at surface level an indiscriminate ‘Postmodern’ appearance in its eagerness to appropriate historical, and also foreign, iconography and style. Projects such as the Venetian and the Parisian are of particular interest by making explicit references to sixteenth century Venice and the Belle Époque French capital. They may be Postmodern in using historical symbolism for populist purposes, but another definition references the baroque ‘folds’ of Deleuze: in describing Deleuze as the inventor of a postmodern baroque in which ‘our desire for the multiple, intermixtures, and the co-existence of universes free of any rule…is able to recognise itself and unfurl,’ Alain Badiou posits a form of postmodernism in line with its supposed ‘incredulity to metanarratives.’ This definition of Postmodernism finds itself at odds with much casino architecture in Macau today, which, instead of providing abundant folding narratives, reflects similar themes: that of brand names, commodities and the spectacle. ...

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Historical reconstruction may just be the extreme form of what architecture does all the time, which is to call into existence currently unreal things, argues Sam Jacob . In his case he refers to ideologies and aspirations: as such Arthur Sullivan’s offices are making real the hitherto unrealised idea of the democratic, light-filled workspace. Seeing as the Venetian already exists as a real object, is it not possible to experience it on its own terms, and arrive at a meaning purely through the experience it provides rather than an analysis of signs? After all, it has enjoyed continued commercial success, and the crowds of tourists who eagerly take their selfies are hardly troubled by claims of inauthenticity. ... The Venetian can feel intended, contra Benjamin, to be an immersive experience. It is a complete enclosure; after all, windows are a distraction when an artificial painted sky can make it midday for 24 hours. These environments function not unlike a Hegelian Umschliessung, or enclosure, but here the isolation is not for cultivation of the Spirit but consumption within a simulated exotic; the pursuit of the novel experience, never-ending, which draws you to spend and gamble. Restaurants, toilets, accommodation are all provided under one air-conditioned roof; there is no need for the gambler to leave and spend his money elsewhere. The endless climate-controlled enclosure and the mini-city are becoming ever more ubiquitous in the developing world, most commonly manifest through shopping complexes. In this context the semiotic capacity of the façade is reduced as the relationship between indoor and outdoor shifts to favour an expansive indoors. As shopping malls and places of consumption become the primary place for entertainment and social interaction in Macau, so too does the weight of visual symbolism shift to favour brand promotion.

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However, the Venetian provides complex experiential stimuli, visual or otherwise, not least in that it satisfies elements of both Baroque and Modern conceptions of understanding architecture. Yves-Alain Bois proposes that Renaissance and Classical notions of design intend to create a unified and immediately comprehensible architecture, something which allows us to find a known conclusion, that which may be a ‘maternal architecture.’ A shift occurs in theorising the picturesque and the architectural promenade, where the concealment of the destination, and a fascination with parallax and displacement, emphasise movement, the cinematic experience and personal discovery. A quick analysis of the plan of the Venetian’s shopping area reveals a concerted attempt to create the feeling of an indoor city, and walking along the ‘canals,’ there is an undoubted picturesque quality to the experience – picturesque not only in the sense of staged charm, but an arrangement of objects which engages in illusion and parallax, much like in eighteenth century English gardening where, ‘by a partial and uncertain concealment, [it] excites and nourishes curiosity.’ The variance in scales adds to this intended spatial excitement, as the voyager uncovers the indoor ‘squares’ one by one. Hierarchy is not lost, however, for the most grandiose central space at shopping level, and the ornate procession corridor from the reception, lead directly to the gambling area. Hence the Venetian provides both mystery and a comprehensible structure; the interior elevation chooses to conceal and reveal the plan at different moments, the latter of which is used to direct the visitors into the casino. In this sense there need not be a cognitive understanding of visual symbols; the experience becomes more important. ...

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

MArch in Architecture The MArch (RIBA Part 2) course at SSoA is one of the most innovative and influential in the country. It prepares students to be enterprising, employable and to use their skills to the benefit of people’s lives. At the heart of the course is a range of specialist design studios and our innovative ‘live projects’ programme, offering excellent opportunities for students to develop graduate-level research by design. Students also have the opportunity to specialise further by taking a dual accredited MArch course with Town and Regional Planning (MArch/TRP) or with Landscape Architecture (MALA). The recently established Collaborative Practice route offers students the opportunity to integrate their MArch studies with continued experience in architectural practice. Modules in humanities, management and technology offer students the opportunity to enhance their design projects and wider learning through focused research, academic writing and critical reflection. Further opportunities to explore specialist lines of enquiry are offered by the fifth year option modules that focus on aspects of urban design, digital design, sustainability and conservation. The SSoA MArch is shaped by its emphasis on collaboration, social engagement and ‘liveness’. This begins each year with live projects and continues in design studios that collaborate with community partners including local councils, grass roots organisations and arts programmes. Projects evolve that are ambitious, innovative and respond to the complexity of real-life conditions. This year, studios have investigated situations and scenarios based along future timelines, providing opportunities to test alternative visions for an uncertain societal and climatic world. Fifth and sixth year students work together in design studios, to explore these current challenges and future opportunities in architecture. Students are encouraged to develop a critical approach to the production of architecture in contemporary society. The design studios offer students the freedom to experiment and develop their own lines of enquiry while being supported by tutors who offer excellent specialist research and practice experience. The fifth year offers students the chance to develop rigorous design enquiry skills. The iterative process of design is valued, as well as the outcomes, and students are encouraged to develop their individual interests, ways of working and attitude towards architecture and the role of the architect. Sixth year students then develop individual or joint thesis projects, exploring research questions through the design of complex buildings. Students are encouraged to be canny, ambitious, and enterprising so that they can not only negotiate and respond to the challenges of our time, but also lead on what ‘Future Practice’ might be: a practice that can listen, negotiate and advocate clients’ and users’ needs in order to produce architecture of excellence. Director of MArch Leo Care Co-director of MArch Jo Lintonbon Director of Masters in Architecture + Landscape Architecture Howard Evans Studio Leaders Simon Baker Carolyn Butterworth Leo Care Bryan Davies Mark Emms Howard Evans Daniel Jary Jo Lintonbon John Sampson Satwinder Samra SSoA Matthew Bradshaw Ranald Lawrence Aidan Hoggard Sofie Pelsmakers Fionn Stevenson Karim Hadjri Cith Skelcher Krzysztof Nawratek Ian Hicklin Rachel Cruise Florian Kossak Mark Meagher Simon Chadwick

Visiting Tutors Eleana Brough, Sarah Wigglesworth Architects Sarah Ernst, Architype Edmund Harrison-Gray, Hawkins/Brown Ellen Page Darren Robinson Robert Blundell Dr Frances Babbage, School of English, University of Sheffield Martin Lydon, Haworth Tompkins Architects Andrew Lees, Architect Lukas Barry Simon Harrison Simon Branson, Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, Manchester Collaborators Carmody Groarke Journeyman Design AHMM Penoyre and Prasad Sheffield Hallam University Hawkins Brown Cullinan Studio Manchester Metropolitan University BDP Bauman Lyons AA Projects Sheffield City Council Assemble Spode Works

Coventry City of Culture Bid Leeds University Derby Silk Mill Better Barnsley Sheffield City Council West Lindsey Council Architype Diocese of Chesterfield The Glass-House The Open University Ingle Gym Elsecar Heritage Riailway Media Lab Prado Yorkshire Art Space Ebbsfleet Development Corporation Urbed University of the Arts, London Advanced Manufacturing Innovation District ArcHeritage Friends of Sheffield Castle Sheffield Chamber of Commerce Israac Heeley City Farm Yorkshire Sculpture Park


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Arrival City A great and final shift of global population is upon us. We will end the century as a wholly urban species. Seen by many in the West as a threat, this rural to urban migration will have profound implications on the geopolitical landscape and the lives and well-being of the migrants. Perhaps most importantly it might provide an opportunity to mitigate or even reverse the impact of global climate change as cities, through their economies of scale, have the potential to reduce demands for resources. Studio Arrival City is interested in the effect mass migration and urbanisation is having on our cities, focusing specifically on the notion of the Arrival City. Operating as transitional spaces for those entering the city, Arrival Cities in the words of Doug Sanders (author of Arrival City), are the places where the next great economic and cultural boom will be born. This year the studio has been located in Mannheim, a German city with a history of migration and hosting refugees. In September 2015 Mannheim found itself at the centre of the migrant crisis. Its central station was designated a so-called refugee “turnstile” with more than 80,000 refugees arriving in around 150 special trains via the Balkan route. As a studio we have set out how architecture can facilitate a culture of openness and resourcefulness. Projects are focused on the centrally located Neckarstadt-West neighbourhood, the gentrifying Jungbusch neighbourhood and the Spinelli Barracks, a former US Military Barracks where many of the arriving refugees have been temporarily housed. We would like to extend our thanks as a group to everyone who has contributed to the studio over the past year. 01 Studio Tutor John Sampson 5th Year Students James Griffiths Emma Koch (MALA) Juan Ruiz Richard Rothwell Thomas Wakelam 6th Year Students Joshua Brookes Cosmina-Daniela Caruntu Shushu Cai Ka Man Lee Yanni Pitsillides Mark Stancombe Holly Wilkinson (TRP)

Studio Collaborators Lena Werner, Migrants for Cities Tatjana Duerr, Office for Building Culture Prof. Stephan Krötsch, University of Kaiserslautern Swetlana Hermann & Caroline Courbier, Klokke Anticafe Aidan Hoggard, SsoA Satwinder Samra, SSoA Visiting Tutors Eleana Brough, Sarah Wigglesworth Architects Sarah Ernst, Architype Edmund Harrison-Gray, Hawkins/Brown

01 Joshua Brookes - The Entrepreneurial City In response to gentrification and lack of entrepreneurial opportunities threatening to stagnate the arrival neighbourhood of Neckarstadt-West, Mannheim, the scheme proposes a community-owned adult education and enterprise centre providing accessible and vocational skills along with the framework in which they can be applied. Imagined as a community-driven social enterprise, users can learn skills while also having the opportunity to put them to use as the centre expands, whether that be in a self-build capacity or inhabiting new work and business spaces. A dense residential context drives the form of the building with chamfered, top-lit masses developed in response to the proximity of residential windows and balconies, reducing both overlooking and overshadowing. The scheme takes advantage of

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the cities proximity to the ‘Black Forest’ providing a huge supply of timber products, that heavily influences a materiality that also aims to embody the core values and craft based, accessible uses that the building offers. 02 Cosmina-Daniela Caruntu - Women’s Resource Centre The project explores outside views cast upon migrant communities which polarise dual images of us and them, of groups of men, or problem neighbourhoods. The project aims to make visible the invisible side of migration through the provision of a place of assembly for the community. The design looks at creating places to reconnect, secure, empower and parent, with a focus on migrant women who will become active agents of integration, receive support for gendered violence and domestic activities. The project looks at ways of achieving ethnic enclaves that are connected within themselves and outwardly.

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03 Shushu Cai - The Stewing and Baking House This project explores the architecture of food as an significant ingredient for social cohesion and cultural integration, focusing on food consumption and co-production. it also attempts to encourage the migrant cookery skills exchange, cultivate skills for the unemployed youth and women, and promoting a more healthy diet for children and families. Two unique traditional cookery techniques, baking and stewing are emphasized in the scheme. The central dining room with traditional brick chimney, the civic support, the kitchen learning studios, the market and the growing spaces are designed, which attempts to develop a self-sustaining model for arrivals to adapt to new life, for migrants to bring out their own identity and have a strong sense of belonging in the city. 04 Ka Man Lee - Nomadic Town ‘A city is more than a place in space, it is a drama in time’. The Nomadic Town is a fictional street in Mannheim where everyone is invited in the production of soap. The proposal is to develop an education and leisure facility for soap production that celebrates the power of ordinary TV soap through learning, co-production, and entertainment. The intangible flow of cultures will be brought back to life on screen of every home as a composition of cityscale storyline. The scheme aims not only to cultivate skills and confident for young people, but also develop a self-sustaining model for regenerating its cultural, social, and economic life.

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05 Yanni Pitsillides + Mark Stancombe - The Ad Hoc Embassy The Ad-Hoc Embassy explores hybridity as a method of overcoming the issues of overpopulation and lack of identity associated with global mass migration. 02

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

The project is located within Mannheim, Germany, a city with a history of migration events, and most recently a major arrival point for refugees of the European Migrant Crisis. Reflecting the cultural and social variety of the arrival city, the Ad-Hoc Embassy combines disparate programmes in one building to challenge traditional barriers of migrant and native. The Multihalle combines a bierhalle and prayerhalle, to enable the embassy as a social and spiritual node within the arrival city. The usually unapproachable debating chamber is coupled with a laundrette, giving anybody validity to engage in local policy making, regardless of experience or background. Within the public library, reading and study spaces are hybridised with a barber and bakery, bringing the cross-societal experience of getting a haircut or buying bread into a civic, shared realm. The Ad-Hoc Embassy was a joint thesis project of two 6th year MArch Collaborative Practice students, who developed methodologies for collaboration, exploration and representation based on shared learning experiences in practice and academia during the 5th year of the Collaborative Practice course. 06 Holly Wilkinson (TRP) - The Peripatetic Embassy for Migrants The project seeks to find a way for the role of embassies to evolve to be representative of people’s aspirations and power, rather than those of government. Designed as an open democratic platform, the Embassy invites migrants and Mannheimers to come together to learn and debate the current political process, with the elected committees formally charged with representing the Embassy to the German Government in the Bundestag. The Embassy is representative of all, and any, country and as such has a rich and bold form, interpretively replicating traditional forms with contemporary materials in a strong rhythmic way. A building of three parts, the project consists of the Chancery (the administrative and archival guts of the scheme), the Embassy (the charged, political heart of the site) and the Residency (housing migrants in dire need). Walkways wrap around and through the democratic forums, inviting both the public and migrants to get involved or to remain as spectators in these transparent spaces, meanwhile the Residency provides emergency accommodation for refugees, and interweaves public terraces with more private balconies and rooftop gardens, creating a plethora of alcoves and meeting spaces for everyone to use. 07 James Griffiths - Protest Infrastructures The project imagines a branch of a supranational organization in Mannheim that provides political representation for immigrants and refugees by lobbying political structures at the continental level, within the European Union. This ‘migrant embassy’ is part of a Europe-wide network that promotes migrant representation in the political sphere through lobbying, protest, and debate. The embassy is buried into the thickness of the concrete platform and sits at a flashpoint between Mannheim’s migrant communities and the city’s regional government buildings. By facilitating the construction of temporary protest structures upon it, the embassy provides Mannheim’s migrants and refugees with the political influence that they were previously denied.

maximise interaction and transition. Key themes of permeability, diversity and a spectrum of spaces, derived from research into a guidance framework for the transformation of vacant spaces into places which would aid the integration of migrant communities, informed key programmatic and architectural approaches. 09 Juan Ruiz - The Language Hub The Language Hub is based in Mannheim, one of the most diverse cities in Germany, where more than 40% of the population has some form of migrant background. The Language Hub looks at how Architecture can provide a support system for migrant children through the use of suggestopedia as a fundamental process of learning. It uses the idea of teaching the target language, in this case German, through the use of different typologies such as music, film, dance, drama, workshops and arts. The process is divided into 3 stages; Deciphering: where the tutors introduce the grammar and lexis of the content in a playful manner, Elaboration: where the students are encouraged to interact with each other whilst the tutor serves more like consultants and Production: where students spontaneously speak in the target language without interruption or correction which allows discussion to happen and education to take place. 10 Richard Rothwell + Thomas Wakelam - Geflüchtlingsnation The merger of two individual research interests, Geflüchtlingsnation was a joint project between two 5th year students investigating the potential future refugee situation in Germany, and how the perception of refugees can be redefined for the betterment of all. Located at Spinelli Barracks to the North East of central Mannheim, the project is set between 2030 and 2050 in a future where human driven climate change has forced millions of people to flees their homes in sub-saharan Africa for Europe. Faced by this massive refugees influx, the German government recognises that traditional mitigation strategies are unsuitable, and instead trials a series of semi-independent interlinked zones across Germany where refugees can live, work, and travel autonomously. Dubbed ‘Geflüchtlingsation’, (Refugee Nation), the scheme spreads across Europe and the Middle-East, eventually creating a genuine safe route across the Mediterranean and integrating into the EU to allow refugees full rights to work and freedom of movement. Spinelli Barracks will host approximately 7000 refugees and will be set out in blocks on a six meter grid, with one block designed in detail as a template for rest of the scheme. In a deliberate move away from the zonal management strategy of refugee camps, each block comprises a range of residential, communal, and civic building typologies. This close proximity of multiple activities creates dynamic social spaces that facilitate the ‘soft’ human infrastructure required for a genuine arrival city. Four WikiHouse based incremental housing configurations make up the bulk of the block, with a common house providing shared facilities to counter the base houses comparatively small size. In the centre of the block, a plastic recycling centre and community workshop in the North and a biogas digester and CHP plant in the South are connected by an open deck with allotments, green space and a terrace freely accessible to all.

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08 Emma Koch (MALA) - Industry & Integration The potential of Mannheim to transform forgotten spaces into socially and economically engaging places as a tool for the integration of its diverse, transient communities. The project uses entrepreneurship and micro industry as an engine of integration by providing a platform for skill, language and economic advancement. Aiming to tackle social barriers to integration through participation by providing places for different types of people to meet which encourage communication and cultural exchanges. A place for refugees, migrants and non-migrants, for the 60 minute engager, the 6 month engager and the 6 year engager in order to

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En erg y and Se r vi ces blo c k, i n c lu di n g c hp plan t, plasti c re c yc li n g an d bi ogas di ge ster.


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Collaborative Production The studio explores a future where a sharing economy has become mainstream, promoting non-market production and social enterprise; a future where automation and robotisation have changed the nature of labour and production, and transformed the way people engage with local governance, education, healthcare and cultural exchange. The studio is located in Sheffield’s proposed Advanced Manufacturing Innovation District (AMID) which aims to link new forms of advanced manufacturing to existing centres of production, education, sport and recreation. At the heart of AMID sits the Olympic Legacy Park (OLP) and Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre (AWRC) which aim to develop technical innovations around sport, health and wellbeing. The project began with an investigation of the Don Valley corridor and its surrounding communities. The notion of collaborative production extended to the working methodology of the studio, with students working collectively, sharing resources, ideas and approaches. Visual narratives were used to analyse the physical and social context, interpreting the past and anticipating the future. Working as a group the students created the concept of ‘the Island Loop’: a 10km running, walking and cycling route connecting their projects via an active public realm. Individual proposals interface spatially, functionally and economically as part of a sustainable neighbourhood, linked through a network of shared green energy and smart technologies. The projects aim to deliver a shared sense of happiness, wellbeing and inclusion through the provision of new research, education and recreational facilities, alongside high quality housing and opportunities for social interaction. Taken together the projects offer a future vision of a healthy, vibrant and socially responsible city. 00A Studio Tutor Daniel Jary 5th Year Students Caroline Green (MALA) William Kreibich Michael McGuinness Beth Mamicha Rebecca Smith Claire Yu 6th Year Students Petros Antoniou Naomi Bailey Ben Bradish Bianca Man Thomas Moore Jess Rees Laura Spence

Studio Collaborators Steve Pool, Poly-technic Richard Bland, Creative Sheffield Ryan Bramley, Lucy PaigeHamilton, Storying Sheffield Pr. Steve Haake, AWRC David Hobson, Richard Caborn, Sheffield OLP Patrick Meleady, Pitsmoor Adventure Playground Jos Boys, Architecture InsideOut Maria Joao Villas-Boas, Champalimaud Foundation

Visiting Tutors Ellen Page Darren Robinson 00A Design Charrette of the Island Loop 00B Running the 10K Island Loop 01 Petros Antoniou - The Happiness Research Institute In a world where culture is driven by data, the sovereign is challenged by the free-market and society is questioning technology’s role in human wellbeing, escape by stepping inside ‘The Tober’! Located atop Sheffield’s new icon - the refurbished Wicker Viaduct - the ‘Tober’ promises a phantasmagorically magical experience of fun. Nothing suspicious with our free entry, we just care for your wellbeing. Step inside the ‘sniff-tangle’ and crawl through lively aromas, or ride the ‘Spotifi Coaster’ through captivating simulation chambers’. Don’t forget to beep-beep-beep your bio-watch everywhere! The fun never stops. 02 Naomi Bailey - The Artist Labs The art of creating and innovating fulfils an instinctive desire to self-actualise. The ‘Artist Lab’ regularly stimulates the minds of its users by facilitating specific arts activities from model making, painting to expressive movement. Similarly to how physical exercise is regarded key to achieving a healthy lifestyle, activating cognitive functions with creative arts may become equally necessary to achieve health and wellbeing. In Sheffield’s industrial district, the Artist Labs provide playful landscapes and explorative walkways that connect the art workshops to its neuroscience and

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cognitive research laboratories. Art engagement influences the project’s programme, concept and design methodology. 03 Ben Bradish - The Vanguard for the Valley This thesis project aims to explore the links between the built environment, architecture and the shift towards collaboration and prevention in our approach to healthcare in the community. Notions of collaboration in this context will be explored through the integration of health and social care services, public recreational facilities, and community functions tied together through an active landscape in the centre of a residential setting. 04 Bianca Man - The Hyperreal Oasis In the anxiety-inducing city, how can hyperreality in architecture provide escape, relief, and purpose for the anxious? Situated in close proximity of converging infrastructure networks, ‘The Hyperreal Oasis’ acts as a physical and psychological retreat; a fantasy in reality. Engaging in the thematic issues of isolation and anxiety in the digital age, the project desires to integrate digital technology into the built environment to positively improve the experience of anxious inhabitants of the city. 05 Thomas Moore - The Precarious Exchange The Precarious Exchange develops a new infrastructure for the exchange of food, culture and energy. Providing security for an increasingly precarious national labour force. In the context of Sheffield’s post industrial Don Valley, the project defines a nomadic architectural practice. Applying tactics of storytelling, assemblage and exchange to promote the use of by-products as a possible solution to current and future problems of sustainability and resource scarcity. 01 06 Jess Rees - Creating Space for Grief in the City Inspired in a belief that the city should cater for the variety and diversity of life’s experiences, this project looks at creating space for grief. A key text inspiring this is Amin and Thrift’s “Cities: Reimagining the Urban” which talks about the rich texture of the city fabric that should be on offer. The project seeks to use urban space and a programme of art and drama to engage people in sharing stories of grief, and exploring their experiences together. A gallery and performance space act as containers of these stories and share them with the rest of the city. 07 Laura Spence - Active Living Made Easy This project addresses the current lack of affordable, quality housing provision in Attercliffe, and sedentary lifestyles associated 01

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The FIve Weirs Walk The Artist Labs cafe Neighboring foliage Solo arts pods River Don sun spot Studio B: Exhibition & artist in residence space The pedestrianised Attercliffe Goods track Walkway between entrance & goods track with temporary sheltered sections Ampitheatre space for arts & sciences to share information & skills The Labs: Centre for cognitive and neuroscience research The Autonomous Arts bridge Balcony overlooking the Artist Labs site Wayfinding acrylic cubes dotted on each building of The Artist Labs Green roof Small creative performance and lecture theatre Treatment centre and artist workshop connection River Don tributary Delivery, loading and unloading access Stevenson Road Newhall Business Park new distribution centres completion date 2018 Stevenson Road entrance The mental wellbeing studio & registration point Landscape decking route through The Artist Labs site Studio A: Exhibition & artist in residence space South pool viewpoint decking Poplar trees bank River Don

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

with preventable health problems. The scheme will kickstart the delivery of mixed-use developments on vacant brownfield sites, offering mixed tenure homes, winter gardens, canal swimming, sauna and shared amenities situated around an improved Island Loop. The scheme practices active design in a shared environment to encourage social and physical activity that facilitates for an allencompassing, diverse and growing community. 08 Caroline Green - The Phyto-Economy This project draws on Sheffield’s engineering heritage to propose an alternative manufacturing process. Advances in production of engineered timber can now provide sustainable alternatives to steel for large-scale architecture. Combining phyto-remediation with the production of engineered timber, the first intervention is for Sheffield’s disused airport runway to be planted with trees for remediation, which can then be cyclically harvested for engineered timber production.

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09 William Kreibich - Centre For Human Augmentation Expanding on studio themes of the future of health, well-being and technology, the scheme is a forum and research facility exploring the possibilities of combining technology and the human body, known as ‘Biohacking’. With current concerns regarding this technology, the building intertwines ethical discussion and experimentation exploring themes of temporality, adaptability and biotechnology. 10 Michael McGuinness - Craftsmen of Tomorrow The scheme opens out onto the Tinsley canal and is a destination where people can engage in the skilful process of making, and learn to work with their hands. This social environment creates opportunities for people to come away from the ever-increasing, machine-lead world. ‘The values of the craftsman can enrich our lives and change the way we anchor ourselves in the world around us.’ R Sennett

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11 Beth Mamicha - The M.O.Y.O Centre The Multi-Operational-Yielding-Officer (Moyo also translates to ‘heart’ in Kiswahili), is the Artificial Intelligence that helps the AMID run the smart city in 2050. The scheme acts as the mainframe and destination to help create and collaborate services for the city to AMID firms, with local independent firms and surrounding neighbourhoods. Game-changing innovations are exhibited using augmented reality experience set in the sky exhibition 30 metres above ground. 12 Rebecca Smith - Community Incubator The project aims to open the door for economic change in Attercliffe by bringing together the simple idea of local businesses with affordable housing, and a place to centre the community around. The programme of the building would allow for spaces that encourage idea sharing, centred around a new market space. At a neighbourhood level, the building provides an active public realm and becomes the landscape due to the fluctuating roof structure of the market hall. 13 Claire Yu - Sheffield Urban Forum The scheme aims to engage the local communities into the process of the AMID masterplan. The Forum is a platform for discussion, open to the public, in-residence researchers and local authorities. An interactive discovery centre and a smart cities research centre provides the foundation of knowledge and opportunities for physical interaction. 06


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Histories of Place Histories of Place this year focused on the legacy of the textiles industry in northern England, in response to Engines of Prosperity, a heritage-at-risk study published by Historic England in 2016. We looked initially at key sites and structures associated with textiles production and trade in Halifax, West Yorkshire, developing an understanding of the changing cultural values attached to industrial heritage and identifying the influence of manufacturing on the spatial development of the town. Wider critiques of industrial production and the factory system, and the various related historical legacies of global trade, immigration, paternalism, workers’ rights, consumerism and the world of goods were then examined by the studio to support individual responses to the architectural potential of abandoned or derelict sites, and their opportunities for remodelling, repurposing, regeneration or redevelopment. The studio has explored architectures that favour contextual rather than tabula rasa approaches to making buildings, taking cues from the historical significance attached to tangible and intangible aspects of place. This is a qualitative approach, recording place in time and taking a critical position on material culture and the legacy of industrialisation. The tectonics of new and old are considered as an approach to authenticity in time and place. Creating a dialogue between past and present, the studio projects respond to the particularities of site, constructing new narratives about place that can unlock spatial redevelopment strategies and stimulate new stories of consumption and production.

Studio Tutor Jo Lintonbon 5th Year Students Sacha Bennett-Ford Jaimie Claydon Matthew Forbes-Yandı Zuozhi Liu Samantha Mooney Nikola Yanev 6th Year Students Daniel Anderson Nicolas Heppner John Lee Cameron Shackley Glenn Spiby Cherry Poon Martynas Vielavicius Visiting Tutor Robert Blundell

01 Daniel Anderson - The New Fenton Works Set in a predominantely residential area of Halifax, this project seeks to challenge the UK’s attitude towards both its current over-consumption of food and its monumental food waste. The programme is designed to reduce food waste whilst also exploring more effective means of production, providing an alternative, more conscience approach to consuming food. In relation to architecture, the project also asks, ‘how can a mill transition from a building that was once served by the community, to a building that serves the community?’; using the growing and consuming of food as a means of crossing social divides and providing a platform which brings people closer.

02 Nicolas Heppner - Factory of the Future The thesis explores how architecture can re-appropriate sites of production of the Industrial Revolution to accommodate new and smart manufacturing processes of Industry 4.0. Set on the site of the Grade II listed former Shaw Sykes goods shed, the Factory of the Future adopts a localised approach to smart manufacturing and uses Halifax as an urban test-bed for the next transport revolution. Led by private investment, the project is a prototype hybrid living lab/factory that would focus on the research of autonomous transportation vehicles and conversion of decommissioned buses.The project would also provide training and work opportunity for the strong locally skilled workforce to adapt to new forms of employment that incorporate autonomous processes. It is set within a wider strategy which includes expanding the learning-through-experience programme of the neighbouring Eureka Centre, improving the proposed Halifax Railway station masterplan scheme and enhancing links between the station and the city. 03 Cameron Shackley - The Halifax Centre for Innovation in Digital Fabrication Following the decline of the once thriving textiles industry within Halifax, the studio is largely interested in the relationship between heritage and community, and asks how the material culture of Halifax’s industrial heritage can inform its future evolution. Set within the context of low skills development in the North, the Halifax Centre for Innovation in Digital Fabrication looks to tap into the Northern Powerhouse Strategy and associated investment into manufacturing and the digital economy. Drawing on the ideas of FabLabs, the project proposes to create an incubator for local skills development, enhanced by links to global knowledge-sharing networks, and explores how digital fabrication innovation might be fostered in the interaction of skilled technicians, researchers and local community members.

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04 Cherry Poon - The Northern Fashion House The project looks at how delicate fabrics can be imitated by robust building materials, and how architecture can be tailored by a dressmaking approach and methodology. The massing, spatial experience and skin and bones of the building were inspired and developed through an understanding of the construction of garment, and fabric manipulation. The Northern Fashion House is a museum and archive complex which holds the regional collection of fashion and textile items designed and produced in the North of England. The building connects the site through a curated route showcasing the history and development of the fashion industry.

