__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

ISBN 978-0-9929705-7-4

2017

9 780992 970574

CATALOGUE 2017

The University of Sheffield School of Architecture Catalogue

£ 10 www.shef.ac.uk/architecture


Publisher University of Sheffield Editorial Design Deborah Adler Petros Antoniou Andreea Ditu Saule Pribusauskaite Sponsorship Satwinder Samra SSoA Photographs Ralph Mackinder and other students/staff members Printed in England by University of Sheffield Print Services (Print & Design Solutions) www.shef.ac.uk/architecture @SSoA_News Cover Images Deborah Adler Petros Antoniou Yen-Ting Chen Andreea Ditu Mansel Haynes Joe Paget Saule Pribusauskaite Simeon Shtebunaev Nor Izura Tukiman Montgomery Williams Wanqing Wong Tong Tsz Ying The University of Sheffield School of Architecture would like to thank the technical and administrative team for their continued support and input throughout the year. We would also like to thank all of our contributors, everyone involved in curating the exhibition and everyone involved in compiling this catalogue.

Copyright 2017 School of Architecture, University of Sheffield. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the publisher. ISBN:978-0-9929705-7-4 For a full range of programmes and modules please see www.shef.ac.uk/architecture School of Architecture University of Sheffield The Arts Tower Western Bank Sheffield S10 2TN Tel. +44 (0) 114 222 0305 Fax +44 (0) 114 222 0315 E-mail ssoa@sheffield.ac.uk Web http://www.shef.ac.uk/architecture/ Twitter @SSoA_news


Contents Foreword 

2

Undergraduate 

4 6 12 18 28

MArch in Architecture 

30 32 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 78

MArch in Architecture: Collaborative Practice 

82

Year One Year Two Year Three Undergraduate Special Study Studio Intergenerational Architecture Studio (re)-Activist Architecture Studio Designing with Knowledge Studio Learning Culture Studio Arrival City Studio Landscape + Urbanism / Alluvial Ecologies Studio: In Residence Studio Collaborative Production Studio Temporal Places  Studio Histories of Place : Metro-Land  Live Projects MArch Dissertation

Postgraduate Taught Masters 

84 86 104 110 118

Graduate School 

124 126 128

Student Achievements, Awards and Activities 

130 132 136 137 138 139 139 140 141

Internationalisation 

142

Celebrating Services Staff and Technical Team 

144

In Memory of Professor Peter Blundell Jones 

146

MA in Architectural Design MSc in Digital Design & Interactive Built Environments MA in Urban Design MSc in Sustainable Architectural Studies Completed PHD Thesis Projects Research Student Awards and Achievements SSOA Building Local Resilience Platform: SSOA Building Local Resilience Platform: SUAS WELL? zine HAS Architecture Students Network Sheffield Society of Architects 


Foreword Welcome to this year’s Sheffield School of Architecture Exhibition and Catalogue, which we are dedicating to a key member of staff who served our School so wonderfully for over two decades – Professor Peter Blundell Jones – sorely missed. Once again, we have reached another milestone in making a difference to meet the key challenges of the turbulent times we live in just now. We are proud of our students and staff, and particularly our international students and staff who face real hardship due to the current situation in the UK. We believe in education as a human right and in architecture for all. You will see truly inspiring and creative projects this year, with our students producing the architectural excellence our reputation rests on. This is fused with a fierce independence and critical thinking – and I encourage you to share your thoughts with us via our twitter account @ssoa_news. Our students once again scooped four top prizes at the Regional RIBA awards, as well as the prestigious SPAB Philip Webb Award, a national AJ/Hoare Lea bursary award, a commendation in the Norman Foster Travelling Scholarship award, and winning prizes at our Faculty Student Research Festival. Our Sheffield University Architecture Society (SUAS), went on to win best Departmental Student Society for the second year running, thanks to a truly dedicated team of volunteers producing an exciting programme of events and support for our student development. This year has seen a blossoming of our international relations with new teaching partnerships developing in India, China and South Africa, alongside developing partnerships in Malaysia, Mexico, Brazil, and beyond. Last October, three of our students were selected to join 25,000 accredited delegates in Quito, Ecuador as Global Leadership Initiative Policy Analysts. The Habitat III conference is the single most important international event on cities and urban development in the past 20 years. We will continue to build in this area of our work in the years to come. Our Alumni initiatives also go from strength to strength, with over 30 top practices partnering us on our unique Collaborative Practice route in our M.Arch programme, which allows our students to ‘earn while they learn’. In 2016 we launched a campaign for undergraduate scholarships in architecture and asked for help from our staff, friends and alumni. We are delighted to say that we raised enough to offer an Undergraduate Scholarship which has now been allocated to a current year 1 student. Sheffield School of Architecture is now ranked 4th in the Guardian QS Rankings, 4th UK School in the World QS rankings, and joint first in UG teaching for the 2016 National Student Survey as well as ranked 4th in the UK out of all Schools of Architecture, for its research. This quality speaks for itself. My sincere thanks go to all our students, staff, visiting guests, reviewers, alumni and our generous sponsors who have helped to make all of this this possible, and who have made my four years here as Head so memorable - your support for our School has been invaluable. I am delighted to announce Professor Karim Hadjri as a most able next Head of School for the next four years. Fionn Stevenson, Head of School


Undergraduate The BA Architecture course is a three-year honours degree that brings together a balanced university education with a professionally orientated course. It combines lecture based courses with a creative studio culture. Lectures develop a broad knowledge base ranging across sciences and humanities; this knowledge is then brought to the studio where it is tested and developed through a sequence of design projects. Lectures are delivered by staff who are all at the forefront of their own field of research, ensuring that information imparted is up-to-date and relevant. Within the studio, full time members of staff are joined by practicing architects, who bring with them topical ideas and skills from the world of architecture. It is this combination of a rigorous academic base and a creative professional direction that exemplifies architecture at Sheffield. The dual degrees in Architecture + Landscape and Structural Engineering and Architecture enable students to integrate their architectural design work with the wider landscape context and the discipline of engineering respectively. All courses offer opportunities to think about sustainability and sustainable futures in an interconnected and contextual way.

Undergraduate Programme Director Simon Chadwick Dual Architecture and Landscape Architecture Director Howard Evans Dual MEng course in Structural Engineering and Architecture Coordinator Richard Harpin


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Year One “Real winners do not compete.” Samuli Paronen The main intention of Year One studio is twofold: We want students to learn basic skills, allowing them to communicate their design ideas to others, and we want students to critically reflect on their own work and consequences of architectural interventions. The building (or any other spatial intervention) is a node within a broad network of forces and actors. We want our students to start seeing architecture in this highly contextualised way. The Year One ethos is built on notions of collaboration, social engagement and inclusivity. While students learn how to design a building, they simultaneously ask why anything should be designed and build at all? Who will benefit from this particular spatial intervention? How the building will influence its location and surroundings?

Year Director Dr Krzysztof Nawratek Studio Tutors Pouyan Akbari Taghi Amirhosseini Matthew Bradshaw Isabel Britch Shan Wei Chen David Gibson Jen Langfield Alex Maxwell Dr. Krzysztof Nawratek Elliot Payne Sheng Song Reem Sultan Department of Landscape Tutors Andrew J Clayden Howard Evans Thomas White BA Architecture Students Jacob Ashton Kallistheni Avraam Joseph Bayley Boyanova Simeonova Max Bridge Nial Brimacombe Grace Byrne Eleanor Catlin Huiling Chen Rachael Cowan Calin Craiu Eugenia Davidson Luzelle Davies Alem Derege Gabriela Di Castro Calderon Mengyi Ding Andreea Dragos Tom Dyvig Emma Dziemianko Matthew Feetham Ruby Flanagan Anna Fulcher Alexander Furness Deepa Goswami Hannah Graves Antonia Headlam-Morley Holly Hearne Nathan Hill Nathan Sally Hodgson Esther Holland Ella Hopkin Benjamin Huckstep

Nathalie Hurlstone Sophia Hutchinson Emma Huxtable Kim Hyo Razvan Ivanov Bonnie Jackson Felix Jenkins Sung Kang Rosalyn Knight Gloria Kostrzewa-Seyoum Agnese Kouzari Arun Kowcun Jacques Lachetta Stuart Lanigan Vincent Las Marias Genevieve Leake Kallum Lightfoot Charmaine Lin Amelia Little Yiming Liu Jennie Lua Yuanwen Luo Minghe Ma Holly Macmahon James Maidment Lily Markey Eleanor Mason Imogen Mason-Jones Maria-Monica Maxim Sabrina Mcdonnell Jessica Meech Matthew Meeson Kemba Mitchell Ilias Muckli Ella Murrell Deepti Nayar Petros Nikolaou Keren Obiuzu Kacper Pach Fenella Pakeman Pannatorn Pavapanupong Maria Perikleous Tobias Phillimore Maria Pinte Hoi Pong Mawee Pornpunyalert James Prickett Florin Roman Diana Savin Kathryn Sedgwick Anu Shemar Boyanova Slavena Simeonova Marnie Slotover Andreea Stanuta Dawid Starosta Alanna Stevenson

Glenn Strachan Haemish Subhash Joseph Syrett Thien Tey Rebeca Thomas Alec Thomson George Thornton Ane Torgard Deividas Vaitekjanas Cecelia Vincent Rebecca Wallace Jun Wang Lan Wang Ben Warren Ziming Weng Georgia Whitehead Anna Wiliwinska Zhuoer Yu Olga Zakrzewska Dimitar Zhelev Haonan Zuo BA Architecture and Landscape Students Sabelle Adjagboni Daniel Codd Isabel Grandcourt Samuel Harris Alice Jenkins Aleksandra Korneeva Jack Saunders Peter Tomson Emmeline Trenchard-Mole Hallam Woodhouse Xiyne Xu Yile Zhang Yilin Zheng MEng Structural Engineering & Architecture Students Geraint Andrews Thitiphol Chokkanapitak Hugo Chung Suzanne Johnsen Johanan Joseph Yin Lam Daniel Letherbarrow Polly Natynczuk Mubaraka Shamsuddin Gabrielle Taylor Freya Williams Lydia Wright Leah Wright Xintian Yu

External Reviewers Maha AA Al-Ugaily Moinak Basu (HLM) Jasmine Kaur Chadha Simon Chadwick Xingyuan Chen Christopher Cooper Ian Hicklin David M. Hodgson Aidan Hoggard Anders Johnsson Azka Khan Seonwoo Kim Ranald Lawrence Alex Maxwell Joseph McKibben Thomas B Moore Luke AJ Moran Aya S Musmar Faith C. Ng’eno Ebru Sen Catherine Skelcher Sheng Song Lakshmi Srinivasan Fionn Stevenson Fionn Stevenson, Professor Amanda C Vos Amro AA Yaghi Beimeng Zhang Lingyan Zhou


7


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester One P1: My Sheffield This project allows students to get to know each other by working together as a group, and to familiarise themselves with the design studio. This project helps students to see architecture in a wider (urban, social, cultural) context. Over the year, students will be exploring the tension(s) between private, social and public space(s) – this project is an introduction to this discussion and exploration. P2: My Room This project explores a range of methods by which the architect can begin to understand and represent space in all its complexities. One important aspect of this project is for the students to learn the skills involved in recording 3D space in 2D and to learn some of the drawing conventions which architects use. This project aims to help students to see a ‘mundane’ space (their room) from several different perspectives and to unpack its hidden meanings and connections. This project is about the individual student and her/his perception of a particular place. P3: Community Kitchen Through the design of a small building in an urban context, this project will allow students to develop an understanding of the relationship between internal spatial layout, external form and the ways in which the particular characteristics of a site affect the design of architectural space. This project has two stages. Stage one focusses on collecting data, analysing site and the process of food preparation and consumption. Stage two of the project aims to use these collected information as a foundation for design of the building. This project will help students to further understand architectural space beyond an architectural object (building) in a wider (urban, social, cultural) context.

01 Luo Yuanwen P2, My Room 02 Pong Hoi Phone P2, My Room 03 Andreea Dragos P2, My Room 04 Lan Wang P2, My Room 05 Rebecca Wallace P2, My Room

01

06 Haonan Zuo P2, My Room 07 Luo Yuanwen P3, Community Kitchen Development Images 08 Rebecca Thomas P3, Community Kitchen 09 Haonan Zuo P3, Community Kitchen 10 Rebecca Wallace P2, My Room

02

03

04

05


9

07

09 03

07

03

06

08

10


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester Two P4: A House Beyond A House Modernism changed our cities, created zoning as a primary form of urban planning and practice. Post-modern thought introduced hybrid and multifunctional spaces, but our cities are still spatially fragmented, socially and economically segregated. Could architecture be a tool to unite them? Could architecture be more inclusive – instead of creating buildings as separated silos, could they be part of wider fields of interactions? Instead of using exclusive logic – ‘this OR that’, can we use the inclusive one – ‘this AND that’? A house is a building which is typically seen as an extremely private and intimate space. ‘My house is my castle’ is a phrase popularly describing British approach to this type of building. This project is intended to challenge (at least partly) this perspective – you will be designing a house which equally creates personal spaces for its inhabitants AND serves other purposes. P5: Space Hacking This project helps students to understand consequences of physical and spatial interventions in an urban context. They build on the knowledge gained in all projects undertaken during the academic year – what has been so far tested as ‘paper architecture’; in this project is tested (in a small scale) as a built intervention. This project is also about the process of negotiating any spatial intervention with the public.

08 Florin Roman P4, A House beyond a House 09 Haonan Zuo P4, A House beyond a House 10 Max Bridge P4, A House beyond a House 11 Florin Roman P4, A House beyond a House

11

12 Pong Hoi Phone P4, A House beyond a House 13 Aleksandra Korneeva (KK13) P4, A House beyond a House 14 Lan Wang P4, A House beyond a House 08

12

09

13

10

14

15 Rebecca Thomas P4, A House beyond a House 16 Luo Yuawen P4, A House beyond a House

17 Max Bridge P4, A House beyond a House 18 Lan Wang P4, A House beyond a House 19 Group work P5, Space Hacking


11

15

18

16

17

19


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Year Two Year Two is a fast paced programme of three projects structured to engender fluidity and confidence in the design process. The course delivery relies heavily on the strength of the studio culture. Academic enquiry and reflection is sustained through investment in the ‘large group review’, designed to expand critique and discourse within a supportive social environment. Each of the three projects incorporates specific drawing or model making tasks intended to extend experimentation and exploration of design ideas through a rigorous methodology. Students are encouraged to become more prolific in the testing of their ideas within the world.

Year Director Catherine Skelcher Studio Tutors Yussur Al-Chokhdar Ian Hicklin Abi Van Hoorebeek Dr Ranald Lawrence Mark Parsons Catherine Skelcher John-Paul Walker Department of Landscape Tutors Mel Burton Andy Clayden Sally O’Halloran Laurence Pattacini BA Architecture Students Rebecca Acheampong Fatimah Adnan Miryan Andonov Elina Andreou Alice Appleby Azrah Asif-Jussab Manraj Bhogal James Black Luke Brennan-Scott Chenhao Cao Cameron Carrington Wei Chew Kiran Chhatwal Ralitsa Chobanova Oana-Cristina Cioploiu Chloe-Anne Clacy Hadley Clarke Paul Connolly Angelina Constanti John Davis Shipra Dawar Dipali Dharmendra Vassantrai Oliver Dorrington Ran Duan Rebecca Earnshaw Oluwarantimi Ehinmola Francesca Frangiamore Aoife Gilchrist Barbara Godel Marcus Goff Rianna Grant Holly Harbour Madeleine Hill Jenna Hobbs Paige Howard Ziai Huang Rubi Hussey Sandu Thisaranee Jayasinghe Mudiyanselage

Francesca Jebb Maiyoor Harish Joshi Frank Kalume Rania Kapitani Jameille Labis Alice Latham Hui Ning Lau Jack Laurie Aaliyah Lawal Shan Li Natalie Liow Ethan Loo Stephanie Ma Thelma Mbewe Jiarong Miao Kwan Mo Nurul Nabilah Mohd Rosdi Kyriacos Mouzouris Michael Neal Stephanie O’Brien Jack Osmond Eloise Piper Thomas Pool Yui Poon Harry Prema Tengku Putri Enisa Perdita Ratsma Lugain Rfidah Claire Sanderson Gulim Satekova Georgina Scott Jay Singh-Gelling Chin Siu James Smith Luke Smith Ryan Smith Charlotte Staton Maria Stavridou Fanzhe Sun Lawrencen Tang Thea Tomos Andreea Triscaru Jacqueline Tsang Theodosia Tsikkou Raluca Turcu Ayushya Uppal Ivan Velev Christopher Ventom Pengnanxi Wang Eleanor Wells Dongqiao Wen Alice Wildgoose Chiu Ho Wong Ching Wong Eleni Xenophontos Edward Yan Lewan Yazici Abigail Yeboah Shuning Zhu

BA Architecture and Landscape Students Liam Gallagher Natasha Jackson Ella Macleod Thomas Ruff Zifei Xie MEng Structural Engineering & Architecture Students Joshua Adjodha Henry Baker Leonora Bela Pilakoutas Lewis Birkbeck Edward Daniels Bethany Fenna Carlo Gagliani Tegen George Joseph Hicks Matthew Holmes Crystal Mason Henry McBrien Nina Scholey Jacob Smith SerenThomas Wai Ken Tsang Alec Wells Benjamin Westphal-Reed Matthew Woolhouse Erasmus and Study Abroad Jing Hui Kelli Littleton Fushen Wang Wen-Li Wang Liang Yan Guest Critics Elizabeth Baldwin Gray, University of Newcastle Adam Booth, Fielden Clegg Bradley Studios Tony Broomhead, OS31 Dennis Burr, Burr Lenton Architecture Anna Gidman, University of Liverpool Marianne Heaslip, URBED Jacquie Milham, Architectonic Design Kasia Nawratek, Birmingham City University Ellen Paige, Hutchworks Ltd. Stephen Proctor, Proctor and Matthews Architects

Tony Skipper, 5plus Architects Lucy Thomas, Tim Ronalds Architects


13


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester One P1.1 Measure The students worked in groups to investigate a given subject or pursuit and collect all data necessary in preparation for their design project. Working in pairs, a series of measured studies were made, including a 1 to 1 drawing of a key component or process contextualised using the human form. P1.2 Territory Each subject typically corresponds to a given type of landscape found in and around Sheffield (woodland/river valley/moorland/ peak). Through the creation of a large ‘figure ground’ drawing and use of other mapping techniques, the students explored the physical and ephemeral characteristics of their site. P1.3 Threshold-Observatory/Walker’s Refuge/Cycle Centre/ Caver’s Retreat Having become experts in their given subject, the student pairs were then required to design a small building in a landscape. They were asked to locate their building in relation to a threshold that they had identified on the site. Their proposal must support all of the practical requirements of the subject whilst responding sensitively and creatively to the landscape in which it sits. Exploring the relationship between architecture and landscape, the students must develop their own conceptual and theoretical design approach in response to brief and site. P2.1 Urban Study The students worked in groups to investigate two neighbouring areas within Manchester - Ancoats and the Northern Quarter. The students explored the social and physical fabric of each area, collecting a range of data, both factual and anecdotal, in order to form an authentic understanding of the constraints and opportunities of each area. P2.2 Library/Theatre The students were tasked with designing a small community library or theatre to serve their given neighbourhood. A precedent study field trip to Liverpool supported the development of a proposal for a specific ‘type’ of library or theatre, and the design of a public building tailored to both audience and place. The project provides the students with their first opportunity to design an urban façade within a streetscape.

01 Yiu Poon P1.1 Measure 02 Sandu Jayasinghe,Oana Cioploiu P1.3, Caver’s Retreat 01 03 Ethan Loo, Shuning Zhu P1.3, Walker’s Refuge 04 Ella MacLeod (KK13) P1.3, Cycle Centre 05 Shan Li, Dongqiao Wen P1.2, Territory 06 Kyriakos Mouzouris P2, Library 07 Ziai Huang P2.1, Urban Study 08 Charlotte Staton P2, Library 09 Ryan Smith P2, Library

02

10 Eleanor Wells P2, Library 11 Frank Kalume P2, Theatre 12 John Davis P2, Theatre 13 Lawrence Tang P2, Library 14 Jameille Labis P2, Theatre

03

04

05


15

08

12

13

06

09

07

10

11

14


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester Two P3.1 Precedent Study As a prelude to the semester two housing project, the students work in groups to study a range of seminal housing precedents, producing a library of housing typologies. Using drawing, modelling and film making as tools to investigate and critically appraise their precedent, the students undertook a detailed critique of the project’s spatial, material and environmental qualities and the extent to which it meets the living needs of its inhabitants. P3.2 Manifesto We opened the project with a debate, inviting a range of academics and practitioners to share their views and experiences and encouraging the students to engage with the live issues – social, political and economic, that provide the context for their housing project. The students then developed their own housing manifesto, which would be the programmatic driver for their own design project. P3.3 Neighbourhood Study The students were tasked with producing a contextual analysis of their project site, located within the Sheffield neighbourhood of Burngreave. Exploring master planning techniques, the students worked in groups to produce speculative proposals considering alternative futures for Burngreave. This provided a means to understanding the character and identity of the area – its needs and aspirations. P3.4 Housing Each student was required to design dwellings to house 6-10 families, with an element of additional accommodation to be individually determined and informed by the student’s housing manifesto. The design of housing, unlike the single house, offers an opportunity to investigate the realm of the shared, the street. Each site provoked a response to the notion of the street and students were encouraged to attempt an analysis of a front to back condition through the use of a sectional perspective drawing. The housing project is supported by the study trip to Amsterdam and Rotterdam during the Easter Break, which is a fantastic opportunity to further explore a range of radical public and housing project.

15 Charlotte Staton P3.1, Precedent Study 16 Ethan Loo P3.1, Precedent Study 17 Jacqueline Tsang P3.2, Manifesto 18 Ryan Smith P3.2, Manifesto 19 Michael Neal P3.2, Manifesto

15

16

20 Hui Ning Lau P3.4, Housing 21 Francesca Frangiamore P3.4, Housing 22 Ziai Huang P3.4, Housing 23 Ryan Smith P3.4, Housing

18

24 Aallayah Lawal P3.4, Housing 25 Perdy Ratsma P3.4, Housing 26 Raluca Turcu P3.4, Housing 27 Rebecca Earnshaw P3.4, Housing 28 Shipra Dawar P3.4, Housing

17

29 Hui Ning Lau P3.4, Housing

20

19


17

21

21

22

23

27

24

28

25

26

29


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Year Three Third Year students undertake two design projects during the academic year, punctuated by a short group project aimed at the development of enquiry and research through a collaborative group output. This sets the intellectual framework for the final project. Studios are comprised of a range of parallel project programmes. Throughout their studies, students are actively challenged to consider the social, political, and typological characteristics of place, in order to develop a critical position within the thematic framework of the project brief. Each programme is rooted in a deep understanding of place, structured by a rigorous site and precedent analysis. Enquiry and experimentation within the studio framework is encouraged through the use of a wide range of representational techniques as well as the creative integration of technology into the studio programme. Throughout the year, students are supported by a dedicated staff of Sheffield School of Architecture and visiting critics, ranging from world renowned architects, structural engineers, and various design professionals. The exceptional work produced by our students is testament to the rigour, enthusiasm, and critical reflection of the student group and their commitment to the spirit of the Year Three Studio.

Year Director Simon Chadwick Studio Tutors Robert Blundell David Britch Simon Chadwick Mel Goode Ruth Hudson-Silver Russell Light Maggie Pickles Paul Testa Department of Landscape Tutors Howard Evans Laurence Pattacini BA Architecture Students Grace Alderson Abby Aldridge Adam Ayub Douglas Baldwin Nur Binti Roszali Katherine Bluff Alice Brammer Sarah Bunting Luke Cameron Abbie Caton James Cave James Chapman Yen-Ting Chen Edward Cherry Alexi Chomyszyn Emily Chooi Felix Cousins Emily Cowell Amy Crellin Anthony Currie Hope Dabernig Christopher Darby Jana Dardouk Andreea Ditu Emma Donnellan Samuel Dowell Florence Drennan Muhammad Emritte Robert Evans Timothy Evans Xingjian Fan Caroline Fielding Dulcie Foster Finn Ruth Friswell Zoe George Mcqueen Louise Gillett

Axel Grubba Sophie Guneratne Katrina Hemingway Daniel House Thomas Jones Chao Kan Sora Kang Lu Ke Shawn Kejriwal Petranka Kirilova Anthoula Kyriakidi Kristan Lacy Mathilda Lewis Ran Li Holly Madeley Alexandra Martin Samuel Mcmillan Jacob Mills Megan Mundy Victoria Noakes Calum Norman Mia Owen Kathryn Parker-Price Alastair Porter Maksim Povstugar Saule Pribusauskaite Tobias Putnam Janani Rajeswaran Joseph Redwood Diana Rosca Joseph Satchell Edmund Savory Amber Seipel Aarandeep Sian Ryan Sinnott Jamie Smith Harriet Stride Jagoda Struzik Tsz Ying Tong Laura Turner Oliver Verrell Joe Wallbank Asyraf Daniel Wan Bo Wang Montgomery Williams Williams Nicole Jia Wong Zi Jin Wong Yuxin Wu Zhikun Wu Xuejun Xu Mengqiao Zhang Yijun Zhao Joanna Zwierzchowska

BA Architecture and Landscape Students Hannah Holden Kamile Kesylyte Mohammed Khizr Oscar Lewis Samuel Morley Chloe Nicol Andrew Reynolds Xijie Tao Melissa Wood MEng Engineering and Architecture Students Mary Ala Matthew Allen Lauren Barnes Lily Bell William Bellefontaine Thomas Donoghue Michael Durkin Harry Eddolls Alexander Finch Natalia Gracheva Laura Jamieson Elizabeth Lewis Margaret Longman Christopher Pate James Paul Selina Rai Glen Richmond James Thormod Erasmus and Study Abroad Students Sophie Oertle Yuni Zhao Visiting Professors Andy Groarke, Carmody Groarke Neil Gillespie, Reiach and Hall Architects Roger Hawkins, Hawkins/Brown Architects Andy Matthews, Proctor and Matthews Architects Paul Monaghan, Alford Hall Monaghan Morris Greg Penoyre, Penoyre & Prasad Architects Tony Skipper, 5plus Architects

Guest Critics Gayle Appleyard, Gagarin Studio Jonathan Boyle, State Studio Tony Broomhead, OS31 Dennis Burr, Burr Design Yves Carew, PDP Architects Oli Cunningham, Sheffield Hallam University Sue Emms,BDP Robert Evans, Evans Vettori Architects Pol Gallagher, Zap Architecture Alex Griffin, Oblong Architecture Colin Harris, Sutherland Hussey Harris Rachel Haynes, Thread Architects Rebecca Hinkley, Hawkins\Brown Architects Thomas Hudson, Hawkins\Brown Architects Simon Hudspith, Panter Hudspith Architects Ranbir Lal, Sheffield Hallam University Alan MacDonald, Norton Mayfield Architects Andrew Matthews, Proctor and Matthews Architects Neil Michels, Carmody Groarke Jacquie Milham, Architectonic Design Alexander Mingozzi, Race Cottam Associates Alastair Norton, Norton Mayfield Architects Greg Penoyre, Penoyre & Prasad Architects Annalie Riches, Mikhail Riches Simon Robinson,MSMR Stephen Ryan, University of Brighton Rob Thompson, Rob Thompson Urbanism Pete Watson, Mackintosh School of Architecture Ronan Watts, 5th Studio


19


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester One Constructing The Image, Scarborough Russell Light This project explored photography and how we construct and frame images. It also explored the specific relationship of the history of photography to the once very fashionable seaside resort of Scarborough, which had the distinction in the mid-nineteenth century of being the location of Oliver François Xavier Sarony’s photographic portrait studios, at the time purported to be the largest in Europe. The project proposed a new centre for photography in Scarborough, including an archive of historical material, gallery spaces, studios and workshops.

01 Yuxin Wu P1, Taking the waters

Taking The Waters, Scarborough Simon Chadwick The bath house, a place historically pervasive in many cultures, has traditionally been a complex space laden with nuanced social customs. The project provided students with an opportunity to contextualise the notion of a contemporary pool/spa/bath house in Scarborough, a city historically known as one of the first seaside spa resorts in England. Students were encouraged to develop their own interpretation of “taking the waters” while emphasising the social, spiritual, therapeutic, and leisurely aspects of engaging with water.

04 Yuni Zhao P1, Taking the waters

The Making Of Place, Scarborough David Britch The project explored the two different forces of ‘arts’ and ‘crafts’ through the medium of stone carving. Based on the existing facilities at York college in collaboration with The Henry Moore Foundation, the project responded to these 2 different forces to find a cohesive civic form.

07 Edmund Savory P1, Physic Garden

The Physic Garden, Scarborough Robert Blundell In its simplest form, a physic garden, or garden for the science of healing, is a collection of medicinal, pharmaceutical and edible plants. The project provided students with the opportunity to explore the development of the Physic Garden from medieval European examples to contemporary gardens. Proposals were then developed for a new physic garden and wellbeing retreat based around the therapeutic qualities of plants. Scarborough, throughout its history associated with ideas of refuge and retreat, was the location for the project.

09 Fan Xingjian P2, City,Performance,Memory

Transitions, Scarborough Paul Testa A project investigating the architectural qualities of coastal light, and the changes of state that occur during ‘hot glass’ formation processes. Exhibiting the technology and craft of manufacture, proposals for workshops and galleries were organised around the dynamic flow of heat, light and people

12 Alistair Porter P1, Transitions

02 Andrew Reynolds (KK13) P1, Taking the waters 03 Saule Pribusauskaite P1, Taking the waters

18 Jia Min Wong P1, Transitions 19 Maksim Povstugar P1, Constructing the Image

02

05 Andreea Ditu P1, Taking the waters 06 Joanna Zwierzchowska P1, Taking the waters

08 Zoe George Mcqueen P2, Urban Bell Foundry

01

03

10 Matthew Allen (HK21) P1, The Making of Place 11 Mohammed Khizr (KK13) P1, Physic Garden

13 Chris Darby P1, The Making of Place 14 Xijie Tao (KK13) P1, Physic Garden

31

EXTERNAL PERSPECTIVE : View from top of King Street

04

15 Victoria Noakes P1, Constructing the Image 16 Diana Rosca P1, Constructing the Image 17 Axel Grubba P1, Transitions

07

05

06


21

11

~

bradbury herbarium

&

volunteer dwellings, quay street physic garden

&

retreat

~

14

17

The Quay Street Physic Garden & Retreat brings back a strong global and regional identity for Scarborough, as well as inviting the local community into a special project where learning about the medicial qualities of herbs brings people together. The scheme blurs the threshold between indoors and outdoors, and invites a converstion between landscape and architecture. The rhythmic architectural language of the three structures impresses a delicacy upon the landscape, as the buildings seek to complement and excentuate it rather than dominate it.

08

12

09

10

18

15

13

16

19


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Semester Two Preliminary Studies Creative Space, Sheffield Simon Chadwick/Paul Testa Initial studies centred around a series of detailed faculty building precedent studies explored through diagrams and models. Fabric Space Movement, York Robert Blundell/Maggie Pickles This short group work project provided an opportunity to carry out a detailed study of the city of York and develop a knowledge of context that could then be used to inform the development of individual design proposals during semester two. Key themes considered were; City fabric, Public space, and Movement through the city. Research findings and analysis were presented in an exhibition. The Immovable Object And The Irresistible Force, Manchester David Britch/Mel Goode “A people without a city are nomads, a city without people is an ossified relic, but put the two forces together and … amazing things happen.” A Museum Of Galleries & A Gallery Of Museums Russell Light/Ruth Hudson-Silver Starting with analytical precedent studies of a diverse range of contemporary and historic museums and galleries from around the world, the project then involved all of the students working together as a team to design and curate an exhibition which explored and explained the key ideas, issues and typologies that inform and influence the design of museums and galleries.

01 Fabric Space Movement, York 02 A Museum of Galleries and a Gallery of Museums, Bradford/Leeds 03 Fabric Space Movement, York 04 A Museum of Galleries and a Gallery of Museums, Bradford/Leeds 05 Fabric Space Movement, York 06 The Immovable Object and the Irresistable Force, Manchester 07 A Museum of Galleries and a Gallery of Museums, Bradford/Leeds 08 Creative Space, Sheffield 09 The Immovable Object and the Irresistable Force, Manchester

01

10 Creative Space, Sheffield 11 Creative Space, Sheffield 12 The Immovable Object and the Irresistable Force, Manchester

02


23

03

05

09

06

10

07

04

08

11

12


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Main Projects A Bigger Splash In Bradford, Bradford Russell Light This project explored photography and how we construct and frame images. It also explored the specific relationship of the history of photography to the once very fashionable seaside resort of Scarborough, which had the distinction in the mid-nineteenth century of being the location of Oliver François Xavier Sarony’s photographic portrait studios, at the time purported to be the largest in Europe. The project proposed a new centre for photography in Scarborough, including an archive of historical material, gallery spaces, studios and workshops.

17 Yuni Zhao P2, A bigger splash in Bradford

Museum Inside Out, Leeds Ruth Hudson-Silver The programme was to create a museum located within the Holbeck Urban Village area of Leeds. Students were encouraged to consider the nature of museums as a place where stories are told and that they should act as both architect, curator and storyteller. Thus meaning that their museum may be designed from the inside - out. The stories could be about a specific collection of objects, about a particular person, place, a manufacturing process or anything else that could be imagine.

20 Petranka Kirilova P2, A bigger splash in Bradford

Creative Spaces, Sheffield Simon Chadwick The programme was designed to explore the nature of creative space within an educational context. Beginning with an analysis of the C19th Art School model, students were encouraged to explore the evolution of environments designed for tertiary level art and design courses, and specifically a faculty building incorporating studio space. Sites within the Sheffield University Campus were investigated with research into the 1955 campus plan by Gollins Melvin Ward and Partners, together with the 2014 Masterplan by Feilden Clegg Bradley Studio. Creative Faculty, Sheffield Paul Testa The project investigated the nature of creative space, starting with a detailed human scale study of a particular creative activity. Students were asked to design a faculty building for a creative subject or department that incorporated studio space. Sites within Sheffield University were explored in the context of the emerging campus masterplan.

18 James Thormod (HK21) P2, A bigger splash in Bradford 19 Mengqiao Zhang P2, A bigger splash in Bradford

17

21 Chris Darby P2, Museum Inside Out 22 Oliver Verrell P2, Creative Spaces

QQ

Model shoots DESIGN PROJECT

23 Ruth Friswell P2, A bigger splash in Bradford

Physical site model and building model

MODEL details

I produced a 1: 100 building model with its instant context. The site allows me to judge the relationship of my design with a visual and touchable context. I try to revivificate the rendering view in the physical building model to understand the actual physical space, and to figure out how the strcutural system works.

24 Saule Pribusauskaite P2, Museum Inside Out 25 Mathilda Lewis P2, Museum Inside Out

18

26 Wong Jia Min P2, Creative Spaces 27 Tong Tsz Ying Victoria P2, Creative Spaces 28 Montgomery Williams P2, Creative Spaces

1:100

29 Janani Rajeswaran P2, Creative Faculty

73

72

Conceptual spaces: Rephrasing Hockney's painting philosophy

30 Michael Durkin (HK21) P2, Creative Spaces

'The David Hockney Gallery Bradford

19

31 Wong Jia Min P2, Creative Spaces

20

21


25

22

26

28

23 29

24

27

25

27

30

31

At night, the civic space becomes an auditorium for the display of audio/ visual events. This could range from conventional screenings through to progressive exhibitions such as Sheffield Contemporary. Reverse projections are a key aspect of the dynamic facade, where passers by on the street can get a sense of the internal experience.

Night Elevation at 1:


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

We Work,Work,Work,Work,Work, Manchester Melanie Goode The Textiles Growth Hub is currently involved in delivering a £45 billion textile growth programme in Manchester. As part of this investment the brief was to design a new speculative, co-working hub for the textiles and manufacturing industry on selected sites in the Northern Quarter and Ancoats. Feeding off Manchester’s industrial heritage and looking to its techhub digital future students were asked to question the culture of the workplace and its changing relationship with self-managing workers. How do you foster innovation, allowing space for collaboration and individual working? How do you integrate technology and design working environments that promote health and wellbeing both mental and physical? Urban Bell Foundry, Manchester David Britch Man has constantly sought to transform the world around him by altering the elements he finds, sometimes these changes produce negative effects on the environment, pollution and climate change. On other occasion he makes objects of unimaginable beauty and purpose. Taking a base metal mined from the earth and by adding great heat and skill, he produces fine cutlery or enormous bells which ring out to mark the passage of the day... City Performance Memory, York Robert Blundell The York Mystery Plays are a series, or cycle, of religious plays that have been performed in the city for over 700 years. The project required students to design a new performance venue in the city alongside an archive and study centre for ongoing academic research relating to the Mystery Plays. The particular qualities of the urban environment of the city, alongside the significance of the Mystery Plays in the historical development of York were important factors addressed throughout the project. Reciprocal City, York Maggie Pickles Investigating the notion of an ‘open atelier’ where skills are practiced and transferred across generations, the program invited students to develop their own brief for a publicly accessible sequence of specialist studios/ educational workshops, located on underused waterside margins adjoining the city rivers. The project was designed to encourage the design of resilient environmental strategies on undervalued central sites, through the provision of connected sheltered public spaces, responsive to variable water levels and to seasonal change.

32 Zoe George Mcqueen P2, Urban Bell Foundry 33 Joseph Redwood P2, Urban Bell Foundry 34 Tom Donoghue (HK21) P2, Urban Bell Foundry 35 Axel Grubba P2, We work,work,work,work,work 36 Victoria Noakes P2, City,Performance,Memory 37 Fan Xingjian P2, City,Performance,Memory 38 Kamile Kesylyte (KK13) P2, City,Performance,Memory 39 Andreea Ditu P2, City,Performance,Memory 40 Joanna Zwierzchowska P2, We work,work,work,work,work

32

41 Thomas Jones P2, We work,work,work,work,work 42 Caroline Fielding P2, We work,work,work,work,work 43 Yuxin Wu P2, City,Performance,Memory 44 Kristian Lacy P2, Reciprocal City 34

45 Chloe Nicol (KK13) P2, Reciprocal City 46 Christopher Pate (HK21) P2, Reciprocal City 47 Edmund Savory P2, Reciprocal City 48 Felix Cousins P2, Reciprocal City

33

35


27

36

37

46

38

39

40

43

47

44

48

SECTION BB @ 1:100

41

42

45


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Undergraduate Special Study The Special Study is an individual piece of work that allows students to explore a particular aspect of architecture in some depth. Topics cover a wide subject range, including architectural theory, architectural history, science and technology, structures, management, CAD and the digital realm, landscape architecture, architectural teaching and practice, and urban design. The Special Study offers students the opportunity to research, organise and produce an extended piece of mostly written work over the course of a year. Studies this year have ranged from the written and graphical analysis of Brutalist design in ‘The Tricorn Centre: Resurrection, Preservation’ by Amy Crellin, to Harriet Stride’s philosophical exploration of ‘Perspectives on Authenticity and its Relevance to Architectural Design’, and from Petranka Kirilova’s study ‘Reclaiming Ruse: Reclaiming the City through Participation in Urban and Art Projects’, to Joseph Redwood’s investigations of ‘Colour, Daughter of Light’ in which he explores Le Corbusier’s use of colour in relation to the separation of colour philosophy from architectural concept in present-day practice. These works offer a flavour of the richness, rigour and variety of the Special Study, and the wide range of research methodologies, analytical and presentation techniques that are deployed.

Co-ordinator Mark Emms Dissertation featured The Tricorn Centre Resurrection, Preservation Amy Crelling

01 The Tricorn Centre is designed around the central courtyard Diagram based upon: Photograph from Portsmouth History Centre 02 Central Courtyard Perspective Diagram based upon: Perspective drawing by Gordon Cullen 03 The Casbah Concept Tangier casbah Source: https://www.delcampe.net The Tricorn roofscape resonates with Tangier casbah’s form. Source: http://lucymelford.blogspot.co.uk/2016/06/brutalismtricorncentre-in-portsmouth.html 04 Pedestrian routes in the Tricorn Centre Ground floor level, leading to the central courtyard. Similar to Aleppo with narrow routes and open squares Diagram based upon: Original Architects Drawings in Portsmouth History Centre

05 Evolution of the Tricorn Centre Complex Ground floor Diagram based upon: Plan from Architectural Design 1966 06 Evolution of the Tricorn Centre Complex First floor Diagram based upon: Plan from Architectural Design 1966 07 Birds eye view looking at the Tricorn Centre From Marketway - North West Diagram based upon: CAD model by Sam Brooks


29

The Tricorn Centre Resurrection, Preservation Amy Crellin How successful is the analytical diagram methodology of analysis? This form of analysis has been relatively successful for a number of reasons: Firstly, it preserves the Tricorn’s ideas, which is vital. English Heritage chief executive, Simon Thurley, says the postwar ‘brutalist’ buildings failed by the listing process and demolished leave “a black hole in architectural history.”72 Once a building is demolished, it can never be recovered, therefore it is important to understand reasons for a decline so that lessons can be learnt from the building. Secondly, there is no former published analysed through analytical diagrams of the Tricorn. Geoffrey Bakers analytical diagramming principles have been applied, situating the building within Baker’s three key factors for analysis. The site conditions, the functional requirements and the cultural context. Due to this study being about one building, it has taken his analytical principles further, exploring one building in more depth and situating it within more context, (historic context particularly). It’s contextual analysis goes further than Baker’s does, (since Baker’s aims to provide a broad range of analysed examples). Thirdly, it confirmed and illuminated the conceptual and spatial reasons for the Tricorn’s development and decline, building upon Clark’s ideas, but providing a greater spatial understanding. Discussing the key ideas Owen Luder, and diagramming the building context uncovered one of the major reasons for the Tricorn’s decline was due to the conceptual site / planning diagram not working. Shoppers did not flow into the Tricorn as intended. A strong understanding of

the concept of the Tricorn, gained through the process of speaking to Luder and drawing the diagrams helped uncover the problems. Fourthly, there is limited spatial and conceptual research on the complex. Many resources describe the Tricorn’s form alongside photographs, eg. 1960s architects articles, however there is no published formal analysis of the Tricorn’s form to uncover its conceptual and spatial ideas, making this study a vital source of information for this field of study. The essence of the building has been uncovered through rigorous diagramming which ensure the ideas are accessible. This work is particularly useful to architects and architecture students wishing to understand the simple architectural concepts which are unapparent when observing the Tricorn as a whole.

03

Although, this form of analysis has been relatively successful, there are criticisms of the technique: Firstly, the Tricorn is not covered in its entirety, eg. interior aspects of the buildings are not addressed. It looks at the complex as an abstraction and focuses on the complex’s conceptual ideas within its site. With greater research, more could be added, eg. how the stairwells or interior work. Hundreds of detailed drawings were found in the Portsmouth History Centre, which would need an extended study to evaluate. Not all drawings could be studied in detail, a simple sketchup model had to suffice within the limit of the task. Secondly, although Owen Luder was interviewed and many of his ideas are used within the study, there is some interpretation of the Tricorn by the author and some ideas illustrated which are not necessarily how the Tricorn was designed.

05

06

07

01

02


MArch in Architecture The MArch (RIBA Part 2) course at SSoA is one of the most innovative and influential in the country. It prepares students to be enterprising, employable and to use their skills to the benefit of people’s lives. At the heart of the course is a range of specialist design studios and our innovative ‘live projects’ programme, offering between them excellent opportunities for students to develop graduatelevel research by design. Students also have the opportunity to specialise further by taking a dual accredited MArch course with Town and Regional Planning (MArch/TRP) or with Landscape (MALA). The recently established Collaborative Practice route offers students the opportunity to integrate their MArch studies with continued experience in architectural practice. Modules in humanities, management and technology offer students the opportunity to enhance their design projects and wider learning through focused research, academic writing and critical reflection. Further opportunities to explore specialist lines of enquiry are offered by the fifth year option modules that focus on aspects of urban design, digital design, sustainability and conservation. The SSoA MArch is shaped by its emphasis on collaboration, social engagement and ‘liveness’. This begins each year with live projects and continues in design studios that collaborate with community partners including local councils, grass roots organisations and arts programmes. Projects evolve that are ambitious, innovative and respond to the complexity of real-life conditions. This year, studios have investigated situations and scenarios based along a future timeline of up to 30 years, providing opportunities to test alternative visions for an uncertain societal and climatic world. Fifth and sixth year students work together in design studios, to explore these current challenges and future opportunities in architecture. Students are encouraged to develop a critical approach to the production of architecture in contemporary society. The design studios offer students the freedom to experiment and develop their own lines of enquiry while being supported by tutors who offer excellent specialist research and practice experience. The fifth year offers students the chance to develop rigorous research by design skills. The iterative process of design is valued, as well as the outcomes, and students are encouraged to develop their individual interests, ways of working and attitude towards architecture and the role of the architect. Sixth year students then develop individual or joint thesis projects, exploring research questions through the design of complex buildings. Students are encouraged to be canny, ambitious, and enterprising so that they can not only negotiate and respond to the challenges of our time, but also lead on what ‘Future Practice’ might be: a practice that can listen, negotiate and advocate clients’ and users’ needs in order to produce architecture of excellence. Director of MArch Leo Care Co-director of MArch Dr Jo Lintonbon Director of Masters in Landscape Architecture Howard Evans Studio Leaders Satwinder Samra Simon Baker Irena Bauman Leo Care John Sampson Howard Evans Carolyn Butterworth Daniel Jary Mark Emms Jo Lintonbon Visiting Professors Tony Skipper Paul Monaghan Greg Penoyre Andrew Smith Andrew Matthews Stephen Proctor Visiting Reviewers Bryan Davies Andrew Lees SSoA Reviewers Matthew Bradshaw Ranald Lawrence Aidan Hoggard Sofie Pelsmakers Fionn Stevenson Karim Hadjri Cith Skelcher Krzysztof Nawratek Ian Hicklin

Rachel Cruise Florian Kossak Mark Meagher Simon Chadwick Collaborators Carmody Groarke Journeyman Design AHMM Penoyre and Prasad Sheffield Hallam University Hawkins Brown Cullinan Studio Manchester Metropolitan University BDP Bauman Lyons AA Projects Sheffield City Council Assemble Spode Works Coventry City of Culture Bid Leeds University Derby Silk Mill Better Barnsley Sheffield City Council West Lindsey Council Architype Diocese of Chesterfield The Glass-House The Open University Ingle Gym Elsecar Heritage Riailway Media Lab Prado Yorkshire Art Space Ebbsfleet Development Corporation Urbed University of the Arts, London Advanced Manufacturing Innovation District ArcHeritage Friends of Sheffield Castle Sheffield Chamber of Commerce Israac Heeley City Farm Yorkshire Sculpture Park


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Intergenerational Architecture Intergenerational Architecture questions how different demographics can come together to form communities within the city of Hull. This not only considers generational relationships between old and young, but also between cultures through projects, which consider immigration, and language. Themes have been developed through a series of personal exploratory tasks, including reflecting on family heritage, replicating impairments, and investigating Hull’s history. Resulting from these tasks are a diverse set of rich and varied projects which respond to current social issues from food waste, to flooding, to mental and physical health. Although many of us have revealed parts of Hull’s history and welcomed working within its derelict buildings, the studio has also encouraged us to consider Hull’s future, with projects set over various timescales from now until as far as 2456. As part of these projected futures, many proposals have tackled and embraced Hull’s future flooding issue as a core driver for design. Despite our various locations within space and time, within the projects across the studio, the nuances of intergenerational relationships are appreciated, the process of ageing is celebrated, and communities for the city of Hull are reimagined. The current  output culminates 3 years of outstanding and engaging work produced by the studio. This will be celebrated through an exhibition based in Hull this autumn as part of the City of Culture 2017.

Studio Tutor Satwinder Samra 5th Year Students Petros Antoniou Laura Spence Emma Seaton David Hodgson Baicen Zhou Stephanie Bott Jaiwen Chen 6th Year Students Bartholomew Smith Joe Paget Rowan Riley Martha Baulcombe Richard Grenfell Nicola Sole With Special Thanks to: Joanna Coleman, Mustard Architects Bryan Davies, Seven Architecture Emma England, RIBA Yorkshire Ben Gibson, Gibson Thornley Mark Hodson, Hodson Architects Ashley Forrester, Hodson Architects Adam Park, SSoA Dwell Project Warren Mcfadden, Warren McFadden Architects Paul Westwood, Heatherwick Studio King Kong Hostel Rotterdam

01 Field trip to Rotterdam 02 Rowan Riley -The People’s Guild of Housing The project investigates whether a civic building can encourage community-led housing provision. Classrooms, workshops, living and assembly spaces offer the facilities for a unified approach where residents, students and professionals are able to be mutually supportive in the process of planning and constructing housing. A semi-public courtyard hosts the annual ‘Guild of Housing Competition’ that creates a public spectacle celebrating new technology, fostering pride in house building and inspiring citizens to take the lead in providing their own homes.

03 Bartholomew Smith -A New Materialism for Hull The project seeks to explore the implementation of a culture of new materialism into Hull through a focus on repair, craft and knowledge exchange. An infill development in the Old Town of Hull, the proposal creates a series of public routes through the urban block – past workshops, studios and education spaces – that converge at a central atrium. Here, the collaborative repair space spills out at the foot of a small tower that peeks out over the surrounding buildings.

01

04 Petros Antoniou - An Orbis Tertius - Hull 2456 The project is born out of an interest in the architectural drawing and its relationship with fiction, especially within the context of academia where fiction is masqueraded as reality. Through a visual methodology as a mode of architectural research, the project investigates Hull within the next 400 years and unravels the findings through the narrative of the never-concluding investigation itself. It presents a hint of a possible reality, whilst being unapologetic on the orbis tertius that is submerged in. Floods, floating machines and algae infrastructure. 05 Joe Paget - Hanover Square Studios Hanover Square Studios is situated in the centre of Hull, East Yorkshire. The project proposes the redevelopment of an urban block in the city’s Old Town Conservation area, using a strategy of conservation, redensification and reinstatement of public space and streetscape. The built proposal comprises; a refurbishment of and extension to a Grade II listed former shipping warehouse, significant alterations to a disused Boiler House, and a cluster of public spaces articulated by canopies, colonnades and active frontages. These combined actions form a new hub for Communication and Broadcasting in the city, run by the University of Hull. 02


33

SECTION B-B

REPAIRING COLLABORATIVELY IN THE WORKSHOP

1:100

03

03

04

04

03

02

05

05


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

06 Emma Seaton - The Bridging Chambers By identifying a place or collection of built forms as a ‘ruin’ can we encourage multiple generations to re-engage with a city’s cultural and industrial heritage? ‘The bridging chambers’ is a forum for language and memory, exploring the role a civic space can play in facilitating the act of remembering. The forum integrates a foreign language school with a series of community spaces, including a community kitchen / memory café, an interactive events space and a hull heritage pavilion surrounding a series of ruins. Accommodation for short-term language exchange tutors is also integrated into the programme. 07 Stephanie Bott - The Edwin Davis Gin Gardens By exploring my own family upbringing alongside Hull’s hidden history with gin as drivers for my brief, the project celebrates the process of ageing and the nature of intergenerational relationships forged through activities such as gardening, swimming, and gindrinking. This aims to redefine our perceptions of the elderly and the city as a place which offers opportunity and excitement to all, regardless of age. 08 Richard Grenfell - The Hullensian Archipelago The Hullensian Archipelago is a exploration into social ecologies for the improvement of mental health in students and the elderly. The proposal, which is located in Newland Avenue, is arranged around a co-housing model, university facilities, and retail element. This programme allows the testing of architecturally induced lifestyle changes on mental health. The ambition is to improve residents and users mental health, whilst informing a citywide strategy for the creation of flood resistant architectures in Hull. 09 Martha Baulcombe - The Frugal Table The Frugal Table will bring food waste to the centre of Hull aiming to teach all generations how to respect food and minimise its waste. Through a mixture of refurbishment and passivhaus new build, this project which includes a waste food centre, nursery, library and housing aims to ingrain a less wasteful way of living into our society. 10 Laura Spence - The Bike Hub Hull has a rising level of Obesity and related Health problems that can be avoided in the future. Healthy architecture and urban design has the power to influence the activity levels of its residents and architects should be designing with Health and Well-being at the forefront of building design. Kingston Upon Hull has won the UK city of culture 2017 and work is already on the way to improve the city for its residents and the thousands of visitors that will visit this year. There are plans to pedestrianize large areas of the city centre to encourage walking and minimise vehicle traffic. More and more active cities are banning cars from their city centres and favouring cycle transport. I have projected a future CAR FREE HULL. I am proposing to retrofit and repurpose an existing multi - storey car park into an urban activity hub with bicycle workshop and teaching facilities.