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T H E H A L I F A X C E NT R E F O R I NNO V A T I O N I N D I GI T A L F A BR I C A T I O N

Design com ponents // assem bly + Structure

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‘ Ski n ’ C L T R oof


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

05 Martynas Vielavicius - From Spinning Wool to Spinning Tales Designed under the themes of time, memory, and nostalgia, the project is the redevelopment of a historical site into a multifunctional cultural facility for Film and TV production, which promotes the growth of local businesses in the film production industry. The project focuses on the notion of heritage and the spatial experience of storytelling - a mnemonic device for the user’s individual perception and re-interpretation of the place’s identity and journey through time. The project is situated in a narrow valley, about a 15 min walk away from the town centre on the remains of the Grade II* listed Rawsons Mill, a building which was once heavily occupied with textil production facilities. where its value and significance has been lost within a community. 06 Sacha Bennett-Ford - The Preservation of Halifax Situated on the site of the Grade II* listed Rawsons Mill, this project evolves over time revealing the deep heritage of the site and remembering its material and immaterial cultures. In particular, focusing on the site’s industrialisation and its effects on the inhabitants of the past. The project is a series of three interventions which seek to rejuvenate the site. The first phase is ‘The Watchtower’ serving as a viewpoint providing an overview of the restorations of the overall site and a place for the preservation of bees reflecting the past hierarchy of the workforce of the mill. The second phase is ‘The Archive & Columbarium of Halifax’ where the literature and lives of Halifax are curated and remembered. The third and final phase is ‘The Botanical and Memorial Gardens’ that allows the community of Halifax to remember the ghosts of the site and celebrate new life. Overall, the project establishes a new legacy, one that pays respect to the past and provides future preservation of bees, souls and literature. 07 Jaimie Claydon - The Active! Youth Centre Currently a destination for curious urban adventures, Rawsons Mill is full of history, wonder, adventure and danger. The Active! Youth Centre aims to convert and celebrate Rawsons Mill by making the existing structure safe and giving it back to the youth of Halifax all while maintaining a sense of exploration and adventure by engaging the local youth in opportunities to learn and explore new life skills. The centre will provide a place for personal development programmes/workshops specialised towards young people to develop life skills, and accommodation for individuals who live further afield creating an ecosystem for a range of young people. The centre will also provide start-up spaces to encourage youth entrepreneurship. 08 Matthew Forbes-Yandı - The Halifax Caravanserai In 2018, over 1,365 textile mills remain derelict in Yorkshire alone, and the crumbling legacy of its textile industry hangs by a thread. Rawsons Mill, a Grade II* listed iron framed building in Halifax faces an equally uncertain future. So, how can the architectural legacy of our textiles industry help to sustain Britain in the postindustrial landscape? Through a means of innovation and new technology, The Halifax Caravanserai proposes to initiate a new silk trade within the region, in an attempt to modernise local industry and restore the mills to fit a new purpose. With a herd of 150 transgenic goats, all modified to have the silk gene of the Golden Orb Spider - 30,000sq ft of Silk can be manufactured in one milking session, thus simultaneously preserving the fabric of our mills and fabricating a new era of textile prosperity in Yorkshire.

09 Zuozhi Liu - Museum of Artistic Mechanisation The textiles industry has been a pioneer of industrialisation during the past two centuries. However, knowledge of traditional craft has reduced and artisanal craftsmanship is no longer mainstream. The Rawsons Mill is a typical textile mill built during the mechanisation process in Halifax, a traditionally industrial town. The project combines mechanisation and craft to create an educational place where people can learn about the history of the textile industry and use machines to improve traditional skills and knowledge. Users can also create their own textile in the workshop and sell them in the temporary market or display them in the gallery. 10 Samantha Mooney - The Craft Crossover The project is based on the site of the Grade II* listed Rawsons Mill which sits in an isolated, steep-sided valley, and is in a derelict state following a number of fires. The aim of this project is to re-inhabit the mill with craft and production, by creating studio spaces and workshops for a community of makers. As a temporary inhabitation of the ruin, the project will be entirely reversible, with new interventions slotting in amongst the existing fabric, creating bespoke spaces to suit specific crafts and craftspeople. With minimum but robust interventions, the mill will be left in a state of decay and celebrated as a ruined relic of the Industrial Revolution. 11 Nikola Yanev - Algae Energy Education and Wetlands Centre This project proposes the regeneration of the abandoned Grade II* listed Rawsons Mill by focusing on power production and people empowerment. The scheme has three aspects: Firstly, the lower two floors of the mill have been taken out, transforming the space into an Algae Energy Centre where heritage is treated more robustly. Here algae is processed into biofuel, which powersup a CHP plant that produces heating and electricity for local communities. Secondly, enticed by the energy production legacy of textile mills sitting as if on an island in between mill ponds, this proposal reintroduces lakes along the breadth of the site that are used for algae cultivation, thus creating a Wetlands production and leisure landscape. Thirdly, the top floors of the mill are classrooms and social spaces where heritage is treated sensitively and people can learn about sustainable technologies, meet at an open forum and exchange ideas.

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researchers are based above the production process and oversee the running of the energy centre

the second to last floor is dedicated to teaching courses where the local community becomes more involved with all processes

the southern facade is covered with algal photobioreactors (pbr) producing heat for the building alongside biomass

EXISTING BUIDING

a public walkway at third level spanning the length of the mill allows people to experience the algal energy production process

the combined heat and power unit is the last step in generating clean heating and electricity for akroydon

the dried and processed algal biomass is finally refined through a typical distillation process to produce biofuel

following filtration, the algae biomass is dried and processed through lipid extraction algae harvesting and filtration done on site at the open ponds a viewing platform provides expansive views across the landscape

PHASE 1

locals using the wetlands park for leisure and recreation cyclists comng from the newly opened queensbury cycle tunnel on their way to halifax city centre

a focal point for community and visitors takes shape in the intermediary space between mill and wetlands piece hall civic space and halifax city centre are 10 minutes away

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hikers both local and tourists enjoying the natural landscape

Section BB @ 1.100 E/W section

dean clough mills complex is located down old lane road - workspaces, galleries, theatre, hotel, food & drink

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community pressure to open up the disused queensbury rail tunnel and reuse it as a cycle route connecting halifax and bradford

akroydon ‘model village’ located on an adjacent hill to the mill is the community driver for this project

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio In Residence This year Studio in Residence explored the capacity of theatre in Sheffield to engage citizens in the future of their city. Ever since the birth of participatory democracy in ancient Athens ‘theatre’ has played a vital role in the political, social and cultural development of the ‘city’. It could, in fact, be said that democracy began as theatre began and that, to understand the health of any democracy, one should look to how that society values its theatres. Theatre can create shared experiences that bind communities together, giving people the strength to both articulate their differences and find common desires. Sheffield has a particularly rich theatre tradition, with national venues such as the Crucible, international companies such as Forced Entertainment and community theatres such as the Merlin. Beyond this existing cultural context we explored the radical possibilities that theatre and performance bring for the collective reimagining and transformation of our city. Our site is Moorfoot, the new home of Live Works, SSoA’s ‘urban room’. This area is the frayed edge of the city centre with lively neighbourhoods separated from the city by a hinterland of underpasses. It is also the new home of Theatre Deli, an exciting immersive theatre venue with whom we worked this year. Working ‘in residence’ we explored the ideas of Theatre of the Oppressed (Augusto Boal), ‘critical design’ (Dunne & Raby) and ‘sense-making’ (Ezio Manzini) to understand how architects, artists and citizens can work together to dream their future city through performance.

Studio Tutors Carolyn Butterworth 5th Year Students Zhao Chen Emily Glynn Steven Msowoya Keeley Newell Benjamin Yeates 6th Year Students Matthew Chamberlain Joshua Frend Tom Hart David Hodgson Chris Scaplehorn Rosanna Sutcliffe Emma Warbrick Studio Collaborators Sarah Sharp & Seb Chew, Theatre Deli Sandra Barley, Moor Management Adam Yusuf, ISRAAC Visiting Tutors Dr Frances Babbage, School of English, University of Sheffield Martin Lydon, Haworth Tompkins Architects Andrew Lees, Architect

01 Matthew Chamberlain - How can new forms of Architecture subvert hegemonic student development? The thesis investigates positive synergies between student developments and the wider cultural field. This has led to challenging normative typologies of the university & the student accommodation, proposing a new model- a live-learn landscape. This model blurs living and learning- creating a sort of university boarding school which not only catalyses innovation, but also local civic responsibility. This will be focused on the development of the digital arts in Sheffield. a globally flourishing yet locally underrepresented artform.

02 Joshua Frend - An ‘Eye-Witness’ to Death The project thesis explores the subject of death within architecture and focuses on exposing time in buildings through materialistic decay. The project is based around ‘Eye witness Works’, an old cutlery production works in Sheffield, and reimagines its internal workings into a series of artist studios and theatrical prop fabrication workshops. Where many buildings in the modern age detail and design out the effects of nature, this project has purposefully designed them in and encourages the natural patination of time. The architecture becomes a performance of its self through its own language and reaction to nature. This project embraces death and flips its negative association with decay to encourage the beautiful effects time has on materials. 03 Tom Hart - The Theatre of United Voice The Theatre of United Voice looks at the use of theatre as a tool for social change. The primary functions of the building are to use theatre to encourage organise and amplify unheard voices within Sheffield. The project is influenced by comparisons between the council chamber and traditional theatre typologies contrasted with the work of Augusto Boal and the Los Indignados movement. It is a place of people coming together to share stories, create, listen and perform. It is a place to be heard. 04 David Hodgson - The Arcade of the Arts ‘The [arcade] is a world in miniature’ – Walter Benjamin. The re-imagination of the 19th century shopping arcade typology provides large-scale infrastructure for a local collective of artists and makers. The scheme centres on immersive performance with a new theatre, performing arts school and set design workshop all directly addressing a covered thoroughfare. The proscenium arch, a key component within traditional theatre, is used as a motif throughout the scheme and has informed elements such as the LVL structure, terracotta tiles and acoustic drapes. The Arcade of the Arts is a melting pot for creativity and invites the curious to explore its splendour. 05 Chris Scaplehorn - VOT FO IM201 +C VOT FO IM201 +C is a thought experiment that uses the studio’s theme of theatre and performance to reflect on citizen engagement within society as a performative activity. It notes the power hierarchies and spatial separations of political spaces as a reason for their lacking accessibility in a contemporary society. The proposal seeks to empower the individual through the many scales of our society, both introspectively as a sequence of testbed engagement spaces, and expressively as a 24 hour broadcasting point. Fundamental to this approach is the concept of incomplete design, where architecture is whole only when interpreted 02


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

through the eyes of the creative user. 06 Rosanna Sutcliffe - The Dance Fusion Centre The project proposes to add to the cultural offerings of Sheffield by celebrating dance in the heart of the vibrant, culturally diverse area of London Road. Taking over an underutilised site in need of regeneration, the project re-inhabits Sheffield’s first coffee house; providing a public and private dance school as well as a public space for large scale cultural events in the place of a disused green plot and vacant building. 07 Emma Warbrick - All Things Nice Co-Operative The Co-Operative appropriates the vacant retail units at the Moorfoot to create a Sweet Emporium and Factory that enables women from disadvantaged backgrounds to be trained in confectionery and become economically active. The scheme celebrates the performance in everyday activity and ordinary ritual, refutes the McDonaldisation of regeneration architecture and reconnects the act of consumption with the art of production in an everyday utopia behind the existing façade. A symbol of power, the dome and its distilled form, the arch, become an important motif, repeated in the ETFE roof and the treatment of thresholds between spaces, while the process of confectionery production, linked to that of ceramics, has informed the glazed tile cladding. The All Things Nice Co-Operative is an urban counterpoint of collective action and collaboration to the prevailing New Mall Style in the ongoing re-invention of the Moor, Sheffield. 08 Zhao Chen - Association of Play Through processes of design intervention, the project proposes ‘playful and serious’ approach to introduce ‘a good place to slow down’ within an urban site – promoting architectural solutions functioning as a community play area within a social setting of a steep decline in playgrounds across England. The proposal provides the locality with a set of communal service resources and a large scaled playground, which assists to drive forward a renaissance in playground infrastructure that inspires children and adults to get active and fosters social cohesion. 09 Emily Glynn - The Treasury of Children’s Stories The project proposes an immersive library experience for children aiming to stimulate imagination and creativity. The library provides an opportunity for exploration of the spaces and moments of discovery of different “worlds” to inspire children’s own stories. The interactive nature of the building’s spaces draw notions from theatre and performativity, aiming to stimulate learning through play. City Stories, a new department situated in the building which aims to increase children’s engagement with architecture and design, working with schools and parents to encourage children to think about the spaces they inhabit and the way they can influence their physical environment in an interactive, hands on way. The project aims to explore how architecture can enhance the immersive nature of reading to explore how children’s literature could be used as a mechanism to engage children with design and architecture. And how this could create both a local resource which inspires creativity and pushes forward the inclusion of children in Sheffield.

efficiently we could alleviate some of the pressure building up on the global food supply network. In this project, conceptual ideas relating to theatre and performance have been used to design an immersive educational environment through which engagement with the issue of food waste is explored. The building combines a theatrical restaurant, public food education facility and new home for Foodhall, a social enterprise tackling food waste and facilitating conversation within Sheffield. 11 Keeley Newell - Theatre of Re-Construction The Theatre of Re-Construction is located within the cultural industries quarter of Moorfoot which is historically a site for making. Through identifying traces of performance which are evident within the everyday through waste, the existing listed building presents itself as an artefact for discovery in the centre of a demolition site. The aim of this project is to create a space which allows residents to learn crafting and making skills in exchange for unwanted materials from home renovation projects; this is made possible through a collaboration with local makers. The building houses a library of deconstructed materials which are donated by the residents, as well as workshop facilities, classroom spaces, digital fabrication equipment, and an exhibition space. 12 Benjamin Yeates - Sonic Arts Centre A sonic arts centre is proposed adjacent to the Grade II listed Moore Street electricity sub-station in Moorfoot, Sheffield. A bridge into the substation’s vacant second story allows for it to be used for sound installation and creates a physical link to the national grid – fuelling the notion that this new centre is kinetically connected to the City of Sheffield and its soundscapes. An overarching space-frame spans the entire scheme to create a three-dimensional landscape akin to Cedric Price’s Fun Palace, while also mirroring the strong structural language of the substation. Included in the scheme are a music school, creative suites, recording studios, an anechoic chamber and three performance spaces: the first a covered outdoor auditorium to fill the gap between Sheffield’s thriving underground scene and its O2 academy, the second an acoustically tuned subterranean concert hall and the third a steel ‘orb’ hung from the space frame above, designed to incite audience hyper-self-awareness.

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10 Steven Msowoya - A Performative Melting Pot It is estimated that by 2027, we as a global population will no longer be able to produce enough calories to sustain ourselves. Whilst the UK is still a net calorie importer, around 30% of all food that is produced domestically is wasted at various points along the food chain. By minimising waste and using valuable resources 06

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THE PRAYER HIVE BEES BUZZ THROUGH THE WALLS OF THE PRAYER HIVE, AS LIGHT TRICKLES THROUGH THE HONEYED WINDOW PANES


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Intergenerational Architecture Studio Intergenerational Architecture investigated how different demographics can be integrated and celebrated within the town of Rotherham. We not only considered generational relationships between old and young but also between cultures. Projects considered language, food, knowledge and recreation. Themes were developed through a series of personal exploratory tasks, including reflecting on family heritage, replicating impairments and investigating Rotherham’s history. Our field trip to Rotterdam included a wonderful visit to the offices of OMA, whose ethos positively supported and echoed the investigations of the studio. Particular passions emerged for reimagining elderly care as well as reviving the declining town centre, with work set in both current and future frameworks up to 2037. Adopting a collaborative working method via a Peer Support Group (PSG), the students took an active role in reviewing each project throughout the course of the year. This allowed for an open dialogue about the relationship between what we do and how we ensure individual and collective well-being. The outputs exemplify a thoughtful, appropriate and relevant set of architectural responses which are the culmination of an engaged, productive and supportive cohort.

Studio Tutor Satwinder Samra 5th Year Students Tse Ling Law Oliver Millett Gopinath Shanmugum Anna White Peiwen Xie 6th Year Students Chris Cooper Josie Dorling Sara Lage Ives Ma Ashley Mayes Simona Petraityte Kenny Sham With special thanks to: Tony Clabby, Healthwatch Rotherham Dr Isaiah Durosaiye, SSoA Emma England, RIBA Yorkshire Prof Karim Hadjri, SSoA Mahara Haque, Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council Isabella Rossen, OMA Paul Westwood, Heatherwick Studio Studio Group Photos 00A The Peer Support Group (PSG) in Action 00B Presenting at the MegaCrit, AHMM, London 00C Studio Field Trip to OMA Offices, Rotterdam Studio Online Blog studiointergen.co.uk

01 Josie Dorling - Designing GenerUtopia: A Platform for Change ‘The potential is there for us to live for longer in good health, however, realising this opportunity needs a radical shift in how society responds to the opportunities and challenges of an ageing population‘ (Centre for Ageing Better 2017). Josie’s project explores how architecture can become a catalyst for social change, for ageing better and overcoming the negative stigma attached to growing old, by imagining an alternative gerontopia (a place to grow old), a ‘gener-utopia’. The creation of intergenerational care and learning facilities, combining a nursery school with a residential care home, seeks to prevent, rather than promote, the onset of age-related health conditions and a poor quality of life for those entering old age in Rotherham. 02 Chris Cooper - The Social Capitol Can Rotherham Provide a Space of Intergenerational Civic Wellbeing? The Social Capitol was commissioned in 2021 to answer this question, bringing multiple user groups of different ages together to live, learn and work in the heart of Rotherham. Designed to come to terms with Rotherham’s increasingly acute social needs, The Capitol aims to provide a much-needed civic service for the citizens of Rotherham, acting as a catalyst for future socialised redevelopment of Rotherham’s Town Centre. 03 Ives Ma - The Hydro Link Located in Rotherham on the River Don, the Hydro-Link is a hydro power Station that includes hydrotherapy, co-learning community hub, recreational activities and educational facility, to improve the body and mind of people in Rotherham. The project explores how hybrid architecture can function as a “prosthesis” integrated with Rotherham’s existing masterplan to repair, connect and enhance social interaction and well-being lifestyle while supporting the coexistence of different functions on a single urban site. The project also shapes Rotherham’s sustainable energy ambition, positively changing people’s attitudes towards energy production and natural environment.

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04 Sara Lage - Active Ageing: Employing the Mind and Body This building is primarily a Learning Centre, where members of society who have reached a period in their lives known as the active ‘Third Age’, are able to transfer life experiences and knowledge by teaching those in need of new skills. The concept is all about highlighting the ‘Social Significance’ of the ageing population, by creating and designing ways to empower the user. As well as learning spaces, other facilities provided are preventative measures to ageing. Elements which can help to mentally, socially and physically keep the body and mind active. 01

Approach to Nursery Entrance through Allotments


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04 WINTER GARDEN “I have had Alzeimers for three years now. My hobby was building customised motorbikes, but now I can’t remember how an engine works so I’m finding a new hobby. I tried guitar lessons, astronomy, and many others, but ended up with gardening. I thought it would be boring, but boy how wrong I was! I got alot of help on Youtube and from gardeners forums. It not only keeps my mind active but also my body.”

Joan - living with dementia


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

05 Ashley Mayes - Celebrating Age at OAPlaza Life expectancy is increasing, but the number of years of healthy life in retirement is not keeping up. Research reveals that loneliness is significant contributing factor towards the downward spiral of health and well-being in old age. The UK, and Rotherham in particular, are facing ever escalating demands on health and social care services for our ageing population. The response: a project that aims to celebrate and improve society’s perceptions of ageing to ensure continued well-being into old age. The OAPlaza project takes on the vacant Primark building on the High Street and offers a number of civic amenities including internal plaza, library, cafe, performance space, and cinema. The project also provides short-term accommodation for retirees with allotments, gardens, hen keeping, and shared workshops. At the heart of the project lies an intergenerational nursery, which recognises the mutual learning and caring benefits offered between older and younger generations. 06 Kenny Sham - Rotherham Food Culture Community Centre Rotherham, in the aftermath of the child exploitation scandal, is a fractured community. Stemming from the misunderstanding between people of different backgrounds and origins, this must be tackled as the population rises and becomes increasingly diverse. This thesis proposes and explores the role of food and cooking in the architecture realm to bring the different communities of Rotherham together. With the construction of the centre not only will it heal the wounds existing in the town, but it will also bring new opportunities to alleviate the declining economy of Rotherham. 07 Tse Ling Law - The Converging Point The project focuses on miscommunications between generations, creating a place that ties people together, to be a converging point where people gather and have more opportunities to understand and interact with each other. The project will be a green converging point in the town centre, including a leisure park and a well-being centre which holds different kinds of activities for all people from all age groups in Rotherham, including gardening classes, yoga classes, crafting workshops etc. 08 Simona Petraityte - Eng/Ageing Riverside Eng/Ageing Riverside is an exploration of a more civic, selfregulating and community asset based approach to ageing-inplace based on preservation of knowledge, health and wellbeing with focus on continuous learning and extended independence. The project seeks to facilitate intergenerational interaction and acceptance of frailty through layers of activity - library, pop-up creche, communal facilities, carers respite and co-living. The Gathering Hall becomes a focal point of the project which connects the residents to the public whereas the public walkway links Rotherham town centre to River Don. Empowerment and acceptance of ageing and frailty becomes the key for rejuvenating and engaging the riverside and bringing life back to Rotherham’s town centre.

09 Oliver Millett - Peck House The project explores how the declining industrial landscape can be used as an asset for the economic and social sustainability of the surrounding community. This is achieved through reworking an existing building (Peck House within Eastwood Trading Estate) to include spaces that facilitate education and industry, tackling the employment and skill deficit in the area. The scheme establishes a new industry on the site (being a car breaker), which is used to train apprentices whilst also retraining workers from declining heavy industries in the area. Through developing and diversifying the skillset of the workforce, the project aims to attract investment into the area, giving rise to higher rates of employment. 10 Gopinath Shanmugum - The Urban Atria The Urban Atria is an open urban space positioned to promote integration between various user groups. Lonely elderly and young people from deprived families are integrated by active engagement that aims to contribute towards health, quality of life and overall well-being. The Grade II listed buildings of the former iron and brass foundry are transformed from a degrading old building which is lost from memory to a wonderful social space with shared learning facilities and thematically programmed social activities to enrich the lives of the elderly and young people. The building is formed from one large atrium which brings back the feel of the past town center activities with a cafe at its heart and the streets defined by pavilions housing learning and performance spaces. 11 Anna White - Beyond the Facade ‘Beyond the Facade’ challenges notions of privacy, health, secrecy and safety by juxtaposing private women’s refuge with a high street health hub to empower vulnerable women alongside the rest of the community. Set in Rotherham within the existing frame of an abandoned shop, the ‘high street health hub’ simultaneously tackles high street decline by offering a more sustainable, reactivating high street typology encompassing health delis, consultation rooms, fitness suite, allotments and childcare; a place for sharing food and knowledge. Perforated screens hide a ‘secret garden’, a new green haven for Rotherham. Secretly, beyond the overgrown garden wall lies the ‘hidden house’: three types of private residence for different vulnerable women and their children within a sensory garden. Thirdly, the ‘communal house’ brings these women together through shared living spaces connected directly to refuge staff support. By challenging privateto-public relationships, this project aims to break down the barrier of seeking help. 12 Peiwen Xie - The Rotherham Cultural Centre Intergeneration has been understood as a process of accumulating culture, so that culture continuity became the main theme of this project. The scheme contains an achieved library , a drama school and a public theatre and a open air stage to present the process of keeping local stories and using performance art to reinterpret stories, aiming to activate the potential art atmosphere embedded in Rotherham . Considering to build a connection between city centre and train station, and reimaging Rotherham arriving experience, the building sits beside the River Don, with a grand entrance facing toward the Rotherham Minster.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Landscape + Urbanism The last 300 years have witnessed an incredible rate of change in the way in which we live with mass migration from rural communities to urban centres changing the face of the country. By 2030 the World Health Organisation predicts that 6.4 billion people will live in cities, with 41 mega cities of 10 million people. The studio seeks to explore how the towns and rural communities that are left behind can forge new identities from their rich but transient histories. Retford is a small town in West Nottinghamshire. Originally a market town on the Great North Road, it prospered in the 18th Century and grew to become the heart of the surrounding rural community. Its wealth continued to grow as it connected to the wider country, first with the arrival of the canals and then the railway. The products of farming and mining were now connected to London. And then in 1961 the A1 was moved to bypass the town. A collapse in mining and a change in the way we purchase and consume food left the town with an uncertain future. The Studio explores the landscape as an ‘agent of change, constructed from cumulative change rather than a rigid reality’. The resulting projects consider the changes within the demographics of the rural townscape and the impact that this has on the social needs of its inhabitants. The projects explore through a research led agenda, the changes wrought on an urban landscape by economic, social and ecological agendas. The studio adopts strategies of mitigation over adaption, looking particularly at the impact of employment, commerce, and education on the sustainable growth of a rural community. 02 Studio Tutors Howard Evans 5th Year Students Monty Dobney Thomas Hattan Sanjukta Jitendhar Marita Nilsen Jingwen Zhang Abderrahman Ech (Erasmus) 6th Year Students Stephanie Bott Guy Bridgewood Mollie-Mae Dale-Collen (MALA) Grace Laurie (MALA) Lian Tee Hannah Towler Ania Wozniczka-Wells Studio Collaborators Matthew Bradshaw, Bradshaw Architects Jonny Yussuf, DYSE Hannah Smart, West Waddy ADP

01 Stephanie Bott - Retford Brick Factory Retford Brick Factory aims to restore pride and identity within both the Northern market town of Retford and the brick manufacturing industry. By reintroducing a forgotten industry to the town, the project revives the endangered craft of hand brick making through a small handmade brickworks and brick education centre. The project also challenges the inward-facing and socially engaged nature of factories though an integrated community clay studio and open visitor walkways. A joint masterplan with Ania forms a new industrial hub, bringing together the communities either side which have become disconnected due to the rail, whilst also installing ambition and identity to the area. 02 Grace Laurie (MALA) - Food Factory Retford’s ‘Food Factory’ is an exploration into improving community food autonomy through responsible use of resources, celebrating local seasonal produce and fostering traditional food practices. The interwar housing estate of Hallcroft is the setting for a communal garden and orchard framed by buildings that provides the opportunity for local residents to engage with every stage of the food production cycle. By returning to the homegrown values that founded the Hallcroft Estate, the ‘Food Factory’ serves as an antidote to the current wasteful model of global food production disconnected from the consumer. 03 Ania Wozniczka-Wells - The Retford Construction Centre This project researches how more inclusive approaches to construction education could encourage equality on site and bring ambition and aspiration to Retford. The Construction Centre is a showcase to excite people to get involved in construction and will act as a catalyst to change the way women are perceived in construction. Amidst plans to redevelop and regenerate Retford and a national shortage of skilled labour, there are high levels of unemployment among women in Retford- only 2% of on-site manual labour is undertaken by women. The inclusive construction centre targets both of these issues and empowers a wider range of people with the skills to build. Transparency and honesty are key throughout. It’s important for theory and practical learning to go hand in hand so specialist construction methods are understood within the wider context and can be used innovatively. The building itself is a learning resource with exposed structure and services wherever possible.

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04 Mollie-Mae Dale-Collen (MALA) - Sound Environments This project seeks to mitigate the problematic sound coming from the two railway lines that run through Retford by using landform, vegetation and built form to create an acoustically engaging route through a site located close to Retford’s railway station. The project proposes a music campus that consists of a music education and recording centre, music therapy facility and music venue that acts as an extension to the existing 19th century pub on site. Each building has specific acoustic requirements that have been explored through structural systems and façade detailing. A new pedestrian bridge is proposed as an alternative route to the existing underpass that links the communities, providing a safer and more coherent crossing whilst providing views across the landscape. 05 Lian Tee - A Habitat for Transition Retford’s recovered post-industrial landscape is a mosaic of spectacular wilderness, with severe past human intervention resulting in a ‘permanently transitional’ habitat - one that is particularly rich and diverse in biodiversity. Retford (and indeed much of the UK) is also home to an increasingly ageing demographic, with a large proportion of people entering their ‘third age’ - a fresh stage in a person’s life full of possibilities. The project proposes an over-50’s cohousing scheme situated between Retford town centre and its suburban outer. It explores how architectural design can support the transitions into and through old age, thus encouraging socially-oriented and autonomous third aged living. Bordering the urban wilderness of the Chesterfield Canal as well as the floodplains of the River Idle, the project celebrates these existing natural environments, inviting its care and inhabitation into everyday life.

08 Monty Dobney + Thomas Hattan - Recharge Service Station Recharge Service Station is a celebration of clean energy and a future of sustainable transport. By 2028, 70% of cars will be electric. With fossil fuels diminishing, we cannot rely on power plants for our energy supplies. Instead, service stations become the renewable power generators, charging electric cars as well as feeding into the grid to supply nearby towns. The project acts as the core within a revitalised electric road network and a hub for a range of electric transport types. It is designed to offer routes, which then branch out into the surrounding landscape and to local market towns. Users are encouraged to cycle into Retford and Worksop whilst their cars charge, thereby connecting the market towns to a national road network and rekindling the life within them. Recharge Service Station is a beacon on the A1, an attractive rest spot and exciting destination that is integrated with and connected to the local context. Recharging becomes a highlight of the driving experience.

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09 Guy Bridgewood - The Retford Experiment This thesis explores how we can make towns and cities more resilient through self-sufficient health care, shifting from purely curative to preventative approaches. Healthcare in the United Kingdom is under severe pressure and along with financial constraint from central government, this could result in bankruptcy for the National Health Service in the near future. In 2023 Retford has become a testbed for new ideas in urban design, making active modes of transport more convenient than they are currently. The aim is establish the most effective preventative interventions that could be implemented nationwide. The proposed wellbeing centre will act as an anchor point in the experiment, monitoring the interventions as well providing further opportunities for activity, nutritional education and traditional medical consultation. 08

06 Sanjukta Jitendhar - Centre for Research and Remediation The Idle Valley nature reserve, located in the North of Retford, is home to over 100 different bird species, vast wetlands landscape and is a protected area. The centre for research and remediation is designed in response to the growing threat of invasive plant and animal species. The scheme is split into two parts. Firstly, temporary low-impact structures that tower over the flat landscape in the wetlands. These ‘foot soldiers’ have storage for the equipment used to remove invasive plant species and a viewing platform to trace the remediation. The second part is a command centre to oversee the operation. The command centre would house training facilities, storage for waste, bioethanol production and the ‘foot soldiers’, with a focus on research. The research centre is located in a brownfield site on the peripheries of the nature reserve.

10 Marita Nilsen - The Idle Ridge Learning Centre for Children A short northbound walk from the little town of Retford in Nottinghamshire lies a beautiful wetland nature reserve that once used to be a quarry. The birdlife thrives here, with its many lakes and varied vegetation. It is among these remnants of the old gravel piles that the learning centre for the children lays. The building is humble and modest, yet it boldly cuts through the landscape as a homage to the site’s history. It serves as a base for the children to come and learn about the nature reserve, and grow confident and aware through outdoors play. Through its hanging walls the children can run freely underneath the building, erasing the boundaries between the indoors and outdoors, and with its open roof the tree canopies create a natural shelter.

07 Hannah Towler - The Retford Institute of Idlenes The thesis proposes to explore how civic architecture can create opportunities for idleness and congregation for the economically inactive population of Retford, challenging current concepts of inactivity and contribution and reducing loneliness and social isolation through a ‘civic building in disguise.’ The trivialisation and infantilisation of inactivity and leisure is prominent in current society, and those who are ‘economically inactive’ are branded as not contributing to society. The scheme itself contains spaces for idleness and congregation – a reading room, library, congregational halls and rooms, public outdoor space, a coffeehouse, nursery, and dining hall, where different levels of interactions can be had and different periods of time can be spent.

11 Jingwen Zhang - Retford Corporate The arrival of the railway in Retford largely defined how each part of the town was divided and connected. Aiming at redeveloping the area near the railway and exploring the relationship and boundary of public and private space, a series of public interventions and an office building is proposed. The first stage is to transform the train station and its surrounding area into a place for leisure and relief, by redesigning the existing bridge and the shelter on the platform, as well as adding a new pathway that connects the platform to the town. In the second stage, a three-story office building is proposed next to the train station, serving the future of business development and the growing number of startups and small employers. The building also contains spaces with different level of privacy, including a heritage centre, a public internal garden and a private garden.