11 David Hodgson - Centre for Health and Wellbeing Two generations are brought together in this Centre for Health and Wellbeing that is situated in the centre of Hull. The project is critical of current dementia care provision as well as promoting healthy lifestyles through the education of primary school aged children. A series of existing buildings, including a disused car garage and Victorian stable, have been repurposed and adapted to accommodate the programme. The architectural response focuses on gardens as places for interaction and exploits their inherent association with improved wellbeing. The scheme reuses and reimagines a number of materials from the site including an innovative crushed-brick panelling system that is used to clad the education centre.

NEW BUILT FORM WITHIN THE EXISTING ENVELOPE

EVENTS SPACES SIT AS OBJECTS IN THE LANDSCAPE

INHABITING THE EXISTING FACADE

BRIDGING HULL’S HERITAGE WITH IT’S FUTURE COMMUNITY KITCHEN & DINING

12 Baicen Zhou - The Beauty of Silence The project sits in the water area called princes dock next Hull city centre. The project include 2 part of the functions: the first part is a treatment hub for the charity group Action on hearing loss; the second part is a series of healing experiences around a pool facility for general public seeking for inner peace. All functional spaces are arranged along 2 axis with designed threshold positioned along each axis. Each key space is carefully designed focusing on what user will sense through hearing, smelling, touching and seeing which forms their perception of each space in different scales.

06

07 RE-ENGAGING WITH THE ROMAN RUINS

06

06

07

08

13 Nicola Sole - Arriving at Hydro-citizenship Arriving at Hydro-citizenship explores how architecture can facilitate the feeling of home for Hulleans and transient communities in a changing climate. The proposed architecture provides facilities to support culture, enterprise and mobility as well as housing. Education facilities foster the integration of migrant communities. In doing so the centre provides services that mediate between the arrival city, the host society and migrants. The architecture is itself a piece of research, a test-bed seeking to expose and critique new ways of facilitating the integration of migrants with local communities. The building embraces the changing climate promoting a positive relationship with the environment in an effort to educate its users.

08

08


35

1

DO

IA

RETREAT &

OR VICT

Y

ATTACK STRATEG

CK

2 1 Views are framed in the tower stairway.

2

IER

RR

L BA

TIDA

1/ Extensive Green Roof Buildup Internal - Primary structure 350mm recycled aggregate pre-cast concrete floor plate or 200mmx135mm sustainably sourced structural Douglas Fir - DPM/ Airtight barrier - 150mm phenolic foam rigid insulation - 50mm drainage layer - Filter membrane - 80mm recycled gravel - 100mm soil -Wild meadow planting External

1

3 3

Waterfall wall creates a spectacle and prompts people to consider water.

Moss wall responds to air and noise pollution from adjoining road.

2/ Timber Cladding Wall Buildup Internal - Internal lining - Primary structure 200mmx135mm sustainably sourced structural Douglas Fir with 135mm phenolic foam rigid insulation between studs - Airtight barrier - 80mm phenolic foam rigid insulation - DPM - 18mmx18mm soft wood battening -25mm vertical untreated sustainably sourced/ recycled cedar cladding External

New pedestrian route along the waters edge.

Flexible business units pull in and out.

Cascade handrail at plinth connects users and water.

3/ Ground Floor Wall Buildup Internal -18mm recycled plywood lining -Primary Structure 200mm recycled aggregate pre-cast concrete panel wall -DPM/ Airtight barrier -220mm phenolic foam rigid insulation -DPM -50mm air gap -Recycled brick panel reinforced with concrete and resin ties with steel wall ties cast into panel fixed back to primary concrete structure External

4

DE

ES

NC

FE

OOD FL

Flood resilient building raised on 600m concrete plinth.

4/ Foundation Buildup Internal -100mm screed -200mm phenolic foam rigid insulation -DPM/ Air tight Barrier -330mm in-situ cast concrete slab -120mm phenolic foam rigid insulation Floating housing units on buoyant foundations.

Waterfal Wall Detail Section

09

Detailed Section BB 1/25

09

SCALE 1:20

13

13

View Within Fire Pit

Re-appropriate the underpass.

Blur the edge between water and land.

Feature the site’s views.

Respond appropriately to the road.

Positive and innovative relationship with water.

The Realisation of Site Objectives

12 12

10

11

11

12


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio (re)-Activist Architecture The studio focuses on reinvigorating places through the stimulation of local cultures and distinction derived through temporary propositions and events leading to long term legacy proposals and lasting change cementing local diversity and difference. We use Situationist techniques of Derive, Constructed Situation and Detournment to engage with context, identifying unsolicited moments of behaviour which can be translated into architectural propositions. Derived through observation, artistic participation and history students develop a narrative describing a speculative proposition which is critical of the current status quo and offers an alternative amplification of evident cultural activity. The studio studies cities of culture, we visited Marseille, European Capital of Culture 2013, to understand their strategies of cultural relevance, reinvigoration and participation. We explore the nature of an ongoing participatory role which is neither top down or bottom up but a synthesis bringing together long term aspirations of city stakeholders, private investors and the immediate concerns of local residents and communities to establish vibrant, distinct, social and fun places to live and work to enhance the image of the city in the eyes of their inhabitants. Our intention is to define new forms of architecture through the amalgamation of unconventional partners to propose new symbiotic relationships of mutually beneficial situations questioning existing institutional separatist forms. This year we worked in Coventry, collaborating with Coventry City of Culture Trust as they make their bid to be UK City Of Culture 2021. We designed, built and operated the Kino-Cine-Bomber; a mobile cinema as an art intervention and as a contribution to an ongoing research project (disrUPt! Creativity, Protest and the City). We explored Architecture by subtraction, the practice of renewing the urban landscape by removing redundant, disused, or over-engineered elements (Easterling, 2014). We embraced negative space or deconstruction, rather than solely additive architecture or construction. We traced a hidden river, culverted in post war redevelopment, thus identifying an engineering infrastructure no longer fit for purpose that could be “subtracted” from the urban landscape for cultural, economic and environmental benefit. The collective response to the hidden river formed the basis of a new framework and studio masterplan. 00 Studio Tutor Simon Baker 5th Year Students John Chia Joe McKibben Simona Petraityte Joanna Poxon Chris Scaplehorn Emma Warbrick 6th Year Students Eva Chee Alex Craig-Thompson Chris Jones Abdulbari EA Kutbi Emma Taylor Wanqing Wong Studio Collaborators Coventry City of Culture Bid disrUPT! Creativity, Protest and the City Visiting Tutors Ricardo Ares 00 Studio Masterplan 00a Friche La Belle de Mai, Marseille 00b Kino-Cine-Bomber 01 John Chia - The Upcycler’s Atelier The Upcycler’s Atelier re-appropriates a dilapidated site and responds to issues of a throwaway society. It explores symbolic and sustainable values in the craft of Upcycling, offering a new initiative for production and restoration which values craftsmanship and collaboration. ‘The Mender’s Atelier is small, tidy and warm. The light is soft. The Weaver’s loom rattles next door. He visits his small Urushi tree on his mezzanine floor, collecting sap for the Joiner to decorate his restored armchair. The Mender walks to his knee-height desk placing his impeccably kept tools in a lacquered box. Laying it into the atelier’s dumbwaiter, he makes his way to the 2pm Kintsugi Workshop.’

00

02 Joe McKibben -Coventry Trojan Market Coventry’s entrepreneurs are now priced out of trading in their own city. Historically merchants would gather outside city walls to trade freely. Today, the ring road of Coventry has replaced the city wall as a trade boundary and within is a monopolised trade zone governed by castles of corporate retail. Using the Trojan horse as a metaphor for taking back the city, the Coventry Trojan Market seeks to provide a legacy of independent trade by growing local talent from within to benefit the community, in contrast to the retail castles that send profits away. 03 Simona Petraityte - Biowaste Recycling Park The project explores how citizens of Coventry, particularly those unemployed or in need, can cooperate to respond to the need for community resilience and edible landscape. An alternative architectural model of sustainable urban recycling plant with local organic waste decomposition facilities using anaerobic digestion holds huge potential for the city of Coventry. By-products such as digestate and methane gas can be converted and reused as fertilizers and energy creating a strategy for sustainable cyclical food production whereas locally grown food can feed people in need. The proposal is not a building nor landscape but a hybrid between the two - a productive social landscape. 04 Joanna Poxon - The Game Park The Game Park is a cultural reinvention of the planning office. Coventry has evolved extensively from the centre of innovative manufacturing to a consumerist city. Today residents live outside the ring road, only to venture in for momentary consumer needs. The community life of the city has deteriorated and left Coventry with an undesirable reputation. Today, in light of the City of Culture 2021 bid, the Game Park brings play back into the city. Removing the fear of change the Game Park encourages engagement within the city.

00a

00b

00b

Cov e n t r y where BEACH means so much more

02

05 Chris Scaplehorn - The Hidden Baths of Coventry Coventry is currently and will soon be going through a period of change, projected by the UK City of Culture 2021 and HS2 line into a future of national media attention. The privacy of Coventry’s citizens becomes lost to relentless broadcasting and monitoring of city life. Within the heart of the urban city of media, technological and national presence, the Hidden Baths of Coventry offer a retreat; a place to breakout, to free oneself of the outside city and disconnect from the global, interconnected, ever-present matrix. 05

03


37

12 noitcurtsnoC emoD nedraG retniW gnizalg elbuod devruc-elbuod 1 xepa ta gninepo desirotom 2 erutcurts gniraeb daol SHC leets 3 recnatsid leets 4 rebmit detanimal-eulg 5

01

04

01

03 Structural Stairs Construction 1 wooden stair treads 2 steel baluster 3 steel structure 4 solid polished steel cover

Internal Spaces Floor Construct

1 underfloor heating system for 2 underfloor air distribution sys 3 floor edge lighting 4 screed 5 thermal insulation 6 damp proof membrane 7 reinforced concrete floor slab

02

PERSPECTIVE SECTION A-A 1:50 THROUGH THE MARKET STREETS

05

12


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

06 Emma Warbrick - The Coventry Registry Office The Coventry Registry Office re-imagines the conventional registry for an increasingly diverse population through reestablishment of a traditional domestic industry: silk weaving. The customary paper register is superceded by a tapestry which weaves together the unique stories of citizen’s lives into a greater narrative. The entire life-cycle of tapestry production is contained within the Registry, which houses mulberry tree groves to feed silkworms whose cocoons are processed for raw silk for the tapestry looms. These production spaces are integrated within the more typical spaces: celebration hall, archive, ceremonial space. The different programmes are united by processional routes that weave between the two. 07 Eva Chee - The Learning Forest The learning forest is a social infrastructure set in Coventry where cultural skills, local knowledge and communal relationship can develop freely. Stemmed from the observed repressive desire of the city to police communities, the project seeks to challenge the increasingly autonomous public realms that attempt to control the social spatial order. To dissolve traditional domains in defining spaces, nature is employed as an instrument for the expressions of indeterminacy in spatial design. This blurred spatial model aspires to provide learning experiences that are permissive rather than dictative. Ultimately, this concept of ambiguity materialises a spatial model that is multivalent, being formed by the people of Coventry

11 Emma Taylor - The Political Platform Located in the commercial centre of Coventry, the political platform will provide an accessible venue for citizens’ voices and opinions to be made visible through: exhibition, performance, debate and rallying. This will enable advocacy groups to be created from the diverse sectors of Coventry’s society, to generate a strength of voice capable of making real change in our democratic system. The political platform will display a visible strength which reflects the significance of the opinions exposed there, and antagonises the unyielding architecture of political institutions, whilst the spatial configuration will also reflect its openness to the public. 12 Wanqing Wong - The Urban Beach Corridor The Urban Beach Corridor is a manifesto that employs urban densification as a tactic to revert controlled spaces. It is an architecture of resistance that emulates the liminal quality of the beach to challenge Coventry’s City Council’s waterpark ambition. By managing water above the surface, the Urban Beach Corridor generates oppositional public realm for leisure while acting as a critical water control apparatus for the city. Offering visitors the opportunity to temporarily invert the codes of conduct that govern their everyday lives, the Urban Beach Corridor is a necessary piece of green infrastructure that symbolises liminality, exoticism and pleasure. 09

8am Print Deadline for the July ‘Zine

08 Alex Craig-Thompson - The Institute for Transient Workers The Institute for Transient workers weaves the social and economic praxis of employment back into the urban fabric of Coventry. In support of the City’s City of Culture 2021 bid it offers an alternative approach to the traditional Arts & Culture led propositions. By combining diverse groups of workers from the gig-economy, the Institute catalyses their collective ability to provide a supportive and diversified work environment that stabilises their precarious position in today’s economy. In doing so it expresses the tensions of the individual vs the collective as an allegory for the city as a whole. 09 Chris Jones - The Coventry Independent Broadcast Co-Operative The Coventry Independent Broadcast Co-Operative is the result of cultural exploration, which investigated alternatives to understand and intervene in the reality of the corporation media. An existing concrete frame is transformed to allow independent broadcast to become prevalent in this new urban territory. Through the treatment of the existing ‘ruin’, the public will be drawn through the cultural centre, witnessing the distribution and creation of local news, to the transformative roofscape where you can enjoy views stretching back across Coventry.

08

10 Abdulbari EA Kutbi - The Sponge Theatre In the context of Coventry’s falling levels of investment in the performing arts and an increasingly commercial entertainment sector. The project sets out to re-imagine the theatre as an open and accessible institution connected to the life of the city, restoring theatre to its origin as an outdoors performance and giving back control of the enterprise to the communities of the midlands. The work uses the local narrative of a newly revealed river ecology, balancing visions of sober performances and classical recitals with dreams of riverside rock concerts and canoe boats.

CELEBRATING UNDER THE BLOSSOMS

11

04

06

THE CEREMONY CHAMBER ILLUMINATED IN EVENING LIGHT


39

07

THE COVENTRY REGISTRY OFFICE 1:100 AXONOMETRIC DRAWING

The Coventry Registry Office weaves together the complex stories of the diverse lives of the city residents into a unified record: the Coventry Tapestry. Embracing a growing movement away from digitalisation and towards craftsmanship the tapestry is a tangible account of the moments that define Coventry which grows over time. The Registry Office re-introduces silk weaving to the city, which was once renowned for it’s ribbons and fabric in the long history of industrial innovation and re-invention, as a celebration of the cities phoenix like past. The entire process of creation is contained within the Registry with the silk worms being reared and the mulberry tree required to feed the insects cultivated and harvested in greenhouse inspired segments of the building. The raw silk from the cocoons is then treated and processed to be suitable for spinning into thread and then weaving into the tapestry. The tapestry [depicted here in Coventry blue, a nod to the famous colour from the wool dying period] then weaves through the public and celebration spaces, so that those inhabiting the building can watch as history is recorded and spun out around them. The tapestry then moves through to the archive spaces where it is cut, rolled, and stored. The record may then be accessed in the Reading Room for a number of years , before becoming available for purchase by members of the public whose lives it details. The production and cultivation spaces exist side by side with the celebration spaces available to hire in order to perform ceremonies for rites of passage such as weddings, birth and death, all of which are then recorded onto the tapestry. Across religions and cultures procession is a common element of ceremony and as such key routes have beeen prioritised [depicted here in brassy yellow]. These two routes weave through the building offering peeks into the tapestry creation and traversing the misted mulberry groves, converging so that the celebrants may briefly meet, before diverging again on their path to the ceremony space at the top of the register, overlooking the re-instated pool meadows and de-culverted River Sherbourne. To allow all members of the public to be a part of this unique procession, water weighted horizontal lifts have also been implemented alongside the traditional staircases to be accessible to those with limited mobility.

07

07

09

10

08

CELEBRATING UNDER THE BLOSSOMS

THE CEREMONY CHAMBER ILLUMINATED IN EVENING LIGHT

10

06

11


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Designing with Knowledge The studio’s ethos was to make design decisions based on substantiated knowledge to develop a future scenario for 2045 (half way through our working lives). This then informed the development of a strategic framework for a large regeneration site on the north riverbank in Derby, an area that suffers from flooding and will continue to intensify as a result of climate change. The generator for the identity of this new neighbourhood was the Silk Mill - Museum of Making on the south riverbank which is currently being designed by a multidisciplinary team led by Bauman Lyons Architects - from which the studio has had input from visiting tutors. As a result, this future neighbourhood caters for old and new forms of making, new economies and the new way of life associated with these. For instance with advances in technology this will mean decreasing the need for people to work, thus more leisure time; as well as time for creative productivity within this community of Makers, working together to create a low impact development, one that produces rather than consumes. Whilst the year 6 developed individual buildings, with input from members of the studio, further development of the framework was undertaken by year 5 collaboratively whereby each member would take a particular layer and create strategies that would be used to inform the design of other buildings within the framework. Year 5 then continued to explore and develop these strategies through architecture that would help to further enrich and integrate each project within the new neighbourhood of Makers. This year the studio trip was to Copenhagen where we had the opportunity to meet Tina Saaby, the Chief architect of Copenhagen and learn about the strategies being implemented as a response to climate change, which has consequently made the city more pedestrian and cycle friendly. We also had the opportunity to visit the Henning Larsen offices and be guided around the city to learn more about their projects and new building typologies. Studio Tutors Irena Bauman 5th Year Students Dan Anderson Josie Dorling Arneta Hoxha Anders Johnsson Sara Lage Maria Ramos 6th Year Students Dean Bartlett Rangika Fernandopulle Harriet Francis Llinos Glyn Amanda Holden Georgie Rathbone Kah Kiam Sham

Visiting Tutors Tom Vigar Studio Collaborators Bauman Lyons Architects Derby, Silk Mill Tina Saaby Chief architect of Copenhagen Signe Kongebro at Henning Larsen

Y

R E N T C E

06 Josie Dorling - FLOODING: A Future in Flood Adaptive Aquatecture An exploration into the use of adaptive aquatecture to respond to the increased risk of extreme flooding in 2045. The building harnesses the opportunity to harvest rainwater and provide a visual flood warning system to the framework’s community through a kinetic roof structure, with its organic form providing visual connotations to the jet engines of Derby’s aerospace manufacturing industry and the organic flow of river water. In extreme flood, the amphibious ground floor floats upwards in its wet dock. The amphibious volume is held in place by exposed guideposts at the base of the structural columns of the elevated upper storeys. Vertical linear motion of a column fixed to the amphibious base facilitates rotary motion in the roof, exposing the bold yellow underside of the roof and increasing its surface area for rainwater collection.

T

05 Anders Johnsson - PUBLIC SPACE: Recreation In search of Identity In a secular world, where we no longer see ourselves as created by a higher power - where do we turn for answers to what makes us human and what gives us our identity? Chapel of Identities revolves around the creation of human identity through the constant dialogue between the individual, the collective and the place in a world where the movement and mix of people is greater than ever before. It becomes the epicenter of the Neighbourhood of Makers as a place to collectively reflect on – and create the identity of the community.

I

02 Dan Anderson - ENERGY: A Neighbourhood Strategy With an aim to make users more aware of the energy that they consume, the project looked at how a thermal storage tower could be utilised to also create a vertical growing space. Chiefly designed for use by low risk category four inmates from the local prison, but also available to members of the public, it aimed to help train people in growing techniques to allow them to live with more self-sufficiency, whilst encouraging integration between the two groups.

04 Sara Lage - HOUSING: Designing for Future Families The project was to come up with three housing typologies that would accommodate future households as well as a system that would allow for individual access into homes during a flood. A multi-generational housing block was further developed within the framework, where the idea of flexibity of structure and space were key to the design. In particular for single flats to merge with family dwellings. C

01 Arneta Hoxha - RETROFIT: Co-Cardinal A co-leisure, co-working community Due to the predicted increase of global temperatures, this was an opportunity to explore solutions for adapting existing buildings. Cardinal Square is one of Derby’s most recognisable headquarter office buildings and sits at the intersection of the A61 and A52 on the eastern side of Derby’s inner ring road. This office building was a test bed for the development and testing of many climate solutions. The first solution being a kinetic facade that provides for climate change adaptation. The new proposal of Cardinal Square also gives Derby the opportunity to open up to the community and enhance the name “The City of Makers” with the building becoming a co-leisure/coworking hub. It encourages activity with the courtyard and ground floor of Cardinal Square, making the building intact and integrate more with the wider city.

03 Maria Ramos - TRANSPORT: Inhabiting the Flyover This project explores how the existing flyover can be retained in order to give back to the proposed Makers Community of Derby. Being the only infrastructure that is currently above flood level, the flyover becomes a key connection to adjacent buildings as well as allowing activities belonging to these programs to spill on to it. With time, the flyover will be eaten away by these and become more integrated into the Makers Community rather than a distinct element that is a barrier. Within this, the green lane kiosk highlights how autonomous technology can bring back free public services.

Strategic Framework

T

6m

in

R

wa

lk

A


41

ELEVATIONAL PERSPECTIVE Community Courtyard

The courtyard within Cardinal Square is acessible to the public as well as tenents. Its a space where people can get together in and make, build and spend their leisure time. Its a place with the facilities that can provide space to spend their free time in.

1:50 C:C SECTION

1:50 C:C SECTION

WATER STRATEGY The existing flyover has been retrofitted to accommodate new leisure functions and Flood water designed to aid with flood mitigation.

The existing flyover has been retrofitted to accommodate new leisure functions and designed to aid with flood mitigation.

1:50 C:C SECTION

02

WATER STRATEGY ENERGY STRATEGY

04

The existing flyover has been retrofitted to accommodate new leisure functions and designed to aid with flood mitigation.

Flood water Solar panels Street lights ENERGY STRATEGY

Shadi ng

Solar panels Street lights

Shadi ng

Stone steps integrated into grassy slope.

Deck over swale

Stone steps integrated into grassy slope.

Deck over swale

PlasticRoad (made from recycled plastic). Sections of the road will be crafted in a factory and then assembled at the construcPlasticRoad (made from tion site.1 recycled plastic). Sections of the road will be crafted in a factory and then assembled at the construction site.1

Porous Paving

Porous Paving

01

05

Perforated Pipe

Service pipes running along the flyover also stores excess flood water.

Retaining Wall

Perforated Pipe

Service pipes running along the flyover also stores excess flood water.

Retaining Wall

Source: 1 http://uk.businessinsider.com/a-dutch-city-is-planning-to-build-roads-from-recycled-plastic-2015-7?r=US&IR=T

03

Source: 1 http://uk.businessinsider.com/a-dutch-city-is-planning-to-build-roads-from-recycled-plastic-2015-7?r=US&IR=T

06

Stone steps integrated into grassy slope.

Porous Paving


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

07 Amanda Holden - The 21 Hour Project In 2045, Landau Forte College building a new secondary school based around Project Based Learning and establishing real world connections. With a 21 hour working week now the norm, parents and volunteers play a key role in educating the next generation. The school’s classrooms are placed around the city’s streets, integrating the school into the urban fabric of the Makers’ Neighbourhood. 08 Dean Bartlett - A New Urban Mobility The project asks how autonomous vehicle technology can sustainably re-invent existing infrastructure in Derby to rebalance the vehicular and pedestrian hierarchy. A time-line has been developed that explores the potential for Derby to become the worlds first autonomous zone, with phased development of a flagship building that provides facilities for vehicles, as well as residents who may have concerns about the new technology. 09 Llinos Glyn - Inhabiting Hetrotopia: A liminal village for subcultures The village is a proposal exploring how a new community within a city can be established through naturally evolved and non homogenous architecture, thus implementing change from the bottom up and from the inside out. Through a series of developed plans over 6 year increments the 2045 scenario shows the village in its accepted and adopted state providing facilities for the local and wider community. Based on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, the village creates a basis for the new community through communal bathing, washing, medical and meeting spaces. 10 Kah Kiam Sham - Building Community Resilience: the Sanctuary above water The project acts as a response to the uncertainties that we are facing in 2045. The building’s primary function as a national disaster training centre is to prepare the community for extreme events due to climate change and social issues. Integrated with a research centre and knowledge sharing centre for the community, the building develops local resilience to disaster. Sitting on a man made canal and retention pond, the building aims to mitigate the impact of flooding on the city, with the capability of engaging in disaster response and relief operation.

11 Harriet Francis - Artisan Works - Campus for experimental building The Artisan Works campus is a new public innovation and development centre for self-build housing. The BRE funded campus opens in response to the increase in community self-build projects as climate and social pressures create a new trend of cooperative living. The program addresses the lack of both hand and digital skills needed by prospective self-builders, providing facilities to learn and explore both forms of craft. Expanding on a combination of current Factory and Makerspace typologies, the building provides workshops, tech-labs, offices and testing facilities. It also hosts new public facility in the form of a tools exchange. The campus-like facility aims to reinstate craft in a digital age, re-skilling users through a collaborative process of design and manufacture. 08 12 Georgie Rathbone - Greenhouse to Restore the Redeemable This project explores how architecture can be utilised as a means of reforming the custodial system in the UK, with a greater emphasis on rehabilitation and reintegration into society. Sited in 2045 within a wider redevelopment area in Derby, the scheme proposes a combination of custodial requirements with community assets and shared facilities. Utilising a platform of food production and education, the project seeks to develop reciprocal relationships and support coexistence between the community outside and the community inside. It is hoped that this will ultimately lead to reduced recidivism. 13 Rangika Ferandopulle - The reCycling Hub The Auto Recycling Hub aims to expand the legacy of the prestigious transport assembly industry of Derby to disassembly of the IC engine automobiles through which materials can be harvested and recycled into a more sustainable mode of transportation ‘The City Cycle’ .The facility will act as a ‘SPECTACLE’ that will engage and educate the public of the recycling process and reintroduce the connection between the raw material and the end products that has been lost in the consumer based society that we live in. The premises will also become a material hub for the ‘Makers Neighbourhood’ where makers source sustainable recycled materials.

08

09

08

07

11

10


43

11

12

09

10

13


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Learning Culture Without opportunities to learn, our lives slip into a cycle of mundane, repetitive and mechanistic existence. Learning is to experience, to feel and to progress; it is essential for the development of our mind, body and soul. But where does learning take place and how do we learn? How do we value learning and how is knowledge collected, synthesised and shared? How can communities, places, landscapes and buildings learn? This year Studio Learning Culture explored the notion of learning through the process of transduction, the transformation of something from one form, place, or concept to another. The term has myriad of interpretations across disciplines, and we investigated this initially through the lense of early years development and learning pedagogy, but then tested this theory in an architectural and urban context; in Barnsley town. Whilst it is a unique place in terms of heritage and culture, Barnsley is also like many other post-industrial towns. Having recovered from the post-Alsopian hangover, the town is currently engaged in its own process of transformation and seeking to find its own identity. Throughout the year we worked with Barnsley Council Place Directorate who are interested in developing a dialogue around the development of their new Town Plan. Our studio’s proposals pose external opinions and catalysts for discussion around this ongoing development, exploring the challenges and oppurtunities that Barnsley may face. 01 Studio Tutor Leo Care

5th Year Students Fanni Csepeli Grace Laurie Tom Moore Luke Moran Lian Tee Caroline Williams 6th Year Students Gary Cheung Jonny Gordon Jenny Horne Kevin Lo Juliette Sung Lucy Uren

Studio Collaborators Lisa Proctor Sarah McHale Barnsley Council Visiting Tutors Phil Graham Lukas Barry Theo Bishop Warren McFadden Simon Harrison

01 Jenny Horne - The Restorative Workshop The Restorative Workshop is a centre to accommodate low risk male offenders aged 18-30 who are caught in the prison cycle. A 2 year residency in the Restorative Workshop would act as an alternative to a short prison sentence in a Category C or Category D prison. The project questions whether physical integration within the community can be used as a vehicle for social reintegration. The programme consists of four elements; live, learn, work and well being. This alternative solution aims to offer stability and streamline the reform and rehabilitation of offenders. 02 Lian Tee - May Day Green Market Hall The project speculates an alternative proposal for Barnsley’s new market hall. A new build which embraces a user-friendly adaptable construction system at multiple levels of use and management. It imagines space for individual deviation and creativity, as well as a reflexivity to future change and a resilient presence as the heart of Barnsley town centre.

01

03 Juliette Sung - The Ageless coLAB In the current world, the distribution of power, freedom, responsibility, wealth and burdens is intensifying the tension between the young and old generations. They do not hold each other in great esteem and, because of their difference in perspective and values, they have little faith in one another. The Ageless coLAB will be looking at the alternative order of economy that can enhance social, economic, political and well-being value of Barnsley. Creating the age-friendly collaborative making studio, it will establish a place to re-unite people from different generations by co-production. 04 Fanni Csepeli - Multi-Sensory Arts Centre in Barnsley My proposal is a semi-commercial building, which incorporates a tactile multi-sensory arts centre along with a new interpretation of the cinematic experience. The key drivers of the design are the concepts of accessibility and tactility. The two storeys are connected by ramps offering multi-sensory experiences. The proposal generates a reinterpretation of routes within a building and it simultaneously challenges the hierarchy of sight by evoking the rest of the senses. The cinematic commercial reality is responsible for inviting people from of all interests into the building and hence expose them to the multi-sensory journey leading to the showrooms.

02

01


45

le

yc

bic liv de ery

b

-b

ute ro

ute

n ro

stria

de

pe

outdoor market

Performance Hall - Midday Performance 12:00

05

hig

h

garden space

stre

pe

de

stria

n ro

ute

et

Barnsley Player’s Village - July 21:00

St Mary’s Place Looking South May, Morning, 09:00

05

03

0.0 floor plan 1:250

03 Visual Experience Sense of sight is evoked by colourful glazing and the careful treatment of light

View to train sta�on visual connec�on to surroundings

Kinesthe�c Experience sense of touch plays a significant role in the building design

Auditory and Visual connec�on to railways

Oflactory Experience sense of smell achieved by scented materials and technological solu�ons

Gustatory and Oflactory Experience of the central cafe the atrium will allow for the smell to spread throughout the building

Auditory Experience interac�ve sound installa�ons

U�lising sunlight South facing facade will maximise the sensory experience gained by the careful treatment of sunlight

Main Point of Entry from the commons

Sensory Experience Programme Diagram

04

06

05


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

05 Jonny Gordon - Barnsley’s Player’s Village A creative hub comprising of a music facility and accommodation for music students and graduates. This projects seeks not only to build upon the existing musical education networks, but to explore how a considered architectural solution can encourage a positive environment for young people to progress themselves in a professional career in music after college. The projects aims to contribute to Barnsley’s aesthetic, reputation, community spirit and to gain a name for itself as one of the best places in the country to study music for young people. 06 Luke Moran - Reclaiming Barnsley Reclaiming Barnsley is focused on highlighting the inefficiencies of many of our urban realms and in turn, providing an educational platform in which to change our somewhat insatiable thirst for demolitions. Situated in the heart of Barnsley, my proposal is primarily a storage facility to reclaim/recycle/reuse all the materials and components from the ‘Better Barnsley Development’ demolitions which will otherwise become victimised as a result of their plans. Reclaiming at an industrial scale, the materials can be reused on the masterplan and other surrounding construction work. Reclaiming at a domestic level, workshops provided spaces for people to learn and explore the possibilities of upcycling for themselves. Reclaiming Barnsley’s cultural heritage exists in the shape of a theatre where Barnsley’s very own demolitions takes centre stage celebrating change but educating towards a more sustainable future. 07 Caroline Williams - The Library of Activities The Library of Activities is set in Barnsley and challenges the notion of what a Library means to the town. It is based around a program of 7 distinct uses, flexible spaces which can be booked by users to meet their particular needs. It facilitates bottom up engagement with the building through a council framework and allows the appropriation of space. The bookable spaces include areas for art and crafts, plant growing areas, meeting spaces for larger groups and areas for children’s activities and books.

09 Kevin Lo - Urban Playground The Urban Playground is set from now to the year of 2030 and explores an infrastructural approach in addressing: - Barnsley’s increasingly obese, physically inactive and ageing population as well as the densification of the town centre from future population increase - The lack of therapy and recreational facilities within Barnsley Town Centre - The lack of education between cooking, nutrition and culinary skills as well as ways of implementing healthy food knowledge into the daily lives of Barnsley’s people 10 Lucy Uren - The Free Childcare Manifesto This thesis project considers the separate worlds of adults and children. The project considers how a free child care policy in Barnsley, South Yorkshire could enable an architecture of a shared spatiality between the world of work and play. The thesis proposal is for an urban nursery at the centre of a community learning and working hub providing a public library, graduate workshops and hot desk offices. Moments of overlap between the different users in shared play and performance spaces allow children to learn directly from adult activity. Creating these spaces of overlap between the child and adult world will create not only a more affordable childcare system for parents but also children who are confident urban natives. 11 Gary Cheung - Therapeutic {Music} Centre This project forms around the central theme of music and its ability to impact society through psychological and physiological forms. It explores how this can be manifested in architecture and the numerous typologies it can synthesize. How music therapy can justify itself as a means to combat depression, mental illness, in addition to providing wider disciplines of mental health and wellbeing, whether passive and active, as a fundamental necessity for social change in Barnsley.

Think Entrance

07

Think

1:50 section

08 Tom Moore - ‘Becoming’ Ever Different How might the regeneration of post-industrial towns such as Barnsley move away from Heideggerian notions of fixed identity and move towards a Deleuzian process of evolutionary becoming? The project uses the Barnsley based, 1968 novel, ‘A Kestrel for a Knave’ as a point of departure for both the town of Barnsley and my own design process. Taking the forgotten children (or knaves) of Barnsley’s schooling system, the building becomes a narrative based program of alternative schooling spliced into a forgotten building in the heart of Barnsley’s town centre. The existing building is stripped back to a ‘body without organs’, prosthetic insertions creating an instrumental relationship with the town centre with ever growing connections.

08

08


47

09

09

09

11

Journey into Therapy

10

10

11

roof top playspace


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Arrival City “A great and final shift of global population is upon us. We will end the century as a wholly urban species.” Habitat III, Sanders, D Seen by many in the West as a threat, this rural to urban migration will have profound implications on the lives and well-being of the migrants and the geopolitical landscape. To explore the effect that mass migration and urbanisation is having on our cities, our studio focused on the notion of the Arrival City. Operating as transitional spaces for those entering the city, Arrival Cities in the words of Doug Sanders (author of Arrival City), are the places where the next great economic and cultural boom will be born. Arrival was the key theme of the 2016 German Pavilion at the Venice Biennial; Making Heimat - an Arrival Country. The exhibition identified Offenbach-am-Main as a prototype Arrival City. Historically seen as the poor neighbour to Frankfurt to its west, the messy urban blocks that form the fabric of Offenbach sit in stark contrast to the looming presence of the European Central Bank over the river. Full of life, ringed with shops and cafes below apartments housing a wide range of people, the urban blocks of Offenbach support a rich mix of urban life that have enabled an Arrival City to take hold. As a studio we would like to give special thanks to all those who were so incredibly generous with their time during our visit to Offenbach. This information was invaluable to us as a studio to begin to understand and reveal the economic, cultural and social threads that make up the city. Studio Tutor John Sampson 5th Year Students Chris Cooper Josh Frend Helen Galletti Nigel Hassell Nicolas Heppner Cherry Poon 6th Year Students John Bacon Helen Berg Adam Justice Josh Molnar Ashley Mountain Hannah Pether Jamie Reid

Studio Collaborators Prof Kai Vockler HFG Offenbach Jan Schultz bb22 Annika Grill Offenbach Council Officer Tobias Kurtz Offenbach Council Officer Visiting Tutors Eleanor Brough - SWA Sarah Ernst - Archetype Edmund Harrison-Gray - Hawkins\Brown Aidan Hoggard - SSoA

01 Hannah Pether - The Threshold: Home of Many Worlds Can thresholds, as active archives of daily life, be utilised to decipher and reconnect their wider fragmented contexts (physical, social, cultural), creating a sense of place in an otherwise transient city? This thesis project explores how the leftover spaces within a city, the voids formed by courtyards mediating public and private space, offer the potential for wider re-engagement. It seeks to remedy the inherent complexities of such transient areas – the extremely high migrant population and population turnover, limiting the right of many in the city to a conventional vote. It seeks to give each individual a voice and story within the city through a deconstructed parliamentary model, mediating domestic and civic space to create a place of integration, debate and refuge: a ‘city within a city’. 02 Josh Frend - Formal vs Informal Cultural purity is an oxymoron. To have a truly thriving community it is inherent that there is a need for diversity. Diversity in people, skills, knowledge and culture. The project is based upon a translation of micro clusters of activity and differences between formal and informal practices, physically and socially. Using a mutual background of food, a cookery school was developed capitalising upon a shared medium for inclusion. Whilst the cookery school is not used for formal teaching, the school and its facilities would be re-purposed by the community, where an informal exchange of knowledge can occur.

03 Helen Galletti - Offen Huas Through the development of the Arrival City of Offenbach, the southern area of the city has been left neglected. The community needs to be reconnected; the solution is to create a space to combine the disparate communities, both indoor and outdoor. On site it was important to create a building that would be welcoming: a timber frame was selected to engage the park as well as act as a vertical garden. Rammed earth was utilised to harness a series of safe interior environments to deal with the joining of many communities. 04 Jamie Reid - Teather The project is based on integrating migrant cultures into a community using tea growing as a social engagement device. The proposal seeks to bio-remediate and convert a former chemical plant site into a tea plantation with mixed-use co-op housing. The plantation and processing of tea would be managed by the community and sold on site. At the heart of the community lies the Teather Tea Centre, a cultural, social, and economic hub where Western and Eastern tea cultures mix. Functioning as a lab for processing tea and an educational place where the history of tea culture can be understood.

01

05 Chris Cooper - The Offenbach Exchange Germany’s refugee intake requires massive numbers of new housing, job opportunities and education services to be provided at low cost in city centre locations across the country. The Exchange provides a model in utilising the existing underused building stock which occupies German city centres following the financial crash of 2008 and their general move towards post-industrialised urban economies. The density of opportunity provided by city centre locations enables a greater bond of social capital to develop between converging new and old strands of German society, connecting people without roofs, to roofs without people. 06 Adam Justice - The Rhein-Main Creative Collective This thesis project explores the viability of a new semi-regulated urban block facilitating an emerging creative class. Connecting creative professionals with arrivals whose creativity is derived from adapting to new ways of living, it offers informal users opportunities to translate unique skills into opportunity of formal employment and exposes formal users to new forms of innovation in a non-traditional creative environment. Addressing Offenbach’s desire for a new creative economy the Collective proposes a holistic response to symbiosis between informal and formal economies, not only celebrating but helping reform the relationship between established and arrival cities. 02

02


49

03

01

05

06

04

06

05


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

07 Ashley Mountain - Industry 2.0 Industry has been key to the success of many cities around the world. However, following industrial displacement through commercial gentrification over the past 30 years, Offenbach, like many cities, has struggled to rebuild and rebalance its economy. This thesis project sought to explore how a new 3D print based industry could be sustainably integrated into the urban fabric of a growing post-industrial city. With global plastic consumption set to reach 298 million tonnes by the end of 2018, and with plans to cut global emissions by 74 % by 2050, could the reuse and recycling of this waste help kickstart a new creative and production lead economy for Offenbach?

10 Josh Molnar - Offenbach’s Living Streets The thesis proposes for an alternative regeneration strategy for affordable co-living and co-working typologies in Offenbach. The project defies tactics of demolition and economic regeneration and proposed a more inclusive and integrated strategy that defies space standards to propose new co-living typologies. These alternative living typologies aim to increase greater mobilization for residents from different ethnic backgrounds and generations into German cities, culture and society. Therefore offering an alternative integration strategy both within the physical environment of Offenbach’s urban block and within Offenbach’s society through community led development using co-living.

08 Nicolas Heppner - Zollamt Studios The project looks at converting a customs holding facility, originally built in 1952, and turning it into a creative hub. It is set within the recently designated creative district of Offenbach, offering local artists and designers the space to work and collaborate, Seeking to integrate and retain talented migrants within the community through entrepreneur mentorship programs. The proposal features a modular timber panelling system which allows artist studios and workspaces to be flexibly partitioned to accommodate especially the volatile growth of small businesses. A parametrically designed timber bridging structure is proposed between the existing buildings and would hold communal spaces such as an auditorium, a gallery, and an exhibition area.

11 Nigel Hassell - MusikHaus Offenbach has been described as both the ‘Arrival City’ and ‘The Creative City’. Celebrating these aspects of life, MusikHaus seeks to release the synergistic opportunity in their integration. The simple idea of music as a universal language is a key driver in helping new arrivals build social capital whilst experiences, sounds and styles are shared. It is envisaged this project can continue a long heritage of both creative arts and especially Music within Offenbach, kick starting a new era of growth within the creative economy and, as a by-product, a boost to other local economies and the service industry.

09 Helen Berg - Breaking Bread Exploring food as a basis for cultural integration, Breaking Bread imagines the expansion and redevelopment of Cavus Bakery within the pioneering Turkish community of Sandgasse: introducing cookery education, a Turkish bazaar, and food growing opportunities united by a thriving market square framed within a distinctive arched colonnade. Emphasizing baking - and baked clay bricks – the community Dining Room is the heart of the project, displaying a “chimney within a chimney”. The inner chimney contains a wood-fuelled oven, whilst the outer corbelling “chimney” frames an arched dining arena around the open kitchen. Adaptable seating caters for varying cultural eating habits, uniting diverse nations through celebration of food.

03

08

12 Cherry Poon - GowHaus ‘We don’t just grow food, we grow people’- Chair of Loughborough Junction Action Group. This housing scheme aims to bring a new and sustainable lifestyle to Offenbach. Including a public growing courtyard and private vertical growing plots, residents and the wider community are all welcome to join in activity that bring people closer together. It is especially designed as a tool for social integration especially for new immigrants and the established community, in the hope of becoming a thriving and vibrant residential quarter. 13 John Bacon - In The Offenbach Block How can reconsidering the offenbach block begin to address this city’s housing shortage?” This thesis project looks at the idea that densifying, by building within Offenbach’s, large scale, mixed use, urban blocks could help the city address it’s current housing shortage. Introducing a mixed use development to the centre of a block could create help sustainable communities, integrated into the existing urban fabric of the Offenbach block and city.

09

07

07


51

12

10

13

11

08

12

13


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Landscape + Urbanism / Alluvial Ecologies Located in and around Gainsborough, a small town on the low lying flood plane of the River Trent, we have explored how our smaller towns can adapt to the shifting ground on which they are founded, both physically but also economically and socially. Set within the context of increasing urban migration against the threat of climate change and the impact this will have on the landscape, we explored through a research led agenda, the changes wrought on an urban landscape. Strategies of mitigation over adaption were adopted, looking particularly at the impact of employment, commerce, and education on the sustainable growth of a rural community. Through group and individual studies we developed a network of projects that sought to address the apparent gaps in education, skills and manufacture within the town. Through our projects we explored the landscape as an ‘agent of change, constructed from cumulative change rather than a rigid reality’, which lead to investigations as to how we might develop synergies between landscapes and how we live and work within the modern rural and urban ecology. The studio considered the changes within the demographics of the rural townscape and the impact that this has on the social needs of its inhabitants. The resultant projects, spatially and temporally referential of each other, were wide ranging with a focus on the development of operative communities and how they in turn develop support networks for health and wellbeing, learning, working and living. 01 Studio Tutor Howard Evans Andy Clayden (MALA) 5th Year Students Benjamin Bradish Cameron Shackley Isabelle Chamberlayne Holly Wilkinson Sin Ning Chan Theodore Roseland 6th Year Students Abigail Humphreys Alexandros Achniotis Hugh Armstrong Joren Heise Maleeka Metteden Robyn Kent

Visiting Tutors Bea Munby Matthew Bradshaw Tilly Beck Hannah Smart With thanks to: Wendy Osgodby Graeme Moore West Lindsey District Council The Gainsborough Heritage Association

01 Theodore Roseland - Carbon Capture and Utilisation Innovation Centre Carbon Capture and Storage has the potential to decrease our environmental impact on the climate, however our government has recently withdrawn its investment in the technology. Therefore other solutions to carbon dioxide emissions are needed. The ‘Carbon Capture and Utilisation Innovation Centre’ provides research, development and industry that utilises carbon dioxide as a raw mineral resource. Flue gas from local CO2 emitters is piped to Gainsborough and passed through a microalgae bioreactor. The algae feed on toxic pollutants, filtering out the CO2 to be used for carbon capture and utilisation processes. The system also allows for algal biomass to be harvested and utilised in local industry. 02 Benjamin Bradish - Bio-Pilot Gainsborough Bio-Pilot Gainsborough is a research, education and advanced manufacturing facility remediating the use of fossil fuels in the plastics industry. Building upon research into the ‘New Plastics Economy’ outlined by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and ‘Britains New Industrial Strategy’, the scheme reclaims Gainsborough’s rich innovative engineering heritage, whilst providing jobs and education for those in the town. As well as changing the course of industrial production through Bio-Plastics, the scheme provides a remedial wetland landscape to remove the toxins of the previous oil field and existing industrial park.

03 Alexandros Achniotis - GMCA: The Gainian (of the people of Gainsborough) Mouseion and Contemporary Agora History makes place. Gainsborough a post-industrial town steeped in history, is on the brink of losing its place identity, from uncontrolled commercial development diluting its historic urban fabric. National funding cuts on culture put strain on local heritage facilities risking their closure. Gainsborough forms a case study that explores the assembly and accommodation of vulnerable but significant cultural repositories in one place in order to secure their viability in the context of heritage-led regeneration. The project vision aims to foster a symbiotic relationship between community, culture and enterprise at both building and urban landscape level.

01

04 Cameron Shackley - Gainsborough Off-Grid Set within the context of environmental change, reliance on fossil fuel energy production and concerns over energy security, my project interrogates the notion of Gainsborough off-grid. Situated within Megawatt Valley, an historically fossil-fuelled energy landscape, it explores the implications of renewable power generation by reimagining Megawatt Valley as a new renewable ‘Energy Landscape’ consisting of large-scale wind power generation connected to the Intergrid; a smart network of micro-grids within Gainsborough. Within this network, the Gainsborough Energy Hub acts as a key nexus between the wider energy landscape and the town, managing and monitoring the flow of energy, whilst promoting energy literacy and facilitating the development of future energy research. 05 Hugh Armstrong - The Gainsborough International Fungarium The Gainsborough International Fungarium was once a global home for mycological sciences, sporting the best in laboratory technology aimed at harnessing the incredible potential of Fungi. Its experiments led to great leaps in sustainable agriculture, material development and of course, myco-digitology. Before the incident it was a thriving hub of activity and knowledge exchange, its architecture providing exciting journeys and connecting the town with its newly landscaped riverside. It is hard to imagine now, gazing at the glowing mushroom forest it has become, but in its prime the Fungarium was a fungal figurehead for what the architecture of science could be. 02

02


53

04

ce

04

C [P obd ro en po S se tr d ee Sh t ard

Su

rfa

ce

M

Lo

ark

rd

et

Str

Pla

ee

t

03

]

Gainsborough Old Hall Grade I Listed

1

Su

rfa

ce

]

5

Co [P bd ro en po S se tre d e Sh t ard

2

Gainsborough Library Grade II Listed

Gai Inte nsbo Fu rnat roug ng ariu iona h m l

Silver Street

Lo [P rd S ed tr est ee ria t nis

ed

]

4

05

2 Ropery

Road

[Propos

ed Sha

red Surf

ace]

Elswitha Court Grade II* Listed

3 Civic Square [Proposed] Gainian

Mouseion

Caskgate Street [Proposed Shared

Surface] Silver Street Square

7 Agora 6

Whitton’s Gardens

8

Gainsborough Energy Hub & Urban Square

Lord Staith Historic Trade Route to Gainsborough [Port Era]

Pocket Park [Proposed]

River Trent Heritage Nexus Masterplan Scale 1:500 Riverside Elevation Scale 1:500 Gainian Mouseion Heritage Wing

Contemporary Agora

Gainian Mouseion Enterprise Wing

Civic Square [Proposed]

Whitton’s Gardens Re-designed

Gainsborough International Fungarium [Hugh Armstrong Year 6]

Elswitha Court Grade II Listed

Regenerated Riverside Walk

Gainsborough Energy Hub & Urban Square [Cameron Shackley Year 5]

Beckingham - Nottinghamshire

03

05

05


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

06 Joren Heise - Aegir Meadows Gainsborough is a post industrial town on the riverside, which remains vulnerable to flooding despite flood defences. After the collapse of its industries in the 19th century the urban fabric diluted and became physically and socially divided. Aegir Meadows uses water management design to create spaces of delight and bring people into direct contact with nature. The project is a new model for sustainable urban growth by weaving water and wilderness into the urban typology, forming the ‘glue’ that strengthens the identity. 07 Robyn Kent - The Biophilic Neighbourhood The biophilic neighbourhood project explores whether healthy living can be achieved under current residential models. This is proposed through biophilic design. The project blurs the boundaries between indoor and outdoors through designing with nature in the space, nature of the space, and representations of nature. 08 Sin Ning Chan - Learning Complex Learning complex provides a combination of learning, making and sport facilities in the community. Responding to current and future social demand in Gainsborough, it aims to promote alternative learning, health and well-being as well as encouraging new social interaction. As the only single-sided river town, the project explores the urban relationship with River Trent and seeks to revitalise the river edge on a wider network. With an opportunity access to Beckingham Marshes, the proposal creates a new footbridge to connect residential areas and wider nature context, and alternative route towards the town centre in masterplanning proposal.

11 Abigail Humphreys - The National Centre of Melissokomy The Honey Bee plays a lead role in the production of the crops we rely on every day and recently, their numbers have been declining. In Gainsborough, farmers have been campaigning to overturn the pesticide ban that the EU Parliament put in place in 2013, under the pretence that they are not making enough crops to keep their farms going. The National Centre of Melissokomy aims to create a hybridised building typology that combines research, production, leisure and educational spaces that inspires people to take better care of the environment through interaction with the honeybee within the wider context of the town. 12 Holly Wilkinson - Edible Deadible Founded in Gainsborough, Edible Deadible has become the emergent form of sustainable urban burial. Consisting of a series of sequential experiences, both for the mourners and those that work there, the building and landscape moves its inhabitants from darkness to light and from beneath to above. Embedded into a landscape of gardens, the Mushroom House uses funghi to process the deceased into nutrient rich soil, whilst removing toxins such as BPAs and mercury, and acts as the central axis upon which the building folds into the hillside. Families can later choose to either use their loved ones in their own gardens or have them commemorated as a new tree in the connected orchard in return for a small portion of the annual crop. Successive family members can be added to the tree over the years. Edible Deadible aims to show that cemeteries can be more than just graveyards, and add vibrancy and life to our towns and cities, whilst reducing the land use required for traditional burial requires.

06

07

06 09 Isabelle Chamberlayne - Gainsborough Agricultural Research Centre Brexit will see drastic changes to British farming, with the EU subsidies based on land area likely to be replaced with monetary rewards for services towards the countryside as well as goods provided. My scheme envisages a future where the sustainability and accessibility of farming is deemed as important as yields produced. This agricultural research centre and farm shop provides a platform for conversations between farmers, researchers and the local community through the celebration of all things food: research, production and consumption. Drawing upon it’s proximity to Gainsborough town and the scarcely visited open countryside on the other side of the river Trent, the centre addresses the way food production can sit adjacent to wetland wildlife and improve the health of Gainsborough through education and access to nature. 06

06

10 Maleeka Metteden - Gainsborough Grow-Tech Centre Economic growth is no longer powered by great big industries, waterways and rail lines but by the richest clustering of people and ideas. In a bid to reinvent the place of innovation in Gainsborough today the project explores the potential of ‘growing’ knowledge in the heart of the town. By introducing an innovation centre which combines technical education in agri food technology as well as practical translation directed towards small and medium enterprises. This creates a framework for exchange and productivity through sustainable intensification of existing networks within an urban research landscape. FIRST FLOOR TERRACE First floor living area with views onto the river.

RIVER SIDE WALK Planting buffer zone to allow mediated visible connections between pedestrians and residents, whilst allowing views to the river

1:50 SECTION THROUGH COMMUNITY COURTYARD

07

DINING AREA

Opening out to external dining, hidden frame and continued materiality blurs the boundary between indoor and outdoor.

EXTERNAL DRYING AND ACTIVITY AREA. Bringing activities outdoors- communal dining, drying and playing, overseen by kitchen for supervision.

LIGHT DIFFUSION AND VARYING PRIVACY

Light diffusion and operable privacy from biomimicry facade.