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Studio Learning Culture This year studio Learning Culture has been investigating the notion of access and asking, what does access mean in contemporary society? We have explored the physical, social, institutional and psychological barriers to people; that prevent them from having the right or opportunity to benefit from places and spaces; or to connect with other people. The studio has been based in Sheffield and started its explorations with the Inner Ring road; a key access artery for many, yet barrier and demarcation line that divides and subverts the city. The projects developed throughout the year are focused on and around the ring road, building upon the studio’s access city manifesto themes of: privilege, perception, control, agency and behaviour. The studio has also formed part of the ‘around the toilet’ research project - working across scales; from the complex taboo of toilet accessibility in terms of gender, faith and disability - to the spatial, bureaucratic and regulatory issues of city scale connections. Each project seeks to create new ways for people to access, engage and act within the city, regardless of their ability, background and beliefs. Together the work of the studio aims to create a series of links that offer an alternative vision for our future city by; empowering women, enhancing creativity, supporting paternity, encouraging religious cohesion, refugee integration and creating social platforms.

Studio Tutor Leo Care 5th Year Students Cressy Lopez Monischa Simpattananont Christie Tan

Studio Collaborators Jos Boys Sarah Rennie Around the Toilet Visiting Tutors Lukas Barry Simon Harrison

6th Year Students Zuzanna Antczak Praneet Bhullar Chris Dembinski Maha Komber Joseph McKibben Jialin Pan Theo Roseland 01 Zuzanna Antczak & Praneet Bhullar - Urban Herbarium The Urban Herbarium seeks to inject life into a neglected space in Sheffield that has been destroyed by infrastructure; the railway and the ring road. Currently acting as a barrier between surrounding communities, the site will be transformed into a community-run urban therapeutic landscape. Through inhabiting the existing wall and reactivating the disused railway line, the physical and perceived barriers around the site will be challenged, shifting from an obstacle to visibly accessible space. The forgotten land will be restored to its former rich ecological life, creating new opportunities for social cohesion through the botanical craft of collectively making and drinking medicinal cordials and tisanes. 02 Chris Dembinski - Permitted Development Despite the St. Vincent’s Action Plan 2004 which outlined the area for drastic improvement, little has happened since, with much of it still lying derelict. Perhaps it is policy that bars communityled development of the area where council provision of civic infrastructure is non-existent. How can we enable communities when their councils fail them? This thesis proposes a community led civic centre that subverts planning policy by inhabiting and reinvigorating an existing derelict building in St Vincent’s Quarter. The centre is comprised of commercial (co-working, catering, market hall) elements to offset the cost of the non-commercial (gallery spaces, library and fabrication) elements. A series of temporary interventions hidden within allow for immediate action through participative construction. These autonomous units are dressed according to the varying environmental requirements of the users. Eventually larger set-piece moves will unite the entire project with further permanence as funding and support increases.

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03 Maha Komber - The Public Sanctuary The project uses the work of philosopher Lefebvre as a starting point in addressing the asylum seeker’s little use of the city. It looks at what barriers to public space face asylum seekers based in Sheffield and seeks to overcome them through the design of a residency centre overlooking a once neglected section of the Porter Brook river. By opening up of the river to public access, a new public space is created adjacent to the current arrival into Sheffield, Sheaf Square. Resident asylum seekers are encouraged to take part in cultural activities, all of which spill out on this public space, encouraging their presence and participation. In addition, the separation between the skin and concrete frame structure empowers residents to take charge of the threshold between public and private; allowing the skin to become a participation device which residents can dissolve in multiple ways. 04 Joseph McKibben - The Paternal Urban Base The Paternal Urban Base is a childcare centre for fathers and seeks to challenge the gendered conventions of primary child care roles. It combines startup offices with a nursery school to foster symbiotic relationships between business and education. Located in a former quarry, the PUB is conceived as a series of slopes that engage with the topography to playfully intersect programs and reveal an active learning landscape.Thresholds between care and work are blurred; the school gates are included in the daily life of the PUB. Play and risk are at the heart of an exchange between enterprise and education, where nursery life is central and celebrated. The landscape represents uncovering the quarry, with mining tunnels for play and varying slopes which challenge children physically use their motor skills. The design responds to the pedagogical theory of scaffolding, as children are intrinsically motivated to climb through collaboration and mutual encouragement. 05 Jialin Pan - Sheffield Sharing Station ‘Where access is better than ownership.’ The project provides a sharing platform for tangible and intangible resources. The library of things allows people to make money through lending idling items or facilitate their life with minimal cost by renting. Enterprise incubator lets people share their ideas and knowledge. The project, located at the edge of Sheffield inner rings road between railway station and Park Hill. It aims to break the traffic barrier and link the city centre and suburban. Sheffield sharing station wants to implement the idea of collaborative consumption, taking a leap to create a more sustainable and connected society.

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06 Theo Roseland - Syncretic Exchange Set within the context of a 2031 post-Brexit British dystopia, the Syncretic Exchange attempts to heal the rifts forming between disparate faith communities on the verge of segregation. At the historic Wicker Arches in Sheffield a new multifaith campus, incorporating a shared worship building, library, market and festival pavilion, forms an environment of cultural and religious exchange through social dialogue, interaction, and proximity. The scheme takes religious concepts of the ‘Veil’, the ‘pilgrimage’ and the ‘monument’ to establish an architectural language accessible and welcoming to people of all faith and culture. Bringing these disparate faith communities together facilitates interfaith cooperation, allowing British culture to adapt syncretically to halt the rise in xenophobia by creating a new welcoming culture of universal acceptance. 03

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07 Cressy Lopez - The Feminist Citadel The Feminist Citadel is the re-appropriation of an existing derelict Salvation Army building within the centre of Sheffield, with the key aim of facilitating a unique programme to encourage greater female participation in politics. Architectural agendas of the scheme were to interrogate what is required to produce a ‘feminist architecture’ and to provide a building which would be an antithesis to its context of the retail quarter developments. My interpretation and hence expression of feminist architecture is as a collection of parts woven together to create a building which not only expresses interventions through material layering, but celebrates the diversity and richness of the building and its new use. Contrasting the corporate disintegration of the urban fabric, it will stand proudly as a semi-civic building, solely valuing the voices of the historically suppressed gender. 08 Monischa Simpattananont - The Moor Extra Care Apartmente Ageing is inevitable! Society today is becoming more mobile, resulting in families and friends often being dispersed, which means that individuals have to live more independently and prefer to downsize. In addition, older people are not a particularly homogeneous group and will become increasingly diverse over the coming decades. Sheffield City Council’s framework builds upon the latest research evidence to achieve a city for all ages to maximize the chances of active lifestyle and healthy ageing. To create an accessible, age-friendly city, built around the Moor quarter with a vibrant high street market and the LGBTQ community, this project promotes new opportunities and a greater diversity into the inner-city as well as maintaining the highest level of activities, independence and a quality of life for old age. 09 Christie Tan - The Creatorium Set in the year 2050, in a world already taken over by automation, The Creatorium is a prototype for a Restoration Scheme, one crafted by Sheffield’s City council together with many other experts around the world, to tackle the ever-increasing displacement of workers from low-skilled leveled occupations. Believing that creativity is the only solution against automation, and that children are pure sources of creativity themselves, The Creatorium is designed in a playful manner, aiming to empower people to learn and collaborate with each other to take control of automation itself instead of seeing it as a threat to mankind. This project served as a testing ground for creativity itself, providing a safe space for people to unleash and showcase their wildest imaginations-one that would make their inner child proud.

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Did you see the news last night?

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No, are there any developments on Brexit?

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Why is there still disparity in pay prevalent in contemporary society ?

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“One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.� Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Material Amendment To make a material amendment to a site or building involves making significant change or adaptation to an existing building or location. The studio asks students to develop a new proposal starting from a historical understanding of their site to generate a future programme, proposed use and function of a building. Importantly they are asked to consider its technology/ the manner in which it might be built from the same genesis. The studio puts a focus on the development of hand drawing and modelling as tool that can be utilised at all stages of the architectural process. The studio bases itself in the City of London with its rich historic development, contested space and position within the current world wide financial system. It is a deliberately broad and rich historical canvas in which students can find their own position and area of interest/ relevance. It is also a site which many share a knowledge of, and come to the table with some experience and understanding to start a conversation from. Suggested starting points are the functional development, route, and current state of the Roman city wall, the medieval guild system and the associated governance structure. Also looking at the history of the blitz and its associated effect on the urban fabric leading to the post-war social housing at Golden Lane Estate - facing renewal and redevelopment. These areas of initial investigation and enquiry are catalytic sparks to ignite a ‘great fire’ of investigation and proposition.

Studio Tutor Bryan Davies 5th Year Students James Harrington Zi He Clare Mckay Stephani Porfyriou Bradley Sumner 6th Year Students Deborah Adler Helen Galletti di Cadilhac Mansel Haynes Luke Moran Ben Powell Leanne Robinson Andreas Tsestos Studio Collaborators Andrew Docherty Black Cat Architecture & Rural Office for Architecture Guy Moulson Seven Architecture

01 Deborah Adler - Zero Hour City What should a livery hall be in the 21st Century? How can we de-alienate the typology, moving from private prestige to civic prestige without losing a sense of richness? This project considers the architectural implications of developing a livery hall for zero hour economy workers on the site of the Museum of London. Typically, liverymen enjoy an excess of physical and political infrastructure through access to livery halls and ritualised traditions. Conversely, gig workers generally have no (official) collective space or infrastructure and work for organisations exploiting the grey areas of the law. This project suggests that zero-hour workers would benefit from increased access to the political infrastructure of the livery companies, and explores how the architectural language and function of the livery hall can evolve for the contemporary company. 04 02 Helen Galletti di Cadilhac - Mnemonic Convivium: The Pedagogical Market The project bridges the metaphorical boundary of The London Wall, defining the square mile from the wider city. Frictions have increased in recent times between the working class and powerful businessmen, culminating in issues regarding the political establishment. This pedagogical market tackles issues of credulity towards deceptive information and general disinterest in the knowledge of significant events, seeking to spark curiosity in contemporary issues by utilising food as a celebratory tool for integration and knowledge exchange. The proposal critically reflects on current methods of learning, and proposes the use of food as a mnemonic device for proactive education. The market takes the form of a shared learning environment, providing connections between the journey of a user and the journey of food as an educational tool, with a sequential architectural language that responds to both in materiality and structure. 03 Ben Powell - Lord Mayor’s Show Headquarters The Lord Mayor’s Show is a pageant, a carnival of history and a demonstration of the enduring strengths and spectacular achievements of the City of London. In its layers of civilization, destruction, creation and survival it continues to adapt and maintain an illusion of continuity, history and pageantry through the City of London for over 800 years. This thesis project celebrates the Lord Mayor’s Show all year round with a museum on Cheapside, providing a permanent base for the organisation and production of the annual parade and establishes a new almshouse in the City of London focusing on creating a intergenerational community. The museum provides access to learning for all and engaging actively with the Cheapside thoroughfare. 02


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Tree planter 75mm mulch planting soil mix gravel or similar perforated drainage pipe prepared substrate

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Brown biodiverse roof 70 mm soil with paved perimeter edge granular drainage layer waterproof membrane 100mm rigid insulation 150mm in-situ concrete exposed precast concrete panels 300mm oak beams bespoke glulam beams affixed to inset steel joint Wall buildup 100mm thick precast concrete panel waterproof membrane 12mm sheathing board 200mm insulation 12mm sheathing board 60x30mm timber battens providing cable run space 12mm sheathing board plaster finish Curtain wall system with full height glazing

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Collonade buildup: upper timber soffit panels with hidden fixings waterproof membrane 12mm sheathing board 100mm insulation 12mm sheathing board 300mm timber joists precast concrete panel 70mm rigid insulation oak floor External wall buildup 100mm precast concrete panel 200mm concrete upstand waterproof membrane 200mm insulation precast concrete inbuilt seating supported by steel frame, concealing column datum upstands

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

04 Mansel Haynes + Luke Moran - Delusions of Grandeur Set within a dystopian London, ruled by ‘The Regime’, the project proposes a national broadcast house for an Ecofascist, dictatorial government who put legislative environmentalism above the welfare of people, marking the sign of a supposedly progressive new era for London. Does architecture transcend politics and ideology, and if the architects own vision is progressive, can architecture be a vehicle for positive change? Our interest lay in exploring whether architecture can be used as a mechanism to empower users, promoting their well-being through design. Set as two British architects who entered an open competition to design ‘The Regime’s’ new ‘Ministry of Truth’, the project explores the moral complexities of working with such clients bringing awareness to the lack guidance. The ARB & RIBA have been criticised for their lack of ethical guidance for architects, with the ARB stating only to follow the country of work’s ethical codes. The project explores how architecture can be manipulated as a means of control, and the ethical dilemmas architects may face in these situations. Adopting a position that rebalances current design hierarchy, equal importance is given to the building’s users. 60% of the world’s natural resources are consumed by the built environment, yet environmental design is not enforced; when researching the ARB’s position, their website had no results for ‘sustainability/ sustainable’, which we find shocking. 85% of people around the world who work in an urban office, yet 47% do not have access to natural light, and 58% no plants. We implemented biophilic design principles, holistically integrating nature into the built environment, which is proven to have a positive effect upon wellbeing. What we have came to realise is a point that resonates with Denise Scott Brown’s remarks in her entry for a Baghdad Mosque competition, which is to think architects can influence Regime change is ‘delusions of grandeur’, however whilst we may not be able to change the agenda of a Regime we can aim to empower and enrich the well beings of the users within the architecture we create. 05 Leanne Robinson - Creative Hub The project explores how art & creative skills can become experiences to be enjoyed by all, rather than products to be consumed by a few, focusing on the use of art to raise awareness and improve local issues. Considering the spatial implications of inserting a new building into the Golden Lane Estate, new publicly accessible green spaces and courtyards tie into the existing network of different garden levels on the estate, whilst being considerate of surrounding residential buildings and creating better links with the adjacent Barbican estate. Galleries and public workshops sit below ground, using a series of sunken courtyards and rooflights to allow daylight into the spaces. 06 Andreas Tsestos - The Thames Amendment Through the centuries, the River Thames - London’s oldest artery - has established its status as a symbol of boundary and defence; without it London could never have existed. The Thames was instrumental in sustaining London as a major port and capital of trade and power. The project explores how architecture can use built form to crystallize and communicate the river’s history, while speculating on its future. A museum is proposed which celebrates the archeology & multi-layered history of the Thames, alongside a fabrication lab for producing floating structures, which challenges the way we use, access and interact with the River Thames and other urban waterscapes in the future. 07 James Harrington - Centre for Material Culture The Centre for Material Culture explores the City of London’s approach to its material heritage, and the nature of culture within

the heart of London’s historic financial district. Responding to the fortified and guarded language of the city and the material culture which has been lost or hidden behind and beneath its modern fabric. A new public cultural institution reframes the upstanding remains of the London Wall, re-imagining a block as a new public thoroughfare and destination for exploring and studying material culture through digital cataloguing, recreation and exhibition of artefact and architecture. The building’s elevated form has been developed in response to the rich archaeology in situ beneath, to create a structure which can facilitate the inhabitation of the site for centuries to come. 08 Zi He - Smithfield Market Working with the existing Smithfield market, this project explores the urban context through themes of interaction, movement and trades. In the beginning, exploring an intervention, ‘interaction’ was developed with an idea that brings people together to trade/ exchange objects, breaking down the process of trading as a journey of interaction. In investigating this, the journey brings the idea of movement into the project. Movement within a space, and how people move through and interact with the space. Trades became the main programmatic theme of the project, from production to transaction, exploring how the existing building work with the new proposed space. 09 Clare Mckay - (Re)Occupy St Paul’s Reacting to the monoculture of the city of London, the project explores how a building for the ‘occupy’ movement might manifest and begin to reclaim space in the city. Drawing on medieval land law to subvert the medieval City of London Corporation, the project invades the triforium level of St Paul’s cathedral, creating a mutual dependence between the occupation and cathedral that sees campaigns and activism placed alongside new galleries & workshops for St Paul’s. The occupation projects through the main elevation of St Paul’s to begin to refront and subvert the facade, announcing an intention to reclaim spaces within the city. 10 Stephani Porfyriou - Active-Learning Visitor Centre The project brings together a new garden for edible and medicinal plants and a historic existing physic garden to create an activelearning centre. Located in the City of London next to BarberSurgeons’ Hall, it has a rich historic landscape character. Tourists and the local residents of the area, come together in a new visitors centre which celebrates the history of the site which was once used as a physic garden. A complex of three buildings of similar shape and structure is created leading to the main Botanical garden. Each unit serves a different purpose including loading and storage facilities, and educational and social services. The proposal incorporates and draws inspiration from the existing Roman wall ruins, driving the circular form of the building.

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1. Council chamber & lecture theatre 2. Teaching room 3. Plant room 4. Entrance area and public workspace 5. Public cafe & bike repair 6. Parking for service and member vehicals 7. Member only study workspaces 8. Education space 9. Co -Working - general workspace 10. Workshop & studio space - shared between education and cowork 11. Gig welfare space 12. Legal support and union link

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11 Bradley Sumner - A New Civic Centre for London The Government within the city of London is developing proposals to allow dual registration at GP’s close to home and workplace which will generate demand for new GP facilities within the City to serve the workforce of approximately 370,000. This project proposes a new typology of the civic health centre, building on the tradition of Roman civic buildings, integrating well-being and socialisation, on the Bank of England’s 3 acre site. The is a building which is open to all; offering atmospheres and spaces which allow the city’s inhabitants to heal offering modern healthcare and spaces for socialisation and contemplation. The project suggests that through architecture and investment in the cities civic amenities the well-being of it’s inhabitants can be improved increasing productivity and increasing the potential of the city workforce. 02

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio (Re)-Activist Architecture Our studio is based in Molenbeek, Brussels, a neighbourhood with a highly mobile and international population with 62% foreign-born residents with associations with terrorist activity, as well as social and economic inequality causing deep divisions. Our projects speculated on future sites of purposeful organised group activity, bringing together people of different backgrounds. We looked at the 2008, Council of Europe white paper: Living together as equals in dignity. Cities have long been characterised by social diversity; city life defined by Iris Marion Young as ‘a being together of strangers’ and by Doreen Massey as ‘throwntogetherness’. Our studio explored ways to develop long-term meaningful contact in order to reduce prejudice and foster respect between people of different social groups. We used the techniques of the Situationists: Dérive, Constructed Situation and Détournement to engage with our context. Through observation, participation and analysis we developed narratives describing speculative propositions which established a critical position, offering an alternative amplification of evident cultural and social activity. We explored architecture in the midst of life, fit for everyday use, looking into a form of cohabitation in which the rights of the individual and the interests of community are in balance. This equilibrium is based upon a shared vision of the future.

00A Studio Tutor Simon Baker 5th Year Students Peter Dykes Ifigenia Ioannou Farhana Jiwa (TRP) Abdul Azim bin Abd Rahman Andy Tee Zhangxiufu Wu 6th Year Students Matthew Evans Laura Postlethwaite Maria Ramos Banah Rashid Kun Shen Caroline Williams Baicen Zhou

Studio Collaborators Jan Zaman Studio Group Photos 00A Yoga in Molenbeek 00B Food in Molenbeek 00C Comedy in Molenbeek 00D Mapping Molenbeek’s media perception 00E Coffee in Molenbeek 00F Performance in Molenbeek 00G Living in Molenbeek

01 Abdul Azim bin Abd Rahman - The Superhero Factory Role model and the surrounding elements are substantial factors in the upbringing of children, who mirror a lot of the things happening around them. Molenbeek is being perpetuated by the media as the birthplace of terror, which has created an atmosphere where local people are paranoid towards visitors while prejudice and stigma comes from people outside. The vacuum of negativity has profoundly affected the children’s environment which made them an easy target for recruitment of a certain radical militant group. The Superhero Factory is a place where everyone has the opportunity to write their own story and channel their inner hero mainly through comic book making. The utilitarian approach mimics the network of metro and services while transparency resonate the notion of openness. 02 Peter Dykes - Gloves Off ‘Gloves Off’ is a hybridised boxing gym, library and arena rising from an industrial ruin. At the site’s centre the boxing ring functions as a platform for verbal and physical sparring and the channeling of aggression, around this the library’s tiered corridors articulate arena standing room. Supporting these and retaining the 19th century factory walls a modular structure houses the boxing gym, circulation and reading rooms. Distinct from the controlled climate of the library/arena and free from its curation, this tempered space becomes a place to test ideas and perform the mental and physical repetitions necessary to develop control over movement and thought, juxtaposing the library in scale, materiality and atmosphere. Through this architectural intervention the stage

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is set for moments of unsolicited interaction allowing affinities to spring up, establishing a vibrant non-exclusionary space of renewed community relevance inspired by and responding directly to our time spent participating in the culture of Molenbeek, a celebration of shared experiences over difference. 03 Matthew Evans - The Socialist Gunpowder Factory The project is situated in Molenbeek, Brussels and it sets out to retain industry and provide jobs locally, while producing enough fireworks for the Brussels New Year celebrations. This population is made up of mostly migrant communities who are still searching for belonging and acceptance within Brussels much like the pigeon, who’s numbers are being reduced through Brussels city centre policy. Brussels has a rich heritage with the pass time of pigeon fancying and pigeon poo is also able to produce potassium nitrate, a key ingredient for the production of gunpowder. The pigeon therefore provides an affinity between the different social groups. The project hopes to integrate workforce and the community and bridge the extensive divide between Molenbeek and Brussels city centre, through long-term meaningful contact using the pigeon as the tool to do so, producing a product in fireworks, which is the universal symbol for celebration across many cultures. 04 Ifigenia Ioannou - ReGrained: The Beer Bakery The project is situated in Brussels, in the area of Molenbeek, one of the less privileged areas of the Brussels City Centre region. The program of the building is centred around an upcycling system for food production, using spent grain from the local beer industry as a food ingredient for an edible byproduct that also targets a circular economy model. The spent grain (barley) which is considered a waste product in the food industry - comes from a local beer brewery, drying and milling it to make flour, bread, protein bars and other confectionery, closing the material loop. At the same time the bakery will operate within a larger organization that focuses on helping unemployed people from the local community develop skills and secure future employment and social sustainability.

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05 Farhana Jiwa (TRP) - Urban Jam In the context of vast migration and movement, the influx of diverse communities serves not as barrier, but as a hub for intercultural exchange. Urban Jam is a multifaceted piece of architecture that aims to stimulate the mind and body through a sensorial experience, building bridges through the practice, production and presentation of music. The design of a musical hub conveys an opportunity to amplify and embrace unique identities in Molenbeek while serving to enrich the site, which is already a culmination of multiple activities. The building’s detail and design consolidate art, material, culture and performance to reflect 00E


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Library 7. Curtain wall double glazing: 4 mm laminated safety glass + 16 mm argon-filled cavity + 4 mm laminated safety glass 8. Handrail: 4mm safety glass, Ă˜ 30mm steel rod External Walkway 9. Extensive green floor / 70mm vegetation, layer, drainage / water retention layer, bituminous membrane, 280mm PIR Insulation cut to falls, vapour barrier, 300mm concrete Modular Timber Frame Systems 10. Low impact modular timber frame system. sealant layer, 50mm douglas fir timber frame system, 280 sheeps wool insulation, 50mm douglas fir frame system, waterproof membrane, 50mm european charred larch cladding. 1

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11 Caroline Williams - Molenbeek’s Comedy Forum Molenbeek’s Comedy Forum is a performance and training venue in Molenbeek, Brussels, which is an area with a rich cultural heritage eroded over time with all nine of the district cinemas being closed by 1975 and issues with terrorism. Recently cultural output has begun to emerge from the district again in the form of stand-up comedy. Popular with residents, it creates a veil of humour under which barriers can be broken down, opening up discussions and bringing people together. However, currently comedy as well as other fringe groups, such as circus skills have no venue for performance or training. Molenbeek’s Comedy Forum looks to fulfil this requirement by taking the existing grade II listed Ancien Cinema Forum and embedding it back into the community amplifying existing cultural heritage. It will provide leisure facilities including a comedy club, circus school and reinstate the former cinema bringing a divergence of communities together creating opportunities and aspirations.

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09 Kun Shen - Anonymous Common The majority media have rendered Molenbeek as a place of crime by linking the terror attacks in Europe to the area however the reality is the contrary. The obvious imbalanced power of discourse is identified that the voice of minority ethnic groups cannot be heard. Education has become a privileged system that creates a loop of poverty which worsens the situation. Additionally, the way knowledge and information is selected and shared by media giants and publishers not only weakens the minority but also concretes the deep-rooted prejudice. The project tries to

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12 Zhangxiufu Wu - Molenbeek Textile Upcycling Factory Influenced by the number of homeless people in Molenbeek, the project looks at designing a textile upcycling factory, which not only provides job opportunities but also solves the problem of local textile waste. The site, originally a junk yard that sat inside a residential block, was transformed into a textile upcycling production line placed on the ground level for best workflow. One end of the production line imports the raw material and the other end exports the finished products. Above the production line are the platforms that allow the public to walk through the spaces and have indirect interaction with the workers.

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08 Banah Rashid - The Liberated Harem ‘The Liberated Harem’ aims to bring feminist ideals to the streets of Molenbeek. By creating a space allowing purely for the leisure of the women of Molenbeek, otherwise ignored in the world of relaxation and recreation, the project utilises the precious little free time for the self-advancement of these women.‘The Liberated Harem’ creates a space for leisure, first and foremost, but also combines the women’s home workload and efforts within the building to free up time for leisure. The project is split between two sites, one catering for ‘work’ and the other ‘leisure’, bringing women out of their domestic nest and into the public realm. This project postulates that the betterment of women, to rise up through Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to self-actualisation, requires time and space. The current lack of both for women of a minority ethnicity and lower income background is problematic for women and therefore by extension, society.

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10 Andy Tee - Participatory Art Centre Participatory Art Centre in Molenbeek (PACM) opens itself up to visitors with active participation in the curation process. PACM aims to serve the overlooked young artists and community as well as to deliver a counterproposal to the conventional programming of the museum. Additionally, PACM will offer the community and visitors to contribute, collaborate and co-create the content with social interaction. Bringing multipurpose hall, stepping lounge, accessible storage, studio and art follies to one location, PACM will become an open stage which allows social encounters and cultural experiences to take place. Teens will be paired with experienced artists which will further help develop skills that will support their individual and community goals.

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07 Maria Ramos - Project Inclusive Eudaimonia Project Inclusive Eudaimonia, located in Molenbeek, Brussels, caters to local organisations that aim to integrate migrants in to the community. The program is a collection of activities related to well-being that work together for the self-sufficiency of the project demonstrating that well-being does not have to be monetized or institutionalised in order to be made accessible. This is all set out in a village arrangement of courtyards with cloistered walkways in between bigger volumes, creating spontaneous moments of interaction among users of the building, and in turn enticing them to the various activities. Overall, Project Inclusive Eudaimonia weaves together different cultural values, both foreign and local. Folding up into an architecture of inclusivity that can be applied to other institutional models. An extension of the neighbourhoods that facilitates the creation of new well-being narratives in our ‘hy-phe-na-ted society’.

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06 Laura Postlethwaite - Parc Ecologique Molenbeek, a transient neighbourhood situated on the border of Brussels City centre, suffers from an unwanted global stigmatisation which has caused mental and physical harm to its inhabitants. Parc Ecologique aims to help remove Molenbeek from prejudice and heal the Commune through addressing the identified need for more parkland within the urban realm. Through the creation of an inclusive, green environment, Parc Ecologique’s programme accommodates all of what a traditional public park has to offer, however the concept of the park is further explored as part of an integrated public health program. Through the creation of flexible, interpretive zones, the project also explores architectural ways of overlapping rhythms of people of differing social practice to help foster exchanges and dialogues between building workers, consumers and visitors.

interpret the wall game, which is to provide the fair place as playing field, taking citizens as audience and judge, introducing a way that make two rivals play interdependently with each other, by which the two worlds can achieve a mutual understanding by radical confrontation of different perspectives.

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elements of the place and its people. Its conceptual arrangement creates an economic, environmental and socially sustainable building. This ethos and intent is largely manifested in the central courtyard - the nodal point and heart of the building.

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13 Baicen Zhou - The Privacy Hotel The privacy hotel aims to create an alternative model providing different level of privacy and therapeutic functions for the purpose of helping mental well-being. Facing the irreversible progress of city densification which caused safety and housing crisis in major cities, residences are suffering from privacy issues due to growing surveillance system and overcrowded living environment. Private moment is becoming a luxury. The aim of the project is making spaces affordable and accessible to host private activities where people can enjoy some time away from the outside world by themselves or with family and friends. The project seeks to create a hybrid architecture adapting the accessibility and inclusion of a hotel model into a private and calming atmosphere to balance the negative results of intensified urban living environment on people’s mental well-being.


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Temporal Places The studio is concerned with dimensions of time, from the persistent to the momentary, and aims to explore the evolution, inhabitation and adaption of particular places through multiple time frames. The studio critically explores the enduring heritage of place, considering long-term issues of identity, continuity and change, whilst simultaneously considering historic places as the setting for everyday life and transient events. For a second consecutive year, the studio has explored the potential of a redundant industrial site containing significant heritage value within Stoke-on-Trent, a once thriving city of production founded on coal and clay. Building upon last year’s investigations at the former pottery of Spode Works, the studio has this year focused on Chatterley Whitfield Colliery at the northern edge of the city. The colliery is a place that preserves the memory of more than one hundred years of coal mining on the site and depicts the evolution of the wider UK coal industry, up until the colliery’s closure in 1976. A large part of the site is designated a Scheduled Monument and many of its diverse buildings and structures are listed, but the colliery has become increasingly neglected with its crumbling fabric now recorded in Historic England’s ‘Heritage at Risk’ register. The studio’s collective research has revealed the colliery’s personal stories, industrial processes, social practices and material legacy, and identified a range of themes embedded within the rich history of the site that are reinterpreted through proposed new activities and physical interventions, exploring the interface of old and new. Studio projects simultaneously employ the site as a test bed for architectural ideas whilst collectively projecting a vision for a re-imagined colliery, maintaining its ‘island’ identity within the landscape whilst re-engaging socially, culturally and economically with the region, and reconnecting via a new tram system to the six towns of Stoke-on-Trent. 00A Studio Tutor Mark Emms 5th Year Students Antonia Alexandru (MALA) Dandan He Karolina Kaminskaite Samuel Letchford Carrie Yin 6th Year Students Sin Ning Chan John Chia Nigel Hassell Rachael Moon Ellen Peirce Joanna Poxon Emma Seaton

With special thanks to: Nigel Bowers, Macca, John and Geoff, Friends of Chatterley Whitfield Stephanie Burkinshaw and Julian Read, Regeneration at the City of Stoke-on-Trent Simon Branson, Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, Manchester BDP Sheffield Studio

00A Studio timeline of events at Chatterley Whitfield Colliery 00B Studio visit to the colliery 00C Studio project locations

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03 Rachael Moon - Celebrating the Pithead Baths This thesis explores an alternative role for the 1930s Grade 2 listed Pithead Baths complex at Chatterley Whitfield. The new bathhouse proposal aims to be sympathetic to the building’s historical significance as a symbol for miners’ welfare, retaining the theme of bathing from the building’s previous use as the on-site shower and changing facility. A condition exists today in which public bathing exists far outside mainstream culture, such as the anonymous experience of visiting a commercial private day spa. This provides a counterpoint for the project. The overall concept for the extension lies around a new tower element that is referential to the existing building’s iconic water tower. Housed inside is an open-air steam bath that forms the social heart of the new bathhouse.