COMMUNAL COURTYARD For social sustainability and a shared responsibility of caring for nature. Each resident puts an individual stamp to create varied approached to nature..

SKY LIGHT Triple height space creates open juxtaposed relationship of variable space and lighting. Views to the sky create visual relationship with nature. Views to nature at all journeys of the day.

COMMUNAL BALCONY Interaction with neighbours, prospect and refuge.


55

08

09

10

10

11

12

12

11


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio: In Residence 2016-17 was Studio in Residence’s third year in Castlegate, a run-down area of Sheffield city centre. We have been working actively with the site and the people we meet there, keeping our eyes, ears and minds open to new creative possibilities. The studio specialises in working between art and architecture in a variety of ways – collaborating with artists and arts organisations, borrowing site-specific techniques from art practice and taking a critical stance on the regeneration potential of arts and culture. Following on directly from a very successful Live Project with the Friends of Sheffield Castle we developed ideas formed there into complex and ambitious design proposals for the whole of Castlegate, with connections to the rest of the city beyond. Being ‘in-residence’ stimulated a rich and nuanced understanding of site that then demanded a spectrum of sophisticated speculative design responses. The studio worked together and individually to produce a set of proposals that are not only situated on site but also in time. Projects range from ‘simple’ pop-ups, to temporary event structures, adaptable architectures and large permanent buildings. The studio embraced the rich heritage and social history of Castlegate to explore how cultural projects can become catalysts for community development & cohesion, local identity and investment. The resulting spatial proposals imagine a future Castlegate that is diverse, ambitious, playful and optimistic.

Studio Tutors Carolyn Butterworth 5th Year Students Deborah Adler Shushu Cai Matthew Evans Mansel Haynes Bianca Man Ania Wozniczka-Wells 6th Year Students Sam Austen Jessica Beresford Nicholas Birchall Matthew Bloomfield Daniel Klaiber Simeon Shtebunaev Hang Zhou Studio Collaborators Matthew Pearson, Hawkins Brown Adolfo Estalella & MediaLab Prado, Madrid ChrisWilderspin, CWArchitects Rachael Dodd, Yorkshire Artspace ISRAAC Studio Learning Cultures Visiting Tutors Bryan Davies Andrew Smith Paul Monaghan Sofie Pelsmakers Tony Skipper Chris Wilderspin

01 Sam Austen - The People’s Hotel The People’s Hotel is heavily based in time, exploring how communities can challenge and adapt to top down incentives through a bottom up evolution that in turn creates a hybridity of people, program and architecture. This is explored through how the adaptation of the hotel typology can create an environment where there is potential to allow for otherwise marginalised social communities to interact. It is rooted by the hotels position in liminality and the opportunities this can be bring to society and the individual. 02 Deborah Adler - City Theatre//Theatre City This project, set in a square in Castlegate’s Law Quarter, examines how wilfully dormant ‘public space’ can become an active and engaging part of the city through performative architectural interventions. The design focuses on a series of architectural apparatus starting with simple person-scale installations leading to a new front-of- house extension link to the Old Town Hall; re-imagined as a theatre to house experimental theatre group, Forced Entertainment. The interventions act to catalyse the reappropriation of the lifeless square into genuinely public space. The design celebrates the everyday drama present in Castlegate, and brings a pastime typically located in the more affluent areas of the city to an area that feels like it is being forgotten. 03 Mansel Haynes - Destructive Exploration ‘A One-Time Investigation’ Faculty of Archaeological Investigation - A New Convention of Destructive Exploration. The project aims to offer a facility that investigates, reveals and celebrates the identity of Castlegate through the act of practical exploration. Through collaborative meetings with the professors of the University of Sheffield Archaeological Department, the project aims to explore new methodologies and approaches of archaeological practices with an objective to both enhance the researcher’s’ capabilities and integrate the process of revealing history of place to the public.

01

01

04 Jessica Beresford - The Art Works Set within the context of increasing automation and an erosion of the culture of creative learning, The Art Works is driven by the agenda that it is the creative and practical skills generated through the arts which will allow future generations to deal with a rapidly changing world. Located in the Castlegate Sheffield, The Art Works celebrates and develops creativity within a multigenerational facility that brings together a new approach to lifelong creative learning. Embedded within a public playscape, the building supports the cross pollination of mainstream, extra- curricular and arts therapy education. Children become introduced to a multigenerational, arts led environment where everybody understands that creativity and participation in 02

02


57

03

03

03

04

05

APPROACHING THE ART WORKS FROM THE PUBLIC PLAYSCAPE

05

04

07

04

06

05

07


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

the arts are vital to our social, personal and emotional well being throughout life. 05 Hang Zhou - Time-based Museum Time-based Museum is a container of continuing changing conditions. It allows constantly reorganizing and rearranging. The building is conceived as the space for transient occurrence and ephemeral events where people can participate in or experience artistic and seasonal activities. The space will be ever-changing and fully customizable. Artists have the liberty of creating their own identity within the confines of the time-based incubators and vitrines. Time based action art will be displayed. And the whole building is processoriented. Also, the project intends to explore the possibility of inhabiting the museum as a public space. Temporary, informal and intermediate uses, appropriation initiatives and experimental designand-build projects have arisen from the need for new public spaces. 06 Ania Wozniczka-Wells - Castlegate Community Construction College The Project proposes a community construction strategy to regenerate Castlegate through the sharing of skills. It aims to bring together local colleges, universities, residents, artists, tradespeople and crafts people through the refurbishment of an old public toilet. This would elevate the quality of space of areas of Castlegate, enabling other projects to take place here. Following this, a modular street of housing would be built using the existing structure of disused shops in ‘the Galleries’. This would link to the proposed Living Library on the old Castle Market site, creating an active street through the centre of Castlegate. 07 Shushu Cai - Castlegate Art Project ‘Artist Impact Hub & Artist in Residence’ (AIR) The project aims to provide an ‘artist impact hub’ that reveals, celebrates the value of Castlegate and activates, blurs the boundary with victoria quarter, through reusing the disused grade II listed building castle house. This project aims to explore the new roles and capabilities of artist as creators in the city regeneration through closely collaboration and co-working with other artists, professionals and local community. Density of the hub is growing in the future with more city projects involved. Meanwhile, 6-12 months affordable artist live and work lobby units are offered to encourage the long-term research on Castlegate. 08 Matthew Evans - No Event Without Castlegate//The Bioscope The project is an event situated on the Castle Market site, sharing similarities to that of a fairground. Many community groups gather on parade floats each year for 2 months as part of The Great Expo of the North, showcasing their achievements acting as a reminder and an advertisement to visitors of what the area has to offer. The project creates detachment from the outside world, with the Bioscope being the main attraction. It contains an amalgam of areas, made up by the parade floats relating to the palimpsests of Castlegate, such as The Megatron, The Steel Forgery and The Don. The Bioscope offers ‘Open Drama’ and ‘Intimacy’ within a dynamic environment. 09 Bianca Man - Playful Infusions | Sculptural Catalysts ‘Playful Infusions’ are experimental pieces of architecture which act as sculptural catalysts in Castlegate. Adopting a narrative of the mobile frame as a story-telling device and of plugging into voids of the city, the project explores a family of interventions given to residents of Castlegate to implement. The intervention in isolation may not have an agenda, but through many user groups gradually adopting them, this collective social behaviour can lead to a network of activists in Castlegate. Translating my interest of storytelling into architectural

language, the rigid origami façade responds to everyday rituals which occur behind the temporary element, producing playful geometries that cannot be replicated. 10 Simeon Shtebunaev - Cultures of Urban Regeneration The project explores an approach by a local agency which takes advantage of the top-down impositions such as service outsourcing. The over-arching question in the context of Castlegate has been concerned with the current regeneration processes and the idea of a Cultural Quarter. The project scenario is realistic and works within the compromised structures of capitalism to promote gradual change. The focused development incorporates essential community functions centred around a new Urban Living Room – a place for discourse to occur. The architect provokes, experiments and to allows for different tastes and social strata to collide. An alternative model that does not subscribe to the neo-liberal notion of the ‘creative city’ is developed acknowledging ‘low culture’ and serendipitous interactions.

08

08

11 Nicholas Birchall - The Living Library Emerging from the void in civic provision left by the closure of Sheffield Central Library, this thesis project proposes the conception of the ‘Living Library’, an evolution of the public library typology for the age of mass information, a physical space for information to touch down, for people to engage with it, contribute to it, and bring it to life. Located in Castlegate, Sheffield’s historic but overlooked quarter, the Living Library will play a crucial role in bringing a sense of pride, purpose and citizenship back to the area. The proposal forms a porous urban block, mediating between the city centre and the green corridor beyond. 12 Matthew Bloomfield - Rethinking Democracy in God’s Own Country The project proposes a Parliament building for the Independent Nation State of Yorkshire, alongside a range of leisure facilities and essential services which aim to increase and enrich democratic functionality. Drawing heavily on Harry Frankfurt’s seminal and prescient “On Bullshit”, the architecture rejects the contemporary simplification of both politics and buildings into soundbites and icons. Instead, it celebrates the complexity and multi-faceted nature of architecture and politics, delivering an emblem rather than an icon. With the provision of such a range of facilities in one place, a hybrid campus is delivered which unifies political, social, commercial and leisure uses, creating an ideal model of civic life and a more accountable, more engaged politics. 13 Daniel Klaiber - Castle Works Castle Works is a new food quarter located on the former Castle Market site in Castlegate. The proposal explores the cross-pollination of cultures across Sheffield’s diverse community network and provides a collection of food-based facilities to celebrate the variation in food traditions around the world. The site masterplan proposes a cooking school, indoor and outdoor market facilities, a brewery establishment and private residential accommodation. At the centre of this development is the cultural market hall which is the facilitator for cultural cross-pollination. This structure provides four distinctive levels of gastronomic activity including an international food court, a world market, cultural cooking workshops, and a collaborative restaurant environment.

09

09

10

10


59

The People’s Gallery

700

900

200

100

500

600

300

400

Administering the Living Library

‘Made in the Library’ residency units

800

800

‘The Bookmakers’ Self-publishing house

000 - Unclassified

Entering the Living Library

Section A - Demonstrate, Knowledge Core, Facilitate 1.100

11

11

11

10

12

13

LIVING FACADE 1:50

10

12

13 SOUTH ELEVATION 1:100


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Collaborative Production Automation and robotisation are changing the nature of labour and production, and transforming the way people engage with local governance, education and cultural exchange. To manage this transition in a sustainable way there is a need for greater recognition of interdependency, social capital and local value. The studio explores the creation of a built environment which supports the collaborative production of objects, processes and infrastructures; generating an architecture which utilises local resources and expertise and is responsive to local needs. The studio is located within Sheffield’s proposed Advanced Manufacturing Innovation District (AMID) which links the University’s Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre to the city centre along the Don Valley corridor. The project began with an investigation of the AMID study area, carried out alongside a critique of the existing local authority and University-led proposals. The notion of collaborative production extended to the working methodology of the studio, with students working collectively, sharing resources, ideas and approaches. Visual narratives were used to analyse the physical and social context, and to explore feelings of nostalgia, both for the past and the future. Students worked collectively to explore the creation of a sustainable urban area, utilising shared green energy and smart technologies. Individual projects accommodate new research and production facilities which address the world’s future energy and material needs, promoting public engagement with new technology and manufacturing. Taken together the projects offer a future vision of a vibrant, socially responsible and productive city.

Studio Tutors Daniel Jary 5th Year Students Matthew Chamberlain Ives Ma Ashley Mayes Rachael Moon Laura Postlethwaite Kun Shen 6th Year Students Chee Kun Chong Patrik Krchnak Zak Nicoll Kasia Oskroba Lucy Parkinson Nam Kha Tran Studio Collaborators Steve Pool, Poly-Technic Richard Bland & Di Buckley, Creative Sheffield Andy MacFee, AMA Alastair Parvin, Wikihouse Ryan Bramley & Lucy Paige-Hamilton, Storying Sheffield Tsung-Hsien Wang, Sheffield School of Architecture Chengzhi Peng, Sheffield School of Architecture Aidan Hoggard, Sheffield School of Architecture Deborah Beck, Grantham Centre Sarah Want, Research + Innovation Services Michael Szollosy & Ana Macintosh, Sheffield Robotics Bryan Davies, Purcell Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre Mercury Centre E.ON Blackburn Meadows

01 Kasia Oskroba - Sheffield Innovation Hall Part of an alternative studio strategy for the development of the Advanced Manufacturing and Innovation District in Sheffield, this thesis proposes a public outreach research and training facility within a larger mixed use masterplan. It attempts to connect the city centre with the emerging innovation district with a new infrastructural link. By adapting and transforming the iconic viaduct, the Wicker Arches, it seeks to bring the trans-disciplinary and collaborative research together with the regular city dwellers and re-establish Wicker as a vibrant urban gateway. 02 Matthew Chamberlain - The People’s Guild The proposal establishes a new governmental headquarters for the developing Advanced Manufacturing District, Sheffield, drawing influence from, and re-appropriating the “medieval guild”. This manifests spatially into a program with 2 key axis: the axis of making and the axis of civic engagement. The strong spatial dialogue between these 2 programmatic elements hopes to frame labour/politics in a very direct, interdependent way, encouraging a more ethical approach to work and innovation. The scheme shows strong affinity with Ruskin’s critique of capitalism which is manifested programmatically and architecturally throughout the People’s Guild- through an emphasis of participation, adaptability and engagement. 03 Rachael Moon - AMID Centre for Solar Energy Set within the former Tinsley Marshalling Yard, this project strives to make research conducted by Sheffield’s Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) more publicly accessible. The current derelict site running parallel to the M1 will be transformed into a new industrial landscape, creating a new route within the remaining train tracks and connecting the adjacent residential areas to the AMRC. The new facility will house both scientists studying solar energy storage and fuels in addition to engineers researching photovoltaic fabrication. Together, the researchers will continue the study of solar energy in collaboration. The building itself acts as learning, adaptive exhibition of the centre’s research, featuring thin film photovoltaic modules capable of solar tracking on its south facade.

01


61

02

03

02

03

VIEW FROM TOP OF STAIRS

04

03

05

01

05


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

04 Chee Kun, Chong - Co-MakerHub Is the high-tech era compatible with the current trends of Industrialisation 4.0, where people can practically work in separate space? In what way is physical proximity still relevant? Co-MakerHub is a building for research, making and community engagement sitting in the centre of the AMP. The hub will receive the near-term future’s investment in the district. It serves as the nexus and collaborative common ground for all stakeholders in this Industrialisation 4.0 era, requiring the coordination of several parties to gather and collaborate to realise the vision. The public realm strategy has the potential to ignite innovation, driving the AMP’s transition toward a new innovation economy. 05 Zak Nicoll and Nam Kha Tran - The Curio Factory The Curio Factory, combines the idea of reconnecting our energy needs to the earth, and the need to connect the development of technology with local communities, to create a research complex within the scarred remains of Tinsley Park. Through its history, we began to see the site as a scarred landscape, neither virgin green wilderness nor picturesque parkland, the ground has been carved and shaped through every inhabitation from park to colliery to open cast mine to airport, and now business park. We have used this edited landscape to create curiosity within our architecture. In an achievable future scenario, the University of Sheffield commission a research complex to replace their proposed AMRC 2 project in Tinsley, with a facility which studies future energy technologies, plant science and soil remediation whilst also testing the possibilities of using UK grown trees to produce engineered timber to help reduce embodied carbon in the construction sector. 06 Ashley Mayes - Brightside Algal Works, Forgemasters Traditional manufacturing in the UK is subject to the increasing threats of globalisation. Sheffield, once being the world capital of steel production, is now a struggling city of manufacture bearing only a tiny fraction of these industries today. Resilience needs to be developed, and environmental initiative taken, to ensure the future existence of such energy intensive industries in a world of stricter environmental legislation and an imminent fuel crisis. The project seeks to utilise the waste heat energy from Sheffield Forgemasters, along with other by products of the steel making process, to cultivate algae for the production of algal biofuel. Brightside Algal Works strategically positions itself adjacent to Forgemasters and parallel to the River Don. This development and research facility is defined by a 700-metre-long wall that has an essential technological role in the operation of the facility, and additionally acts as a flood defence for Forgemasters. The existing Five Weirs Walk is rerouted through the facility, taking the public through an experiential journey of the algal fuel production process. 07 Lucy Parkinson - Meadowhall Park Is there an architectural cure for unsustainable consumerism? Meadowhall Park explores how the current unsustainable nature of consumerism, can be cured, using an architecture that satisfies our innate human needs. The proposal inhabits the existing Meadowhall in 2050 during its decline and creates a variety of ruination across the site that will sit alongside the existing retail tenants. The consciously ambitious architecture promotes a mentally and physically healthy environment, where each part of the programme; the reassembly factory, consumerist museum, and rehabilitation centre, is connect through the continuous timber forms which reaches its crescendo inside the dramatic tower.

08 Chi Fai, Ma (Ives) - Maker Community incubator, Attercliffe Globalization has created a phenomenon of commodity fetishism, deteriorating the current marginalization of community. Attercliffe, also a victim in globalizing economy, was once a golden gem in Sheffield. However, it is a segregated area now. Meanwhile, new technology, such as 3D printing can transform the supply chain of the old production system. Perhaps in the future, the use of robotization and automation can reduce the technical division of labour and resolve current globalized issues. The design is to create a hybrid of open research facility and a fab lab center to attract people in different region to Attercliffe, and incubate a high tech maker community in the future that response to the David Harvey’s theory as follow: ‘The class opposition between capital and labour is dissolved into associated producers freely deciding on what, and when they will produce regarding the fulfilment of common social needs. A new mean of exchange is created that facilitates the circulation of goods and services.’ 09 Laura Postlethwaite - Sheffield Flood Resilience Park Sheffield Flood Resilience Park stems from a response to the increasing detrimental risk of flooding to the Lower Don Valley region located between Sheffield and Rotherham. An area in neglect post the industrial decline but also left suffering from the River Don floods, which are becoming more frequent due to climate change. Through using sustainable solutions and a sensitive approach to the landscape, the negative connotation of flooding can become one of a positive kind, celebrating and embracing the natural occurrence of water into our urban landscape. This approach not only provides property insurance for surrounding homeowners who have been let down by the fragmented systems that are currently in place to deal with flooding but also causes awareness and encourages individuals to engage with the issues that are effecting them. A new localised flood management forum is situated within the park allowing the community to collaborate with business owners and governing bodies through the sharing of knowledge and expertise to form the best flood resilience solutions for the area. 10 Kun Shen - Reimagine Manufacture This project introduces an alternative governance and explores the potential collaboration of two companies. By studying the vision of AMID, the two companies were selected which represent the future and present symbols of manufacture: additive manufacture and subtractive manufacture. The project responds to the problems of manufacture of the two kinds, and introduces a space that facilitates the transformation from a closed system to a more public engaged one. The project explores the manufacturing processes, and tests the space that facilitates this in-between space. The application of advanced manufacture technology extends into the process of construction, exploring its place within a sustainable future. It is a project that reimagines future factories.

RAMMED EARTH LANDMARK

04

GREENHOUSE

WOODLAND

LIBRARY/LABS LIFT

PRIVATE OFFICE

SEMINAR ROOM SUSPENDED TREES & STAIR

CAFETERIA KITCHEN

SMALL SEMINAR ROOM

SHARED WORKSPACE READING ROOM

RAMMED EARTH BENCH

PUBLIC CAFETERIA

05

06

06

06


63

07

07

10

08

12

09

09

01

08

06/09

10

10


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Temporal Places The studio is concerned with dimensions of time, from the persistent to the momentary, and aims to explore the evolution, inhabitation and adaption of particular places through multiple time frames. The studio critically explores the enduring heritage of place, both cultural and material, considering long-term issues of identity, continuity and change. Simultaneously it considers historic places as the setting for everyday life and specific events, exploring transience in activities and movement, and how the fabric of place accommodates and adapts to increasingly rapid societal change. This year the studio has been situated in Stoke-on-Trent, focusing on the town of Stoke which is one of six towns upon which the polycentric city’s status was founded. Once part of a thriving industrial centre at the heart of the world’s ceramics industry, Stoke now has a struggling town centre but retains a strong character of place and is rich in industrial heritage. At the centre of the town, Spode Works acted as a particular starting point for the studio’s research, as a complex factory site which evolved from nearly 250 years of continuous production before its closure in 2008, and now ready for reinvention amid a new optimism embodied by the city’s UK City of Culture bid for 2021. The studio’s proposals respond to contemporary issues whilst recognising the significance of the past, engaging strongly with the existing urban fabric of Spode Works and the surrounding town of Stoke, and drawing upon the Potteries’ distinctive sense of place. Studio Tutor Mark Emms

5th Year Students Thomas Hart Guy Bridgewood Ka Man Lee Jialin Pan Banah Rashid Ben Powell 6th Year Students Jack Baker Joe Ingham Marika Karouzou Katherine Nicholson Jorunn Karadottir Jessica Quinn Studio Collaborators Simon Robinson MSMR Architects London Simon Branson Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Manchester Nicola Winstanley Acava Art Studios - Artist in residence Dan Southward Acava Art Studios Michael Escolme Spode Museum Trust Alan Shenton Spode Museum Trust Dave Proudlove Stoke Sentinel

01 Kate Nicholson - Storytelling at Spode Storytelling at Spode addresses the communication crisis in Stokeon-Trent through the establishment of a centre for storytelling and learning at Spode Works while redefining the relationship between the town and the factory. Key themes of heritage and adaptive reuse examine the role of the architect as mediator between the past and the future. The proposal will be a work of storytelling in its own right adding a new layer to the rich histories of Spode Works. 02 Joe Ingham - The Big Works: A Social Innovation Nucleus The Big Works aims to address the deficiencies of the local authority, proposing a new architectural framework that fills gaps in social, urban and political contexts, re-engaging citizens and enterprise, providing them with the opportunity to co-create their society. Reinforcing Stoke Town as the civic heart of the city, the project is located directly opposite the town hall, creating an instant dialogue between the old and new institutions. The Big Works creates a re-energised environment that works alongside the existing political system to transform the way citizens perceive and respond to the council.

01

03 Jorunn Karadottir - Beyond Seeing This proposal aims to frame, reveal and touch on what’s already in situ and build upon the heritage so it doesn’t get lost with time. The  aim is to bring the artefacts and architecture together as one. Whilst exploring past activities, the proposal adds value to the chosen site and to the town in a wider context. How can architecture endorse the true value of objects that are a part of our lives and remind us that there was a time when things were made by human first, machine second? Beyond Seeing is a museum typology where workshops are a part of the experience as well as curating the 250 years of Spodes pieces in one place.   01

01


65

01

02

03

02

03

01

02


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

04 Benjamin Powell - Spode Writers Retreat The Urban Writers retreats demonstrate how Spode can act as a muse for creative activity. The program reflects the legacy of Spode Works by reintroducing key elements of creativity and production. The publishing house, library and writers retreats work together around the courtyard to form a holistic whole. The Ramp, the Printing press, the book pod, the external stair and the retreats appear as objects in space to define, orientate and articulate the experience across the site. 05 Jialin Pan - Spode - The Event Factory This project attempts to seek how the tunnel kiln warehouse, a milestone in Spode Works’ modernising process, can be adapted and reused into a flexible events space. The intervention approach is to establish a civic event hub, mainly included by assembly facilities and variable partitions, in order to form diverse optimised modes to fit different events by flexible strategies. The project believes that the flexible space embodies flexible future and it can be a good response to the changing context. This project uses civic events as both a catalyst and an engine for regenerating the Spode, but also provides a tangible social and cultural impact on the daily life of the public. 06 Carmen KaMan Lee - Spode Art Project Situated in a former pottery site that once enjoyed a strong cultural identity on creativity and innovation, the Spode Art Project seeks to promote its cultural significance and bridge the gap between Spode Works and Stoke on a wider networks by continuing the productive site through an artist-in-residence programme. The Spode Art Project is a creative hub which provides facilities for artists to engage with community and the public in site-specific artwork production. In response to the declining social and economic condition in Stoke, it provides production, showcase, and event space to nurture the current artistic development on site and allow for a new collaboration and social interaction that supplement heritage with new interpretive frames, acting as an economic catalyst and an important connector to the neighbourhood. 07 Jack Baker - The Casting Institute The proposal builds upon Stoke’s identity as ‘the Potteries’ by proposing the Casting Institute: a vocational college alongside a research and development facility that specialises in casting and moulding processes with a significant focus on developing transferable skills. Consequently, Spode Works will be re-cast as a place of production but producing knowledge instead of objects, fulfilling a social need of the people of Stoke-On- Trent. The Casting Institute turns the factory typology on its head from a place where the people make the objects, to a place where the objects make the people.

09 Banah Rashid - Spode: Urban Crematorium To address the spike in social unrest amid both the brexit campaign and the by-election in Stoke-on-Trent, the Urban Crematorium seeks to unite the residents of Stoke city during a significant and cross-culturally celebrated life event: death. The Urban Crematorium houses three types of cremation, including open-pyre cremation, all of which encourage cultural diversity. The project also deals with moving death to an urban context by placing the Crematorium within Spode Works, the former pottery factory and a landmark of the city. 10 Marika Karouzou - Creative Mind This project aims to design a community of spaces that will increase arts and health programming throughout Stoke, by advocating for therapeutic support, counseling and education. Stoke Youth Centre will become a collaborative resource for individuals and organisations interested in arts and health integration programmes and raise awareness of the benefits of the arts for health through relationship building, exploration & participation. The Centre will provide the facilities to increase arts and health programming throughout Stoke by advocating for professional development, programme support and research. It will also become a collaborative resource for individuals and organisations interested in arts and health integration programmes or learning about the field of arts and health.

04

04 SITE EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

-CHIMNEY

-ROOF

-CIRCULATION

DELIVER

Y ENTRANC

E

-GF

SECONDARY ENTRANCE

MAIN ENTRANC

E

05

05

05

06

08 Guy Bridgewood - Spode Works Regenerative Centre This proposal challenges the typical approach of regenerating places of immense heritage and history.  Situated on what would be a new civic entrance into Spode, the project aims to offer public opportunities with the regeneration approach, whilst also being an assembly for the proposed future users of Spode to meet and discuss.  Spode’s built fabric has evolved sporadically over time through a history of make do and mend; an archive and workshop appeases this, allowing for the periodic maintenance of Spode’s rich built fabric by collecting building elements which can be fixed and later reused.