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00C 01 Sin Ning Chan - The Heritage Museum The project proposes a museum exhibiting a collection of historic photographs depicting the evolution of Chatterley Whitfield Colliery, together with its stories and salvaged artefacts, and remembers a forgotten industrial legacy of Stoke-on-Trent. Learning and archiving facilities aim to collect mining knowledge and share it with future generations, whilst photography studios and gallery offer opportunities to records and present the changing colliery and its wider city context. The museum sits on the principal mining axis of the colliery, along which a new lightweight timber tower acts as a marker for the lost headgear of the Middle Pit shaft. The exhibition explores above and below ground relationships, offering both daylight galleries and a dark immersive projection experiences for visitors.

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02 Nigel Hassell - Data, Things + Intangibles The collapse of the coal mining industry has removed key community anchors and job opportunities in Stoke. To help combat this, The Datamine is a business incubation centre for a networked interdisciplinary community of digital industries combined with learning and training hub. Demolished in the 1940s, two timber cooling towers are remembered by cutting a void through the centre of the scheme, acting as an anchor structurally, environmentally and socially, with co-working space, cellular offices and a digital fabrication workshop wrapping around this. A charred timber cladding evokes the scars of mining, a memory of buildings blackened by coal, whilst cutting a stark contrast against the predominantly brown masonry site. To keep the building geometry legible, window reveals are carved deep into this charred façade embellishing this with light timber casings. This is a project about our relationship with digital technology, wellbeing, and heritage.

04 Joanna Poxon - The Art Machine The project builds on Stoke-on-Trent’s current identity as a hub for making and a centre of production and innovation, and reestablishes these functions in the former Fitter’s Shop at Chatterley Whitfield Colliery. The thesis proposes The Art Machine, a place for large art installations and assembly, which offers a spectacle of construction and collaboration between artists and the public. This is supported by artist studios, workshops and collaborative workspaces. A landscape of art interventions creates a sensory experience that extends beyond the site, breaking down the threshold between colliery and city. Re-establishing the colliery’s historical relationship with the surrounding landscape, The Art Machine is a place for creativity, inclusivity and fantastical that embraces art as a form of celebration and unity. 01


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Scene Three: That’s a Wrap! 1. Due to the poor condition of the existing roof, it will be removed and replaced with a timber framed, zinc standing-seamed clad, insulated roof. The proposed roof will be of a similar materiality and rhythm, still allowing the existing building to be identified from a height. 2. The existing roof is made up of continuous roof lifts along both pitches of the roof, therefore a rhythm of roof lights within the roof will maintain the aesthetic both internally, but also continue to capture natural light on the upper

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floors. 3. A break in the rhythm of the roof is made for the ventilation shafts which aid in keeping the theatre cool. Not only do they provide adequate functionality, but they also identify the theatre within the existing building from a distance. 4. The lower roofs will also be replaced with a similar language to the existing.

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5. New construction will be wrapped in a triangulated metal sheet cladding. Perforations within the cladding provide variation in the facade, along with providing shading and change in light condition within the internal spaces. 6. The cladding material will continue to wrap around the roof, this time in a

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flat sheet form, concealing all roof servicing and creating a monolithic form from afar. Perforations in the roof will allow for rain to pass through, before it is harvested and re-used within the building.

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7. The one exception within this pure roof scape is the protruding fly tower, which not only provides extra height to this space, but also highlights it aesthetically when viewed from a height.

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Scene Two: Building the Stage Constructed using a glu-lam frame and CLT panels, the proposal provides a soft and light language that contrasts the existing fabric. Internally, timber linings and white wall finishes provide a blank canvas for the students to inhabit. The new construction is made up of two installations;

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Volume One - ‘Production’

Volume One forms the ‘Production’ side of the project, where the theatre and the stage meet the workshops, recording and broadcasting studios. Volume Two, ‘Practice’, provides studios to aid in the education of dance, acting and music.

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1. A large, triple height space, forms the workshop and fly tower. Surrounded by a balcony on three sides.

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Dramatic Sundial

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2. One metre thick service walls not only provide studios with adequate servicing but also provide storage as well as an acoustic barrier between social and studio spaces.

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3. Overlapping with the threshold of the new and existing the stage is raised, both defining its character as the stage but also highlighting the location of the threshold.

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4. Following the removal of the mezzanine floor and existing steel the theatre is placed within the void. The opening of the theatre is surrounded by three service corridors, over three floors, defined as the technical levels. Seating is also recessed into these walls on the upper ground floor. 2

5. Timber volumes push into the large atrium space creating an informal layout in contrast to the studio spaces. These volumes highlight key interaction points such as the box office, theatre entrance and main school entrance.

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6. A glass framed wall provides translucency between the public atrium and the theatre school, providing views from the library of activity and the informal lighting of the atrium. 7. A new timber floor creates a new level within the existing building, now

Volume Two - ‘Practice’

providing three floors. The existing concrete floor level will be retained. 8. Core circulation for the theatre school is punctured through the existing structure. In this instance, a platform lift will be installed to reduce the need for overruns. 9. A large double height space provides a large studio and rehearsal space, including a technical balcony. The large fenestration provides views to the iconic headgear of the colliery, re-connecting the proposed programme with the historical site function.

Scene One: Preparing the Existing Fabric 1

The existing Area Shaft Building (23) is re-generated and altered in preparation for the new construction to be installed both with-in and next to the existing fabric. 4

1. Two new concrete foundation slabs ready for the proposed construction works. 7

2. The existing Old Methane Store (25) is re-modelled and re-generated to create a cafe, box office, and adult changing room for the site.

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3. Portions of the existing concrete mezzanine floor are removed to create large, triple height spaces, such as the main entrance foyer, the theatre, and to also allow for core circulation.

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4. A large opening is created in the existing facade to create a large opening which not only creates a large space to transition from stage to workshop, but also forms the proscenium arch for the stage.

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5. A second opening is made to create the transition from the existing to the proposed studios. The existing windows are removed along with the lower brick panels. 6. A final opening is made to identify a new main entrance to the Performing Arts Centre. 7. The former lift shaft is re-utilised as part of the project ventilation strategy, but also creates an iconic centre point to the project.

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8. A square is created by the adjacencies of the existing and proposed buildings, utilising hard landscape which contrasts to the wild and informal landscape that surrounds the site. 1 9

9. The materiality of the square inches out to connect with the pathways and landscaping of the wider site. 10. Further hard landscaping is enclosed by a wall to provide an external space for the students to create and make.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

05 Ellen Peirce - The Chatterley Whitfield Performing Arts School Set in the backdrop of the 1984 coal miners’ strike, the tale of Billy Elliot highlights the challenges and tensions young Billy faced whilst expressing his differences through ballet, a discipline seen outside his social class. Today this diversity of social classes within the performing arts industry is still prevalent. The CWC Performing Arts Centre aims to re-instate production into the colliery, whilst providing a platform to increase social mobility in the performing arts industry and diversifying the skill sets available to the communities of Stoke-on-Trent. The project is explored through key themes of; Production, Practice and Hospitality, ranging from the small scale box office through to the large scale workshops, whilst exploring the building from its rawest and truest form through to the clean-cut materiality of the proposed studios.

09 Emma Seaton - The Sleep Sanctuary The sleep sanctuary is a national research institute for innovative sleep therapy located in the abandoned Chatterley Whitfield Colliery. The project creates an architecture which is proto circadian, focusing on provision of routine and working to create highly temporal spaces, whilst using nature as an active agent for healing. The program explores the interface between institute and sanctuary; research and respite. Whilst the sanctuary is loadbearing masonry designed to provide a sense of enclosure, safety, security and permanence, the institute spaces are lightweight engineered timber, flexible, open and adaptable to future requirements and technologies. At the heart of scheme is the central courtyard, the junction between the new walls of the sanctuary and the existing walls of the boiler house where all elements of program unite.

06 John Chia - The Ragman Playhouse The phenomenological relationships between space, movement and time are explored through the architecture of site-specific performance in relation to the socio-historical context of the site. The thesis explores the boundaries within theatre and architecture; the real and imagined, past and present - and thus seeks to celebrate the ‘behind-the-scenes’ theatricality of both fields. The architectural concept for the design of the Ragman Playhouse is an archetypal scenic street. The design provides for a progression of performative spaces, from the gardens of the Boiler house, into an open courtyard, through the communal hub, which leads into the PlayPit. As one winds up the large openings at the end of the scenic street, one has a view of the undulating landscape of the countryside and coal spoil tips beyond. The scenic street will act as a testing ground for the ‘Wandering Wagons’ before they are proliferated beyond the site. The aim is to create a distinct architectural language, imbued with the spirit of the site’s industrial and technological past.

10 Dandan He - Museum of Excavation The project brings together a series of tools used in the process of coal mining and creates an underground exhibition experience. The scheme focuses on creating exhibition spaces in accordance with the size and character of the objects. The three main exhibition spaces get bigger and deeper from near to far as the exhibits get bigger, newer and more advanced. A circulation slot underground connects these spaces with ramps and stairs. Meanwhile, the roof of these spaces serve as the extended landscape zone for the site. With a clear and straightforward scheme, the project explores dynamic environments for each space by laying contrast of darkness and brightness, of scales and materiality of spaces.

07 Antonia Alexandru (MALA) - Chatterley Whitfield Gallery The project brings together concepts of landscape memory, revealing the hidden layers of history at Chatterley Whitfield Colliery, the relationship between architecture and the landscape and bioremediation. The project revolves around the idea of removal - from the removal of coal when the colliery was active, and subsequently the scars it left in the landscape, to the removal of contaminants from the site, which now allows the landscape to heal and regrow. The project is formed of 5 elements - the landscape, the cutting, the courtyard, the gallery and the tower, with each element connecting to and framing views towards the landscape and the colliery. Chatterley Whitfield Gallery aims to provide its visitors with insight into how the colliery used to work and the changes it went through, while showcasing elements from the site that are removed through the remediation strategy. 08 Karolina Kaminskaite - Chatterley Construction College The project, driven by the derelict condition and the materiality of the site, proposes a college curriculum which focuses on steel and brick construction and the repair of existing buildings meaning that in a sense, the colliery would regenerate itself. It seeks to build upon the history of making and apprenticeships on site, while at the same time responding to current issues in Stoke-on-Trent, such as low job density, poor GCSE performance and the need for colleges to plan technical pathways that lead to high quality progression routes including apprenticeships. The identity of the college is built around promoting conservation and traditional building craft expertise and knowledge exchange between four user groups: students, construction workers, a volunteer organisation currently operating on site, the Friends of Chatterley Whitfield, and the public.

11 Samuel Letchford - The Chatterley Platform Following on from Stoke-On-Trent’s bid to become City of Culture 2021, The Chatterley Platform capitalises on the celebratory optimism expressed during the city of culture campaign, providing a headquarters for the future conception, planning, management, and execution of cultural events in Stoke. Positioned along a defining axis within the site, the project forms the next ‘temporal chapter’ in the ever-changing evolution of the colliery. Envisioning Chatterley Whitfield Colliery as a future ‘events campus’, The Chatterley Platform acts as a catalyst for the rejuvenation of the colliery, providing a point of arrival from which an iterative building programme can develop over time, gradually re-introducing Chatterley Whitfield to the cultural landscape of Stoke-On-Trent. 12 Carrie Yin - Filmmaker This project is a communication center for filmmaking and TV production, building upon a recent history of filming on the colliery site along with communication traditions of the mine. The form of the building consists of three slightly shifted blocks, responding to geological seams hidden beneath the colliery surface, and establishing a central courtyard within. The proposal acts as a new gateway to the colliery site, with its interior spaces experiencing a series of visual links back to the colliery and out to the landscape beyond.

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LARGE SCALE STEEL CONSTRUCTION PRACTICE

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VIEW OVER BOILERHOUSE SPRING EARLY MORNING

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Live Projects Since 1999, 1700 Sheffield School of Architecture students have delivered over 190 Live Projects across 15 different countries. This year 200 students worked on 13 projects, 12 sited across the north of England and 1 in Brussels. Projects were sited in rural and urban locations and addressed issues of community cohesion, social engagement, heritage, recreation and regeneration. The projects start with an open brief and, through close collaboration between students and their community partners, they developed into a diverse range of outcomes including detailed designs for buildings, participation toolkits, urban strategies and built structures. Running for the first 6 weeks of the academic year, Live Projects bring together Masters students from the MArch and MAAD courses. Students work in groups to produce built and strategic design solutions for real clients with a particular emphasis on community participation and collaborative working. The Live Project programme is widely recognised as an innovative form of teaching within UK architectural education, offering students at SSoA the opportunity to test design ideas in a real-world context not offered on such a sustained level by any other architecture school. Live Projects celebrate the value of meaningful engagement with diverse groups of people, to broaden the potential of architecture as a driver for positive change. The public presentation day, held at St Mary’s Church in the city centre, and attended by clients, was a celebration of collaboration, creativity and the power of ideas in the real world. SSoA continues to work with many of our Live Project clients, outside the curriculum, through our project office Live Works.

01 The Ashton Platform Mentor: Jo Lintonbon Xiang Ren Client: Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council Location: Ashton-under-Lyne, Tameside, Greater Manchester Students: Mark Stancombe, Nathaniel Powell, Joanna Poxon, Louise Taylor, Andreas Tsestos, Yixin Zhang, Xiaoxiao Zhao, Yuanxin Gu, Ethan He, Rouqing Li, Jiacong Ma, Beth Mamicha, Joseph McKibben, Rachael Moon, Keeley Newell The Ashton Platform weaved the voices of the people of Ashton into a creative vision for the future of the town. Working in collaboration with Placeshakers, the team carried out a number of engagement events in Ashton, collecting stories, opinions and visions for the future. This engagement research process formulated one of the key outcomes – the Platform for Engagement. This ‘how to’ guide, a toolkit of recipes for creative engagement, was designed to capture the voices of everybody in the town. Alongside this set of tactics, the team made use of their research and the results of the engagement events to form a sequence of visions for the future of Ashton, involving artists, events and architectural projects. This formed the Platform for Action, an inventive guidance document to allow the council to act on the perceptions and ideas of Ashton’s people. 02 CRBC Live Mentor: John-Paul Walker, David Pogson Client: Mike Green, Cemetery Road Baptist Church Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire Students: Mengzhou Chen, Chayakorn Chulasai, Yulei Wang, Ziru Wang, Zhao Chen, Steven Msowoya, Hongcheng Yin, Deborah Adler, Daniel Anderson, Benjamin Bradish, Theodore Roseland, Christopher Scaplehorn, Cameron Shackley, Connor Kendrick, Helen Galletti Cemetery Road Baptist Church is a grade II listed church and community building within Sheffield’s city centre. The team were presented with a brief to refine and expand the church’s community involvement, as well as to provide design ideas for improving the church’s financial situation. The team was to integrate with an architect and design team throughout the process. CRBC Live assumed multiple roles within this matrix, analysing CRBC as both a religious assembly and community loci, and its prospects for future development in both regards. By hosting two large community events within the church, the team invited both church members and non-members alike to consider and record their integration with the place. Outputs from this project included a mapping and process document, toolkit and manual for participatory engagement, spatial proposals, marketing and promotion strategies, alongside the construction of a timber pagoda entranceway.

03 The Great Pier Mentor: Bryan Davies Client: Kate Dore, Yorkshire Artspace; Bally Johal, Bal Fashions Speakeasy Location: Castlegate, Sheffield, South Yorkshire Students: Nigel Hassell, David Hodgson, Nicolas Heppner, Ellen Peirce, Sacha Bennett-Ford, Samantha Mooney, Jaimie Claydon, Stella Tse, Liuqing Yang, Yingran Qu, Jianbin Zheng, Xiaoyu Jie, Yitong Guan, Evangeline Martin, Glenn Spiby The story of The Great Pier starts where the Great Castle of Sheffield once towered tall and the rivers Sheaf and Don collide. This is a spectacularly unique location, where archaeologists, artists, entrepreneurs and folk from all the land collide in merriment of what came before and anticipation of what’s yet to come. The Great Pier itself stretches heroically above the castle ruins. Its majestic red rachis leads adventurers along a transformative journey to one of its two equally as red snouts. Transcended through time by magic and sorcery, a simple gaze through our telescopes is wont to fracture the present, revealing Sheffield Castle, the archaeological dig and potential prospects. On completion of your inquisitive voyage, The Great Pier’s familiar red spine leads you back to the lively milieu of Exchange Street where you are requested to meet like-minded explorers for a drink or two back at Bal Fashions speakeasy. 04 Harmony Works Mentor: Russell D. Light, John Jeong Client: Sheffield Music Academy & Sheffield Music Hub Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire Students: Tom Moore, Shushu Cai, Ashley Mayes, Emma Warbrick, Jialin Pan, Ifigenia Ioannou, Will Kreibich, Jack Flynn, Stephani Porfyriou, Tiantian Xie, Mingming Han, Abderrahman Ech-chikh, Xiao Chen, Tuyang Liu, Jingyi Liu, Xiao Chen Harmony Works proposed an exciting new centre for music education and performance in the city through occupation of an empty historic building. This centre would embody the shared belief that Sheffield should be striving to provide access for young people from all backgrounds to a musical education. The project was cultivated around a shared narrative, beginning with the idea of ‘music factory’, rooting the hub in the fabric of Sheffield through adaptive insertions and creative demolition. The tram network was re-imagined as a travelling music venue, entertaining passengers, raising awareness and giving the students an audience and explored through a ‘Tram Jam’, using performance to gather public feedback. Collaboration with the clients and end users enabled the production of a tool kit for accessing funding necessary to manifest the project, comprising of a document detailing process, a series of posters, an animation and a collection of workshop outcomes with the students. 11


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

05 Made in Brussels Mentor: Simon Baker Client: Jan Zaman, Brussels Department of Planning & Mark Brearley, Atelier Master Location: Brussels, Belgium Students: Ives Ma, Oliver Millett, Sara Lage, Tom Wakelam, Polina Zharkova, Naomi Bailey, Jamie Griffiths, Junzi Yuwen, Ningning Ye, Leanne Robinson, Michael McGuinness, Mengxia Hu, Heng Qiu, Raluca Burlaca The team worked with urban planning experts and the Brussels Government with the aim of generating ideas for how to intensify industry within Brussels. This work fed into a series of workshops involving various experts in both England and Belgium, and feeds into a larger body of work by Atelier Brussels. 9 key design principles were identified at the beginning of the project to clearly define parameters for the team’s approach to intensification. The team focused on three sites in the Southern Senne Valley and developed three detailed proposals that utilised different methods in order to double the amount of industry on each site. The 3 key strategies identified were “Build Up”, “Build Out” and “Infill”, which were applied to each site after detailed analysis of key characteristics and area use. The design toolkit was then applied to a fourth site identified by the client in order to test and modify the approach. 06 Moorfoot Link Mentor: Leo Care, Jasmine Chadha Client: The Labour Party Planning Polic Location: Moorfoot, Sheffield, South Yorkshire Students: Tom Hart, Josie Dorling, Kun Shen, Claire Yu, Cosma Allen, Dandan He, Juan Ruiz, Peter Dykes, Cheney Huang, Frank Sun, Guangda Hou, Harvey Huang, Matthew Huang, Tom Cunningham, Holly Wilkinson The reestablishment of a direct link between London Road to The Moor has been discussed for a number of years, with no concrete plans being formed. The site is divided by Sheffield’s inner ring road, and currently pedestrians either have to cross a wide road or travel through a narrow underpass, creating both a physical and perceived separation between London Road and The Moor. The team started with two public consultation events to help determine the priority of needs for the design process and build a sense of community ownership over the project, which received close to 200 responses. The team then developed a three-phased design: the first phase enhances the current urban realm and can be implemented immediately so that positive change can occur as soon as possible. The second phase expands the urban realm creating a new public space via two options; either retaining or removing the underpass. The third phase demonstrates the potential that the urban realm expansion has on redeveloping the surrounding area. 07 Penistone LIVE! Mentor: Daniel Jary, John Jeong Client: Fiona O’Brien and Stephen Miller, Barnsley Council Location: Penistone, South Yorkshire Students: Zuzanna Antczak, Praneet Bhullar, Yijun Chen, Matthew Drewitt, Farhana Jiwa, Emma Koch, Hao Li, Heng Lu, Zihao Lu, Azim Rahman, Maria Ramos, Jessica Rees, Kenny Sham, Rebecca Smith, Anna White, Benjamin Yeates, Min Zhang Working with the local council and community, PenistoneLIVE! identified the problems currently facing the town and developed proposals in the form of a toolkit for the council to use to enhance Penistone’s future. This toolkit is based on a ‘3R’s’ strategy – Reconnect, Rebrand, Reuse. In ‘Reconnect’, the team proposed two new wayfinding routes through the town with new, creative signposting. Penistone was also lacking an identity as its traditional

market culture is declining. In ‘Rebrand’ the team created a future identity focusing on the unique Penistone Paramount cinema via a logo and various graphical templates for marketing future events and the town as a whole. Thirdly, PenistoneLIVE! identified key buildings throughout the town that suffer from underuse and a lack of qualities and facilities. In ‘Reuse’, architectural interventions are proposed to solve these problems and enhance the value of these buildings within the community. 08 Sheffield Housing Conversation Mentor: Tatjana Schneider, Goran Vodicka Client: South Yorkshire Housing Association Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire Students: Bole Liu, Cherry Poon, Qiutan Zeng, Peiyao He, Karolina Kaminskaite, Clare Mckay, Yang Yan, Yi Tang, Yanni Pitsillides, Cristina Carcanescu, Tse Ling Law, Maha Komber, Hannah Towler, Marita Nilsen, Daniela Caruntu Working with the Sheffield Housing Conversation Collective, the Live Projects team worked to make connections with other key housing stakeholders in Sheffield, introducing more diverse voices to the conversation to reach a larger proportion of Sheffield’s population. These efforts concluded with the organisation of a re-launch event where the team’s findings were presented to all involved stakeholders. The team analysed the findings from participation activities in order to produce constituency specific data, enabling direct discussion with local MP’s and councillors around issues specific to their local area. The social media presence of the collective was expanded and the team produced a proposal for the Sheffield Housing Conversation’s website to become the ‘one stop shop’ for housing in Sheffield. Two ‘OnCampus’ placements were set up with the University, which will continue the work the students started, widening the collective’s network and analysing feedback from different community groups on the key housing issues in Sheffield today. 09 Stocksbridge Live Mentor: John Sampson, Stany Babu Client: Andy Clarke, 4SLC Trust Ltd Location: Stocksbridge, South Yorkshire Students: Christophe Dembinski, Laura Spence, Grace Laurie, Stephanie Bott, Josh Brookes, Mollie Dale-Collen, Emily Glynn, Jiaen Li, Gonglin Li, Chengbei Li, Siteng Lin, Caroline Green, Bethany Willis, Gopi Nath, Monsicha Simpattananont Stocksbridge Live Project aimed to help SCLC unlock the business potential of Stocksbridge Leisure Centre by tackling problem areas in the existing building, and highlighting opportunities to rejuvenate life and activity into the forgotten community asset of Oxley Park. The proposal improved the building’s programming of space to become more inclusive for existing and future users, integrating the leisure centre with the rejuvenation of Oxley Park to enhance the identity of both. The project engaged with a variety of community groups to identify how this close-knit community could contribute to the sustainable delivery and future management of the two community assets whilst building support for the project. These consultations shaped the team’s proposals into an achievable yet aspirational scheme which was presented to stakeholders at a final presentation. Alongside this, a series of documents were handed over to the client containing research, consultation data and detailed proposals to aid 4SLC in gaining the funding required to deliver this vision.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

10 Tinsley For Us Mentor: Satwinder Samra, Xiang Ren Client: Tinsley Forum Location: Tinsley, Sheffield, South Yorkshire Students: Yue Chen, Zhaohan Huang, Yixuan Li, Heyi Zhang, Sanjukta Jitendhar, Yuqi Zhao, Zuozhi Liu, Richard Rothwell, Jingwen Zhang, Chris Cooper, Simona Petraityte, Rosanna Sutcliffe, Martynas Vielavicius, Jennifer MacFadyen ‘Tinsley For Us’ Live Project team explored the options of how a library facility could be included within the Tinsley Forum. In addition to developing the project brief, the team engaged in an iterative process that included consultation with a wide range of stakeholders and the holding of public events and presentations to test ideas. The Live Project team proposed small, medium and large-scale options for redevelopment that utilise the functions and requirements of a library to enhance the existing Forum. The Tinsley Forum has a long-term relationship with Tingas (space for local business), which is currently run by Studio Polpo. The Live Project team analysed the strategic relationship between these parties, whilst being conscious of not interfering with the work already produced by Studio Polpo. Outcomes produced by the team included the costing and feasibility study of including the library in the Forum, the setting of of a website and ‘how to use’ guide, alongside general wayfinding strategies and event analysis. 11 Umbrella Factory Mentor: Carolyn Butterworth, Danni Kerr Client: Theatre Deli Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire Students: Mansel Haynes, Luke Moran, Banah Rashid, Bianca Man Carmen Lee, Baicen Zhou, Antonia Alexandru, Samuel Letchford, Matthew Forbes – Yandi, Christie Tan, James Harrington, Adam Tarasewicz, Chang Sui, Jian Chen, Jinwen Shangguan, Linna Yuan, Ning Li The Umbrella Factory is a playful, cross-disciplinary project exploring the links between drama and space, through the medium of immersive theatre. Supporting Theatre Deli on their new venture into the city, the team proposed a series of playful investigations to resolve issues surrounding the move of location to a new premises on Moorfoot, alongside strategies to publicise and engage further with the local community. The PROP (Pink Rollable Operating Pop-up), a public engagement tool used to facilitate a new level of dialogue between Theatre Deli and the wider public, was created as a means to maximise outreach, whilst disused areas of the premises were renovated using upcycled materials found on site. Finally, the team worked in close collaboration with the clients to produce building strategy proposals and visions for the future of Theatre Deli.

communities, becoming a valuable natural resource for local people. A plan of projects across the site prioritised scale and user groups, ensuring sustainable development in response to the unpredictable nature of funding. Design proposals for educational, volunteering and recreational use formed the most immediate series of interventions. The team held building workshops, joined in on volunteer days and took part in a bat walk on the reserve. These activities enabled the team to interrogate the various needs of the stakeholders, forming crucial knowledge which informed the proposed designs. 13 Zest For the Future Mentor: Mark Parsons, Aimman Mohdrashid Client: Matt Dean, Zest Community Centre Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire Students: Ylann Amand Reghai, Petros Antoniou, Guy Bridgewood, Monty Dobney, Matthew Evans, Thomas Hattan, Laura Postlethwaite, Benjamin Powell, Junqi Shen, Yi Shi, Kimbo, Fidelo Sito, Caroline Williams, Shaohua Xue, Tian Yuan, Yan Zhang Zest for the Future focuses on the revitalisation of the Zest Community Centre, providing a vision for the future as a creative catalyst within the community, whilst also creating design proposals which focused on attaining funding. The project brief involved aligning the needs of the Community Centre with funders. Together with the client and volunteers, the team’s output was displayed publicly for comment from the community and suggestions added continuously to refine the brief. This developed into a design centred around the focus of funding. Each phase of design catering to different fund sources and their requirements. The Live Project team delivered a feasibility document that helped Zest to communicate their ideas to the wider community, architects and potential funders. The document contains the wide breadth of research to define what the grand scheme could or should be. It demonstrates how participation with stakeholders can be undertook and applied to enrich the outcome.

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12 Wild WEB Mentor: Howard Evans, Danni Kerr Client: Idle Valley Nature Reserve, Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust Location: Retford, Nottinghamshire Students: Andy Tee Qi Xian, Ania Wozniczka-Wells, Anna Barring, Bradley Sumner, Celine Chan, Yue Zhao, Cressy Lopez, Emma Seaton, John Chia, Josh Frend, Lian Tee, Chu Long Liu, Melissa Kirkpatrick, Jinbo Su, Zhangxiufu Wu, Wenyue Wang, Xianyu Zhang The Wild WEB project is Idle Valley Nature Reserve’s development plan for 2017 to 2022. This collaboration with Live Projects happened early in Stage 1 of the Wild WEB project, building up to their bid for funding. The project focused on the need to open up the reserve to a wider range of user groups as well as to better provide for the people who already use the reserve. There was a desire to improve connections with local 10


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

MArch Dissertation The MArch dissertation is a critical written study on an architectural subject chosen by the student and undertaken with expert advice from the staff. It is seen as an opportunity to investigate an aspect of architecture in which the student is interested and would like to explore in more depth. The dissertation should contribute to the subject area through reasoning and critical analysis and may involve original research. Topics usually fall within the following subject range: architectural theory, architectural history, environment and technology, architectural practice, representation, landscape architecture and urban design. The dissertation offers students the opportunity to research, organise and produce an extended piece of mostly written work over the course of the year. Students often use their dissertation as a theoretical foundation for the design research of the Y6 thesis project. Sheffield is one of the few schools of architecture that still offers students the chance to undertake dissertations in both undergraduate and masters degrees. The quality and range of work is remarkable, producing richness, rigour and variety, and demonstrating a wide range of research methodologies, analytical and presentation techniques.

Co-ordinators Jian Kang Carolyn Butterworth Featured dissertations Aesthetics of Sustainable Architecture Rachael Moon The Neighbourhood and the World Maria Ramos Reclaiming Housing Christopher Cooper


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Aesthetics of Sustainable Architecture How can the image of sustainability be categorised and encompassed by a holistic design philosophy? Rachael Moon Rachael’s choice of subject for this study stems from a general concern about the effects of rapid transformations on the production of the built environment, connected to advancements characterising the current era. Such developments underline a growing consciousness of worldwide environmental concerns. As a result, it can be said that the architectural profession has been impacted upon, the topic of sustainability somewhat embedded within the discipline’s discourse and practice (Lee 2011, p. 7). Of concern, however, is the fact that ‘green’ design rarely features among what we name ‘great’ design, as highlighted by the Vanity Fair (2010). This study outlines the need for a new approach to sustainable design. The important role that aesthetics can offer the subject is explored through literature, a theoretical study and practical case study analysis. In harnessing the power of imagery, architecture holds the capacity to act as an agent of change: a transformational opportunity in dealing with the challenge of sustainability in the modern era. Green design must become synonymous with good design in order for the sustainability movement to sustain itself. The research outcome defines a new cohesive aesthetic philosophy or paradigm for sustainable architecture, to better equip designers in the challenge of sustainability without being restrictive.

01 The front of this dissertation features a manifesto drawing visualising the themes covered in this study: a timeline, bringing to the forefront the many styles of sustainable architecture. The drawing highlights ideas of beauty and delight, from John Ruskin and Marcus Vitruvius Pollio respectively, asserting qualities that may be related to aesthetics and therefore relevant to this study. The 1970s marked a public consciousness of harmful human processes established by the Industrial Revolution, shown in the centre of the drawing. Architecturally, this period brought about major transformation. Before the growth of heavy industry and new possibilities for architecture, building was restricted to localised materials, forms and technology - what we now term vernacular. Lessons for sustainability can be learned from traditional techniques today.