06


67

07

08

ALTERNATIVE HISTORIES Date of Subject: 1914 - PRESENT Date of Production:

07

08

08

SPODE URBAN CREMATORIUM

07

Interior Perspective

10

BANAH RASHID

09

TEMPORAL PLACES

10


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Histories of Place : Metro-Land In December 2015 and June 2016 two new stations opened as part of the West Yorkshire ‘Metro’ railway network, creating stops at Apperley Bridge and Kirkstall Forge in the Aire Valley between Shipley and Leeds. Borrowing from John Betjeman’s critically acclaimed documentary film Metro-Land (1973), the studio investigated this new “Metro-Land”, documenting the settings, events and typologies that have contributed to the history and context of the Aire Valley, and analysing the effect of transport networks on its evolution as a place. With an interest in the relationship between heritage and community, the studio looked critically at the significance of material culture, using spatial research to form an understanding of local contexts, past and present. Recognising that architecture is socially and speculatively produced, the studio sought to develop individual propositions that responded sensitively to the intensification of suburban housing provision in the valley, identifying future needs for both existing and newly-founded neighbourhoods. Proposals include retirement community housing and infrastructure, leisure and wellbeing facilities, local neighbourhood centres, arts and culture provision and a local transport interchange. Some projects engage directly with existing buildings or reuse brownfield sites; others respond to village expansion strategies. In all projects, students were asked to explore through research-by-design how new architectures can be realised in response to the particularities of setting, history and a ‘sense of place’ and to develop their own position on material history and the specificity of place.

Studio Tutor Jo Lintonbon 5th Year Students Mollie-Mae Dale-Collen Maha Komber Ellen Peirce Jessica Rees Kenny Sham Amanda Vos 6th Year Students Max Crichton Asia Cydzik Jennifer Lee Tom Saunders William King Visiting Tutors Robert Blundell

01 Studio Group Work - Valley Wide Mapping A mapping exercise looked at the studios experiences as they travelled through the newly established ‘Metro-Land’, based on the ideas set out in John Betjeman’s short film.

01

02 Studio Group Work - Precedent Booklet The studio compiled a booklet of city, community and neighbourhood precedent studies to reference throughout the year. 03 William King - Re-stitching Kirkstall Re-stitching Kirkstall explores how Abbey Mills, a grade II* listed former textile mill, can be re-used to re-assert the identity of current and future communities in Kirkstall, a small town 2 miles north west of Leeds. This project expands the current brief of the Kirkstall Valley Development Trust to re-imagine Abbey Mills as a new cultural destination for Kirkstall. The proposed graft is organised by an architectural promenade that threads together a sequence of new and existing spaces to reassert significant architectural characteristics that have faded over time. 04 Tom Saunders - The Interchange This project looks at how the typology of the interchange must define its civic responsibility within Kirkstall Ward, Leeds. ‘The Interchange’ makes use of it’s key role as a catalyst for further development by becoming a space used for local self organisation and governance, manifesting as a vertically arranged civic square. The complex attaches itself to Kirkstall Viaduct, taking advantage of existing infrastructure to provide and promote accessible public transport, walkability and a quality public realm as the drivers for further development in the area.

02

02 Perspective Section through internal street The street becomes the social heart for Abbey Mills, unlocking circulation between the existing buildings and proposed Assembly Hall whilst providing an alternative town centre destination to that offered by Kkirkstall Retail Park. Archaelogical excavations continue into the use of Abbey Mills, uncovering remains of the former Cistercian medieval corn mill which becomes a cultural destination in its own right.

05 Asia Cydzik - Apperley Bridge Canalside Centre The Apperley Bridge Canalside Centre is an outdoors educational, leisure & cultural hub that celebrates the value of the Leeds and Liverpool Canal and promotes people’s wellbeing. These objectives are the key elements of the slow lifestyle philosophy, which has informed the brief and design for the scheme. This thesis project intends to question the current expansion of rural suburbs in the Aire Valley and proposes an alternative, low impact, mixed use architecture which adds to the wider discourse of a self - sufficient settlement, reconnecting individuals with the surrounding nature. 03


69

03

03

05

00 Existing Abbey Mills

01 Creative Destruction

01 Proposed Graft

04

05


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

06 Jennifer Lee - Hawksworth Third Age Co-Community Centre Hawksworth Third Age Co-Community Centre seeks to explore how architecture can facilitate the integration of older people with their wider communities by playing an active role in community events and encouraging social interactions and convivial exchanges. The idea of varying levels of privacy and ownership, as well as the thresholds separating them, has been carried forward in the project to explore how differing levels of belonging can be achieved on a single, suburban site. 07 Max Crichton - Edge Town If factories stood at the centre of urban communities, what do we build in their place? Throughout the UK city fringes have faced increased pressure for development in response to a rise in population and continued economic growth. As a result, many historic industrial grey belts are becoming residential ghettos. Belonging to neither suburbia nor the city, these former industrial neighbourhoods bear all the flaws of urban life with none of the suburban benefits.As layers of history are revealed, an emphasis is placed on cultural inheritance, and how new proposals can reference history without replicating it. Through exploring the conditions of proximity, density, intimacy and memory the project considers how these former industrial fringes can develop using newly granted neighbourhood powers to provided vital housing but also reinstate lost civic assets. 08 Maha Komber - Shipley Creative Arts Hub This scheme utilises the opportunity provided by certain development endeavours along Shipley’s Canal stretch which give the opportunity for the canal to begin to be used as a much needed pedestrian route in Shipley, rather than the neglected back waters it currently is. The final design is a creative arts hub based which connects the canal to Shipley town centre and provides a mixture of social and educational opportunities expanding on the growing arts scene in Shipley.

11 Mollie-Mae Dale-Collen - The Shipley Exchange The project is based in Shipley adjacent to the town’s railway station and aims to create a destination but also a space for both existing and new residential communities to come together. The building combines a Food Hall and Crèche as separate components of the same structure, to serve both visitors and the local community, sitting within a new mixed-use master plan that combines retail, residential and recreational facilities. 12 Ellen Peirce -Apperley Bridge Sports & Wellbeing Centre The re-establishment of the Airedale Railway brands Apperley Bridge a prime commuter location, transforming it from its thriving industrial past. The land along the canal is attracting new residential development, closing down the land as a public domain and decreasing permeability along the canal. By providing a new community hub of health and wellbeing to the Leeds and Liverpool Canal towpath, it re-establishes activity back on the canal towpath providing public function and physical activity to the heart of a commuting community. Locating itself at the heart of an expanding town it creates an approachable and accessible building, echoing the bygone industrial buildings of the canal.

07

06

09 Kenny Sham - Shipley Pensioners Housing Pensioners currently live in big houses on the outskirts of Shipley, while the centre is inhabited by young families in smaller homes. However, all the communal facilities for the pensioners are in the Market Square, the heart of Shipley. This project aims to develop new housing for the pensioners in the town centre and aims to encourage pensioners to relocate there. Their old homes could thus be sold to younger family, acting as an experiment to solve the housing crisis. 10 Jessica Rees - Inhabiting the Folly A new ‘inland pier’ seeks to establish a boundary and threshold between suburbia and the Aire Valley, viewing the valley as a valuable resource for health and well-being, as well as a green corridor to serve as breathing space between the urbanised centres of Leeds and Shipley. As more and more housing is being developed (a result of a new fast link railway line to Leeds), the problem of already lacking neighbourhood amenity becomes ever more acute. As well as defining place and space -through boundary and threshold- this project provides well needed neighbourhood space in the form of a sports, leisure and education programme, drawing on existing stakeholders and inviting new participants to the table.

08

07


71

09

10

12

07

09

11


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Live Projects Since 1999, 1700 Sheffield School of Architecture students have delivered over 190 Live Projects across 15 different countries. This year 220 students worked on 19 projects, 16 sited across the north of England, 2 in London and 1 in Italy. Projects were sited in rural and urban locations and addressed issues of co-housing, making, mental health, community cohesion, heritage, recreation and regeneration. The projects start with an open brief and, through close collaboration between students and their community partners, they developed into a diverse range of outcomes including detailed designs for buildings, participation toolkits, urban strategies and built structures. Running for the first 6 weeks of the academic year, Live Projects bring together Masters students from the MArch and MAAD courses. Students work in groups to produce built and strategic design solutions for real clients with a particular emphasis on community participation and collaborative working. The Live Project programme is widely recognised as an innovative form of teaching within UK architectural education, offering students at SSoA the opportunity to test design ideas in a real-world context not offered on such a sustained level by any other architecture school. Live Projects celebrate the value of meaningful engagement with diverse groups of people, to broaden the potential of architecture as a driver for positive change. The Live Projects programme this year has been enhanced by the use of Live Works, SSoA’s ‘Urban Room’ in Sheffield city centre. We were also pleased to welcome Dr Julie MacDonald, the High Sheriff of South Yorkshire, who met some project groups with their clients. The public presentations were hosted at Vestry Hall, home of ISRAAC, one of our clients this year, where we celebrated our biggest year of Live Projects so far with a Somali feast! 01 St Peter’s Churches Mentor: Jo Lintonbon Client: Diocese of Chester / Location: Chester and Congleton The team worked with the Diocese of Chester, looking at the feasibility of reconfiguring two of their Grade 1 listed churches: St Peter’s in Congleton and St Peter’s in Chester. Whilst addressing these local concerns the group also asked the wider question ‘What is a church in the 21st century?’. The result was a toolkit, a ‘Design Navigator’, which introduces participatory design practices in order to help churches involve their communities in the development of their spaces. The navigator includes a series of creative participation tools, suggestions on funding sources and advice on regulatory frameworks. Workshops and ‘checkpoints’ at each stage will facilitate discussion within the congregation and engagement with the wider community.

Apiary in the Woods Mentor: Cith Skelcher Client: Sheffield Beekeepers’ Association (SBKA) Location: Ecclesall Woods, Sheffield Sheffield Beekeepers’ Association is a growing organization, with a small demonstration apiary in Ecclesall Woods. The team worked with SBKA to develop a conceptual scheme for a larger timber apiary and shop complex to help promote the craft of amateur beekeeping and to raise awareness about the importance of bees and beekeeping to the environment. The project went through several phases from research to brief development, participation and design, with focus on enabling a holistic development of the site into a community-based resource and research centre. The design proposal thus serves as a springboard for further development in the future in order to procure funds to support the client in the realization of the project.

02 Glodwick Pool Mentor: Lorenza Casini Client: The Ghazali Trust Location: Oldham, Greater Manchester The Ghazali Trust uses sports, education, arts and community participation to help members of the community achieve their potential. The team worked in partnership with the Trust to explore the potential of its recently acquired building, the disused Glodwick Pool. They aimed to provide the best possible facilities and high social value for the community by proposing a sporting and community hub for all ages and abilities. This vision is made challenging by the restrictive existing plan and difficulties involved in adapting a former swimming pool to a more diverse programme. A desire for openness and accessibility permeated all the design decisions and the final vision is organized around a community space that will catalyze the project’s sustainability and viability.

05 Future Factories Mentor: Renata Tyszczuk Client: Patrick Murphy (Made North) / Sarah Hill (Mesters Works) Location: Sheffield This project explored how makers, architects, and manufacturers can collaborate to future-fit their work environments for a carbon-constrained future energy landscape. The team mapped collaborative practices between makers engaged in arts, crafts and manufacturing. They explored how further collaboration among makers could be encouraged and also how to improve the future use of historic industrial spaces, in this case – the communal space within Mesters Works. The team designed an app and a system of adaptable furniture that creates spatial organisations ranging from a cafe to a cinema. The app creates a network for makers/artists; connecting collaborators on projects across the city

03 Manor Allotments Mentor: Rachel Cruise, Danni Kerr & Magda Sibley Client: Manor Allotments Volunteers Location: The Manor, Sheffield Manor Allotments comprises 60 plots of land that are rented out to the local community and are used by people of different ages, ethnic backgrounds and physical abilities. The project focuses on the reception/shop which is currently housed in a shipping container. The client urgently required an extension to provide a space that could accommodate at least 6 people, with ramp access, that can also be used for water collection. The team initially worked to expand the project brief with the community, taking into account the longer term needs of the stakeholders, and examine how this could be done under a limited budget. Material was reclaimed from an existing wooden structure, and the team worked with a carpenter to develop joint components. 04

06 Future Forum Mentor: Carolyn Butterworth Client: Sheffield Futures Location: Sheffield The team worked with Sheffield Futures to help redesign the ground floor of their Sheffield home, Star House. Sheffield Futures is an independent charity providing numerous services for vulnerable young people. This project focused on developing a safe and welcoming environment in which to offer mental health support. A cyclical process of participation, analysis and design was used to develop spatial proposals and engagement activities that were meaningful to staff and users. All design decisions were made through participation and outcomes fully co-designed with the young people, staff and multi-agencies that use Star House. The team advised the client on the ensuing architectural commission to ensure that the values of co-design are embedded as the project develops - and they ran a 10K on their behalf! 01


73

02

03

03

03

04

05

05

04

06

01


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

07 Civic University Mentors: Cora Baibarac Client: R-Urban Wick & Partners Location: London The Civic University is an experimental educational model that teaches citizens to be at the forefront of decision-making in how the city develops. The team created, recorded and disseminated a prototype participatory eco-civic curriculum based on direct site engagement with four communities in London. This curriculum is intended to remain open for others to adopt, adapt and contribute to based on their own neighbourhoods. A toolkit was developed through a three day London ‘master:CLASS’ and consists of a website combining research, user guides, types of ‘master:CLASS’, a communication platform and a proposal for Tate Exchange. Overall, the toolkit aims to facilitate pedagogical approaches that invite others to share their knowledge, skills and experience to promote a network of open-source learning. 08 St Wilfrid’s Centre Mentor: Simon Baker Client: St Wilfrid’s Centre Location: Sheffield St Wilfrid’s is a day centre for vulnerable adults. The centre runs activities including a wood workshop, pottery studios, a photography club, and various arts/drama groups. The team was asked to collaborate with the client to solve problems to its existing building, such as accessibility, usability and appearance. The team recognised that a long term vision for the centre could be developed to celebrate the potential of St Wilfrid’s, and provide a greater variety of services for a larger number of people. Proposals for ‘Today’, ‘Tomorrow’, and the ‘Future’ were generated based on the ‘Five Ways to Well-being’ and consisted of detailed spatial designs for the existing building and site, improving the layout of services and enhancing the quality of the internal and external spaces. 09 Re-Make Gainsborough Mentor: Howard Evans Client: West Lindsey District Council Location: Gainsborough Working closely with West Lindsey District Council and the local community, Re-Making Gainsborough sought to explore how the identity of this historic market town can be regained through community engagement-led regeneration. Through extensive public consultation, the project identified and prioritised areas of the town for improvement whilst providing valuable methods that can be used by the client to enhance ongoing communication between community and council. The students made short, medium and long term spatial proposals to improve connectivity, navigation, footfall in the public realm of the town. 10 Revealing the Castle Mentor: Carolyn Butterworth Client: Friends of Sheffield Castle (FOSC) Location: Castlegate, Sheffield The students worked with FOSC to develop a vision for the site of the buried Castle in Castlegate, a struggling quarter of the city centre. The team proposed a vision for incremental phased regeneration of the Castle Site that places the revealing of the Castle remains at the heart of the development. The project proposed that the site is regenerated through a mix of archaeology, events, arts installations, meanwhile use, creative start-ups and longer-term permanent development. This vision is supported by thorough research of global precedents. The students brought together key stakeholders as the ‘Castlegate Collective’ so that

the vision can be progressed beyond the Live Project. 11 Goldthorpe Railway Cuttings Mentor: Daniel Jary Client: Barnsley Council & Big Local Location: Goldthorpe This project was in collaboration with the residents of Goldthorpe, a former mining village in South Yorkshire. The community group Big Local asked the Live Project team to help them reimagine derelict railway cuttings that slice through the town into a neighbourhood resource. Working with the local community to develop and test ideas, the team identified potential funding streams and developed a timeframe to implement phased projects along the cuttings. The proposals include interconnected spaces for play, education and leisure within a rich biodiverse green corridor. The design weaves the legacy of its former use with the new activities on site - symbolising a future of the cuttings and Goldthorpe, whilst remembering their past.

07

08

12 The Vestry Hall Mentor: Leo Care Client: Israac Somali Community Association Location: Sharrow, Sheffield The team worked with the Sheffield Somali community charity ISRAAC to help them develop their spatial and organisational strategy as the new owners of the Grade 2 listed Vestry Hall. ISRAAC have been operating from the building for many years but now have the responsibility for the building’s upkeep. The team identified that design proposals for underused spaces on their own would not achieve the income generation that ISRAAC require and so the team explored how the building could expand its users as well. Through a series of participatory events both inside and outside the building, the team proposed a phased strategy to open the building to a wider population, offer a wider range of activities and provide a vision of a future where the building realises its full potential for the community. 13 RUSS Self Build, London Mentor: Mark Parsons Client : Rural Urban Synthesis Society Location: Lewisham, London The students worked with community land trust Rural Urban Synthesis Society and architecture practice Architype to develop solutions for affordable self-build mass housing at an urban scale. The team worked with Architype to deliver participatory workshops with the future residents of Church Grove. The result was a co-design strategy that took into consideration people’s working lives, standard materials and simplicity of construction in order to save cost, waste and allow untrained people to contribute. A resource pack was produced that collated precedents, material research, strategic construction proposals and a step-by-step construction manual - supported by a series of explanatory physical models.

08

09

09


75

10

13

11

11

11

12


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

14 Greenhill Community Library Client: Friends of Greenhill Library Mentor: Russell Light Location: Greenhill, Sheffield Greenhill Library is run by a volunteer organisation who aim to expand the building’s role into a community hub. The team worked with the volunteers to explore the potential of the distinctive 1960s building by fostering new relationships with potential stakeholders, increasing public awareness, improving the library’s image through re-branding and offering design solutions from short to long term. The team used participatory methods to collect the opinions of library users through their ‘Open Book’ and their Pop-Up Cinema changed perceptions of underutilised space through temporary use. Events fostered relationships between the library volunteers and members of the local community, tested the introduction of a permanent cinema club and produced detailed designs to be used in funding applications. 15 Migrant Narratives Mentor: Nishat Awan Client: Edge of Europe Research Project Location: Yorkshire Sculpture Park For six intensive weeks, the Migrant Narrative team worked with Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) and academic Nishat Awan to produce an immersive installation in the Bothy Gallery at YSP. The exhibition traces the borders of Europe along the Black Sea, documenting areas of the current refugee crisis. Narrating stories of these migrant journeys and the illicit crossing of borders, this project visualises the continent from the perspective of those who inhabit its edges and those who are in transit. The team transformed an initial concept into a detailed design, translating concept to detail and solving construction and material problems along the way. The Migrant Narrative Exhibition was open to the public for four weeks. 16 EHR// Live Mentor: John-Paul Walker Client : Elsecar Heritage Railway Location : Elsecar, Barnsley The EHR//Live team collaborated with the Elsecar Heritage Railway charity and the Coalfield Line, providing them with potential solutions for their planned expansion of the railway. The playful, elegant, contextual proposals were informed by thorough research, both in the history of the client organisation and the industrial heritage of the surrounding Dearne Valley. The output of the projects consisted of detailed designs for stations at Hemingfield and Cortonwood, a suite of graphics enabling the Elsecar Heritage Railway to better communicate with their volunteer and customer base, and a film aimed at attracting more volunteers by showcasing the joy of working on the railway. This was collated within a set of documents providing useful information and proposals for EHR to use in future funding applications.

17 Ingle Gym Client: Brendan Ingle Foundation Mentor: Satwinder Samra Location: Wincobank, Sheffield The Ingle Gym in Wincobank, north-east Sheffield, is renowned for training some of boxing’s all time greats and is an integral and well respected part of the Wincobank community. The current gym facilities do not match the prestige of the organisation and its important role in teaching young people self-discipline, selfrespect and respect for others. The Live Project team evaluated the existing building and provided strategies for expanding its capacity and the range of functions that it could offer. Proposals ranged from “featherweight” to “heavyweight”, providing the Client with different options according to cost, timescale and perceived demand. The designs encompassed the surrounding landscape, suggesting play facilities and community space.

14

18 Community Economics Mentor: Cristina Cerulli Client: Brave New Alps Location: Rovereto, Italy Brave New Alps is a design collective that is part of a wider network exploring the development of new types of sharing economies. During two weeks in Italy the team led a five day Erasmus+ workshop to develop a framework that can facilitate a ‘Community Economy’. The students acted as workshop leaders, supporting participants, many of whom were asylum seekers, to contribute skills and experiences through design, production and knowledge dissemination. These were developed through model making, design charrettes and by studying Sheffield’s Portland Works and Leeds’ East Street Arts. Issues such as; how to winterproof a space, how to design for a diversity of activities and how to effectively communicate the centre’s aims were investigated.

15

15

19 Made of Waste Mentor: Ian Hicklin Client: Heeley City Farm/Amey Location : Heeley City Farm, Sheffield This project aimed at designing a safe social space for dementia patients at Heeley City Farm using waste materials like pallets and tires. The team collaborated with dementia specialists at Heeley City Farm and with AMEY who provided the waste materials. Explorations into the construction limitations of pallets and into the needs of stakeholders led the team to propose a timberframed construction for the main building and the use of pallets to create an outdoor, semi-enclosed haven for patients. The team’s output consisted of a schematic design for an indoor and outdoor space, furniture layouts, ideas for activities, a handbook outlining the method of building a structure or wall with pallets. An additional handbook collated the team’s research on design for dementia, general design guidelines for this condition and how these were applied in the proposed design.

E L S E C A R H E R I TA G E R A I L W AY

E EL LS SE EC CA AR R H HE ER R II TTA AG GEE R RAAIILLW WAAYY

CORTONWOOD STATION

ELSECAR STATION CORTONWOOD STATION T TH HE E C CO OA A LL FF II EELLD D LLIINNEE

THE COALFIELD LINE

Tr a i n s t o H e m i n g f i e l d a n d C o r t o n w o o d Tr a i n s wt o n ady.H mk i n g f i e l d w wE. el lsse e ccaar rr a a ilw c oe. u

Tr a i n s t o E l s e c a r a n d H e m i n g f i e l d w w w . e l s e c a r r a i l w a y. c o . u k facebook @Elsecar_Railway

16

w w w . e l s e@Elsecar_Railway c a r r a i l w a y. c o . u k facebook facebook @Elsecar_Railway

16


77

17

17

17

18

19

18

18


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

MArch Dissertation The MArch postgrauate dissertation is a critical written study on an architectural subject chosen by the student and undertaken with expert advice from the staff. It is seen as an opportunity to investigate an aspect of architecture in which the student is interested and would like to explore in more depth. The dissertation may involve original research and contribute to the subject area through reasoning and critical analysis. Topics usually fall within the following subject range: architectural theory, architectural history, science and technology, structures, management, CAD and the digital realm, landscape architecture or urban design. It offers students the opportunity to research, organise and produce an extended piece of mostly written work over the course of the year. Sheffield is one of the few schools of architecture that still offers students the chance to undertake dissertations in both undergarduate and postgraduate degrees. The quality and range of work is remarkable, producing richness, rigour and variety, and demonstrating a wide range of research methodologies, analytical and presentation techniques. This year’s studies included Hannah Pether’ ‘Occupying the Threshold as Antidote to the Transient City’; Nicholas Birchall’s ‘The Holy Ghost Zone’; Nicola Sole’s ‘Architecture as Freedom’; Zak Nicoll’ ‘Temple of Culture, Nuclear Power Station’, ‘A Smoulderer, Marvelously Human’; and Jessica Beresford’s ‘Land Art Architecture’.

Co-ordinator Jian Kang Featured dissertations Occupying the Threshold as Antidote to the Transient City Hannah Pether The Holy Ghost Zone: What factors determine the territorialisation of Southwark by African diaspora churches, and what architecture results from this? Nicholas Birchall Architecture as Freedom: Piloting the application of the Capability Approach to the evaluation of the Battambang Housing Scheme, Cambodia Niki Sole


79

Occupying the Threshold as Antidote to the Transient City Deciphering Inter-woven Urban Thresholds to Rediscover a Sense of Place Hannah Pether Hannah’s research explores the urban transience stemming from our contemporary disengagement with space, examining how threshold zones – existing on the peripheries and often occupying unassuming sites – can offer opportunities for re-engagement with our surroundings, transforming an abstract ‘space’ into a ‘place’. Inspired by Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities, it considers the vital intervals they interpose in the ever-accelerating pace of modernity, temporarily suspending our hurried reading of the city and rendering the invisible, visible.

The threshold is introduced through a narrative depicting juxtaposing routes to the site before being explored at several scales: City, Street, Building, Body and Time, interpreting its relevance culturally, socially, physically, experientially and temporally in remedying our contemporary disengagement with space. The methodology of each is nuanced, enabling a specificity in approach.

01 “The dominant silhouette of St Paul’s Cathedral forms such an instance, not only denoting the intangible threshold between the sacred church grounds and profane context of the surrounding commercial developments, but also a complex threshold of public and private ownership. The Occupy movement of 2014 highlighted how the site interlaces City of London (public) and Cathedral (private) land, creating a intricate web of restriction and free movement, profoundly impacting the urban fabric yet remaining concealed to the passerby.” 02 Site as Gate[way] 03 Site was [Windows]space

01

02

While there is extensive research into the theoretical readings of the threshold, this is rarely framed at an urban scale, examining the traces of previous hard borders of exclusion, for example those of historic city walls. The following chapters therefore seek to address this void in exploration, framing analyses around a case study of fragmented space situated on the traces denoting the historic walls of London.

03

04 Site as Door[way] 05 Extrapolating: City as Edifice

04

05

Cyclical Time: Ritual

Suspended Time: Memory

Accumulated Time: Weathering

Fleeting Time: Shadow

The site and the notion of time are inextricably linked. Historically, the church occupying No.1 St Martin’s le Grand was responsible for tolling the bells heralding the evening curfew and ritualistic closing of the city gates each evening. Curfew derives from the French cuevrefeu, meaning ‘to cover the fire’, originating in the City when William I decreed that all fires be covered at eight o’clock to prevent conflagration of the vulnerable timber structures common at the time. Interestingly, traces of this ritual endure, with the park gates ceremonially locked at eight o’clock each evening. Since Aldersgate admitted access to the livestock market and fair at Smithfield Market beyond the City walls, the site also reflected temporal themes through the seasonal ebbs and flows of produce alongside the daily regulations of commerce and people entering and leaving the city. This ritualistic quality was strengthened by the subsequent construction of the General Post Office headquarters, lending the surroundings a sense of ceremony through the weaving procession of postal carriages threading their way North. This role endures in an evolved manner; contemporarily the site mediates the diurnal ebb and flow of commuting routes, the flurry of commercial activity occupying daylight hours, yielding to nocturnal patterns of illuminated window openings denoting inhabitation of the residences woven into the urban tapestry bounding the site.