03 01 Efforts to classify the ‘homogeneous categorisation of green design’ are made in the research by exploring a literature context. This is the basis upon which case studies are selected. Quantitative performance data still remains with an important role in validating the effectiveness of sustainable strategies, hence both examples chosen satisfy various assessment standards. At one end of the scale is the ‘natural image’ expressed by St Michael’s Hospice, Hereford by Architype. At the other is the ‘technical image’ exhibited by Siemens HQ, Abu Dhabi by Sheppard Robson. Both were AJ 100 Shortlisted Finalists for Sustainable Practice of the Year. The case studies are evaluated in terms of approach, material choice and environmental strategies. The analysis tests certain criteria extracted from a literature review and falls under the headings of conservation, symbiosis, visibility and differentiation. It may be observed that both examples go further than satisfying quantitative assessment standards and embody new visions.

02 The many manifestations of ‘sustainability’:

The criterion visibility deals with architecture as visible reality, a consideration of expressing environmental objectives to some degree of consciousness. For St. Michael’s Hospice, sustainability is visible in its most traditional sense, incorporating a more benign version of nature into the building and its immediate context. Natural building materials used and proximity to biodiverse surroundings connect the building to nature in its most tangible form. The Siemens Headquarters resultant expression directly reflects its operation. A trust in science and technology produces the aesthetic of the building, much like the characteristics of high modernism. A different contract is entered into with nature, one which deals with its natural processes such as the path of the sun, without a reflection of natural physical matter. Sustainable strategies of efficiency and conservation are represented through high-tech means of production.

d. Hockerton Housing Project, Brenda vale and Dr Robert Vale Architects

a. Gambian vernacular shed b. Siemens HQ, Abu Dhabi by Sheppard Robson c. Bahrain World Trade Centre by Atkins

e. Taos Pueblo, New Mexico, US f. Apple HQ, California, US, by Norman Foster 03 Texts featuring discussions of aesthetics and sustainability

A new sustainable aesthetic philosophy is generated to acknowledge that a ‘one approach fits all’ cannot be used here. This concerns design with an aesthetic focus. Through using strategies upon a scale from ‘low tech’ means and vernacular principles, to ‘high tech’ means and contemporary principles, a resultant image is tended towards.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

The Neighbourhood and the World KEY AMINITIES point of greatest contact between the residents of both sides

What role do artistic interventions play in the urban regeneration of marginalised neighbourhoods? A Case Study of the Urban Art Festival of Bairro Padre Cruz Maria Ramos Maria’s interest in this social housing neighbourhood originated from attending the MURO Street Art Festival and frequenting multiple guided street art tours around the city. Her dissertation allows for a deeper investigation in these urban narratives, specifically in context of urban regeneration and placemaking. To date, very little has been written about the creative regeneration process and the small academic contributions that exist often lack critical evaluation through a post-occupancy study and “through which artists and designers can interrogate their practice”. (Malcolm Miles, Art, Space and the City: Public Art and Urban Futures, 1997)

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Bairro da Horta Nova Since the Portuguese Carnation Revolution, in April 1974, street art has been used as a tool to express social grievances and political criticism. The imagery depicted is ultimately a reflection of the country in the perspective of the most disadvantaged. Recently, a marginalized social housing neighbourhood in the periphery of the capital, Bairro Padre Cruz, underwent a government initiative for urban regeneration through an artistic intervention program, an event called MURO Street Art Festival. It was proposed as a creative agency to foster social, political and economic progress.

inexpensively and its ease of installation. Even though creative interventions don’t offer a complete urban development strategy, rehabilitation through traditional planning mechanisms don’t necessarily create fundamental conditions for a deprived community to become better integrated. By critiquing the processes and effects behind public art programs, this dissertation aims to explore these urban narratives in more detail and how, in today’s increasingly globalized society, we can aim to integrate communities through low budget regeneration projects.

The urban art has made the neighbourhood a not so typical tourist destination and it now brings many new visitors from around the country and abroad to an area of the city that was once reserved to African immigrant communities. Bairro Padre Cruz has now arrived to the world.

The critical position taken is one of highlighting architects, artists and designers as enablers of the fundamental need for human expression and ultimately facilitate communication between inhabitants, professionals of the built environment and city authorities.

Walls are usually synonymous with creating separation, but in several cases walls painted with art break these barriers through three ways:

01 Artistic Methods for Community Production

- Self-expression and the promotion of dialogue - Easing social tensions - Contributing to a sense of belonging in society This media gives a voice to the voiceless by providing artists a platform to speak on their behalf and to question political and economic decisions made by authorities. Through exploring sitespecific street art and the effects on the immediate community, this dissertation will evaluate the importance of this visual selfexpression in establishing an identity for the residents and being a platform for activism. Creative interventions generally take place in a context of perceived urban decay due to its capacity to regenerate space

Carnide Cemetry

Bairro de S. José

Much critical commentary belongs to non-peer reviewed public media. These are tainted with political agendas and do not depict a unbiased evaluation of the project. The role of creativity in urban regeneration and economic development have also been separated from debates on the future of cities due to its makeshift nature.

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Reclaiming Housing A Study into the Potential of Long-Term Land Finance Models to Increase Housing Diversity Chris Cooper Having worked in the residential sector of architectural practice for two years in London, Chris has been exposed to the shortcomings of the UK’s housing policy from all sides. His attitudes have been developed and framed through working with developers keen on maximising profit by driving down quality and affordable quotas, whilst designing flats which require occupants taking on extortionate personal debt to afford. Often these are in areas with few opportunities for work where exorbitant transport is required. Living in a room rented for 40% of his monthly income surrounded by others who view this predicament as ‘the norm’ has driven Chris to believe there must be a viable alternative. This study aims to identify and explore potential models for the UK to diversify housing supply, giving agency to those who currently are locked into a system of high rents, low savings, and unaffordable house prices. Understanding the political, social, and economic context of how we arrived at where we are is the first step along the path. Ultimately, the study aims to understand and develop housing models which secure long-term, genuinely affordable investment for sustainable housing. While acknowledging that these proposals are not silver bullets able to resolve our housing crisis on their own, they ought, however, to be seen as part of a wider armoury with which our homogenised and oligopolised housing system ought to be challenged for our collective long-term good. 04

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The UK’s suffers a long-term housing supply shortage. The Government’s recent White Paper, ‘Fixing our Broken Housing Market’, published in February 2017 contains scathing reviews on the UK’s effectiveness to affordably and effectively house our population from both the Prime Minister and Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government. This is a chronic issue. On average 65000-115 000 fewer homes are built annually than required since the 1970s. There has been specific recent focus on diversifying housing delivery, recognising that having the 10 largest house-builders responsible for delivering 60% of new homes is unhealthy for our housing stock, limiting choice for a growing number of people. This thesis focuses on political and economic issues over the aesthetic. I will attempt to identify and summarise the existing development context, and will then propose alternative housing models. As architecture is inherently political, with direct relation

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to prevailing ideology and economics of its time, it is important to understand and critique architectural context in these terms. To achieve a situation where housing is suitably designed, located, and priced for all would require an immense paradigm shift in national economic attitudes. With the UK economy and personal finances so closely tied into the housing market, any policy change which would dramatically threaten to reduce house prices would be infeasible. Instead I intend to look at what can be done to change the discourse in political thinking to move in a direction which facilitates greater agency and freedom over our housing options in this country, enabling more affordable, adaptive, and diverse architectures to arise alongside the dominant speculative model. This is with the aim of aiding a cultural shift towards alternative models, away from the speculative, repetitive “smaller, faster, cheaper” housing which currently saturates the new-build options available in the UK.

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Focus will be on the potential of long-term financial models operated by both Public and Private sectors to provide more genuinely affordable housing, for rent and ownership. This dissertation is written with a belief in creating a built environment which works effectively for all, providing opportunity in an economic system where labour, rather than accretion of capital is the primary driver of increased prosperity. We have speculated ourselves into a housebuilding oligopoly and felt its damaging effects on social equality, intergenerational wealth imbalance, and economic stagnation for the past 40 years, in an unfortunately predictable and increasingly acute cycle of boom and bust. It is time to speculate an alternative.

01 Existing Speculative Development Model. Adapted from Parvin 02 Proposed Model 2: Reformed Private Leasehold Structure 03 Proposed Model 3: Development through Local Authority Development Organisation 04 Proposed Financial Loop, Model 3: Finances Reinvested and Quality Improved Through Managed Development


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

MArch Architecture: Collaborative Practice The University of Sheffield’s School of Architecture (SSoA) continues to place itself at the forefront of architectural education with our Collaborative Practice Part 2 Architecture course, now in its third year. We now have over 35 leading UK practices onboard and we have received positive feedback from both employers and students alike. Collaborative Practice is a full time course, which blends a reflective practice based experience with academic research and learning. The route is a 2 year program where Year 1 (Year 5 of the architecture route) is based in Practice with the student employed 4 days a week. Year 2 (Year 6 of the Architecture route) is based back in Sheffield. The work produced is a testament to the enthusiasm, commitment and tenacity displayed by both our pioneering cohorts and our collaborative practices.

Director of Collaborative Practice Satwinder Samra From practice, thank you to: Paul Monaghan, AHMM Jo Bacon, Allies and Morrison Simon Fraser, Allies and Morrison John Assael, Assael Architecture Richard Coutts, BACA Denise Bennetts, Bennetts Associates Chris Harding, BDP Andrew Smith, BDP Stephen Marshall, BDP Katie Parsons, BPTW Bruce Raw, Bond Bryan Jonathan Herbert, Bond Bryan Joe Witchell, Broadway Malyan Andy Groarke, Carmody Groarke Kevin Carmody, Carmody Groarke Lukas Barry, Carmody Groarke Neil Michels, Carmody Groarke Phillip Graham, Cullinan Studio Helen Roberts, FCB Studios Andrew Thomas, Grimshaw Harbinder Birdi, Hawkins\Brown Roger Hawkins, Hawkins\Brown

Edmund Harrison Gray, Hawkins\Brown Rebecca Watts, Hawkins\Brown Tom Hudson, Hawkins\Brown Dan Tassell, Haworth Tompkins Martin Lyndon, Haworth Tompkins Karen Mosley, HLM Ben Derbyshire, HTA Caroline Dove, HTA Spencer Guy, Levitate Matthew Goulcher, Levitt Bernstein Jo McCafferty, Levitt Bernstein Richard Lavington, MacreanorLavington Karen Henderson, MacreanorLavington Stuart Blower, MAKE Guy Barlow, Manser Practice Annalie Riches, Mikhail Riches David Mikhail, Mikhail Riches Simon Robinson, MSMR Greg Penoyre, Penoyre and Prasad Stephen Proctor, Proctor and Matthews Andrew Matthews, Proctor and Matthews Mike Stiff, Stiff Trevillion Dan Campbell, Stiff Trevillion Ivan Harbour, Rogers Stirk Harbour Simon Davies, Rogers Stirk Harbour Andrew Mortimer, RMA

00A Collaborative Practice cohort at Hawkins\Brown London 01 Raluca Burlacu - The Creative Academy Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios The project represents a critique of the Britannia masterplan designed by FCB Studios. The masterplan is composed of residential units, a new secondary school and a new leisure centre. The alternative brief formulates a critique of the Britannia school brief requirements and it explores an alternative to school design focused on social learning and community interaction. The project proposes a number of shared spaces amongst which school sits at the heart of the development , bringing the community together. The school therefore becomes a centre of making, engaging and displaying. It is a place for emerging businesses as well as artist studios and residency programs, ultimately acting as a catalyst for the development of the area. 02 Cristina Caranescu - Battersea Arts Centre, Reimagined Haworth Tompkins Haworth Tompkins have been working alongside the Battersea Arts Centre team, the local community and theatre artists for over a decade on a series of ongoing projects that are gradually transforming the building into a powerhouse of creative communal activity and a record of the building’s vivid history. My alternative design approach is placed in 2015 and embraces the Playgrounding methodology, the practice of applying the ideas of Scratch to the architectural process. It places the artists and audiences at

John Sampson, URBED Tony Skipper, 5plus David Gloster, RIBA Education Stephanie Beasley, Suffolk RIBA Education Alex Maxwell, RIBA Grant Dyble, ARB Emma Matthews, ARB From SSoA, thank you to: Carolyn Butterworth Leo Care Andrea Chambers Sam Dobrinski Sam Guest Karim Hadjri Ian Hicklin Aidan Hoggard Dan Jary Sara Lancashire Russell Light Jo Lintonbon Alex Maxwell Allanah Millsom John Sampson Ralph Mackinde

the centre of the architectural process, where ideas developed collaboratively are being tested through a series of low cost investments. Through this project, I explored how the building might develop over time.

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03 Thomas Cunningham - The Thames (Our River) Hawkins\Brown Thames Tideway Tunnel is a major infrastructure project in London that will clean up the River Thames whilst creating new public realm in key sites along the river. This project interrogates London’s changing relationship with the Thames over the 50 years clean-up period, exploring how infrastructure can bring joy and character in riverside public realm in 2068. The landscape is uninterrupted by a gridded station structure, allowing views and routes through from the city to the river. This station reimagines our current infrastructure usage, exploring how technological and societal changes will shape the way we travel in the future.

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04 Matthew Drewitt - Tower Hamlets Civic Centre and Cultural Hub AHMM The Tower Hamlets Civic Centre and Cultural Hub is an extensive campus of buildings in London’s Former Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel. The site will house both a new civic centre and offices for up to 3000 council staff, alongside a reimagined Institute for the Borough, Museum and Royal London Hospital Archive. It is hoped the broad redevelopment and creation of a micro-campus in the heart of Whitechapel will continue the regenerative legacy Crossrail has catalysed in the surrounding areas. 02


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

05 Connor Kendrick - The Marconi Works, Chelmsford RMA The original story had the site bought by a major house developer who along with the firm I work for developed a master planning scheme for several hundred apartments and houses to help address the city’s lack of new housing stock. My personal iteration of the scheme has it that the site was bought by the local University whom wanted to extend their campus to this site. Their provisos for obtaining this site that they to retain the character and history of the existing buildings and take on some new stakeholders. The proposed scheme for the university has a programme where new structures interact with the existing creating spaces not only for student’s but for the locals to interact and spend time in. These spaces are created using a new path though the site which links the University Campus and the northern part of the city to the City Centre and the local train station. 06 Melissa Kirkpatrick - Ransome’s Wharf Reimagined MSMR This project uses MSMR Architects’ Ransome’s Wharf scheme as a starting point, and pushes the boundaries of a typical residential scheme in London, exploring the potential for urban farming to play a role in city based communities. The design speculates on what might benefit London dwellers in the future, using the Mayor of London’s future strategy as a framework. This includes networks linking green space around the city, access to a botanical ‘oasis’ to benefit wellbeing and the inclusion of vertical farms in new build residential schemes which use natural resources such as rainwater collection to allow communities to be self-sufficient and healthy. The project shows that sustainable living and healthy, happy communities can be possible whilst building densely in the city. 07 Tobias Mackrill - Mission-Led Living Cullinan Studio The project is the redesign of Cullinan Studio’s competition entry to design student accommodation in Cambridge. My alternative iteration performs a critique of the architectural competition, touching on the lack of client, consultant and prospective user participation during the design process. Much like the Collaborative Practice course, the scheme accommodates learning structures that bridge the gap between education and professional practice. The building programme emerged following exploration of the impact on future student accommodation if the University of Cambridge adopted Stanford University’s Mission-Led Learning model. This concept proposes that students have six years of study, which they can undertake at any point in their life, following a mission rather than a set curriculum. In compliance with this method of learning, my design caters for users of different ages, working in different ways with differing living dynamics. 08 Evangeline Martin - Rockingham Residence BDP This project reimagines the future of Rockingham Court, a 1970s red brick building originally intended for office use, developing BDPs design for South Yorkshire Housing Association’s new headquarters. ‘Rockingham Residence’ provides housing for Sheffield’s homeless, and on-site support for guidance through the journey to independent living, through group activities and facilities from cooking to gardening. Designed around an off-street public landscaped courtyard at ground floor level, residents are provided with a constant visual connection and sense of community, as this heart of the building echoes throughout the staggered atrium.

09 Kimbo Fidelo Site - Tameside Hospital (Deinstitutionalising Care) Levitt Bernstein Tameside Hospital has been amended and extended many times over the last 50 years. Often the additions are short sighted, focused on improving individual healthcare departments. The outcome of this has created a large sprawling building, confusing to navigate with many cellular rooms, undefined entrances and lack of natural light. Coupled with long waiting times and lack of amenity spaces, the existing hospital provides an unfriendly experience to its many users; staff, visitors, and patients. The proposed masterplan aims to revitalise and make the hospital feel less institutional by providing amenity spaces around the site that connects its users and the hospital to the wider community. It focuses on providing a better visiting, recovering, working experience and create a rehabilitative environment that puts an importance on both the health and the wellbeing of the many people it serves. 10 Adam Tarasewicz - Southall Waterside Levitt Bernstein The project attempts to develop an alternative residential scheme located in Southall, West Ealing. The proposal started with a design manifesto called “Sharing Makes Sense”. In the document divided into four chapters, I talked about design issues I chose to address: public realm, context, industry and housing. These four areas I identified are addressed in the designed proposal: Southall Place (a new contemplative secular landmark of Southall that addressed local demographics), Southall Reading Room (a public pocket that is connected to the colleges on site) and Southall House (a modern interpretation of South Asian typology of a shophouse). 11 Louise Taylor - Lancaster Castle Repository BDP This project reimagines the future of the Grade I listed Lancaster Castle as a publicly owned artifact, building on BDP’s 2016-18 conservation and redevelopment of the site for the Duchy of Lancaster. Lancaster Castle Repository positions the Medieval fortress and former HMP Prison as a museum of itself, allowing public access for the first time by proposing new visitor amenities, subterranean archives and exhibition space. The Repository will exhibit the array of ‘found’ objects rediscovered in archaeological excavation works during BDP’s scheme, whilst the new public space hosts cultural and educational events. 12 Bethany Willis - Social Sciences HLM The Social Sciences project is a new central hub for the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Sheffield and this new build will accommodate new learning and teaching spaces, a research hub, social learning spaces and faculty facilities. This module has created an opportunity to re-think the brief, look at key concepts and processes and design an alternative scheme driven by a series of ‘what if’s’ scenarios. What if the briefing stage was shorter, how would this affect the brief? What if I challenged the idea of standard academic offices and introduce much more flexible options? What if the project was more contextualised and complimented rather than contrast?

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Postgraduate Taught Masters The Sheffield School of Architecture offers four Postgraduate Taught Masters (PGT) programmes. These are built on the core strengths of academic staff and embody the School’s commitment to social and environmental responsibility in the design and production of the built environment. MA in Architectural Design (MAAD) MA in Urban Design (MAUD) MSc in Digital Architecture and Design (MSc DAAD) MSc in Sustainable Architecture Studies (MSc SAS) Each PGT programme prepares students with the academic and professional skills to further their career and the programmes are tailored to meet the special needs and interests of their students with flexible modular teaching. These range from research and practice in areas of experimental architectural design, participatory urban design, regeneration, sustainability and digital design. The PGT programmes aim to expose students to meaningful conversations and collaborations with researchers and professionals engaged in all aspects of design and the built environment. We emphasise the importance of allowing students to engage with cutting-edge research and innovation from across the full spectrum of architectural humanities, social sciences, building science, technology and design research. With this, we have an embedded studio culture within our taught and professional programmes making the school a thriving and creative place to be. Image to the right: MAAD students during their Marrakech fieldtrip. Director of Postgraduate Taught Masters Programmes Dr Florian Kossak Programme Leader MA in Architectural Design Dr Nishat Awan Dr Mark Meagher Programme Leader MA in Urban Design Dr Beatrice De Carli Programme Leader MSc in Digital Architecture and Design Dr Chengzhi Peng Programme Leaders MSc in Sustainable Architectural Studies Aidan Hoggard Dr Sofie Pelsmakers Programme Support Officer Allanah Millsom


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

MA in Architectural Design The MA in Architectural Design is a design-based Masters course focusing on knowledge of design approaches, processes and architectural research methodologies. It encourages students to develop a distinctive design practice, underpinned by a deep interest in social dynamics and architectural culture. The programme builds on the School of Architecture’s acclaimed research and teaching expertise in the area of architectural design, complementing the work done in ARB/RIBA acredited programmes of the school. These consider architectural design within a broad social, environmental and economic context. Students on the MA in Architectural Design programme are encouraged to explore, challenge, and inform contemporary architectural design practice through seminars, research, studio project work, field trips, and participation in design-led practice, teaching and learning innovations – for example the pioneering `Live Projects´. Students registered for the MA in Architectural Design will attend specific core modules. The studio work is an essential part of the MA in Architectural Design. Our thematic studios investigate architectural themes in depth, according to the studio tutors’ research interests. The aim is to consider design within the context of rigorous and innovative research. The core module Reflections on Architectural Design supports students in understanding the value of architectural research within the contemporary design framework and it relates directly to their studio work.

Course Directors Dr Nishat Awan Dr Mark Meagher Studio Tutors Meryem Gurel Akpezi Ikede Gihan Karunaratne Danni Kerr Cressida Kocienski Mark Meagher Xiang Ren Magda Sibley Helen Stratford Yingran Sun Renata Tyszczuk Amro Yaghi Guests/Collaborators Wen-Shao Chang Viviana Checchia Robert Evans Florian Kossak Xiang Ren Krzysztof Nawratek John Jeong Doina Petrescu Patrick Okofu Adriana Cobo Corey Students Jian Chen Mengzhou Chen Xiao Chen Yue Chen Yijun Chen Chayakorn Chulasai Mili Du Yuanxin Gu Yitong Guan Mingming Han Peiyao He Guangda Hou Mengxia Hu Chennuo Huang Fengshuo Huang Yixun Huang Zhaohan Huang Xiaoyu Jie Chengbei Li Gonglin Li

Hao Li Jiaen Li Ning Li Rouqing Li Yixuan Li Siteng Lin Bole Liu Chulong Liu Jingyi Liu Tuyang Liu Heng Lu Zihao Lu Jiacong Ma Heng Qiu Yingran Qu Jinwen Shangguan Junqi Shen Yi Shi Jinbo Su Chang Sui Feng Sun Yi Tang Wenyue Wang Yulei Wang Ziru Wang Tiantian Xie Shaohua Xue Yang Yan Liuqing Yang Ningning Ye Linna Yuan Tian Yuan Junzi Yuwen Qiutan Zeng Heyi Zhang Min Zhang Xianyu Zhang Yixin Zhang Yan Zhang Xiaoxiao Zhao Yuqi Zhao Yue Zhao Polina Zharkova Jianbin Zheng


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Anthropocenes The ANTHROPOCENES studio has explored provisional cities, future climates and deep time geologies. The Anthropocene is the proposed new geological epoch in which human activity is considered to have such a powerful impact on Earth systems that it will leave a long-term signature in the rocks. The Anthropocene has not yet been formally approved as an addition to the Geological Time Scale. However, it represents a time of political and social reckoning for a planet of cities in planetary crisis. The studio has investigated the historical contexts and has anticipated the possible design futures and urban transformations of the Anthropocene. We have engaged with different territories, researching pre-histories, proto-industries, minerals, topographies, textures, cultures, species, societies, climates and instabilities. Through mapping, prototyping, storytelling, scenarios, filmmaking and documentary the studio has collectively explored the responses, responsibilities and possibilities of architecture in this human-made epoch. The studio’s speculative inquiries and novel stratigraphies have provoked and tested ideas about future making, urban infrastructures, social relations, hybrid materialities and alternative energy futures for continued inhabitation on Earth.

00 Studio Tutors Renata Tyszczuk Cressida Kocienski Students Chayakorn Chulusai Rouqing Li Siteng Lin Bole Liu Jiacong Ma Chang Sui Feng Sun Shaohua Xue Tian Yuan Qiutan Zeng Heyi Zhang Yuqi Zhao 00 Paris Field Trip For the Anthropocenes studio field trip in February we visited the city of Paris. The temperatures in the ‘City of Light’ were below freezing, the Seine was flooding and there was large snowfall. This did not deter us from walking in the city and thinking about its pre-history, its present ambitions and its possible futures. Among the places we visited were the Catacombs of Paris in old limestone quarries and the new site of Agrocité, an initiative of R-Urban at Gennevilliers being constructed from salvaged building materials. The studio created alternative three-dimensional city maps, according to different themes: Earth, Air, Fire and Water. These maps reveal how urban infrastructures, social relations, hybrid materialities and alternative energy futures collide in appreciating continued inhabitation in cities like Paris on Earth. 01A World Map - Group Projects 01B Paris - Earth 01C World Map - Group Cities 01D World Map Section 02 Siteng Lin & Tian Yuan - Zaatari Future City The project asks the question: if the war in Syria ends what will happen to the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan? Our ambition is to build Zaatari Future City as a model of a sustainable city. This has five parts: 1. The water recycling system: the goal is to save water, eliminate the need to import water and make a play feature of the water pumps for children. 2. Ecological circulatory system: the use of human waste in the fields around Zaatari could enhance the productivity of the agricultural area. 3. Solar energy and wind farm: the city will rely on renewable energy; the solar panels provide

additional shading for people to avoid UV light 4. Mushroom Lab: fungi is used to degrade plastic waste materials while providing edible food source 5. Self-build process: the residents are encouraged to participate in and supported in the construction of their houses; different types of housing for different residents reuse and repurpose available materials including tents, cabins and wood. 03 Bole Liu - Solar Road and Infrastructure Residents living in Lagos have been plagued by energy shortages and traffic congestion and these issues are amplified by climate change. In 2008, the government began to build BRT roads to ease traffic problems, which improved the situation. Therefore, my project - the Solar Road - will begin to be built in 2018. By 2028, solar roads and most of the solar infrastructure are completed, and residents will start to enjoy the changes brought about by solar energy. By the time the project is complete, cars can be charged while driving, the clean energy that solar power brings will hardly damage the environment. Lagos’ traffic problems have been eased and energy shortages will no longer be a problem for Lagos. 04 Chang Sui & Yuqi Zhao - Building with Water in New Orleans The city of New Orleans faces many problems related to The city of New Orleans faces many problems related to climate change such as increasing possibility of adverse weather and flooding as a result of sea level rise. To restore Louisiana’s coastal wetlands, the strategy presented in a 2007 report for the region (CPRA) was based on the use of appropriate shunt control structures to transfer Mississippi water and sediments to degraded wetlands. Our project will be designed for the submerged scene of New Orleans after 100 years. The purpose of the project is to try to replace the obstructive attitude with an adaptive attitude responding to sea level rise. The project works in a series of stages responding to the different stages of rising seas. In the first step, through the selective removal of some concrete facilities, the rate of land subsidence will be slowed down with the purpose of mitigating local sea level rise. In the second stage, submerged buildings will be selectively reconstructed. Different functions will be provided, including air and water purification systems, green roofs, green plant wall transformations and plant irrigation systems. Wind and water energy will gradually replace the original energy system, and the overall natural ecological environment in this area will be changed. In the third stage, most of the buildings in the city will be submerged. The city will face problems with housing, traffic, and public amenities. The concept of vertical cities is used to raise the urban platform and reorganize urban functions. After the three stages, if the sea level continues to rise, these temporary floating constructions will provide the basis for further designs for the future.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

05 Shaohua Xue - Future Photovoltaic Glass Factory Human societies are facing a series of issues such as the depletion of natural resources, the rapid development of urbanisation, and accelerated energy consumption. The whole world needs a pollution-free and cheaper energy source. The Future PV Glass Factory uses solar energy converted into electricity to provide energy for buildings. All of the factory’s buildings will be constructed using PV glass in a lightweight steel frame. This could provide it with enough energy to complete the production. The proposition is that if a community’s buildings and factories are equipped with PV glass, this would reduce the consumption of natural resources and greenhouse gas emissions. This would encourage a transition to a time when large scale coal and gas power stations will no longer be needed. With the development of PV glass, China has achieved a world-leading position in photovoltaics. 06 Feng Sun - The Artificial Floating Island The artificial floating island is an experimental project that is a prototype for living in the context of future flooding. Shanghai city has been experiencing the danger of rising sea levels and subsidence. Scientific data of climate change from the IPCC has projected that most of the land in Shanghai will be flooded in the future. This means that at least 17.5 million people- the current population of Shanghai – could be affected. As my starting point, my idea is to experiment with designs that make use of the floatability of artificial islands. This also suggests designs for new ways of living for an island community in response to new environmental conditions. The project explores the potential for a new relationship between humans and water in the future. 07 Jiacong Ma - The New Manhattan Project The New Manhattan Project builds a pilot Generation IV nuclear power station system and related infrastructures in New York City, and promoting this system in the entire US and further regions around the world during the remaining years of the 21st century. The advantages of these new type of nuclear energy technologies is the use of highly-compact, high-security, highefficiency, low-waste hazardous fourth- and even fifth-generation nuclear reactors, which can allow nuclear power stations to be sited in densely populated areas as well as making construction sites more flexible. This scenario aims directly at the root cause of climate change: carbon- based energy systems. It proposes to replace fossil-burning power generation, by adopting advanced nuclear energy technologies in combination with other renewable energy sources to minimize future carbon emissions. 08 Qiutan Zeng - Future Factory The project is a future factory, aiming to meet the expectations of both humans and the ecosystem in the future. Considering the high proportion of carbon emissions resulting from the construction industry and industrial production in energy consumption, this exploration is likely to be very necessary. Cell phones are the products of the future factory, recognising the current universal high reliance of people on mobile phone technologies. In terms of sustainability, the factory will reduce the consumption of energy and natural resources through advanced technologies and rational layout. Additionally, the project is also concerned with the workers’ experience and their well-being. The automatic manufacturing system and the convivial and comfortable spaces can give employees a much better working environment.

rise by 6 degrees. The melting of the Antarctic glaciers will have caused the sea level to rise by about 60 m from current levels. The world’s population has fallen drastically due to the lack of food and successive natural and man made disasters, with much of the planet’s land becoming unfit for living. Eco-farm is an attempt at providing the resources necessary for humans to continue living. Then here comes the Eco-Farm. The prototypes will be tested in Antarctica, one of the only remaining regions with a more favourable climate for human survival. Eco-Farm is a small, cell-like ecosystem, with each cell being able to self-recycle and produce the vegetables, fish and even animals that humans need. It can be floating at sea or on land, and it can be built into a large-scale building community through bringing together many unit cells.

10 Rouqing Li - It’s 2100: A Compact Society Hong Kong serves as a prototype to discuss and design adaptations for future climate change. Just as Lisbon had to rethink its construction in response to the triple disaster that befell it in 1755, Hong Kong can also inspire future city living. My scenario is based on the RCP 8.5 scenario of IPCC and imagines Hong Kong in 2100. This is a time when the climate issues that Hong Kong faces can be referred to as an epitome of world climate issues. I have envisaged that a new compact society pattern of city living will be the key adaptation measure. All of the basic city functions will gather in small building clusters, which will be connected by sky bridges and parks, on which different infrastructure in different levels will support different local activities. 11 Chayakorn Chulusai - Kintsukuroi Kintsukuroi: Japanese word meaning ‘golden repair’ The scale of this project is about observing the possibilities for landscape and urban scale interventions, rather than detailed design. It aims to be a sustainable model for revitalising Namie, a city in Fukushima prefecture, Japan that is in the exclusion zone following the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. The approach of the design has been a crystallisation from scenario thinking and defining a mitigation plan for Namie. The project will be operating in phases; each phase has its own capability to respond to the context. Together the phases are expected to propose a convincing solution for the city.

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Studio Discovering the Temporal Fabric The town and city is a dynamic condition with ever changing patterns of urban grain, unfolding purpose and interpretations of the meaning of place. These patterns can persist through extended periods of time (history) or become submerged in the flux or rediscovered in different modes of interpretation as heritage, conservation or regeneration projects. Studio Making Time integrates theoretical and practical approaches to explore this unstable, precarious-balanced, and non-linear understanding of temporality in architecture, landscape and contemporary urban condition, within the broader context of post-industrial urban landscape heritage rich environments through an integrated approach to theoretical agenda, design media, research methodologies and themes. Methodologies Research by Design Digital Resurrection Prototyping Virtual Reality Narrative Experimental Scenarios Themes Heritage, Conservation and Context Regeneration Memory Loss and Representation Futurology Design for Change

Studio Tutors Danni Kerr Xiang Ren Students Yijun Chen Zhaohan Huang Jingyi Liu Heng Lu Yingran Qu Jinwen Shangguan Wenyue Wang Yang Yan Xianyu Zhang Xiaoxiao Zhao Polina Zharkova With thanks to Robert Evans of Evans Vettori Architects

01 Parasitic Memory Pavilion 02 Group Activity 03 Halifax Gateway 04 Technology Module - Time Maze 05 Florence Field Trip 06 Metabolist City 07 Adaptive Reuse at Sheffiled Manor Lodge

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Studio Hybrid Architectures for Cultural Dialogue & Wellbeing Nineteenth Century European travellers who first came across public hot-air baths and Islamic hammams in the Ottoman Empire labelled them as Turkish baths. However, early hammams developed from Roman and Byzantine prototypes and were adapted and adopted in Islamic civilisation to promote cleanliness, purity as well as physical and mental wellbeing. They were located in every single residential neighbourhood and became, for many centuries, centres of social interaction and neighbourhood cohesion. In this studio, we explored how the public bathhouse as a building type and a social institution evolved from the Roman to the Ottoman era. Students traced the historical development of public bathing in different eras, cultures, and geographical contexts. The studio was based on two different but related field work investigations and future scenario making for Victorian Turkish baths in the UK (first semester) and the Moroccan Hammam in Marrakech (second semester). Students researched in the first semester how the Turkish bath was adopted and adapted in the UK during the Victorian era in order to improve public health and wellbeing for the UK population. They worked in groups of four to investigate the concept of Hybrid Architectural Heritage for Wellbeing and Cultural Dialogue through case studies of Victorian Turkish baths in Sheffield, Harrogate and Manchester. Using a series of design research methods such as historical mapping, analysis of orientalists paintings and travellers’ accounts, ethnography with participant observation, socio-cultural & environmental analyses, students were the able to develop future scenarios of the public baths institution for the 21st Century conditions in the UK. In the second semester, an overseas field-study trip was organised in old city of Marrakech where students lived and worked together for a week in a Moroccan courtyard house located in the historic urban fabric of the centuries old city. Each group of four students was allocated a historic neighbourhood with its cluster of urban facilities consisting of a mosque, a hammam, a theology college and a bakery. Three neighbourhoods were investigated: Ben Youssef, Mouassine and Bab Doukkala through their architectural typologies and urban morphologies and socio-cultural dynamics. This allowed students to develop future scenarios for the Moroccan hammam as a 21st Century key facility for public health, wellbeing and cultural dialogue.

Studio Leaders Magda Sibley Gihan Karunaratne Studio Tutors Meryem Gurel

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Students Mingming Han Guangda Hou Chennuo Huang Fengshuo Huang Yixun Huang Chengbei Li Gonglin Li Jiaen Li Heng Qiu Yi Tang Linna Yuan Min Zhang Yan Zhang

0B Harrogate Group - Research into the Royal Baths, Harrogate 01 Manchester Group - Drawing of a Turkish Bath 02 Mouassine Neighbourhood Group 03 Min Zhang - Individual Project 04 Ben Yousseff Neighbourhood Group 05 Manchester Group - Swimming pool in Manchester Victoria Bath 06 Mingming Han - Individual Project 07 Gonglin Li - Individual Project 08 Mouassine Neighbourhood Group 09 Yan Zhang - Individual Project

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Mosque The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

It is a space for Muslims to perform their 5 times a day prayer and some other communal prayers such as Friday prayer, Eid Prayers (Religious holiday, twice a year). Etc. Each daily prayer could be performed with a group right after the call for prayer OR alone during the specific time.

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Studio Pseudo Public Space: Public space does not exist! explored how the cities we live in are performed and produced through everyday activities, routines, legislations and policies. We used performative methodologies as a tool to rethink place in order to propose alternate ideas, concepts and spaces that might be deemed ‘public’. These alternatives to increasingly commodified Psuedo Public Space, were based on producing an alternative public space, sense of publicness, or common(ing) set of relations. The three methodological stage of the studio included: 1. Place as Performance - exploring how cities (Sheffield and chosen sites) are performed through observation and direct action. 2. Performing Place - Building on performative methods (direct action) we made productive disruptions ‘constructed situations’ that told us more about so-called ‘public spaces’ intervening within them. 3. Performative Places - constructing a wider strategy / proposal for a new type of space that either built on and supported a minor set of practices that have produced an alternative public space, sense of publicness, or common(ing) set of relations, or is critical of the existing pseudo public space through highlighting and pushing to absurd levels the current situation. In each case, we critiqued notions of public space and offered alternative provocations based in a critical spatial practice Throughout the year and for the field trip to Berlin we visited practices who are working in different ways to challenge and question ideas around public space. 00

Studio Tutors Helen Stratford Amro Yaghi Students Jian Chen Mengzhou Chen Yuanxin Gu Mengxia Hu Xiaoyu Jie Hao Li Junqi Shen Yi Shi Jinbo Su Liuqing Yang Ningning Ye Junzi Yuwen Yixin Zhang

01 Junqi Shen - Location 02 Jian Chen - London Granary Square Mapping 03 Group 1- Civic Space 04 Group 4 - Commercial Space 05 Jian Chen - Site Analysis 06 Group 2 - University Space 07 Yixin Zhang

With thanks to: Torange Khonsari - Public Works Adriana Cobo Corey Johnny Cullinan and Caitlin Elster – MUF architecture/art Amelie Schneider and Benjamin Foerster-Baldenius - Raumlabor Michael Mcguinnes, Dan Dorocic, Sam Carvalho and Gianni Laneri - ON/OFF Miodrag Kuč - ZKU Katrina Moebus and Melissa Harrison - Common(s) Lab

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Studio Open Networks This studio explored networks as a paradigm for spatial design exploration. The network is a fundamental cultural concept, enabling and describing relationships between people as well as the infrastructure and data structures required to support these relationships. The concept of the network is a useful shorthand for describing the transformation of daily life through interactive media: Through the theme of ‘open networks’ we have explored the design of software and spaces that creatively and critically engage with methods for making and understanding network data as a basis for design. The primary design method of the studio has been virtual reality. Our field trip took us to Graz and Vienna, cities that are both centres for creative research in architectural applications of virtual reality and also for technical and social innovation in architectural practice. We met with researchers in Graz, and documented sites for exploration and creative transformation in virtual reality.

Studio Tutors Mark Meagher Akpezi Ikede Yingran Sun Students Xiao Chen Yue Chen Yitong Guan Peiyao He Ning Li Yixuan Li Chulong Liu Tuyang Liu Zihao Lu Yulei Wang Ziru Wang Tiantian Xie Yue Zhao Jianbin Zheng

With thanks to: Urs Hirschberg - TU Graz Constantinos Miltiades - TU Graz Robert Stacey - University of Sheffield

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01 Peiyao He - Symbols The concept for this VR game came from the Graz field trip: starting with the actual site information, but its design significance breaks through to real life. I was inspired by the symbols in Graz Square, which let me begin to think about the significance of symbols in architecture and space. I built the game like a small city, all buildings in this world have abandoned the architecture appearance, they are the same except the size. People in this world move by different symbol portals. They only recognize the space by the text symbols, which were obtained from the Graz site. 02 Ziru Wang - Experiencer This project shows my interest in exploring the possibility of handcrafting models in VR design, as well as movies and interactive game-telling stories in VR. First, manual models are very appealing in storytelling. Putting a manual model into a VR environment, requires me to make a two-dimensional hand-drawing into a three-dimensional model, and then use photogrammetry to capture the production of electronic models. Secondly, this design incorporates my daydream that happened during the field trip in Graz. The dinosaurs in the comic world became the protagonists of the story and presented a unique perspective to describe the impression of the city. Then, exploring the possibility of manual models being implemented in VR has advanced the experimental value.

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03 Xiao Chen - Movement + Game The final outcome of this project is a game that allows players to design the city and the characteristics of the agents. I regarded the game as an attempt which suggests the ability of the computer to provide us with new methods in architectural design. 04 Victoria Quays - Peiyao He, Yitong Guan The Victoria Quays once famous for its coal industry and commercial business, which generated an invisible network improving the local development, is now derelict and unused. The theme of our group is simulation. After doing our research, we tried finding a method which could repair and reconstruct the local network. Therefore by employing multiple media, including 3D and 2D animations and VR, we did the simulation, so that interaction between people and the site could be possible. Meanwhile, the data collected from VR could also reflect the how people want Victoria Quays to change, which can give architects inspiration and possibilities of how to reconstruct the site. 00

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05 Ning Li - Parallel City Using the field trip to Vienna as a starting point, I started doing research on city visions from several architects and the possibilities of city future development once the city comes to a situation where urban population reaches saturation. In this VR game I studied the possibility of urban development by studying the radiant city of Le Corbusier, in order to make practical proposals that could be applied in Vienna. 06 Tuyang Liu, Jianbin Zheng - Nomad in the Air This project is a simulation game of flying flats, a game providing the experience of a futuristic way of travel. There are two main parts to the project. The first part is building a virtual reality simulation game of flying flats and the related research. The second part is my follow-up study and my hypothesis on the game design background. Using VR technology is essential to the project as this game aims to simulate the movements in motion. Also, being able to provide the opportunity for audiences and players to interact with the environment is another key element. 07 Yixuan Li, Yue Zhao - Space + Emotion In this project, we explored how different spaces can document people’s emotional changes through a VR game. Therefore, we built a few exaggerated spaces that do not exist in real life to amplify the emotional impact that spaces have on people. We added four different types of spaces in the game scene so that players can experience different feelings. 08 Chulong Liu - A Special Journey This design is based on a theory of cognitive linguistics - the image uses a narrative method to create a special journey. The design itself is an experiment, aiming to test the emotional changes due to spatial changes. The concept of “container schema” is behind the strategy to build the whole project and connect the sceneries. This design is a special journey: people start at a spaceship and then go to 4 sceneries - Room, City, Forest and Outer space tunnel. At the end of each scenery, people should complete an AR questionaire, which is based on concept of container and have strong emotional implications.

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09 Yitong Guan, Yue Chen - Boundary In previous works, our studio mainly pay attention to using VR equipments to realize the idea of ‘built by all’. And we believe it can be used in the chain of real construction. I found the answer after visiting the exhibition of ‘ INSTANT CITY-Peter Cook’. The architects should make the rules for the public construction, meanwhile they should guide the public to use the rules. 04 09 Tuyang Liu, Jianbin Zheng - Trout Plays VR In this project, my teammate and I aimed to combine multiple media especially virtual reality to foster our understanding of spatial design. Furthermore, describing the interaction between people and their environment in a narrative way. Our project is a VR game simulating a trout fish’s journey from the source of Porter Brook, Sheffield to the end which is our given site Porter Brook Pocket Park. Our group theme is Emotion, our interpretation of this was to create a virtual reality game with a narrative sequence, arouse viewers’ emotional fluctuation. I also have a vision of this game to be an online game, from which we can collect users’ behaviors for future studies. .

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MA in Urban Design The MA in Urban Design is a studio-based design programme that specialises in community-led approaches to the design and production of the built environment. The aim is to address the challenges of uneven urban development, both locally and internationally. Grounded in the School’s social and political ethos, the course seeks to establish innovative modes of practice involving ideas of collaboration, participation, and distributed agency, and to investigate which approaches might allow for rethinking the role of both designers and citizens in the processes of city-making. The overall approach of the programme is underpinned by a desire to critically examine the key urban development challenges that cities are facing today. Who is addressing them? In which ways? To whose inclusion, and exclusion? Local urban areas in Sheffield are taken as a reference for comparison with other UK and international contexts in Europe as well as overseas. The main core of the programme consists of a design studio, supported by core modules exploring urban design theory, participatory methodologies, and reflections on urban design practice. These are complemented by a range of optional modules, study-trips, thematic workshops, and lecture series.

Course Directors Dr Beatrice De Carli Module Co-ordinators and Staff Lucia Caistor-Arendar Leo Care Beatrice De Carli Florian Kossak Helen Stratford Goran Vodicka Design Tutors Lucia Caistor-Arendar Lorenza Casini Beatrice De Carli Kristanti Paramita Victoria Okoye Jonathan Orlek Thesis Supervisors Alex Axinte Leo Care Beatrice De Carli Florian Kossak Celia Macedo Claudia Rojas Bernal Sheng Song Giorgio Talocci Rob Thompson Renata Tyszczuk With Thanks May Al-Ibrashi Jonathan Bennett Stephanie Christodoulou Gahyun Choi Laura Clarke Oliver Clemens Larissa Fassler Paul Goodship Claire Gordon Nabeel Hamdi Marianne Heaslip Sarah Linn Katie Matthews Omar Nagati Mitch Neave Elettra Pellanda Doina Petrescu Aiman Rashid

Cagri Sanliturk Katy Schroth Marwa Shykhon Beth Stryker Dahee Yu Students Alqreeni Abdulmajeed Che Chengye Chen Qianying Cui Yanyao Ding Yanbo Dong Yihong Ellebedy Yomna Gu Liyue Guo Zhuo Jun He Xiangting He Zongling Hou Wenyu Jin Tongfei Li Qiyan Li Siyuan Li Zongming Li Zhongyi Lu Shan Lyu Lantian Meng Yue Niu Hanshi Qayyum Samman Qi Xiangxi Quille Neassa Shi Tianran Sun Yexin Tao Jiapei Tao Yunyi Wang Lingya Wang Shumei Wang Zhihui Xiang Zheyue Xie Yuwei Xu Jiabao Xu Rui Yang Chen Yang Weinan Yao Tao Yu Sinan Zhang Chen Zhang Kai Zhang Yiming Zheng Canjie


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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

P1: Urban Catalysts This first project explored questions of time and temporality in Urban Design. This focus was based on the understanding that urban spaces are necessarily dynamic: their production continues over time, and is not fixed to a single moment of completion. This dynamic understanding of the ‘urban’ inevitably shifts the focus of our attention away from the static products of design, and moves it onto the continuous cycles of urban change, and to all the people and processes that go into those. The project explored these ideas by investigating Sheffield’s Inner Ring Road. Students were tasked with sampling a range of situations of vacancy and under-use along the ring road, with the aim to identify specific sites in need of re-activation, as well as the stakeholders who have an interest in those areas. They were then asked to design a catalyst intervention: a strategic, temporary project that can activate / precede the implementation of a long-term proposal for a site or set of sites. The project embraced the idea of ‘designing from within’ as a contextual condition, and students were asked to immerse themselves in the context of Sheffield’s inner city throughout the project’s development. Studio tutors Lorenza Casini Beatrice De Carli Kristanti Paramita 01 Regenerative Exploration Based on ‘Urban Acupuncture Qianying Chen, Yanbo Ding, Yihong Dong, Xiangxi Qi, Tianran Shi Kelham Island has a proud history of industrial development. However, since the1980s, industrial activities began to shrink, and the neighbourhood began to suffer a recession. Many of the important historical buildings of Kelham Island have become empty and underused. This scheme is based on the theory of ‘urban acupuncture’; the principle is to use small-scale temporary interventions that can lead to the regeneration of larger areas. 02 Art Arches Experiment Zhuojun Guo, Xiangting He, Zongling He, Wenyu Hou, Liyue Gu Art Arches Experiment is a temporary interactive art festival that will be organized inside one underused arch of the Wicker Arches in Sheffield. Our design focuses in the potential of art pioneers to stimulate vitality, and promote participation and integration with residents, through interactive art activities. The project will seek funding from the community and S1 art space Sheffield. The arch could be rent or use for free after negotiating with the network Rail company. 03 Victoria Quays Revival Tongfei Jin, Siyuan Li, Qiyan Li, Yexin Sun, Zongming Li This project is located in the old city center of Sheffield - Victoria Quays. This site has become neglected due to industrial recession and the city’s renewal. The project aims to stimulate regional development by attracting more people to the site through the organization of temporary activities. The programming of the project will be based on the Water Front Festival and complemented with various social public activities. 04 Triple Four Yue Meng, Zhongyi Li, Hanshi Niu, Shan Lu, Lantian Lyu Triple Four aims to activate four derelict sites by making a roundup tour with urban catalyst activities. The core site and starting element of the projects is a green space in Park Hill (initiate). The other three sites are tour sites: King street (formalize), Fitzalan Square (claim) and Arundel Gate (exploit). Each site has a specific theme according to the existing activities and the different characteristics of possible sponsors and initiators (Urban Splash, residents, shop owners, students of Hallam University, retailers). 05 Towards Community Incubator Canjie Zheng, Lingya Wang, Jiapei Tao, Tao Ya In this project, we intended to transform an abandoned and semi-damaged area into a productive community incubator. Our approach proposes a 11-week temporary use plan generated in 4 steps. First, cleaning the partial-damaged area. Second, activating

the site by adding a sports track. Third, enriching the space by adding cardboard equipment to increase activities and uses. And finally, inciting long stay by increasing furniture. These steps will involve four groups of stakeholders at different stages, the city council, the community, the retailers and a construction company. 06 Festival: Public go to University In this project, our group found the vacant spaces in the University of Sheffield and Netherthrop, and designed activities to activate these spaces. Because of the special location, we want to strengthen the connection between the university and surrounding communities. Our theme is finding opportunities of university vacant spaces for temporary re-use. We chose three sites to be the design sites, in this festival, the students and residents can exchange their second-hand items, read books, communicate with others, appreciate works of art and have a rest. 07 Community for University Students Zhihui Wang, Abdulmajeed Alqreeni, Yuwei Xie, Chengye Che This project is located on the south of Netherthorpe Road, in a former hotel. The site is surrounded by an old industrial area which is being transformed into a residential area for student accommodation. However, there are still huge vacant areas and underused buildings. The projects aims to revitalize one of the vacant spaces to increase the social value and appropriation of residents through the introduction of different social activities. The proposed activities were thought considering the largest group of residents, which are student 08 Street Culture Neassa Quille, Yomna Ellebedy, Samman QayyumThis project is located in an underused car park surrounded by historical factories which has the potential to be reactivated by temporary uses. We propose to inject street culture into this site, creating a lively space for young people who are interested in extreme sports. Therefore, we plan to organize an extreme sports festival twice a year, one in Spring bank holiday and another in Summer bank holiday. A large quantity of activities will be organized during the festival, for example, BMX, skateboarding, rock climbing, graffiti and market.

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09 Frame of Culture - ‘Connecting People, Pubic Space & Art’ Neassa Quille, Yomna Ellebedy, Samman Qayyum This project proposes a temporary catalyst initiative to a series of underused spaces across CIQ, focusing on bringing out the hidden cultural value of Sheffield by bridging the gap between the public space and community. The catalyst acts like a facilitator to bring more social value to the area and highlight the existing art and cultural activities, which are collaborated and promoted by different organisations and cultural festivals. The core of the catalyst will be one constant element travelling to different sites for a set amount of time, to enable variant types of activities for cultural expression through different mediums. 02

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P2/ Theme A: Designing Inclusion Based in Downtown Cairo, Egypt, the project investigated urban regeneration processes through the lens of inclusion and exclusion in/ from urban spaces. The Studio put emphasis on the diverse and often contradictory set of policies, practices, and physical artifacts that govern access to urban space: be they legitimate or illegitimate, official and unofficial, strategic and tactical, intentional and habitual. As such our research by design paid particular attention to the spaces, practices and policies that have been or can be used by residents, planners, policymakers, activists and other urban actors to draw, erase, or redraw the lines of inclusion/exclusion to urban buildings and open spaces. The project was a collaborative endeavour between the MA in Urban Design and Cairo Lab for Urban Studies, Training and Environmental Research (CLUSTER), and activities kicked-off with a 5-days workshop in Cairo hosted by CLUSTER. The workshop explored CLUSTER’s alternative development framework for Downtown, promoting sensitive, incremental development that prioritises genuine stakeholder engagement to mitigate the risks of physical deterioration and social displacement in Cairo’s city centre. Over the following six weeks, students were asked to develop a pilot intervention for the inclusive re-use of a specific site in Downtown Cairo.

Studio tutors Lucia Caistor-Arendar Beatrice De Carli Victoria Okoye

00 Studio Field Trip to Cairo 01 The Rabbat Building Co-op Zhuojun Guo, Jiabao Xu, Chen Yang The Rabbat Building was constructed in 1930 during Egypt’s colonial period when the district was inhabited by foreigners and affluent Cairenes. Our urban design proposal is for a co-op to promote the Rabbat Building’s stakeholders to begin to selfmanage the building, to communicate more with each other, to work together to resolve shared issues, and to establish a vibrant community. The co-op vision enables cooperation between the government ministry, the building’s owners, and tenants. At the same time, we hope to create a new culture, using the building as an engine to drive the urban renewal in Cairo’s Downtown district. 02 Bab al-Luq Market: Between the Blocks Yue Meng, Hanshi Niu, Tianran Shi The first step of the project is a participatory process in which the community can contribute ideas on different activities for the market; the second step is a shared process between community and business ventures where we introduce new activities based on the community’s ideas, then we adapt the functions of the venue and programme regular events to improve traffic through the market. We expect those new activities introduced to the market would be wide in range, workshops, art spaces, restaurants, and cafés. Seasonal festival events will be held throughout the year, according to Egypt’s religious and cultural traditions. 03 Open and Interactive Market Shumei Wang, Abdulmajeed Al-Qreeni, Chengye Che, Sinan Yu Our design proposes to promote the market’s economic development and then use that impact to develop the entire Downtown. We connect the different buildings surrounding the market, such as the educational, government, and commercial buildings, to the market in an exchange process. The surrounding buildings provide business opportunities for the market, and the market also provides the daily goods for the surrounding area. This can address the market’s economic decline and promote the economic development for the whole area. The Bab al-Luq Market provides a good case study for economic development opportunities in Downtown and the city of Cairo.

04 Urban Arcadia Xiangting He, Zongling He, Liyue Gu In our project, we propose that Cinema Rio could be reborn to inclusively attract many more kinds of people and activities of different cultures and publics. We would link the site with other arts and culture resources and institutions in downtown Cairo. As part of our intervention, we propose the use of mobile furnitures, plants, and trees within the cinema’s open design, to provide the flexibility of different layout setups depending on the activity. To connect the cinema to local and nearby restaurants, we propose a special food festivals series in which visitors can enjoy music, movies, and have a great lunch or dinner as well. 05 The Forgotten Rooftop Life Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians who moved into Cairo during an economic boom in the 1970s had no money to rent an apartment, and instead setup houses on the city’s rooftops. On some of Cairo’s larger roofs, communities of families can develop in an environment preferable to the one below. This project is based on our field trip to Cairo and we would like to think of a pattern that could alleviate this social problem.

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06 Secret Garden Yanbo Ding, Qianying Chen, Yiming Zhang The new Cinema Rio that we propose is called Secret Garden, a public area that combines green space and commercial space. To ensure that the venue can meet its expenses, our vision is a film venue that contains restaurants, cafes, and shops, and that also spreads the film culture more widely by showing films, including classic movies, and teaching filmmaking techniques. The cinema will keep with its original focus on films, but to create a garden environment, we also add the natural elements of plants. This ‘secret’ garden is not only a space for the surrounding residents to experience, but more importantly, it can attract people living in other parts of the city to come to downtown Cairo.

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07 The Square of Equity and Life Neassa Quille, Yomna Ellebedy ‘The Square of Equity and Life’ is a movement for women and the Downtown community in the Rabbat Building site. It is intended that the pilot project will generate an impact in the downtown area which will be used to develop an incremental wider approach to fester a female inclusive urban fabric. The key vision is to create more female inclusive public spaces through gender sensitive design while bringing a positive input to the community through amenities and events. The strategy aims to create equity by giving opportunities and a platform for women, while bringing awareness to the community of the positive impact the female society can harvest. 01

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P2/ Theme B: Regeneration Strategies Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras condimentum elementum lorem eget vestibulum. Sed convallis iaculis vestibulum. Donec ligula urna, congue elementum blandit nec, accumsan ut elit. Ut sem tellus, rutrum eu diam nec, euismod venenatis neque. Suspendisse placerat placerat diam, eget ullamcorper ligula accumsan at. Aenean vel convallis dui. Etiam cursus fermentum odio. Donec finibus elit posuere semper cursus. Sed sit amet aliquam enim. Suspendisse nec commodo velit. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Curabitur auctor, felis sit amet aliquet interdum, velit nunc ultrices neque, non bibendum orci lacus in enim. Aliquam condimentum quam finibus eros efficitur maximus. Nam feugiat commodo erat sed tincidunt. Nunc sem orci, ullamcorper at cursus non, luctus sed ipsum. Vestibulum sodales ante vitae justo tempor fringilla. Sed ipsum mauris, tincidunt ut arcu quis, luctus maximus lorem. Nunc sem risus, blandit at venenatis nec, auctor sit amet nunc. Mauris elementum ligula sed laoreet iaculis. Nullam luctus nisl et leo volutpat viverra. Curabitur at ligula convallis, eleifend sem nec, porttitor neque. Duis pellentesque id diam sed sagittis. Ut scelerisque nulla a augue venenatis, non tempor lorem congue. Sed congue convallis scelerisque. Quisque urna dolor, consectetur sit amet purus id, tincidunt sollicitudin massa. Duis gravida, diam at vulputate faucibus, erat ex pellentesque erat, a consectetur lacus justo in elit. Nam a leo dapibus, tempor orci sed, fermentum turpis. Phasellus libero ante, egestas non vestibulum nec, gravida malesuada odio. Phasellus eget tincidunt urna. Vivamus suscipit sem ligula, nec fermentum risus sese egeuet risus.

Studio tutors Lorenza Casini Jon Orlek

01 Mehringplatz Memory Yuwei Xie, Zhihui Wang ‘Mehringplatz Memory’ is an urban regeneration project sited in Mehringplatz, Berlin. The project aims to investigate the role art can play as a catalyst for urban regeneration. It develops through long-term urban strategies including a series of physical and social interventions. It includes 5 phases over 10 years. The first phase focuses on refurbishing Mehringplatz’ inner open space. Secondly, Berlin artists will be invited to exhibit their work in the neighbourhood’s underground areas. Thirdly, a network of bike lanes will be introduced. Thirdly, two openings will be created at the southern edge of the site, and artists will be invited to paint murals on the walls. Finally, artists and art-led organizations will be invited to establish their studios or workshops in Mehringplatz’ vacant units. This set of urban strategies aims to improve the site’s environment, draw public attention to the area, and maximise its value. 02 Mix Berlin Lingya Wang, Lantian Lyu, Rui Xu, Zheyue Xiang The ‘Mix Berlin’ project aims to address the reception of refugees in Berlin, while also re-activating underused spaces in Mehringplatz. It develops over a ten-year timeline, and includes a range of strategies that contribute to linking refugees with their host community, from the moment of arrival to their inclusion into local life. The project includes five phases-- accommodation preparation, counselling and training support, retailing, becoming neighbourhood and integration. Each phase includes the transformation on a different set of underused spaces. By combining tangible and intangible strategies, the project explores the role of design in resolving urban challenges from social and physical perspectives.

02 Immigrant Fusion Canjie Zheng, Chen Zhang, Jiapei Tao, Zhongyi Li, Tao Yao This project focuses on the reception of migrants in Mehringplatz. The short-term goal of the scheme is to facilitate newcomers’ engagement in the neighbourhood’s activities. The long-term goal is to transform Mehringplatz into a multicultural market. The first step of the project is to set a base to collect residents’ ideas about the area. The second step is to establish an agency providing services to migrants. The third step is to hold activities in selected public spaces, to encourage the interaction between newcomers and long-term residents. The fourth step is to establish a market for multicultural products. 04 Unlock Life - live alone without feeling lonely Tongfei Jin, Weinan Yang, Yihong Dong, Yunyi Tao This project addresses the needs of one-person households who live in and around Mehringplatz. It is structured into 4 smallscale sites and 5 phases spanning over 10 years. The 4 sites have multiple functions and aim to provide sports areas, co-working spaces, live-work spaces and clubs where one-person households can meet and make friends. The final aim is aims to support a range of lifestyles for single people across age groups. 05 Urban Dynamic Lines Siyuan Li, Wenyu Hou, Yexin Sun, Zongming Li Based on both on-site and off-site research, this project proposes a route that connects Mehringplatz with the Park at Gleisdreieck, to be used for jogging and cycling through Mehringplatz housing blocks. The aim is to use this route to strengthen the links across the area, enhance social life, and improve the quality of open space. We hope that over the next ten years, this route will serve as a spine for the regeneration of the area’s street network, transport system, green spaces and building facades. At the same time, the route will provide residents with a new space for everyday physical activities, while also restoring the quality of the environment and re/introducing the pedestrian scale in the neighbourhood. 04

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MSc in Digital Architecture and Design The MSc in Digital Architecture and Design (DAAD) is a digital design based programme structured around four key areas of intensive study: (1) parametric modelling linked to digital fabrication and prototyping, (2) building information modelling for cross-domain design analyses, (3) computer programming for data processing and interactive prototyping, and (4) advanced simulation for modelling adaptive architecture. Students are introduced to a set of digital design methods, techniques and processes including parametric modelling linked to 3D printing & laser cutting, BIM-based building performance analyses, computational design with Python and Arduino, and advanced environmental simulation for modelling adaptive architecture. Studio MAKE (Modelling Adaptive Kinetic Environments) is where students engage actively with formulating and testing hypotheses and scenarios of digital architecture to address environmental, social, technological and cultural challenges. Studying on the DAAD programme, students often come with an interest in the capacity of architecture to respond dynamically to change. Architects and designers of the built environment increasingly anticipate the inevitability of change, as well as the potential to creatively shape the way that buildings, landscapes and cities change and age over time. At the end of this programme our postgraduates develop the skills and theoretical knowledge needed to formulate blueprints for a future built environment based on multiple scenarios for buildings that change over time. For the fourth year running of this dedicated MSc programme, we see students’ learning grounded in solid understanding of computational techniques that support a data-centric and parametric approach to design generation and evaluation. Within 12 months, DAAD students have shown to excel in exploratory application of the 3D interactive prototyping methods and techniques to computational design thinking and making.

Course Directors Chengzhi Peng Tsung-Hsien Wang Studio Tutors Chengzhi Peng Tsung-Hsien Wang Mark Meagher Additional Reviewers and Lecturers Wen-Shao Chang Rob Jackson Nils Jaeger Marc Schnabel Choo Yoon Yi Zhuoqun Zhang

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Studio M.A.K.E.

Folding-based mirror interactive installation.