‘Remarkably, even the position of our bodies in relation to the passing of time has altered: the ancient Greeks faced the past, and the future emerged from behind them, whereas modern man faces the future and the past disappears behind him.’ This contemporary paradigm is remedied through the site, and in particular, the Watts Memorial to Heroic Self-Sacrifice. This imbues the selfless acts with a permanence, petrifying the narratives through their inscription and curation. What would otherwise have formed fleeting headlines, fading with the fragile material on which they were printed; has instead been concretised. The impact of this memorial is exhibited through the installation ‘Monument’ exhibited at the Tate by Susan Hiller in 1980, [...] drawing inspiration from the site and immortalising this cultural artefact. Symbolically, on a visit to the site, a single rose had been left to honour these acts, reinstating the site’s original use as a place honouring memory while allowing historic deeds to echo through the intervening centuries, enmeshing past and present in a poignant testament to ordinary lives rendered extraordinary. In this manner, the memorial and site act as palimpsest and archive for the wider city, anchoring the threshold temporally and physically.

The notion that a city’s past, though not explicitly referenced, is etched into its very fabric, is one I am enchanted by. Contrary to most earthly entities, the tales inscribed in a city’s prominent landmarks and deepest alcoves are strengthened rather than weakened by age, a sedimentation of uses lending a rich patina to everyday surfaces – from the balustrades polished by countless fingers tracing their lengths; to the stone paving worn to an uneven gleam through innumerable footsteps; to the benches bleached by the sun and tempered by raindrops. As Leatherbarrow asserts ‘finishing ends construction, weathering constructs finishes’, however contemporary architectural thought views weathering as destruction rather than construction, rendering the architecture mortal and lending credence to Victor Hugo’s assertion that the book is a more enduring medium than that of stone. Thresholds embrace rather than fear the passing of time, viewing the sedimentation of aging as an enriching rather than depleting process, and in this manner transcend the constraints of time.

The passage of time is expressed across the site through the interplay of light and shadow, gently touching the tree canopies before bathing the ground below in dappled light. Time is most potently rooted in the site than through the central sundial, the focal point of the inward-facing ring of benches situated at the widening of the site. This counteracts the contemporary reliance upon linear, digital time, reinstating cyclical time, etched in shadow upon the enduring stone clock-face. ‘We delight in … the delicate glow of fading rays clinging to the surface of a dusky wall, there to live out what little life remains to them’ posits Tanizaki. Alternating arabesques of shadow and tendrils of light enliven the contoured surfaces they dance across, imbuing ordinary materials with an opulence while encouraging visitors to the site to trace their choreographed path, pursuing the pockets of natural light in a city composed of artificial environmental controls.


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

The Holy Ghost Zone: What factors determine the territorialisation of Southwark by African diaspora churches, and what architecture results from this? Nicholas Birchall At the fringes of our cities, in the fault lines of our urban landscape, new building typologies are emerging. As one culture attempts to reconfigure the cold geometries of another, unique spaces of duality are being created. Nicholas’ research interest lies in the way that diaspora communities, particularly Pentecostal Churches, re-appropriate and re-enchant spaces in host cities. This dissertation examines the factors determining the ways in which African diaspora communities plant churches in non-traditional locations within the London Borough of Southwark, and investigates the architecture that this generates. Focusing specifically on Pentecostal and Charismatic churches, this dissertation firstly assess the situation in the London Borough of Southwark and the factors that mould the church’s spatial decisions. The emphasis then shifts to analysing how this manifests itself as an architecture. Initially, the publicly visible external architecture and signage systems are analysed before moving across the threshold and into the church to investigate the churches’ intimate internal spaces, whilst continually exploring the ways in which a range of external factors have shaped the resultant architecture.

01

02 This dissertation sets out to examine the factors determining the territorialisation of Southwark by African diaspora churches, and to investigate the architecture that results from this. The work investigated, from an architectural standpoint, a phenomenon that involves 20,000 congregants across 240 churches within Southwark alone, yet remains largely unnoticed by the wider city. Having initially assessed the situation within Southwark, and the factors that mould the church’s spatial decisions, the emphasis then shifted to analysing how this manifests itself as an architecture. Through this analysis the extent to which external factors, both proximate and distant, shape the resultant architecture were continually investigated. In assessing the situation within Southwark it was found that NPCs place themselves within a transnational religious geography that transcends their marginal premises. Through the example of the Holy Ghost Zone, the ways in which an NPC can operate within this transnational geography, and the impact this has upon their definition of community and the ‘local’, were demonstrated. This difference in definition to traditional churches, along with their congregational geography and the ssociated flexibility for NPCs to locate wherever the most adaptable premises can be obtained, were found to be key in explaining why the churches can be gathered in highly concentrated areas. These concentrations were largely based within areas containing high rates of commercial and industrial premises. NPCs were found to be pushed towards these spaces by economic factors, yet drawn there by their unique ecclesiology and a desire for spiritually neutral spaces that can be sanctified through worship. A lack of D1 Use Class premises and widespread religious illiteracy were found to be very significant issues for NPCs, resulting in them seeking planning permission with a remarkably low rate of success. Through first hand research carried out within Southwark, the external architecture of the NPCs was then investigated.

03 Four distinct typologies of NPC premises were established, and their key features identified, catalogued and examined. It was shown that, regardless of typology, it is often only through their distinctive signage that NPCs can be identified: the small, often temporary, changes intimating great wonders beyond the door of a mundane and often withdrawn facade. These external changes are heavily influenced by how secure the churches feel in their premises, determining how distinct their threshold to the public realm becomes and, therefore, how successful they can be in their evangelical mission to become ‘a church without walls’. This insecurity, and the resultant architecture, are directly influenced by the the lack of D1 Use Class premises, the lack of guidance and flexibility from Southwark’s planning authority with regard to NPCs’ dealings with the planning system, and the inadequate definition of the D1 Use Classification within the context of modern religion. Planning is ‘at its core, an ethical enquiry into how to live with each other in the shared spaces of multicultural cities’, and currently the system is failing NPCs. Moving across the threshold to the NPCs’ internal spaces, the question was posed; what changes were required for a warehouse to become an ‘ascension centre’? At first glance these spaces, often with little in the way of long term security, appear to have been put together with little consideration beyond their temporary nature. However, there was found to be an astounding consistency in the way in which the NPCs’ internal spaces were approached. This consistency, despite the churches’ differing situations in terms of premises and permanence, was found to mirror that of mother churches in Nigeria. This imagined connection, from the margins of the host city to the heart of the mother church, was found to be key in allowing the churches to operate with a duality; simultaneously the peripheral warehouse proclaimed by its facade and the ‘ascension centre’ proclaimed by its signage.

04

01 Signage analysis

03 Duck typology features

02 Shopfront typology analysis

The space can operate on both the real and the imagined level

04


81

Architecture as Freedom: Piloting the application of the Capability Approach to the evaluation of the Battambang Housing Scheme, Cambodia Niki Sole Architectural interventions in the global south are seen by many as a ‘good thing’. However, the evaluation of these is limited; the social and economic impact of design-based interventions in international development is often overlooked. Through an exploration of writings by Amartya Sen, Alexandre Apsan Frediani, Sabina Alkire and others, as well as learning from Architecture Sans Frontières’ (ASF) Challenging Practice course and fieldwork undertaken with Building Trust international (BTi), Niki’s dissertation applies the capability approach to the evaluation of the Battambang Housing scheme (BHS). The aim is to assess the achievement of beneficiaries’ well-being aspirations and to inform BTi’s future practice. Whilst design-based interventions in international development in the global south have aims of improving social and economic prospects for beneficiaries, the majority of evaluations focus on built performance. As a result, an increasing number of projects fail to meet the needs and aspirations of beneficiaries. Whilst built performance data may be able to quantify the ‘technical’ quality of built outputs, the gap in the analysis of social and economic impacts calls for a new approach to the evaluation of design-based interventions. Without a strong evaluation framework development practitioners will struggle to overcome these obstacles. With cities and urban spaces in the global south expanding at unprecedented rates, the audience for this type of evaluation is growing. This dissertation seeks to apply the capability approach, through design and participatory methods, to the evaluation of the BHS. In doing so, it pilots a new evaluation methodology and hopes to assess the extent to which the BHS achieved well-being aspirations valued by beneficiaries.

01 The evaluation methodology is designed to combine an ethnographic approach with specific methods from architecture (mapping and drawing) and participation. It includes in-depth interviews and the production of maps and visual material at every stage of the research. Data collection methods include observation and mapping, field notes, interviews, focus groups and workshops. Persons, buildings and places are visited in order to undertake the research. Findings are typically documented through photography, audio and video recordings, drawing and note taking. A translator is present when working with the community, be that focus groups, workshops or interviews. Interviews with HFHC & BTi Evaluation of each project commenced with interviews with HFHC and BTi. These are in-depth interviews with the actors involved designed to pay particular attention to the ways in which architecture was practiced, how and why decisions were made and the successes and shortcomings already identified. These were semi-structured interviews with specific questions to guide discussion in order to obtain in-depth qualitative information regarding their understanding of the community, project aims and objectives and perceived well-being outcomes. Both HFHC and BTi were asked the same topical questions. Questions guide the discussion in the context of capability freedoms, as identified by Frediani. Discussions are voice recorded and transcribed Community Focus Groups and Workshops Following interviews with HFHC and BTi, community focus group discussions and workshops were held at the project site. These were designed to pay particular attention to the ways in which architectural practice has affected the community’s capabilities. They included mapping, drawing and discussions. The way in which these workshops were run is analysed and developed during the research. A variety of participatory strategies, already piloted by ASF (ASF Participate), were adopted in order for a holistic understanding of the community and the freedoms enabled by the processes and products of the project.

Understanding the local context Led by a member of the community, a transect walk allowed the researcher to observe, listen and ask about the community. Transect walks revealed the current living conditions of residents, the spatial arrangements, hierarchy of spaces, the activity systems and the existing social structures. This was recorded through sketches, mapping and photographs. Once a basic understanding of the neighbourhood was achieved, households were visited and conversations had to develop a ‘picture’ of the neighbourhood at a personal level. Semi-structured interviews with community As with the semi-structured interviews with the funder and BTi, these informal discussions were guided by topical questions. The aim is to obtain in-depth qualitative information regarding the community’s understanding of the project aims and objectives in relation to their well-being aspirations. Questions guided the discussion in the context of capability freedoms, as identified by Frediani. Notes were taken during discussions and discussions were voice recorded. Translations were transcribed where necessary. The semistructured interviews explored the perceptions, feelings and opinions beneficiaries had of the BHS in relation to their choices, abilities and opportunities.

04

01 Houses of a selection of interviewees during Niki’s fieldwork 02 Dreaming through Model Making: workshop in Koh Kong Giving beneficiaries the freedom to influence the design of housingw 03 Participatory Workshop 04 Sketch impression of one of the participant’s ‘dream’ house

Dreaming through drawing This workshop encouraged community members to consider their needs and desires. Observation and conversation during the workshop exposed the hierarchy of spaces and allowed the motivation of spatial arrangements to be questioned. Drawings were collected and photographed to allow crossexamination Evaluation The data gathered from the interviews, community focus groups and workshops was analysed in the context of capability space using literature review to consider the extent to which the project had enhanced the community’s freedoms to achieve well-being. This provided useful insights into both the project and the application of the capability approach to evaluation. The evaluation was fed back to BTi to improve their practice.

02

03


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

MArch in Architecture: Collaborative Practice The University of Sheffield’s School of Architecture (SSoA) continues to place itself at the forefront of architectural education with our Collaborative Practice Part 2 Architecture course now in its second year. We now have 30 leading UK practices onboard and we have received positive feedback from both employers and students alike. Collaborative Practice is a full times course, which blends a reflective practice based experience with academic research and learning. The route is a 2 year program where Year 1 (Year 5 of the architecture route) is based in Practice with the student employed 4 days /week. Year 2 (Year 6 of the Architecture route) is based back in Sheffield. The work produced is a testament to the enthusiasm, commitment and tenacity displayed by both our pioneering cohorts and our collaborative practices. Director of Collaborative Practice Satwinder Samra From practice, thank you to : Paul Monaghan, AHMM Jo Bacon, Allies Morrison Simon Fraser, Allies Morrison John Assael, Assael Architecture Richard Coutts, BACA Denise Bennetts Bennetts Associates Chris Harding, BDP Andrew Smith, BDP Stephen Marshall BDP Bruce Raw, Bond Bryan Jonathan Herbert, Bond Bryan Joe Witchell, Broadway Malyan Andy Groarke, Carmody Groarke Kevin Carmody, Carmody Groarke Lukas Barry, Carmody Groarke Neil Michels, Carmody Groarke Phillip Graham, Cullinan Studio Helen Roberts FCB Studios Harbinder Birdi, Hawkins\Brown Roger Hawkins, Hawkins\Brown Edmund Harrison Gray, Hawkins\Brown Rebecca Hinkley, Hawkins\Brown Tom Hudson, Hawkins\Brown Dan Tassell, Haworth Tompkins Martin Lyndon, Haworth Tompkins Chris Liddle HLM

From SSoA, thank you to: Karen Mosley HLM Spencer Guy, Levitate Matthew Goulcher Levitt Bernstein Jo McCafferty Levitt Bernstein Richard Lavington, MacreanorLavington Karen Henderson, MacreanorLavington Stuart Blower MAKE Guy Barlow, Manser Practice Annalie Riches, Mikhail Riches David Mikhail, Mikhail Riches Simon Robinson, MSMR Greg Penoyre, Penoyre and Prasad Stephen Proctor, Proctor and Matthews Andrew Matthews, Proctor and Matthews Mike Stiff, Stiff Trevillion Dan Campbell, Stiff Trevillion Ivan Harbour Rogers Stirk Harbour Simon Davies Rogers Stirk Harbour Andrew Mortimer, RMA Jane Collier, Waugh Thistleton John Sampson URBED Chris Williamson, Weston Williamson William Matthews WMA David Gloster, RIBA Education Alex Maxwell, RIBA Grant Dyble, ARB Emma Matthews, ARB

01 Quaker Gardens: Naomi Bailey - Levitt Bernstein An alternative design to Levitt Bernstein’s initial development proposals of Quaker Court in Old Street, London. My design approach suggests an alternative way to split the existing podium to generate activity and community connection in the middle of Quaker Gardens. 02 Television Centre Affordable Housing, London Leanne Robinson - Maccreanor Lavington Affordable housing provision for redevelopment of the BBC Television Centre. 142 units with commercial retail provision at ground floor. My alternative proposal explored different tenure provision within the affordable housing bracket, attempted to open up more routes through and to better use the site by providing more public outdoor space and opening up the railway arches for use as workshops and artist studios. 03 Holbeck Masterplan, Leeds Zuzanna Antczak - Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Ground Floor Plan of the central fragment of Holbeck Masterplan in Leeds, showing the cluster of three connected buildings comprising of existing old Printworks converted into flexible working spaces, food market in the middle part and commercial building to the South with retail units, dining space and workspaces above.

Carolyn Butterworth Leo Care Andrea Chambers Sam Dobrinski Sam Guest Becky Gray Karim Hadjri Ian Hicklin Aidan Hoggard Dan Jary Sara Lancashire Russell Light Jo Lintonbon Allanah Millsom Fionn Stevenson Rob Sykes Miranda Wall

01

02

04

03

04 Enderby Place Cruise Terminal, Greenwich, London Josh Brookes - The Mansar Practice This project focuses on an international cruise terminal amongst a larger mixed use project amidst the current redevelopment of Greenwich Peninsula. My reflection looks to bring a larger public use to the site, creating a river front park and function to the cruise terminal outside of the main tourist season. My image shows an exploded axonometric of this proposal. 05 Plumstead Library Martynas Vielavicius - Hawkins/Brown The project is an extension and refurbishment to the existing Grade II Listed Library, which will replace its current functions and the facilities of a close by Warehouse Leisure Centre site to provide a new cultural facility for local communities forming a key part of new RBG’s Urban Framework to support regeneration of Plumstead Area. 06 The Manchester Engineering Campus and Development Daniela Caruntu - BDP Manchester Engineering Campus and Development (MECD) aims to bring together 4 engineering schools within Manchester University. The campus will also have a range of central teaching spaces, two research institutes an a variety of research activities. The architecture focuses on visibility of activities, technology, permeability, urban continuity and craftsmanship. The completion date for the entire campus is in 2020.


83

07 Advanced Manufacturing - UoN Hannah Towler - Bond Bryan My proposal is aimed to reinterpret the current scheme for an Advanced Manufacturing Building for the University of Nottingham. Located at a prominent site on the Campus, the brief was expanded to consider public realm along with the need for labs and research offices. 08 Albert Wharf, London Andros Tsestos - MSMR The proposal responds to the unique nature of the site by promoting the regeneration of three wharves as a vibrant mixed use development consisting of residential and public uses. The design has evolved with the aspiration to create spaces that complement and add to the locality, offering delight to those who use them and foster a sense of community.

07

09

06

10

09 Townhouses - Uxbridge Mark Stancombe - BDP Redesign of 27 townhouses as part of a large masterplan in Uxbridge, focussing on bringing purpose, activity and public amenity to the largely residential site. 10 Teaching and Learning - UoSo Yanni Pitsillides - Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios The proposal is a new build Teaching and Learning Building at the University of Southampton. My proposal aimed at harmonising the city and the campus whilst maintaining the brief which pushes new types of teaching and learning spaces. 11 Tech Lab Rosanna Sutcliffe - BOND BRYAN The Tech lab is split into three separate workshops, with shared meeting spaces joining the three buildings together. The engineering created within the workshops is celebrated by encouraging views throughout the building. The structure will be left exposed to tie-in with the idea of manufacturing and creating well engineered products. 12 Volumetric Temporary Housing Chris Dembinski - Rogers Stirk Harbour & Partners An off-site volumetric housing response that responds to the opportunity of temporarily and permanently available sites. The project aims to improve the existing proposal by opening the street frontage, reducing the structure, increasing communal spaces and activating the rooftops with a new language of Existing further interchangeable volumetric units to give the proposal flexibility and longevity. Praneet Bhullar

13

Iteration

Proposal

12

11

Thames Tideway Tunnel Hawkins\Brown Mentors: Roger Hawkins & Harbinder Birdi

13 London’s current sewer network, designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette in the 1850s, has been outgrown, discharging untreated sewage into the River Thames. The Thames Tideway Tunnel project will extend London’s The Thames Tideway Tunnel sewerage system to cope with the demands of the city well into the 22nd century. Despite being one of the UK’s leading infrastructure projects, Praneet Bhullar - Hawkins/Brown most of the engineering will remain unseen but will be represented through creation of four acres of new public realm along the River Thames. London’s current sewer network, the designed by the developed Sir design Joseph Hawkins\Brown has undertaken of the central section, comprising of 8 sites of public realm. Bazalgette in the 1850s, has been outgrown, discharging untreated sewage into the River Thames. The Thames Tideway Tunnel project will extend London’s sewerage system to cope with the demands of the city well into the 22nd century. Despite being one of the UK’s leading infrastructure projects,most of the engineering will remain unseen but will be represented through the creation of four acres of new public realm along the River Thames.Hawkins\ Brown has undertaken the developed design of the centralsection, comprising of 8 sites of public realm. 05

08


Postgraduate Taught Masters The Sheffield School of Architecture offers four Postgraduate Taught Masters (PGT) programmes. These are built on the core strengths of academic staff and embody the School’s commitment to social and environmental responsibility in the design and production of the built environment. MA in Architectural Design (MAAD) MA in Urban Design (MAUD) MSc in Sustainable Architecture Studies (MSc SAS) MSc in Digital Design and Interactive Built Environments (MSc DDIBE) Each PGT programme prepares students with the academic and professional skills to further their career and the programmes are tailored to meet the special needs and interests of their students with flexible modular teaching. These range from research and practice in areas of experimental architectural design, participatory urban design, regeneration, sustainability and digital design. The PGT programmes aim to expose students to meaningful conversations and collaborations with researchers and professionals engaged in all aspects of design and the built environment. We emphasise the importance of allowing students to engage with cutting-edge research and innovation from across the full spectrum of architectural humanities, social sciences, building science, technology and design research. With this, we have an embedded studio culture within our taught and professional programmes making the school a thriving and creative place to be. Image to the right: MAUD students during their Berlin fieldtrip on the runway of the former Tempelhof Airport. DIrector of Postgraduate Taught Masters Programmes Dr Florian Kossak Programme Leader MA in Architectural Design Dr Nishat Awan Dr Mark Meagher Programme Leader MA in Urban Design Dr Beatrice De Carli Dr Celia Macedo (maternity cover) Programme Leaders MSc in Sustainable Architectural Studies Aidan Hoggard Dr Sofie Pelsmakers Programme Leader MSc in Digital Design and Interactive Built Environments Dr Chengzhi Peng Programme Support Officer Allanah Millsom


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

MA in Architectural Design The MA in Architectural Design is a design-based Masters course focusing on knowledge of design approaches, processes and architectural research methodologies. It encourages students to develop a distinctive design practice, underpinned by a deep interest in social dynamics and architectural culture. The programme builds on the School of Architecture’s acclaimed research and teaching expertise in the area of architectural design, complementing the work done in ARB/RIBA acredited programmes of the school. These consider architectural design within a broad social, environmental and economic context. Students on the MA in Architectural Design programme are encouraged to explore, challenge, and inform contemporary architectural design practice through seminars, research, studio project work, field trips, and participation in design-led practice, teaching and learning innovations – for example the pioneering `Live Projects´. Students registered for the MA in Architectural Design will attend specific core modules. Then, according to their major interests, they can choose a studio and option modules related to a selected area of specialization (Theory, Sustainability, Digital and Re-Use). The studio work is an essential part of the MA in Architectural Design. Our thematic studios investigate architectural themes in depth, according to the studio tutors’ research interests. The aim is to consider design within the context of rigorous and innovative research. The core module Reflections on Architectural Design supports students in understanding the value of architectural research within the contemporary design framework and it relates directly to their studio work.

Directors Dr Nishat Awan Dr Mark Meagher Studio Tutors Dr Nishat Awan Russell Light Dr Mark Meagher Dr Krzysztof Nawratek Dr Magda Sibley John Jeong Danni Kerr Aya Musmar Cagri Sanliturk Anya Sutton Students Yusuf Abushamaa Walaa Addas Pritika Akhil Kumar Tahira Al-Raisi Stany Babu Yang Bai Daria Belova Nanxin Bu Xinxiang Bu Jasmine Kaur Chadha Qun Chen Ningyi Chen Tan Cheng Silei Deng Tong Dong Ziquan Du Chong Fu Xiaoxiao Gao Kasthuri Priya Govindaraju Chakrapani Qingyu Guan He He Si He Pooya Hosseini Mengmi Hou Yixiao Huang Ziyan Huang Akpezi Victoria Ikede Junkai Jia Rui Jin Tan Ke Hua Li Jiayang Li Jie Li Yafei Li

Baiyang Li Minjia Li Xuhui Li Xiangjie Lin Haotong Liu Ziwei Liu Yufu Liu Dandi Long Ming Lu Linfeng Lyu Cangyue Ma Qiong Ma Nidal Majeed Monica Meza Perez Xiangyu Na Yiru Pan Hou Fai Pang Jing Peng Ebru Shen Lakshmi Srinivasan Xuejing Sun Yingran Sun Shi Tan Fatemeh Vafaie Kan Wang Zhuoying Wang Run Wang Ziyan Wang Weilin Wang Xiaofan Wang Yincheng Wang Kaiqi Wei Tong Wu Li Wu Weiqiang Xia Meng Xiao Xiancheng Xu Jing Yan Yingyi Yang Meng Yao Xiaoxuan Zeng Beimeng Zhang Yilin Zhang Ruojin Zhang Yanxi Zhang Yuting Zhang Ziyi Zhang Xinfei Zhao Kangcheng Zheng Shaoshuai Zheng Nan Zheng

Ming Zhong Yujiang Zhou Bonan Zhu Yongnian Zhu External Reviewers and Guest Lecturers Nabil Ahmed Jhono Bennet Nadia Bertolino Gauri Bharat Rutul Joshi Gihan Karunratne Florian Kossak Efstathios Margaritis Marc Neelan Faith C Ng’eno Kristanti Dewi Paramita Tom Parsons Doina Petrescu Xiang Ren Aiman Rashid Helen Stratford Renata Tyszczuk

01 Sheffield: MAAD studio exhibition. 02 Jordan: Border Topologies studio field work. 01


87

02


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Border Topologies The studio took as its site one of the largest refugee camps in the world, Za’atri, which is situated in Jordan close to the border with Syria. We focused on the everyday life of refugees and considered the spatial implications of issues around governance, autonomy, agency and belonging in the camp. Our approach to refugee camps followed the anthropologist Michel Agier’s conceptulisation of them as places for ‘managing the undesirables’. These pseudo cities spring up at the edges of established urban centres, near borders or in the middle of a desert, and are designed to provide refuge for the vulnerable. Yet unlike standard cities they are often closed spaces where entry and exit is controlled and where political representation is not possible. Theses places are usually governed by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) alongside the host country government.