Studio MAKE (Modelling Adaptive Kinetic Environments) explores how syntheses of digital (virtual) and physical environments can lead to innovation of interactive built environments (IBE). DDIBE students undertook three projects in Studio MAKE 2017-18: (1) Inspired by Nature, (2) Transformable Urban Furniture, and (3) Adaptive Urban Nanotecture. Led by Dr Tsung-Hsien Wang, Inspired by Nature is a five-week long project in Semester 1 to explore the underlying formal elements and rules of pattern-forming found in nature. Beginning with a small scale study, each student investigates a chosen topic of natural evolution through abstraction, parameterisation and manifestation. The 3D parametric models developed from Inspired by Nature were then applied to ideas of making furniture-like urban interventions to some campus spaces identified by the students. Returning back from the week-long field trip to Switzerland in the beginning of Semester 2 (early February), students started with precedent studies of Nanotecture drawn from Nanotecture: Tiny Built Things (Rebecca Roke 2016, Phaidon). Supported by Element of Computational Design II (ARC6819), students swiftly moved to prototyping an Adaptive Urban Nanotecture (AUN). The goal was for each AUN project to build a prototype of a small interactive architecture that explores a specific form and performance of adaptive interaction situated in some urban environmental and social conditions. As presented here, the DAAD students this year have produced thought-provoking digital design project outcomes, demonstrating what they foresee the possibilities of interactive adaptive architecture in response to the social, environmental, technological or cultural issues they care about.

01 Fatin Abdoul-Wali, Albeena Sofi - Reconfigurable Interactive LED Display Composed of a basic unit of two cubes joined at an edge, the design assembly can be transformed by rotations around the cube edges. The faces of the cube units are an interactive display, which becomes reconfigurable as per the space constraints or user needs. 02 Ruxin Deng - Fragment: Folding-based mirror interactive installation This project aims to develop a folding-based mirror interactive installation, as Origami can be designed and rearranged to change properties. Based on this feature, origami was used its effectiveness was further explored with mirrors, which could provide an abstract space of reflection. By folding the mirror, broken image maze was created, like a kaleidoscope, to disorder visual order and transform the daily perspective, deconstruct and reconstruct the property of an object. Additionally, the ultrasonic distance sensor was used to sense the distance between people and installation, and then receive the distance data, after the sensor data was processed through Arduino, to influence the angle of the servo motor, which changed the angle of each geometric unit in the installation.

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03 Anastasios Kladis, Yasser Mohammed Ali, Dimitar Zhelev Adaptable Studio Space An architecture studio prototype adaptable to its users’ needs. Four layouts with different purposes accommodated in one space. The project was inspired by common problems experienced by students. 04 He Lei, Heng Zhan - Smart Bus and Bus Stop Design As a vision for smart sustainable cities, we developed an intelligent bus and bus stop system which turns a city’s buses into a moving network for delivering small parcels in addition to transporting people. Meanwhile, citizens will be able to use such bus stops as small parcel collection points on-route to work, home or other destinations.


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population displacements, international or national humanitarian agencies often carry out operations of rescue, assistance, relief and recovery. There is an urgent need to address architectural long-term strategies that support solar energy collection, and water harvesting in camps for the displaced. This project focuses on a parametric design of a modular, light, and kinetic active skin system for micro solar and rain harvesting as part of an adaptive disaster relief architecture. 05 Binh Vinh Duc Nguyen, Thanonchai Watlom - Multi-functional adaptive architecture device In this study, we proposed a digital modelling process that sought to balance the architectural flexibility and adaptability in the design of a kinetic device. Inspired by the pinecone nastic movement, a flexible modular component is proposed and evaluated through various methods, which include: optimisation of geometry based on efficient movement, maximisation the effectiveness of the controlling mechanism, and balancing of adaptability and flexibility based on site-analysis. The modular design system is then applied to a specific chosen site with its environmental and contextual requirements. The results show how the pinecone-like nastic movement may be translated into design and fabrication of adaptive architecture. We discuss the effectiveness of origami pattern and mathematical formula calculation in the design process of kinetic architecture.

10 Haoyang Yuan - A dynamic curtain wall box The project consists of two parts: (1) The exterior is a transparent box with different hollowed-out patterns, (2) The interior is a curtain wall that can be activated by a proximity sensing system. When the two parts overlap, the adaptive architecture exhibits dynamic visual effects. 11 Xiang Zhou - The self-adaptive with environment of pavilion This landscape pavilion is located in the Weston Park, next to the Sheffield Museum and its design is inspired by biomimicry. The building structure simulates the shape of a shell, and the dynamics of the unit comes from the breathing system of grasshoppers. Arduino control technology is deployed to allow the pavilion to sense temperature changes in the surrounding environment, thereby achieving thermal comfort inside the pavilion. In addition, it can provide a shelter space for people and animals in the park.

06 Ge Qian - Fractal framework with light-detecting blinds To redefine a special urban outdoor or indoor space, a fractal frame structure which is generated with the aid of 3D scanning and FEA tool is proposed as the first layer. A system of lightsensitive blinds is introduced as the second layer to service the space reframed. 07 Wenjie Pu - Showroom with all components based on the curved plywood This project presents an interior design for an Intelligent Showroom. After laser cutting with particular patterns, hard plywood boards become very flexible and can bend freely at large angles. All components such as partition walls and furniture of the showroom are constructed in this material. An electromagnetdriven control system is developed for actuation of moving surfaces and furniture according to the data collected from sensors. 08 Yi Yang - The Wing The site, Bridgewater Place located in central Leeds, causes heavy wind for pedestrians passing by. The wind at height is forced downwards, hitting the ground together with the effect of acceleration due to gravity, with the speed as high as 40 mph. In 2016, a lorry on an adjacent road lost control in the wind, hit and killed a pedestrian, after which wind buffers were designed and installed to the building. This project goes with a solution in a larger scale: erecting a tower in front of Bridgewater Place. The aim is to create a dynamic edge that changes its curvature responding to real-time wind direction, directing the high wind away from the Bridgewater building surface and the ground, as well as bringing entertainment effect for the neighborhood.

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09 Jessica Rivera - Sun tracking and water harvesting kinetic envelope for disaster relief camps Natural and man-caused disasters have social, economic, and environmental impacts. Disruptions and physical environmental damages incur costs, ranging from health and psychological harms to suspension of livelihoods. When disasters lead to human 08


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MSc in Sustainable Architecture Studies The MSc in Sustainable Architecture Studies (MSc SAS) combines social and technical aspects of sustainable architecture through an interdisciplinary approach. The programme focuses on exploring sustainability through design with dedicated studio modules in which we undertake evidence-based design. Lecturers and supervisors have expertise in low energy design, retrofit, lighting, modelling, building performance, parametric design and renewable materials. The programme is driven by an ethos of global stewardship and positive regeneration to transform the built environment for a more equitable future. In 2016-2017 the MSc SAS attracted students from China, India, Egypt, Germany, Greece, Jordan, Mexico, Myanmar, Nigeria, and the United Kingdom.

Course Directors Aidan Hoggard Studio Tutors Paul Testa Andrew Lees Aidan Hoggard Students Adepeju Aderogba Sara Al-Sawi Rawdah Alzahrani Amanda Azavedo Xue Bai Nikita Bansal Vidula Bharthee Ruiwen Deng Mili Du Panagiota Evelzaman Xueyan Hu Shuo Huang Pablo Ibrguengoytia Arias Visut Innadda Giska Ayu Pradana Putri Kamase Wenbin Lei Qinyi Li Yao Li Zhenwei Lin Callum McRobbie Ibrahim Halil Ozdemir Daniel Restrepo Aguilar Twishi Paresh Shah Idil Sindir Rujirej Suppakitjanusan Susan Sutherland Jin Xie Anhui Zhang Minghui Zhang


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Studio Radical Transformation Our studio was led by Sofie Pelsmakers and we focused on radical architecture and energy interventions of existing houses and housing, while Aidan Hoggard led a Resilient Housing studio with sites in Switzerland. The studios seek to foster an awareness of the relationship between global environmental change and the construction and inhabitation of buildings. The modules introduce students to a range of approaches in sustainable architectural design, and encourage students to work iteratively and to develop a critical stance in relation to theories of sustainable architecture and discover their own approach and way of working. Students are supported in this process with a mix of seminars, lectures, (group) tutorials and group discussion and team work, field trips and workshops. The Radical Transformations studio worked with real clients and case study houses in Sheffield and London, using in-situ performance monitoring tools to understand the existing dwelling and to critically evaluate the energy needs, prior to proposing radical transformations, aiming for PassivHaus or EnerPHit standard. We used DesignPH and PHPP as tools, and this module is aligned with the UK PassivHaus student competition. In the Resilient Housing Studio, the students researched a wide range of topics and issues that are critical to the Switzerland sites and local climates. A priority was placed on the implications of spatial complexity and precision of working on urban and building sites, designing with knowledge and using “5 steps to sustainability”. Throughout the year students on the course actively attended conferences and events across the country. At Timber Expo in Birmingham students were exposed to and inspired by some of the latest developments and applications of timber. Many projects later in the year researched and developed these themes to a high level of detail. Students were encouraged to participate in a field trip to Leicester University Passivhaus Medical Centre and in the international PassivHaus open day around Leeds and the UK PassivHaus conference in London. Furthermore, a trip to Switzerland was organised in February: students visited Zurich, Lucerne and Basel where they studied examples of sustainable architecture and urban design. Each day, in small groups they acted as “sustainability consultants” and proposed solutions to identified issues of places visited. A number of programme specific modules deliver research guided teaching and support the design studios across a range of sustainability areas of knowledge and skills. From winter onwards, students develop their own research through either a written or design-based thesis project. This substantial piece of work is supported by supervision from experts in the field within the school and students are assigned to specific staff research groups, choosing from a wide range of topics.

01 Minghui Zhang - Lucerne Hydro Power Museum The new water power museum is located at the Reuss River which crosses the Lucerne city. The concept is to create a transparent building with a timber bridge and platform that can become the landmark of the city and the extension of public spaces. In addition, the relationship between water, history and city are enhanced by the new museum. In order not to block the view towards the river and to make the building look lighter, large triple glazing and polycarbonate material were to create a double skin façade. The WWR are validated by the indoor daylight, energy and visualization. Movable roller blinds help solve the overheating problem for which energy is provided by the hydro power system. Thick concrete slabs and interior walls provide thermal mass to maintain indoor temperature. Using local timber for the outdoor space not only reduces the embodied energy but also responds to the old historical timber bridge nearby and vernacular Switzerland building material. 02 Evelazaman Panagiota, Ibrahim Halil Ozdemir, Rawdah Alzahrani - Zurich Building The project is a mix used building with café, offices and residentials. The building is located next to the river in Zurich, Switzerland and the site is rich with historical and natural context. The project aims to create outstanding building by using sustainable materials and construction systems. The sustainable design is a collective work of many different aspects and it starts from sketch to demolishing. Some of the aims of the project include reducing energy demand and carbon, using passive heating, cooling and ventilation systems, sustainable sourced timber construction, carefully placed units and strong connections with surrounding environment.

03 Giska Kamase - Park Hill Retrofit The design idea proposed to incorporates the energy, architecture and community as the fundamental aspects of retrofitting Park Hill to improve building performance, as well as enhancing occupants’ living experience. Improvements in building insulation are essential, so occupants’ comfort, health and well-being through energy efficiency strategies can be achieved. In addition, the proposal also aims to revive Park Hill historic environment by minimising substantial harm to the listed building and retain the existing condition as much as possible. The primary objectives of this proposal are to reduce the annual heat demand by 80%, increase the social spaces on each level by 30%, and maximum use of clean energy. 04 Mili Du, Jin Xie This design aims at exploring a sustainable solution to extend the life of the abandoned urban industrial land. The vision is to create a sustainable mix use community which is not only energy efficiency but also a supplier of healthy, happy and affordable life. The design defines the site as a ‘farm’ which is not only a traditional farm of food but also an innovative farm of solar energy where residents can gain electricity as well as making a contribution to the city. A series of activities are added to the site to attract more people to live in a sustainable way. The design process is under an iterative and integrated workflow. We use a series of tools to simulate the real climate and test the energy usage of the design, and then fine tune them. The final layout is a result of balancing the critical analysis and aesthetic implication.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

05 Qinyi Li - Zurich Building The six-storey building uses timber as the main construction material and consists of multiple uses, including residential, cafe and office. In addition, this project aims to provide comfortable interior and exterior spaces for tenants by using a low energy building design. To reach the design objectives, different software simulation results were generated and analyzed in the process of making decisions. The main design considerations in this project: keeping the current passenger streamline and balance the connection between the new development and the surrounding environment; sustainable timber construction; low energy demand (Passivhaus standards); position of the blocks and different shaped pitched roofs to maximize solar energy gain; nice deep balcony for natural shading and private spaces.

in the wellbeing of the whole community. 10 Susan Sutherland - Basel Residential Homes The site resides on a small river and its original use was a wood workshop which needed incorporating into the design. The main idea of the project was to create energy efficient homes that were not only sustainable environmentally but also creates spaces that allowed the occupants to live in comfort physically and visually. Therefore, thermal comfort year-round, good daylighting, views to the outside world and good circulation of spaces were all paramount in this design with almost all energy demands being met via renewable energies.

06 Wenbin Lei - Zurich Building This project is located near Sihl river in Zurich, Switzerland in a historical block. The project aims to use local materials (timber) to build a sustainable building that can be integrated with the surrounding environment, increasing the greening rate of the neighborhood. The building mainly relies on different orientations of the balconies to provide shade, while the vertical greening plants can block direct sunlight and reduce indoor overheating. The vertical forest can also contribute to the regeneration of the environment and urban biodiversity without the implication of expanding the city. 07 Sara Al-Sawi, Rujirej Suppakitjanusan, Giska Kamase Lucerne Hydro-Power Museum Located in the historical site of Reuss River, the site separates the old and the new city of Lucerne, Switzerland. Due to the richness of history on the site, the main idea of this project was to respect the existing surrounding area with all of its historical backgrounds. Moreover, the presence of existing hydropower on site is an essential element, since it provides energy for multiple households in the city. Thus, the initial idea was to establish an active engagement to the hydropower and the river. The vision of this project was to encourage the visual connection between the old city, the new city and the Reuss River that falls in between; by integrating a transparent project within the existing environment, yet becoming the city landmark through the permanent exhibition “The Lightbox�. 08 Ruiwen Deng - Zurich Urban Infill This timber structure mix-used project, which including retail, office and residential parts, is located near Sihl river in Zurich, Switzerland. The specific building shape reflects not only the natural and historical site context, but also the design solution for climate conditions. Based on the consideration of reducing overheating by natural stack ventilation in the office part, the double skin facade comes into my mind. In addition, sustainable timber construction for this high- rise building within urban area is inspired by the surrounding Shigeru Ban Temedia building.

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09 Pablo Ibargurngoytia - Lake Park The project is a mix use building with commercial areas and 12 apartments. It is located at the edge of the lake of Zurich, Switzerland. It complies with the Passivhaus Standard and the majority of the materials used come from sustainable sources. To arrive to the final design, different software was used to carry out environmental and energy simulations. The results were used to inform the iterative design process. The project also takes into consideration the impact of the new development in the existing community, and with this, finds opportunities to impact positively 05

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Graduate School With currently over 75 PhD students and 96 PGT students from the UK, Europe and further afield, the school has one of the largest cohorts of architecturally based research students in the UK, reflecting its pre-eminence in the field of architectural research. The Graduate School embraces these Doctoral programmes, it fosters links between PhD students and research staff, and supports the flourishing research culture within the School. Our PhD research is intrinsically inter-disciplinary and is open to students with an interest in any aspect of architectural research. These include histories, theories, practices and politics of architecture, environmental design (lighting, acoustics and the thermal environment), sustainability and structures, design processes and user behaviour, computer-aided design, emergent systems and complexity, sociotechnical systems (particularly related to sustainable energy technologies) urban design and development, community design and participation, places and place-making, children’s environments, feminist approaches, transformative education and practice. With a tradition of innovative education, our PhD Programmes encourage student-led initiatives and exchanges in research and education. We have a programme of events and seminars, often shared with larger research groups in SSoA, and more informal lunchtime research meetings. The PGR School also organizes informal meetings and formal public presentations for PhD students, and other research cluster activities such as the on-going East-West seminars, Lines of Flight, and the Lighting, Home and Digital Groups. Current PhD Students Aliyu Abubakar Ahmed Ahmed Pouyan Akbari Mohamad Al Taha Maha Al-Ugaily Monteriro Aleksandra Yahia Ali Mohammed Aljammaz Talal Alshammari Taghi Amirhosseini Jennifer Brierley Esra Can Jingwen Cao Choong Yew Chang Shen Chen Michael Coates Ahmed El-Astal Olivia Espinosa Trujillo Rui Miguel Ferreira dos Santos Ziyad Frances Fabio Franz Gioia Fusaro Ayesha Ghazanfar Meryem Gurel Vera Hale Khalid Hamoodh Ahlam Harahsheh Gillian Horn Iulia Huducas Intisar Husain Dongwon Jeong Sarah Joyce Suyee Jung Danni Kerr Deniz Kesici Zeynep Keskin Cressida Kocienski Derong Kong Cathryn Ladd Andreas Lang Ying Liu Yichong Mao Mithuna Maran Efstathios Margaritis Basma Massoud Madihah Binti Mat Idris Ula Abdali Khalel Merie Katharina Moebus Juliza Mohamad Nurul Mohamad

Aiman Mohd Rashid Kate Morland Jingyi Mu Zainab A.A. Murtadhawi Qanawati Aya Musmar Katlego Pleasure Mwale Mahya Nazarian Faith Ng’eno Yanisa Niennattrakul Partick Okofu Victoria Okoye Yiru Pan Kristani Paramita Junghyun Park Eleni Pashia Quishi Peng Octavianus Priyanto Hussain Qasem Shima Rezaei Rashnoodi Chada Romcai Emad Salih Cagri Sanliturk Emmett Scanlon Sheng Song Helen Stratford Reem Sultan Jonathan Sykes Na Tang Huan Tong Ian Trowell Nor Izura Tukiman Claire Louise Tymon Alberto Urrutia Maria Van Elk JingJing Wang Bo Wang Chunyang Xu Amro Yaghi Yang Yang Tingting Yang Choo Yoon Yi Meng Yiping Yang Yu Al-Chokhdar Yussur Boyan Zhang Shuyou Zhang Litao Zhou

Congratulations to students who successfully completed their PhD during this year: Fariba Fani Molki A design research towards developing an appropriate domestic architecture in Iran: A case study of Kerman Junjie Huang Spatial affordances for preschool children interactions in a childcare environment Efstathios Margaritas Effects of urban green spaces and related urban morphology parameters on urban sound environment Fei Qu Impacts of wind turbine noise on health and well-being from the perspective of urban morphology Xian Reng Hybrid building and hybrid practitioner: Understanding and transforming Chinese rural villages through architecture of social engagement Masa Sorn Designing with children. Spatial literacy explored through communication between children and spatial designers Ian Trowell Difficult fun: Fairground as heritage, heritage as fairground Bo Wang Effects of urban morphology on the distribution of traffic noise Yang Yu A mixed reality approach to 3D interactive prototyping for participatory design of ambient intelligence Shima Rezaei Rashnoodi Home Remaking: An architectural study of home in diaspora in contemporary Britain with particular reference to the lives of Iranian women


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Completed PHD Thesis Projects

Spatial affordances for preschool children’s interactions in a childcare environment Junjie Huang Understanding human behaviour in the built environment has long been a key interest to most architects. It relates to the essential need to design a good building for society. Gibson’s affordance theory offers an insight into the behavioural potential that the environment can provide to human beings, and has been adopted by a number of researchers in their studies of children’s environment. While most of these studies focused on children’s physical activities, the knowledge of the affordances for children’s social interaction is yet to be explored in depth. Employing a focused ethnographic approach, this research conducted its fieldwork in a childcare centre in Sheffield, and studied the preschool children’s social interactions during their free play sessions in both the outdoor and indoor environment. The study deconstructs the childcare environment by means of behavioural affordance, and demonstrates a typical taxonomy of children’s social interactions in the childcare environment, followed by in-depth interpretation of case social interaction events. The study proposes a methodology to conduct focused ethnographic research in the spatial design field, and establishes an affordance correspondence framework between children’s social behaviours and environmental features, and further suggests a range of design guidelines towards a children-centred, diversified, and supportive child care environment.

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Following this study, further research can be expected in the area of children’s environmental perception, interest, decision-making as well as affordance design in the built environment

01 Affordances support social interaction events 02 Illustrations of children’s spatial needs in individual and social activities

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Home Remaking: An architectural study of home in diaspora in contemporary Britain with particular reference to the lives of Iranian women Shima Rezaei Rashnoodi This research highlights the lack of architectural studies in the current home literature, aiming to fill the gap between the studies of home in architecture and humanities. For that purpose, a framework for the study of home is developed with an interdisciplinary approach that examines the ways in which Iranian women situate their identity by the way they make their diasporic homes. The everyday space of the Iranian home, as well as the Iranian diasporic home, is analysed with a particular focus on the ways that these space accommodate cultural/religious modalities. Additionally, the importance of this study is designated by highlighting the lack of studies on Iranian female interactions with their home spaces, specific to their homemaking approaches.

to provide an understanding of the making of Iranian home in diaspora. It is within this framework that the atmosphere of home is discussed across different disciplines and is examined as a possible approach to homemaking in diaspora. The research is developed through a phenomenological study of Iranian home that introduces hierarchy, hospitality and cleanliness as spatial/cultural themes under the dialectical notions of Zaher and Baten in Iranian culture. The feminist and phenomenological theories were incorporated into mixed qualitative methods such as in-depth interviews, focus groups and visual analysis. These methods draw attention to the architectural dimensions of home, specifying the necessity of looking at home within a spatial framework.

The transient nature of these diasporic homes as an embodiment of female identity provides a unique situation to be examined in relation to the notions of gender, culture and homemaking. To address this complexity, with the help of the theoretical studies, home is described as a place that embodies dialectic notions of real/ideal, one/other and tangible and intangible. Therefore, to be able to study home within those contradictory notions a framework was developed that responds to the necessity of examining home within an interdisciplinary study in relation to gender and identity conceptions. Hence, a combination of feminist and phenomenological theories are applied to deconstruct the conventional dualistic conceptions employed in current home studies by defining home as a space of in-between. Thus, a framework of tangible, intangible and the in-between elements is proposed for the formulation of an architectural methodology

Ultimately, the contribution of this thesis is a proposed architectural methodology for the study of home and homemaking that is incremental as well as holistic. In that guise, a framework of themes for the study of home in diaspora that is a combination of tangible, intangible and in-between elements is formulated that encompasses spatial/cultural elements of Iranian home. In that sense, the main contribution to knowledge ground on proposing a methodology for the study of home, while representing an understanding of the Iranian home. It is concluded in this thesis that the study of home with an architectural evaluation is achieved, only if it is situated in a context that acknowledges subjective experience, memory of space, identity and gender while signifying its indispensable tangible aspects.

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01 01 The development of the proposed framework of themes through each step

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02 The spatial movement of the guests and the host 03 Zaher and Baten in Iranian culture and the embodiment of hierarchy, hospitality and cleanliness

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Research SSoA is one of the top five research schools of architecture in the UK, The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) has confirmed the School’s position as a world class center for architectural research. In a joint submission with the Department of Landscape and Town and Regional Planning, we are proud to have achieved 4th place overall by subject scoring very closely to the first 3 places in the subject area of Architecture, Built Environment and Planning. 48% of our research was assessed 4*, representing world-leading quality and outstanding impact, and 37% was rated 3* (Internationally excellent). We had excellent results overall in the context of the faculty and TUoS Performance, being one of the five Faculty departments in the top 4 in their field, and having one of the highest ranked impact studies in the University. With 19 active research staff and approximately 75 postgraduate research students, the school consistently attracts external funding for its research and is involved internationally with a range of research projects. We do not see research as an isolated academic activity, but aim to shape the national research agenda and policy on the environment and to pro-actively address public and professional needs. In addition to external academic and industry partners, SSoA collaborations have been established within the University and City - Sheffield Urban Institute, Methods Institute, Engaged University. Research is carried out in three main research groups which reflect a particular methodological set of approaches: Design, Engagement and Practice, Space Cultures and Politics and People, Environments and Performance. Each group brings together a number of academic staff, researchers and postgraduate research students within shared interests. Three research strands weave across these new groups and into the FSS and TUoS: Building Local Resilience (BLR) which focuses on global strategies for developing local approaches to climate change; Architectural Research Practice (ARP), fostering Knowledge Exchange between industry and academia and LiveWorks (LW), an experimental laboratory for participatory research and pedagogy based in a shop in the city centre developed in collaboration with FSS and the Engaged University team. Some of this years research events include: - How to Publish in the Social Sciences? Nishat Awan, January 2018 - Short Talks by PhD Students, Ying Liu, Jonathan Sykes, Qiushi Peng, February 2018 - Embedding Ethics in Architectural Scholarship, Cathryn Ladd & Cressida Kocienski, March 2018 - Short Talks by PhD Students, Cagri Sanliturk and Maha Al-Ugaily, April 2018 - Preparing for Fieldwork, Beatrice De Carli, May 2018 - Methods of Dissemination, Tatjana Schneider, June 2018

Design, Engagement and Practice Globalisation and Spatial Practice Agency Urban resilience Participation Gender and architecture, Housing Co-production, Design for climate change Culture and climate change Design theory, practice and methodologies Selection of Current Projects: R-Urban: An alternative strategy of regenerating neighbourhoods with the principles of urban commons (ADEME) Culture and Climate Change: A series of interdisciplinary initiatives, events and publications on the topic of climate change Stories of Change: Creative engagements with industry, policy and the everyday around energy transitions (AHRC) Odessa: An EU-China project on understanding population change focussed on care delivery models that support ageing-in-place (ESRC) People, Environments, Performance Acoustics Lighting Digital Design Building Performance Evaluation Environmental Design Selection of Current Projects: MERLIN2: Lighting for Pedestrians: Working with UK, US and international bodies to specify how much light is needed for pedestrians to walk safely, and to feel safe (EPSRC) Unlocking the potential for model-predictive control in building energy management: A team of researchers from the School of Architecture and Departments of Civil and Electrical Engineering

will develop and test a new Model Predictive Control Algorithm to control heating, ventilating and cooling systems in buildings Space Cultures and Politics East – West Studies Critical Historiography Conservation & Regeneration Urban (Hi)stories Selection of Current Projects: RAUM: Researching Architecture as an Urban Method, Beatrice De Carli, Florian Kossak, and Tatjana Schneider Urban Education Live: Dr Tatjana Schneider, Dr Carolyn Butterworth, funded by JPI Urban Europe/ESRC Innovative Affordable Housing: Dr Tatjana Schneider, funded by The British Academy Research Strands Building Local Resilience (BLR) Architecture Research Practice (ARP) Live Works (LW)

Academics Dr Nishat Awan Diversity, post coloniality and geo-politics in spatial practice, creative research methodologies, alternative modes of practice, intersection of architectural, computational and artistic practice. Dr Beatrice de Carli Architecture, Participation and the Governance of Space and Learning and Urban Practices Professor Steve Fotios Research in lighting, research methods for visual psychophysics, building services, and environmental design. Professor Karim Hadjri Influence of the built environment on people with physical, sensory and cognitive impairments. Challenges of designing age-friendly environments. Enabling environments for people with dementia. Professor Jian Kang Computer simulation for room acoustics and environmental noise control, auralisation, urban soundscape and acoustic comfort considering social and psychological aspects of sounds, acoustic scale modelling, acoustic materials. Dr Florian Kossak Urban history, contemporary urbanism, urban design, experimental mediation of architecture. Dr Ranald Lawrence History of environmental design and its influence on the development of modern architecture. Dr Jo Lintonbon Urban history and theory of the 19th and 20th centuries, building conservation and conservation led urban regeneration, design approaches within the historic built environment. Dr Mark Meagher Augmented environments, digital forms of making, smart materials information visualisation, architecture and social media. Dr Krzysztof Nawratek Urban theory in the context of post-secular philosophy, crisis of the contemporary neoliberal city model and urban reindustrialisation, evolution of (post)socialist cities. Dr Chengzhi Peng Interactive architectural and urban visualisation modelling, e-documentation of heritage sites, mixed reality modelling and interaction, co-design of virtual and physical spaces.

Professor Doina Petrescu Gender and space within contemporary society, participation in architecture, culture and resilience. Professor Darren Robinson Interface between social, built and urban physics: people- buildingscity; buildings’ performance, urban systems. Dr Tatjana Schneider Social and political context of architecture, an ethical and expanded role of the architect, architecture as a collaborative, empowering and political discipline. Dr Magda Sibley Courtyard houses and public bath houses in the world heritage cities of North Africa and the Middle East, rehabilitation of the daylighting qualities of heritage hammams and innovative off grid solar lighting systems. Professor Fionn Stevenson Ecological approaches, sustainable design, climate change, bioregional contexts, tacit knowledge, occupancy feedback, building performance evaluation. Dr Renata Tyszczuk Cultural transformations and transitional periods, concepts of sustainability, global environmental change and globalization, experimental representational practices, communicative aspects of architecture across different media. Dr Tsung-Hsien Wang Lecturer in Sustainable Digital Design - architectural geometry construction from a parametric and generative perspective, digital fabrication, building performance simulation, sustainability evaluation and information interoperation in the building domain. Research Associates and Fellows Dr Chris Cheal Dr Isaiah Durosaiye Dr Célia Correia Macedo Dr Daniel Alonso Paredes-Soto Dr Maša Šorn Dr Gustavo Sousa Dr Jim Uttley


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2018 SSoA Manifesto/s PhD Conference 27-28th April 2018 Organising Team Nishat Awan Esra Can Gioia Fusaro Danni Kerr Cathryn Ladd Yanisa Niennattrakul Victoria Okoye Olivia Espinosa Trujillo Tingting Yang

PhD students at SSoA organised the Manifesto/s PhD Conference in the Arts Tower, University of Sheffield, on 27th and 28th April 2018. The two-day internal research conference brought together Architecture and Landscape PhD students who shared their research, created connections, and gained constructive feedback from a diverse and multidisciplinary community of scholars. This two-day internal research conference has been an important step in strengthening the SSoA student research community. The first day consisted of research presentations by PhD students on their ongoing research. Parallel sessions ran throughout the day, with space for each student to engage in a discussion with panel responders (which included SSoA and Department of Landscape faculty, Urban Institute research staff, and invited external responders). Presentations were grouped into four research themes: Mixed Methods in Research, Human Environment and Liveability, Co-production of Space and Technical Environment Research.

01 A discussion platform 02 Manifesto introduction 03 Methodology workshop 04 Organisation team 05 Presentations 01

The second day of hands-on workshops developed students’ research skills through experimentation, both in the areas of research methodology and research writing. These sessions were facilitated by leading academics who both progressively bridge research and practice in their work. Marie-Louise Richards, an architect and adjunct lecturer at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, facilitated the research writing workshop. Grainne Hassett, an architect and senior lecturer at School of Architecture, University of Limerick, facilitated the research methodologies workshop. A manifesto is a “public declaration” of an idea, intention, or view of an individual or a group. This first-everManifesto/s PhD Conference brought together and gave voice to the different research branches present within SSoA and the Department of Landscape. With such strong participation and high-quality discussions it provided, we hope that this conference will be the first of many more to follow in future academic years.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

field field is an international peer-reviewed journal that is available free online and with occasional limited edition print runs. It was launched in 2007 to provide an open access resource for innovative research in the architectural humanities. ISSN 1755-0068 The newest issue of field: Issue 7 on ‘Becoming a Feminist Architect’ has been published this year. www.field-journal.org For information and submissions email: field@sheffield.ac.uk Editorial and Review Collective Nishat Awan, University of Sheffield Peter Blundell-Jones (until 2016), University of Sheffield Gary Boyd, Queens University Belfast Peter Carl, University of Cambridge Cristina Cerulli, University of Sheffield Murray Fraser, Bartlett, UCL Katja Grillner, KTH School of Architecture, Stockholm Mari Hvattum, Arkitektur og Designhøgskolen i Oslo Andrew Higgott, Independent Scholar Florian Kossak, University of Sheffield Thomas Markus, University of Strathclyde Peter Mörtenböck, Goldsmiths College & Technische Universität Wien Helge Mooshammer, Technische Universität Wien Johan Pas, Antwerp Academy of Fine Arts Rosie Parnell, Northumbria University Doina Petrescu, University of Sheffield Wendy Pullan University of Cambridge Peg Rawes Bartlett, UCL Flora Samuel, University of Reading Tatjana Schneider, University of Sheffield Gabriela Switek, University of Warsaw, Warsaw Robert Tavernor, London School of Economics Jeremy Till, Central St. Martins, London Renee Tobe, University of East London Igea Troiani, Oxford Brookes University Renata Tyszczuk, University of Sheffield Stephen Walker, University of Sheffield Sarah Wigglesworth, Sarah Wigglesworth Architects Art and design Pouyan Akbari (web design) John Sampson (journal layout and web design) with Doina Petrescu Tatjana Schneider Renata Tyszczuk Contact field@sheffield.ac.uk


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field: a free journal for the discussion of critical, theoretical, political and playful perspectives on all aspects of architecture. field: an international peer-reviewed journal and an open electronic forum. field: makes architectural discourse and research available to, and aware of, the widest possible field.

How do we reconstruct a legacy of women working in architecture? How do we make them more visible and present in our discourse about architecture? How do we make their concerns heard? What are the ways in which architecture as a discipline participates in intersectionality, or the multiple frameworks of identity at play in the social field? Is that a term that our discipline is specially equipped to handle or is it woefully limited in that regard? Can feminism survive resource conflicts?

field: published by the School of Architecture, The University of Sheffield. ISSN: 1755-068

What is the framework for sexual ethics in a socio-cultural environment that can interrogate gender equity, privilege and heteronormativity?

Why do we keep having to relearn our past?

How do women redefine their practice?

How are feminist principles manifested in built works of architecture?

How can feminist thought approach and improve current housing and make it more socially inclusive?

How can we best address the generational differences between definitions of & attitudes toward the word “feminism” so that it may be a word that joins, rather than separates, all ages? How can the role of feminine playful spaces contribute to developing new forms of representation in waste urban spaces?

[Are there] Feminine ways of occupying urban space? Although feminist scholars have greatly increased their work, it does not flow to practitioners or to the public in a way that has caught on. How to integrate feminism and architecture needs persuasive arguments and activism to compete in a profession with many challenges.

If we want to correct the underrepresentation of women in architecture’s most visible practices, how do we avoid adopting masculine norms of success as guidelines for women’s attitudes in the workplace? Women Architects are often not mentioned in literature concerning architectural history and/or theory. If they are mentioned than often in passing or as collaborators and wives of male architects. Should it be a goal to ‘rewrite’ such history books towards a more inclusive history of architecture or are such books obsolete?

‘[Architectural and feminist theory, arguably] has shifted from oppositional dichotomies to include and embrace a spectrum of differences.’ (Hilde Heynen and Gwendolen Wright) Is this the case today, and if so, what might this diversity mean for architecture and feminism? How does architecture address the need for ‘situatedness’ in an increasingly mobile and networked world? In a period of unprecedented damage to the climate in part caused by flying should not we as feminists and ecologists practice what we preach?

How can we carve out a space in practice where there is room for analyses of power structures, and how they play out in the spaces we create? How can the architect reclaim a role where we can contribute to a socially and environmentally sustainable society? How can we move away from a situation where we are passive executioners of commissions from the builders, and take a more active role in what spaces we create, building more inclusive societies that we can actually be proud of?! How can we move towards a situation when city planning and architecture is based on the idea of an inclusive and sustainable society, where the initiative comes from the town planning office and not from builders looking to maximize their profit?


Student Achievements, Awards and Activities The social nature of the school has been exemplified this year by a range of activities and events taking place on a weekly basis within the school. Our staff and students have organised, participated and attended numerous events both locally, nationally and internationally. The strong social life within the school has fostered many creative partnerships.


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Student Awards and Achievements The School actively encourages students to participate in national and international design competitions. Our students have been consistent in winning prestigious and highly sought after awards and prizes. This year, our students have been shortlisted for several medals, prizes and awards as highlighted below. Professor Karim Hadjri, Head of School, explains "These are excellent achievements that showcase and disseminate the outstanding work of our students and the School's profile nationally and internationally. It is important for our students to consider and take part in these competitions. Congratulations and well done to the winners."

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01 European Architecture Medals - Shortlisted Hannah Pether - Part 2 Hannah’s thesis proposal seeks to address the extremely high migrant population and population turnover inherent in transient areas such as Offenbach, limiting the right of many in the city to a conventional vote. It seeks to give each individual a voice and story within the city through a deconstructed parliamentary model, mediating domestic and civic space to create a place of integration, debate and refuge: a ‘city within a city’. 02 SPAB Philip Webb Awards - 3rd Place Kate Nicholson - Part 2 This project addresses the communication crisis in Stoke-onTrent through the establishment of a centre for storytelling and learning at the former Spode Works pottery. While redefining the relationship between town and the factory, Kate's project was awarded for her creative approach to the site, use of the literacy, communication and storytelling thread to inform the next stage of its own story.

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03 European Prize for Political Innovation R-Urban The R-Urban project has been awarded a prize in the Ecology category at the Innovation in Politics Awards 2017. Led by Professor Doina Petrescu, R-Urban is a bottom-up strategy that explores the possibilities of enhancing urban resilience by introducing a network of resident-run facilities. 03 04 Vectorworks Design Scholarship 2017 Peter Markos - Part 1 Peter's project focuses on Saltaire village which was once at the forefront of the textile mill industry. Today the village is renowned for its world heritage site status but is equally stuck in the past. As we experience environmental and climate change, factories and production lines must be altered to meet our current and future needs. The Energy Centre proposes the production of renewable energy components as a catalyst to re-introducing industry and production into Saltaire.

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05 Passivhaus Competition Karl Higham Karl Higham has been announced as a winner in the Passivhaus Student competition 2017. Competitors were asked to identify one retrofit or new build project and provide a detailed design to turn this into a certifiable Passivhaus building. The competition was incorporated into the teaching schedule of the five participating Universities, forming part of the students' ongoing coursework. Karl chose a site in Zurich which is situated on the peak of the Uetliberg Mountain, a key Swiss monument. The design philosophy was that the building meets Passivhaus standards, embraces traditional Swiss vernacular, responds to complex site topography and utilises ground thermal mass. 06 Inspiring Graduate Awards Robin Poulson Robyn Poulson graduated from the MArch course in 2016 and has been named amongst four contenders for the 2017 AJ/Curtins Inspiring Graduate Prize. The award celebrates entrepreneurial Part 1 and 2 graduates that significantly contribute to their architecture practice’s business or have demonstrated exceptional business thinking on an independent project.

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07 Student Innovation Competition on Sustainable Energy Polla Dilshad Ibrahim Sktani Polla Dilshad Ibrahim Sktani has been awarded first place in the Student Innovation Competition on Sustainable Energy 2017. The award recognises individuals and teams who have undertaken an innovative project that offers environmental solutions which have a positive economic and environmental impact in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. 08 Shortlisted in 3D hubs student grant 2017 Josie Dorling The international competition attracted around 450 entries from 300 universities worldwide. Josie’s entry, ‘A Future in Flood’, included a 3D printed kinetic model that she worked on during the MArch course. The project is set in the year 2045 and focuses on architecture that responds to the effects of climate change, in particular flooding. Josie designed the project with an amphibious floating base, that rises up in a wet dock in a flood, causing linear vertical movement in the columns and subsequently causing rotary motion in the roof mechanism, providing visual warning towards environmental change. 09 Re-think 2017 Competition Wanqing Wong Re-think 2017 is an annual competition organised by Balmond Studio, a research-led practice of architects, designers, artists and theoreticians run by the leading thinker on form and structure – Cecil Balmond OBE. Wanqing’s entry was selected from hundreds and showcased not only originality, but practical real world possibilities. The judges' commented "Innovative and original with real world potential, Wanqing’s concept impressed the judges. The Urban Beach Corridor is an architecture of resistance. A rethink that proposes new experiences and purpose through the demolishment of urban infrastructure, revealing the ‘Beach’. The ‘Beach’ is an undesignated public space that also acts as a tool to manage and control water usage in the city.

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

SSoA School Forum 2017 Theory Forum 2017

Wednesday 22.11.2017

Research confronts global energy challenges The Stories of Change project, in collaboration with Derby Museums, launched a pair of exhibitions challenging our understanding of the energy stories in everyday objects. Spread across the top two floors of Derby’s finest Georgian townhouse, Pickford’s House, these exhibitions showcased objects never before seen, delving into their history, production and conservation. Energetic’ was the culmination of an ambitious research project led by the Open University in partnership with the Universities of Sheffield, Bath, Birmingham, Exeter and South Wales. It was designed to stimulate lively conversations about energy by looking in a fresh way at its past, present and future.

ETHICS AND ARCHITECTURE We are a society concerned with architecture that makes positive change to those who need it. We run trips, construction workshops, lectures and other events through the year. We would love you to join us whatever you study!

This year’s Theory Forum will explore the ethical dimensions of architecture with particular critical focus on contemporary topics such as ‘humanitarian architecture’, ‘social architecture’, disaster relief, architectural ‘voluntourism’ and community participation.

School Forum: The Expanded Field What does it mean when we step out of norms within which architecture is practiced? And upon what assumptions are these norms based? In an expanded field, questions arise. Seven speakers discussed what it means to work with the limits of western theory. They talked of how you position your work. They spoke of the ethics of practicing in places where other practices are failing people. This discussion was a beginning of a process of dismantling and recalibrating the practice of architecture.

The forum will be a day of presentations and provocations from academics, journalists, architects and students.

Towards integrated and affordable health and social care at home for older people ODESSA (Optimising care delivery models to support ageing-inplace) is a three-year, €1 million venture which aims to find new and innovative ways of adapting a person’s home so that they can live independently for longer. This final conference presented the findings of the project, featuring renowned speakers across ageing, housing, and assisted living.

Feel free to drop into any of the following: 11:00 11:20

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Arts Tower

16:30 Train Station

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Introduction Tatjana Schneider On the who, where, how and why of ‘social’ architecture Angie Hobbs On ethics and the city Panel discussion Grainne Hassett On ‘unpacking’ practice Megan Groth On values in education and practice Panel discussion Zerm On Lille Housing and being a collective Freya Cobbin On ethics abroad Panel discussion Closing summary

St Mary’s

St Mary’s Church, Bramall Ln, Sheffield , S2 4QZ

HAS.

Humanitarian Architecture Society.

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@SheffHas @SheffHas

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SSOA Ethics and Architecture Theory Forum 2017 Theory Forum 2017

Wednesday 22.11.2017

22 November 2017 Organised by Carolyn Butterworth, Magda Sibley, HAS

ETHICS AND ARCHITECTURE

Keynote address: Grainne Hassett (Graham Willis Professor, Architecture 00)

We are a society concerned with architecture that makes positive change to those who need it. We run trips, construction workshops, lectures and other events through the year. We would love you to join us whatever you study!

Aims & themes: The Theory Forum is an international conference hosted annually by Sheffield School of Architecture, focusing each year on a topic of contemporary relevance for architectural theory and practice. It is a day-long event which provides an intense introduction to the theory, history and contemporary discourse around the topic, through a variety of presentations from academics and practitioners.

This year’s Theory Forum will explore the ethical dimensions of architecture with particular critical focus on contemporary topics such as ‘humanitarian architecture’, ‘social architecture’, disaster relief, architectural ‘voluntourism’ and community participation.

‘Social architecture.’ A familiar phrase; but what does it actually mean? This year's Theory Forum theme, ‘Ethics and Architecture’ explored the ethical dimensions of architecture and architectural research. Particular focus was concentrated upon contemporary topics including: practice, working internationally, analysis of current rhetoric along with a grounding within the field of ethics and philosophy, something identified as distinctly lacking within the current architectural education syllabus.

The forum will be a day of presentations and provocations from academics, journalists, architects and students.

Speakers: The conference was split into three sections, each comprising of two presentations, followed by an opportunity for students to reflect, discuss and debate through a panel discussion with the speakers. The first section was an insight into the philosophy of ethics in the city and beginning to tackle notions of the social. The second section delved into the ethics of research and practice and the final section, was concerned with reflections on various case studies. Six speakers with a plethora of diverse experience within and outside the field of architecture helped students to begin to dissect some of the ethical considerations.

Feel free to drop into any of the following: 11:00 11:20

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Grounding: Ethics and the Social Tatjana Schneider: On what what is social architecture? Angie Hobbs: On ethics and the city

15:20 16:00 Arts Tower

Ethics of Research and Practice Grainne Hassett: On what are the forces shaping our work? Megan Roth: On values in education and practice

16:30 Train Station

Reflections Through Case Studies Zerm: On Lille housing and being a collective Freya Cobbin: On ethics abroad

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Introduction Tatjana Schneider On the who, where, how and why of ‘social’ architecture Angie Hobbs On ethics and the city Panel discussion Grainne Hassett On ‘unpacking’ practice Megan Groth On values in education and practice Panel discussion Zerm On Lille Housing and being a collective Freya Cobbin On ethics abroad Panel discussion Closing summary

St Mary’s

St Mary’s Church, Bramall Ln, Sheffield , S2 4QZ

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Humanitarian Architecture Society.

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01 Tatjana Schneider: On what what is social architecture? 02 Theory Forum 2017 poster 03 Theory Forum 2017 01

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@SheffHas @SheffHas

SSoA


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Sheffield School of Architecture London Exhibition 2017 We are pleased to launch the Sheffield School of Architecture London Exhibition! On 26-28 June 2017 architects, alumni, friends and family were able to view a selection of design work from our undergraduate (RIBA Part 1), MArch (RIBA Part 2) and Postgraduate Taught Masters students. The exhibition was displayed at Old Spitalfields Market and provided a fantastic opportunity to showcase student design work in our capital city. We were delighted to host practices looking for Part 1 and 2 graduates, alumni mini-reunions, proud parents and the RIBA Education Committee.

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01 London Exhibition Launch Night 2017 02 Students speaking about their work to local people in Spode 03 Studio Temporal Places Masterplan 04 Poster for Arrival City International Architecture Exhibition 01

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MArch student exhibition: ‘Evolving Spode Works’, Stoke-on-Trent

Arrival City International Architecture Exhibition, Mannheim, Germany

Projects from last year's MArch Studio Temporal Places were exhibited in July 2017 In Spode, showing a series of architecture schemes that investigated the heritage of Spode Works, a former pottery in Stoke-on-Trent.

An exhibition of the work of 13 MArch students from the Sheffield School of Architecture will be exhibited in Mannheim, Germany in June 2018, which will be funded by SSoA. For the past 9 months, students in Studio Arrival City have been working on theoretical projects based in Mannheim, focusing on themes of arrival, migration and identity.

The projects explored a series of creative possibilities for the future of this important former pottery. Projects responded to contemporary issues whilst recognising the significance of the past, engaging strongly with the existing urban fabric of Spode Works and the surrounding town of Stoke, and drawing upon the Potteries’ distinctive sense of place.

The studio visited Mannheim in November and met with representatives from the City including the Officer for Building Culture, and the leader of the Migrants for Cities Programme. Mark Stancombe and Yanni Pitsillides, both Year 6 Collaborative Practice students, have retained links to contacts they met in Mannheim and have secured funding from the University to return at the end of the academic year to exhibit the work of the studio and to run a series of workshops with local activists. They are also looking to set up a Live Project in Mannheim that will run next year.

ARRIVAL CITY ARCHITECTURE EXHIBITION 13 student projects from Sheffield School of Architecture, UK //

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20-21ST JUNE 2018 KLOKKE ANTICAFE // Mittelstraße 19, Neckarstadt-West, Mannheim

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

SUAS This year SUAS has run a diverse range of activities and events for our members. The success of these meant we were once again nominated for ‘Best Departmental Society’ of the year at the Activities Awards. Our weekly lectures series have been a continued success, attracting a wide range of people, such as the current RIBA President Ben Derbyshire and Forbes Massie. We have also run a weekly Lunchtime specials series run by post-graduates for the undergraduates to help their architectural education, for year collaboration and have included Photoshop and InDesign masterclasses. This year it was important to the committee to have more emphasis on Mental Health Awareness, with Dave Hodgson coming in for a Lunchtime Special on the topic and Emmanuel Owusu giving a lecture on Wellbeing. Socials have remained a highly enjoyed aspect of the society, attracting all years, and have included the annual Winter Ball, pub-crawl in Bakewell and the fantasy-themed Summer Social! Following that, we re-launched our collaboration with Sheffield Society of Architects and Sheffield Hallam Architecture Society with a networking quiz night which was a great success. We ran a successful mentoring scheme with over 100 people involved with most master’s students tutoring 1-2 mentees each. Finally, we would like to thank Emma England and Sarah Drummond from RIBA Yorkshire, for the screening of She Draws: She Builds, which we showed on International Women’s Day. President Ryan Smith Vice-President Ellie Piper Treasurer Keren Obiuzu Secretary Chloe Clacy Inclusions Officer Luzelle Davies Social Secretaries Ben Yeates Ben Warren Deepti Nayar Lecture Co-ordinators Clare Mckay Oliver Millett Lunchtime Specials Richard Rothwell Shop and Merchandise Officer Jack Laurie Social media/ Publicity Lugain Rfidah

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Special thanks to all our incoming speakers: Autumn semester Jim Heverin Zaha Hadid Architects Forbes Massie Forbes Massie Ben Derbyshire RIBA President Alice Brownfield Peter Barber Architecture Karim Hadjri SSOA Spring Semester Emmanuel Owusu Finn Williams Public Practice James Halsall Mae architects Steve Jones Coffey architects Sean Douglas Sutherland Hussey Harris Fergus Feilden Feilden Fowles

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We hugely appreciate these lectures, they are a very welcome break from our lives in the Art Tower and we hope that the value they add to our education and knowledge will continue throughout the years. Thank you to all the staff and students who have contributed and partook in our society and we hope to see you all in October for the AGM and a fresh new year of SUAS! Ellie Piper Vice President

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Graphics Officers Becky Smith Deepa Goswami Competitions Luke Smith

01 SUAS lecture by Steve Jones 02 Quiz night with Sheffield Society of architects poster 03 SUAS lectures posters 04 Quiz night with Sheffield Society of Architects 05 Lunch Time Special: Photoshop Speed Painitng poster 06 SUAS at the Students Activities fair 05

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HAS The Humanitarian Architecture Society, affectionately known as HAS, is a university society concerned with architecture that makes a positive change to those who need it most. Rather than merely sitting in studio talking about social ideals, we are a group who aim to be proactive and seek opportunities to become aware and get involved in real debates and community events. Established in 2017, HAS is a relatively young society yet has achieved much so far. This year, we curated and participated in a wealth of events, projects, talks and even a conference to. From organising a timber construction workshop building furniture for Foodhall, a local community kitchen, to showing a range of documentaries highlighting socially oriented architecture on a global scale, to various visits to community driven building projects including the co-housing scheme managed by our very own head of MArch, Leo Care. Among this year’s the highlights was our visit to Hill Holt Wood, a social enterprise and woodland near Lincoln where we completed a three day, level two BETC in straw bale construction. With a mixture of hands on experience and theory, we constructed a small straw bale structure using on natural and traditional techniques.

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05 01 Course in straw-bale construction at Hill Holt Wood 02 Course in straw-bale construction at Hill Holt Wood 03 'Give it a go' event. Making furniture at community social enterprise, Foodhall 04 Film screening event poster 05 'Give it a go' event. Making furniture at community social enterprise, Foodhall 06 The Theory Forum 2017. Ethics and Architecture 03

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The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Sheffield Society of Architects SSoA is proud to feature Sheffield Society of Architects (SSA). Established in 1887, SSA is a branch of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Yorkshire Region. There is no charge for SSA membership which is open to all RIBA members within the Sheffield, South Yorkshire and North-East Derbyshire areas and extends to employees of Chartered Practices and students/lecturers involved in architecture. Other professionals and interested parties are also welcome to be involved with the Society’s activities. Led by a volunteer steering group comprising of President, Senior Vice President, Honorary Secretary, Treasurer, Vice Presidents and committee members, SSA exists to support our members, provide a local voice to regional and national RIBA and encourage thinking about how architecture can positively impact on the places where we live out our lives. In recent years our focus has been on promoting public, professional and student interaction with each other and Sheffield’s architectural realm through the organisation of and involvement in numerous (fun) events and activities, including: • Organisation of regular building visits • Delivery of a series of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) events, including ‘hands-on’ workshops • Social Events – Pub Quizzes, Soap Box etc • The Sheffield Design Awards, working with Sheffield Civic Trust • Presidents Medals Exhibition, in collaboration with UoS • Sheffield Design Week • Sheffield Modern Architecture Festival • Fantastical Cities – family-focussed construction events In addition to the regular CPD and Building Visits, SSA activities in 2018 are focussing on three main projects: Sheffieldsocietyofarchitects.org.uk The Sheffield Society of Architect’s website was launched late last year and regular updates mean this is now our primary resource and method for keeping in touch with our members. We have phased out of our blog, introduced quarterly newsletters and improved administrative systems for contacting members, booking our events and engaging with a wider community in our area and beyond. Flockton exhibition and walking tours We are developing various projects relating to the Flockton Archive which we purchased in 2015. Flockton were a series of architectural practices that were based in Sheffield in the 19th and 20th centuries.

The firms were responsible for a number of significant buildings in the Sheffield area, many of which are still in use and some subject to recent refurbishment/ alteration. We have completed our digital archiving and are preparing for a public exhibition in the autumn. The first of our walking tour guides was completed in 2017 and was provided as a guided tour during Heritage Open Days. This year, we will release a further walk which takes a route through our city centre through to the Wicker, visiting surviving Flockton architecture as well as sites where those buildings have been lost or redeveloped. Route maps will be available from the exhibition and for download from our website.

Going forward we want to further strengthen our ties with architectural students, academics, practices and other partner organisations to help promote architecture and enable debate about our great city and the design issues/opportunities it offers. New members are always welcome to strengthen our committee and if you would like to become involved, subscribe to our newsletter or find out more about SSA and its events please see our website at www.sheffieldsocietyofarchitects.org.uk. Leanora Simmonite, President of Sheffield Society of Architects


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Internationalisation SSoA continues to be a vibrant international community: over 30% of our students and nearly 40% of our staff are international. This is reflected across all aspects of our work from the way we learn and teach, to the diversity of our research portfolio and the way we engage with the city and the world beyond. We are particularly dedicated to supporting incoming international students, as well as home students seeking international experience. We focus on developing the cultural agility of all our students, and actively seek to create further opportunities to expand our students’ awareness of the international context of research, study and practice. We have developed curricula that are culturally aware, sensitive, appropriate and ethically grounded, supported by a diverse and comprehensive international teaching network. We have strong connections with other schools and organisations around the world and actively promote cultural exchanges within the department, across the University and with our partner institutions. As well as raising cultural awareness, our teaching collaborations enable students and staff to participate in international exchanges through collaborative work or placements. Our international teaching network includes Erasmus + partnerships with a wide range of EU universities (2 new exchanges with TU Delft and Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris La Villette have been added this year) as well as partnerships further afield through programmes such as the Univeristy-wide Study Abroad. Additionally, a range of informal teaching collaborations with international partners and activities - such as field trips, case studies and research collaborations - enrich the learning experience, making it culturally diverse and geographically spread.

Outgoing Exchange Students: James Maidment (Y2) - Delft University of Technology Maria-Monica Maxim (Y2) - The Technical University of Munich Rebeca Thomas (Y2) - National University of Singapore Nikola Yanev (Y5) - Delft University of Technology Incoming Exchange Students: Y2 Junyoon Lee - South Korea Brianna Braukmann - Montana Zhiyuan Zhang - Kyushu University Kerry He - University of Sydney Jia Xian Tan - National University of Singapore Huiyung Li - University of Sydney Xin Du - University of Sydney Sherry Goh - National University of Singapore Kevin Yuen - Griffiths University Y3 Matthew Bellomy - University of Kansas Antonia Bohn - The Technical University of Munich Cedric Lomeier - The Technical University of Munich Panphila Pau - City University of Hong Kong Y5 Cosma Allen - Paris La Villette Anna Bärring - Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm Abderrahman Ech-chikh - Paris La Villette Marita Nilsen - The Oslo School of Architecture and Design Yiann Reghaï - Paris La Villette

01 Cedric Lomeier, 3rd Year The Technical University of Munich, Munich The thought of living abroad for a whole year was a scary one at first, but within the open, friendly and very welcoming atmosphere of the University of Sheffield I really shouldn’t have worried: The first trip to Scarborough was really all it took to feel part of the SSOA. As my home university in Munich is quite focussed on technical aspects and practicability, I have definitely gotten to know a different approach to designing in my Erasmus year. A more playful, openminded view on architecture is what I will take home with me; and on top of that, a whole year packed full of new experiences! 02 Panphila Pau, 3rd Year City University of Hong Kont Studying architecture in Sheffield not only enriched my academic knowledge in architecture, but also inspired me to design without boundaries. Through its distinct teaching style, from the unrestricted submission format in design, to the extensive tutorials provided by tutors, I was able to create projects that are not precedented by me before. The exchange programme at The University of Sheffield allowed me to fit into the university well and I was able to fully experience the life of an architecture student here. 03 Nikola Yanev, 5th Year Delft University of Technology, Delft Exposing myself to a new school ethos at TU Delft in the Netherlands, I have expanded my knowledge and understanding of architecture and the Dutch traditions. It was inspiring to develop projects that have different emphasis to Sheffield, which I was able to bring back with me upon my return. TU Delft is a highly stimulating place to do architecture, where I have made wonderful friendships and was difficult to say goodbye to in the end. I have had the chance to visit incredible buildings that I have only read about before and even do a design project on one designed by Herman Hertzberger! Cycling everywhere has been a joy (even when it snowed!) Delft is a picturesque city, a mini - Amsterdam with its canals that you can even go paddle-boating in the sunny days too!

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Australia Japan Singapore South Korea Sydney USA


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Celebrating Services Staff and Technical Team We would like to express our thanks to the team of staff who play such a major role in keeping SSoA working successfully, And extend our congratulations to Rebecca on the birth of her daughter Rosie.

John Allred Junior Technician

Cheryl Armitage Postgraduate Research Officer

Martin Bradshaw IT Manager

Andrew Elliott Technician (Digital Media)

Rebecca Gray Learning and Teaching Manager

Sam Guest Recruitment and Admissions Assistant

Laura Mason Materials Workshop Manager

Allanah Millsom Student Experience Officer

Stuart Moran Materials Workshop Technician


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The School of Architecture is delighted to announce Professor Karim Hadjri as Head of School. Professor Hadjri took over from Professor Fionn Stevenson from 1st September 2017.

Andrea Chambers Finance Administrator

Roy Childs Reprographics Manager

Samantha Drobinski Departmental Manager

Karim Hadjri joined the School in September 2016 from the University of Central Lancashire where he held a Chair in Architecture. Previously he was a Reader in Architecture at the Queen’s University Belfast. Karim is an architect with a Master of Philosophy and a Doctor of Philosophy in housing studies completed at the Joint Centre for Urban Design at Oxford Brookes University. He has worked as a scholar in the United Kingdom, UAE and Saudi Arabia, and managed academic units and research centres in both Cyprus and Colombia. Karim has led and contributed to over twenty research projects worldwide since 1992. He was recently the PI for €1m ESRC-funded ‘Odessa’ project part of the EU-China collaborative research on understanding population change. He currently supervises several PhD projects on people-environment studies and sustainable design. He is a member of the ESRC peer review college, a member of the Newton Fund Social Sciences Review Panel under the British Council, a senior member of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) validation board, and a fellow of the UK Higher Education Academy. He is also a reviewer for various UK and European funding agencies, and a referee for academic promotion to various universities worldwide. Karim is looking forward to maintaining the School’s position and to further grow its offer nationally and internationally, to consolidate the staff team and physical resources, to increase grant capture particularly through the GCRF fund, and to continue to strengthen the research base in preparation for REF2021.”

Christie Harrison Research Manager

Sarah Lancashire Marketing and External Relations Manager

Fran Sutherland Learning and Teaching Manager

Tariq Zaman Facilities and Technology Development Manager

Ralph Mackinder Learning Technologist and Media Unit


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

In Memory of Mohammed Elashry Mohammed, or Mo as he was known to his friends in the School of Architecture and beyond, was a relatively new member of the first year studio, having only transferred from engineering after Christmas. It is a sign of the young man that in such a short space of time he had formed such strong friendships within the year, and his loss is so keenly felt. He will be remembered for his relaxed and friendly attitude, his informality and openness, as well as for his exuberant sense of style. His enquiring approach to his studies and the environment around him would have served him very well in his ambition to become an architect. It is very hard to come to terms with the fact that Mo will not now have that opportunity. He is very much missed by all who knew him in the School of Architecture and Department of Civil and Structural Engineering. This exhibition and catalogue is dedicated to the memory of Mohammed Elashry.


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Publisher University of Sheffield Editorial Design Samuel Letchford Antonia Alexandru Gulim Satekova Anakin Poon Editorial Design Staff Support Adam Eckworth Sara Lancashire Sponsorship Satwinder Samra SSoA Photographs Ralph Mackinder and students/staff members Printed in England by University of Sheffield Print Services (Print & Design Solutions)

www.shef.ac.uk/architecture @SSoA_News Cover Images John Chia Josie Dorling David Hodgson Holly Wilkinson Helen Galetti Minghe Ma Michael Neal Thomas Cunningham The University of Sheffield School of Architecture would like to thank the technical and administrative team for their continued support and input throughout the year. We would also like to thank all of our contributors, everyone involved in curating the exhibition and everyone involved in compiling this catalogue.

Copyright 2018 School of Architecture, University of Sheffield. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the publisher. ISBN:978-0-9929705-9-8 For a full range of programmes and modules please see www.shef.ac.uk/architecture School of Architecture University of Sheffield The Arts Tower Western Bank Sheffield S10 2TN Tel. +44 (0) 114 222 0305 Fax +44 (0) 114 222 0315 E-mail ssoa@sheffield.ac.uk Web www.shef.ac.uk/architecture Twitter @SSoA_news


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Profile for SSoA

Sheffield School of Architecture 2018 Catalogue  

Full catalogue of student work from the University of Sheffield, School of Architecture Summer Exhibition 2018.

Sheffield School of Architecture 2018 Catalogue  

Full catalogue of student work from the University of Sheffield, School of Architecture Summer Exhibition 2018.

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