Studio Tutors Nishat Awan Aya Musmar Krzysztof Nawratek With thanks to Efstathios Margaritis Aiman Rashid International Relief and Development Care International UNHCR All the community mobilisation teams and volunteers who helped us in Za’atri, Azraq and Irbid refugee camps Honorable Spaces Chong Fu He He Si He Kan Wang I am a RefuSHE Tahira Al-Raisi Ebru Shen Xinfei Zhao Negotiating Domestic Space Tong Dong Haotong Liu Ming Lu Yilin Zhang Agencies of Infrastructure Hua Li Hou Fai Pang Lakshmi Srinivasan Beimeng Zhang Spaces of Possibility Jasmine Kaur Chadha Pooya Hosseini Kaiqi Wei Xiancheng Xu (De)Constructing Normality in the Camp Nidal Majeed Tan Ke Ziwei Liu Zhuoying Wang

01 Honorable Spaces This project aims to explore how honor is weaved through power relations in refugees’ everyday lives inside of Za’atri camp. We started our exploration by assigning three main attributes (money, health, and honor) to each of the players in the scenario game. As the game was being played and recorded, we found that any exchange of honor occurs within specific spatial settings; such as the mosque, the shop, or communal spaces. While keeping in mind the cultural gendered substance of honor in the camp, we investigated how the mobilization of honor produces unjust spatial geographies. 02 Images from fieldtrip to Za’atri. 03 I am a RefuSHE In our visualisations, we studied camp spaces with a particular concern for spaces that empower women through creating networks that connect their interests, values and activities. To achieve our aim, we mapped women’s current use of space in the refugee camp by analysing social (familiarity in the space with neighbours), environmental (shade at different times of day, and year), and material factors (boundaries and materials that provide privacy). Through our mappings, we found that a tactical and temporal inhabitation of spaces for specific activities enables women to create networks that grow over time. 04 Negotiating Domestic Space The diagram shows the development of a man’s caravan. He is one of our actors, as well as our interviewee. Based on an interview with him and our scenario game, we simulated the development of his caravan. We used these drawings and narratives to map out the different configurations of domestic space in the camp and how this can be negotiated between families and strangers.

05 Agencies of Infrastructure For us, this project raised many important questions - how could we efficiently assemble the spatial narrative of the camp (map) with its intangible narratives (power, privilege, etc.)? How can we quantify privilege or power in order to account for it in design? However, the ultimate question was this - how do we operate under the current model of power relations in order to create spaces that would liberate people from the vicious cycle of oppression? 06 : Void/ Spaces of Possibility Our project investigates Za’atri refugee camp in order to capture those spaces that hold the capacity for refugee action to take place. Mindful of the rigidity that characterises the governance structure in Za’atri, life in the camp as we witnessed it, has a less rigid nature. Our interest lies in those moments when refugees can not only escape that rigid structure of Za’atri, but also deform it. Our project asks two main questions: how were the rigid lines established inside the camp set down by humanitarian agencies? And how did the portability of camp materials facilitate the emergence of spaces of possibility within this rigid structure? 07 (De)Constructing Normality in the Camp This project revolves around the sociocultural necessities of life that are beyond the bare essentials required to sustain life. The study is initiated through a constructive criticism of UNHCR’s interpretation of normality in the camp and its analysis. Our study focusses on identifying those elements that differentiate the camp from the normalities of life outside the camp. Our studio methodology of employing scenario games and parametric site modelling has thoroughly helped us in identifying unique narratives of refugees lives in the camp.

01

02

02


89

12

00

m

UNHCR Office

80

Dis

0m

tric t5

Player Home 40

0m

Dis

Kindergarten

Psycho Social Center

UN Woman Oasis

Mall

Primary Health Center

Toy Shop

0

tric t6

Distribution Center

School

0

Handicap

Dis

School

tric t7

Hospital Play Area

400m

Market Street Player Home 800m

1200

m

1600

m

2000

1. When first arrives at the caravan, refugees have to buy some cushion at market street and food or go to distribution center to get some food cause they have no space to cook, they would buy a phone to contact with their relatives,there are little recreational activities for them to do at home.

2. He need to buy some materials at market street to decorate his caravans. When his family members increased,he got another caravan for free at UNHCR office but he has to check if there are any available space for him to expand.

m

3. When two caravans connect together,the living environment is better than before,in the condition of sand storm,he can do more activities at home,for example they can paint the wall to beautify his house.

Sle

4. Then he can abundant their activities,planting trees and vegetables,keeping a pet or a bird,teaching their child and watching television. At this point, he can enjoy his life with his family in the refugee camp and wait to go back Syrian.

11PM

ing

ep

Sle

ep

ing 11PM

g ayin Pr

11PM

11PM 11PM

g hin atc W

8PM

Co Pla yin

5PM

2AM

ep Sle

Mee

Frie

ing ink Dr

nds

BED

BED

O RO

M

O RO

ng ayi Pr

&

Ea

g

tin

e Me

gF tin

nti ng

2AM

gw ithll a kid s gW

in int Pa

ok Co Eatin

2AM

g

Pla nti ng

11AM

5PM

ng ayi Pr ing

2AM

g 11AM

11AM 8AM 8AM

rie

s nd

ng ayi Pr

5AM

5AM 5AM

BED

O RO

M

BA TH HEN

C KIT

G IN LIV

O RO

OM RO

BED

ES GU

2. When he earned some money by work, he bought another caravan next to the previous one, and use some waterproof materials to cover the gap between the two caravans. Thus, here would be a semi-outdoor space.

T

RO

OM

M

GU EST RO

OM RO

M

OO ER

OR ST

OM

U CO

YA RT

RD

4. When he has done enough decoration in the indoor space, he would build a yard in front of the house to do some planting to light up his family’s mood as well as improve the life.

April 2015

Connecting Two Caravans

O RO

G IN LIV

3. After earning more money by the toy shop, he bought some durable materials to close the semi-outdoor space to make it a indoor space,usually this space is used as living room.

July 2014

Buying New Caravan

04

5AM

M

ES GU

03

D

Pla

8AM

HEN

T

September 2012

8AM

tin

Ea

5PM

hin atc W

M

C KIT

1. When refugees firstly arrive at Zataari camp, UNHCR would provide them a caravan for free.

g& ki n rin

Co oki ng

Sho wer ing

g ayin Pr ting

s ng nd ayi rie Pr gF nfo tin rcin ee g th M eW all

Co oki ng

11AM

ing

g ayin Pr

g

pin

e Sle

Rei

8PM

ing Eating ok V gT

8PM 8PM

Eat ing Co oki ng

5PM

g ayin Pr

TV

June 2016

Expanding Courtyard

KITC

HEN

RO OM


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

06

05

06

05

05

05

05

06

06


91

06

07

07


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Re-use The studio started with a trip to the seaside at Scarborough, where the students then developed individual design proposals for a museum of photography for a range of small, infill sites within the historic town. The project acted as a vehicle to explore the interplay of memory, heritage and museums. At the beginning of the second semester the studio went on a field trip to Berlin to look at examples of conservation and the reuse of buildings. Berlin is a great city to study the past, as major historical events are so immediate and intensely felt, with visible traces that are everywhere. This substantially rebuilt city raises numerous questions about what we should remember and conserve and why. During the trip we visited a wide range of buildings and spaces: from David Chipperfield’s painstaking and sensitive restoration of the Neues Museum to the remnants of the Berlin Wall itself and the graffiti that adorns it; from Foster’s symbolically transparent dome over the parliament in the Reichstag to the revitalised group of traditional courtyard buildings at Hackescher Hof. This trip was followed by the major project, Re-making Bradford, which focussed on two conservation areas within the centre of the city - Goitside and Little Germany. Working in groups, students made detailed drawn records of the existing buildings, studied the typical building typologies and developed urban regeneration strategies for each of these areas. Their understanding of the existing architecture then formed the basis for a range of new interventions that aimed to enhance and regenerate the conservation areas.

Studio Tutors Russell Light and John Jeong

01 Fieldtrip to Scarborough

Students Walaa Addas Pritika Akhil Kumar Stany Babu Nanxin Bu Xinxiang Bu Ningyi Chen Mengmi Hou Yixiao Huang Ziyan Huang Junkai Jia Rui Jin Baiyang Li Minjia Li Xuhui Li Xiangjie Lin Qiong Ma Monica Meza Perez Shi Tan Fatemeh Vafaie Weiqiang Xia Yingyi Yang Xiaoxuan Zeng Ziyi Zhang Nan Zheng

02 Ningyi Chen, Scarborough

Reviewers Dr Nishat Awan Russell Light Dr Mark Meagher Dr Krzysztof Nawratek Dr Magda Sibley John Jeong Danni Kerr Aya Musmar Cagri Sanliturk Anya Sutton

03 Weiqiang Xia, Scarborough 04 Mengmi Hou, Bradford 05 Little Germany group strategy, Bradford 06 Little Germany group analysis, Bradford 07 Minjia Li, Bradford 08 Qiong Ma, Bradford 09 Nan Zheng, Bradford 10 Junkai Jia, Bradford 11 Fieldtrip to Berlin 12 Xinxiang Bu, Bradford

01

13 Walaa Addas, Bradford 14 Monica Meza Perez, Bradford 15 Weiqiang Xia, Bradford 16 Goitside group strategy, Bradford

02


93

03

04

05

05

06

07

06

08


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

09

12

10

11

13


95

14

15

16

15


The function of the farm could be divided into farmland, animals shelter, storage and resting area. There are three types of activities for people experience: agricultural experience, feeding experience and landscape experience. This farm play a significant role in our whole experiential area. It would be the main experiential area for people to practice after they get the information or guides from educational center. In additional, it supplies most of the food for people self-cooking local traditional food in the eco-experimental center. So it becomes the important connection in the whole area.

Earth

The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Cultural Sustainability

“Exploring Physical and Virtual Itineraries for Public Engagement” This project explores the concept of museums in the 21st Century as sites of physical and virtual public engagements and cultural understanding. The studio mapped Sheffield’s museums with the aim of developing virtual and physical itineraries for increased visibility and opportunities of public engagement. In addition, virtual twinning with other museums such as the National Railway Museum in York, the Science Museum in Manchester or the Beatles story in Liverpool are to be explored and developed where and when appropriate. “Tourism and Climate Change in the Atlas Mountains” The context of the studio is the development of tourism within the Atlas Mountain region of Morocco. Studio investigates the transformation of the landscape and the ecosystem through two intertwining forces – the rapidly expanding tourism industry and the effects of climate change in the region. The aim of the studio is to imagine future scenarios for integrating responsible and sustainable tourism within already existing local economies in order to support traditional ways of living. Studio looked at how tourism can be used to not only support the business interests of developers, but can also be used as a mechanism for sustaining traditional practices and livelihoods. How can agriculture and other practices be supported by the burgeoning tourism industry and how might these be transformed in the process? Students drew upon knowledge gained during the field trip and work conducted in the first semester to conceptualise ‘cultural sustainability’ within the Atlas Mountains context. This included distinctions between tangible and intangible heritage, ideas of how these can be interwoven into tourist itineraries that change with the seasons and the needs of the local economy. The studio used scenario making techniques to imagine such itineraries that make links between localities within the Atlas Mountain region, as well as imagined connections to the tourist hub of Marrakesh and beyond. Studio Tutors Dr Magda Sibley Cagri Sanliturk Dr Krzysztof Nawratek Anya Sutton Students Yusuf Abushamaa Yang Bai Qun Chen Tan Cheng Silei Deng Qingyu Guan Jiayang Li Jie Li Yafei Li Dandi Long Cangyue Ma Yiru Pan Jing Peng Ziyan Wang Run Wang Tong Wu Meng Xiao Meng Yao Ruojin Zhang Yanxi Zhang Yujiang Zhou Bonan Zhu Yongnian Zhu

01

01 Silei Deng 02 Studio Work 03 Yang Bai 04 Tan Cheng 05 Yiru Pan 06 Yang Bai 07 Silei Deng 08 Yusuf Abushamaa 02

Picking Vegetables


97

Long-term Planning

Echoing future plan on tourism and also creating more possibility for further development, the four strategies in short-term phase will respectively upgrade to water harvest house installation, cactus garden as a tourist attraction, community social space and water sensitive accommodation.

Water harvest device Take use of the air as natural well for alternative water source collecting rain water, moisture and dew, It can be developed into the function of a tea house on site.

Community space After reconstruction, the dam can be helpful to improve local conditions by creating shaded social space around the dam.

Cactus Garden

A large amount of cactus growing set up the potential to build a cactus garden/ botanical garden as tourist attraction.

Water sensitive accommodation Bring water recycling techniques into future accommodation especially for tourists, increasing the water utiliaztion rate.

52

45

03

04


Tourism and Climate Change in the Atlas Mountains The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

LOCATION AND CONNECTION

Route B Cultural Sustainability

OLIVE FRUIT OLIVE FRUIT BIOMASS

OLIVE OIL 24

OlIVE TREES 22

CHIRDREN CARE 20

C o ns tr u C ook

Market

c ti o n

18

OlIVE TREES

in

g

16

Wea F ar

12

St

ud

ng

WASTE WATER

g vin

mi

24 HOURS

14

i

ng

D in n er

SUNLIGHT

Pl a y

P r a y er

in g

10

in g

F ar

m

er

d in g S

M illi n

he

H

08

g

ep

06

04

HOTEL

Water well

Salt well

School HOME

Olive oil factory

Field

Mosque Work shop

HOME Field

Water well

HOME

ng

00

ki

OlIVE TREES

a t e r Ta

OLIVE OIL BIOMASS

W

Local Woman

DONKEY

Local Man Local Child Visitor

05

05

N

30

0

20

40

80 m

ACTIVITY AND TIME MAPPING OF THE INDIVIDUALS IN MARAGHI


3. Chaotic Identification System Only a few of the exhibition are have names, most of those rooms are anonymous, which makes people more easily to get lost in the museum.

99

07

Our group research start from views, following the route of the field trip, there are about 15 views (9 views within the site and 6 surrounding views) could be used to display the feature and the various elements of the site. As can be seen from the view analysis, the view of the site consist of abundant elements, which could simply classify into two parts: natural landscape (south and west) such as snow mountains, seasonal river, olive tree, cactus, sheep, cow and etc. And the other aspect is human culture (south and east) which including olive harvesting, olive oil making, farming and daily activities. After the analysis, it could be shown that the elements of the views compose a healthy and original ecosystem that play an important role in local area.

06

07

(View points

10

19

Our group research start from views, following the route of the field trip, there are about 15 views (9 views within the site and 6 surrounding views) could be used to display the feature and the various elements of the site. As can be seen from the view analysis, the view of the site consist of abundant elements, which could simply classify into two parts: natural landscape (south and west) such as snow mountains, seasonal river, olive tree, cactus, sheep, cow and etc. And the other aspect is human culture (south and east) which including olive harvesting, olive oil making, farming and daily activities. After the analysis, it could be shown that the elements of the views compose a healthy and original ecosystem that play an important role in local area.

Site Plan (View points and Field Trip Routes) 11

07

07


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Prototype City This studio investigated prototypes as a means of evaluating design hypotheses, gathering site data, and making proposals for the future of the city. As a studio we asked what it means to take an ‘open source’ approach to architectural design and production, engaging with this question through a range of digital design methods including virtual reality, video, and rapid prototyping. In semester 1 we employed research by design methods to produce a design intervention to add value to, re-invigorate or catalyse a lost and forgotten space in Sheffield. Our semester 2 project focused on experimental architecture as a means of responding to specific challenges in the built environment. Our project began with a visit to Graz, a city with a strong history of experimental architectural practice. As a group we documented a square in Graz as a testing site for our interventions. Upon returning to Sheffield we developed proposals for the site as a means of evaluating our design hypotheses and developing a personal understanding of the roles of experimental practice.

Studio Tutors Dr Mark Meagher Danni Kerr Students Daria Belova Ziquan Du Xiaoxiao Gao Kasthuri Priya Govindaraju Chakrapani Akpezi Victoria Ikede Yufu Liu Linfeng Lyu Xiangyu Na Xuejing Sun Yingran Sun Weilin Wang Xiaofan Wang Yincheng Wang Li Wu Jing Yan Yuting Zhang Shaoshuai Zheng Kangcheng Zheng Ming Zhong With thanks to: Urs Hirschberg (Institute of Design and Media, TU Graz)

01 01 Rhombic Tricontahedron This project was performed by the entire studio Prototype City, aimed at creating a pavilion that opens and closes in response to human movement. This work was completed by the entire studio in the core Environment and Technology module lead by Danni Kerr and Aidan Hoggard. https://maadfireballproject.wordpress. com/ 02 Assembly: Changing Market for Changing World. Daria Belova, Jing Yan, Akpezi Ikede, Shaoshauai Zheng Drawing by Daria Belova 03 Mechanical System Kasthuri Priya G C, Ming Zhong, Yingran Sun This project aimed to develop an installation responding to the users. Our hope is that it grows and evolves in intelligence (internet of things and emotions/motions) and physicality (more transforming capabilities) and becomes a reality for future cities. 04 Responsive Systems of Sensory Components Kasthuri Priya G C, Ming Zhong, Yingran Sun Photomontage of a scenario. 05 Concepts for Transient Culture group Weilin Wang, Yufu Liu, Xuejing Sun We want the “walls” to move, stretch, curve and sit above the land. So, we got a steel frame with a track and moving device. We used projectors to project what we needed onto the “walls”. 02


101

03

04

05

06


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

06 Movement and Change group Xiaoxiao Gao, Xiangyu Na, Yincheng Wang, Li Wu, Ming Zhong In our project, we aimed to come up with improvement plans to revive forgotten sites by going through open data, both online and written; collecting and analyzing relevant information along with history, culture and nature; observing human activity and building prototypes. 07 New Urban Landscape group Xiaoxiao Gao, Linfeng Liu, Xiaofan Wang In this project I designed an artificial tree and used the design concept of “folding”. This artificial tree is simple and flexible. The top of it is a collapsible and retractable solar panel. To improve function, the bottom of the tree has been equipped with wheels. Rendering: Xiaoxiao Gao. 08 Digital Fabrication workshop We produced a series of modular components. In photo: Jing Yan. 09 Stories in Dislocated Space group Li Wu The concept behind the project is based on allowing people to make a profound impression on the site and escape from everyday life. The Chinese garden concept adds to the design, creating a place where users can project feelings on it. I tried to use a relatively simple element in the building, which is nature, to create a sense of tranquility. 10 Movement and Change group Xiaoxiao Gao, Xiangyu Na, Yincheng Wang, Li Wu, Ming Zhong

07

11 Make Time Public group Xiangyu Na and Yincheng Wang Time was one of the main design concepts. Our project simulated the time sequence of the arboreal growth. Part I’s theme was the sapling, so it reflected the growth of a sapling. It centered on low design with the main function of transmitting the information thus to make the people obtain the information related to Graz.

08


103

09

11

10


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

MSc in Digital Design & Interactive Built Environments The MSc in Digital Design & Interactive Built Environments (DDIBE) is a digital design based programme structured around four key areas of study: (1) parametric modelling linked to digital fabrication and prototyping, (2) building information modelling for cross-domain design analyses, (3) computer programming for data processing and interactive prototyping, and (4) advanced simulation for modelling adaptive architecture. Students are introduced to a set of digital design methods, techniques and processes including parametric shape modelling linked to 3D printing & laser cutting, BIM-based building performance analyses, computational design with Python and Arduino, and advanced environmental simulation for modelling site-specific climate change adaptation. Studio MAKE (Modelling Adaptive Kinetic Environments) is the digital design lab where students actively engage with formulating and testing hypotheses and scenarios of interactive architecture, addressing an environmental, social, technological or cultural challenge. Students come to study with us on the DDIBE programme with a growing interest in the capacity of architecture to respond dynamically to change. Architects and designers of the built environment increasingly anticipate the inevitability of change, as well as the potential to creatively shape the way that buildings, landscapes and cities change and age over time. At the end of this programme our postgraduates develop the skills and theoretical knowledge needed to formulate blueprints for a future built environment based on multiple scenarios for buildings that change over time. For the third year running of the DDIBE programme, we see students’ learning outcomes grounded in solid understanding of computational techniques that support a data-centric and parametric modelling approach to design generation. They show a wide spectrum of exploratory applications of 3D interactive prototyping methods and tools that requires joined-up design thinking and making. Imaged to the right: Students during their fieldtrip to Austria Programme Leader Chengzhi Peng Module Co-ordinators and Studio Tutors Mark Meagher Chengzhi Peng Tsung-Hsien Wang Zhuoqun Zhang Additional Reviewers and Lecturers Marc Schnabel Alex Petersen Students Nazneen Chinikamwala Adrian Eduardo Fuentes Padilla Zhen Gong Yue Guan Hewen Hu Chenjun Liu Sofia Maraki Philippos Michael Bettina Serpa Chernicoski Xiang Sun Zhiqiang Wang Ying Zhu Philip Shilton


105


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio M.A.K.E Studio MAKE (Modelling Adaptive Kinetic Environments) explores how syntheses of digital (virtual) and physical environments can lead to innovation of interactive built environments (IBE). DDIBE students undertook three projects in Studio MAKE 2016-17: (1) Inspired by Nature, (2) Transformable Urban Furniture, and (3) Adaptive Urban Nantecture. Led by Dr Tsung-Hsien Wang, Inspired by Nature is a five-week long project in Semester 1 to explore the underlying formal elements and rules of pattern-forming found in nature. Beginning with a small scale study, each student investigates a chosen topic of natural evolution through abstraction, parameterisation and manifestation. The 3D parametrical models developed from Inspired by Nature were then applied to ideas of making furniture-like urban interventions to some campus spaces identified by the students. Retuning back from the week-long field trip to Slovenia and Austria in early February, students started with precedent studies of Nanotecture drawn from Nanotecture: Tiny Built Things (Rebecca Roke 2016, Phaidon). Supported by Element of Computational Design II (ARC6819), students swiftly moved to prototyping an Adaptive Urban Nanotecture (AUN). The goal was for each AUN project to build a prototype of a small interactive architecture that explores a specific form and performance of adaptive interaction situated in some urban environmental and social conditions. As presented here, the DDIBE students this year have produced thought-provoking digital design project outcomes, demonstrating what they foresee the possibilities of interactive adaptive architecture in response to the social, environmental, technological or cultural issues they care about. 01 01 Chenjun Liu Social Strips - An social moods affective architecture unit This studio design presents the development of an interactive installation intended as a prototype of experimental architecture connected with social media data processing. Social moods and emotions now spread more widely and faster than ever before due to pervasive social media platforms. I explored how data processing of users’ expressions of moods/emotions through social media can become a source of influences on shaping the form and behaviour of interactive architecture, resulting in a prototype of affective architecture. The prototyping method includes (1) a feather-inspired data-to-shape rule system for generating developable strip surfaces, (2) a physical computing platform built with Arduino micro-processor and shape memory alloy springs for actuation, and (3) physical model-making. As a prototype of affective architecture, an interactive installation was proposed for a campus space where the actuation of the installation is linked to data processing of Twitter messages collated from the campus spatial boundary. 02 Hewen Hu Park Pavilion In this project, I designed a park pavilion in Western Park for people to hold activities and protect themselves from the sunlight. The design consists of two parts. One is an elastic surface, the other is a frame that supports the surface. They are connected together with some wires. By controlling the length of the wires, the surface can change and move. To adapt to sunlight, the movements of the surface is related to intensity of the sunlight. For this reason, a light sensor and servo motor are used in this project. When the sunlight is strong, the rotating of the servo will drive the wires, so that the surface goes up. And then it provides space for people to stay in from the strong sunshine. 03 Sofia Maraki and Philippos Michael The AUN proposed is based on the origami folding technique. To make the structure that reacts to the input data and movement in actual scale we will need to actuate the folding mechanism with the use of motorised actuators. These can inflict rotating or translational movements, according to the proposed folding method. The selected origami is the herringbone origami which after experimentations we found that it has a twisting ability as that creates shaded space on both sides. For that reason we decided to combine two twisted herringbone origamis and create a more enclosed space in between and a more open but shaded space on the outside.

01

04 Nazneen Chinikamwala Octave Organ Semester One was a study of all things natural and their application in architecture. My approach to it was through the study of the sound of wind and its application in the built world. Hence, the ‘Octave Organ’ (aka O2) was born. The O2 is an exploration aimed at enhancing the physical realm of the campus by reclaiming the streets and engaging passersby with a lively pattern. This is realised through the deployment of a series of organ pipes over one segment of Portobello Street, serving a two fold purpose: one - they create little pockets of spaces peppered along the length of the street which serve as meeting spots-equipped with seating spaces and bike stands or simply a space to stop by and have a chat or catch a break from the rain if caught in a downpour. Two - The installation serves as a giant playing instrument with all octaves of sound represented along the length of the street in the form of a piano, various drum kits and a harp. This musical ability was brought forth and enhanced in semester two’s studio where the use of micro controllers like the Arduino allowed digital fabrication of music through interaction with the built environment. The result was an installation that renders its site a lively and dynamic space that students and passersby will actively seek out for various activities. 05 Philippos Michael The shelter is to be constructed in the Arts Tower forecourt. It will provide shelter to people who want to get into a weatherprotected environment and enjoy some fresh air. A small cafe space will be hosted in its closed side. The whole landscape of the Arts Tower has been redesigned into that concept; an open space area with sitting spaces, greenery, a watery element and free space that emphasizes current paths. The physical model is a test of the concept behind the canopy, which was a compression only structure that has origins from the Black Mambaís skin.

02

06 Sofia Maraki This project is an investigation on the design to fabrication work flow of an urban lighting device. The use of parametric design facilitates and automates the generation and composition of complex geometries. The inspiration of this project is the infinity puzzle made by the Nervous System team. The property of this puzzle is that it can be generated to multiple direction and each piece can take different position. Following this thought, the initial purpose of this project is to design a lighting structure in which each component can be placed in different positions and create different lighting patterns based on the voronoi diagram. 03

03


107

04

05

04

05

05

06

06


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

07 Xiang Sun The design of our studio project is based on a specific site located in the Academy area of the University of Sheffield. The project is composed of 3 main parts - one intelligent movable footbridge and two terminals. The bridge is inspired by the robot WALLI which can automatically determine which terminal is the most, and then make the next step to judge. The bridge can learn and record on its own, providing people with a more convenient and intelligent traffic experience and a better interactive experience. 08 Ying Zhu In the last project I worked individually. The aim of my project is to provide a shelter for different users and different environments. There are no specific sites or users. Dr Chengzhi Peng lead this project and we also got help from Dr Tsung-Hsien Wang in parametric modeling, Alex in Arduino support and especially Zhuoqun Zhang.

07

09 Yue Guan and Zhen Gong This project was located in the academy area of the University of Sheffield, it was composed of three main parts-one intelligent footbridge and two terminals. The footbridge is designed on the Upper Hanover Street, one of the terminals is located in the south part of Information Commons, and the other terminal is in the north part of Jessop West. In order to make this footbridge intelligent and interactive, multiple kinds of sensors have been used, such as force sensor, ultrasonic sensor, and sound sensor. The layout of the site is separate, the two academy areas didn’t have a clear connection. This situation makes students who want to study in the buildings located in both areas have to go across the Upper Hanover Street. However, the width of the street is too narrow to support a large amount of the traffic. Not to mention a large number of students need to go across this street. This problem causes both walkers and drivers to waste time. 10 Zhen Gong 11 Zhiqiang Wang In project 2, the aim is to create a transformable urban furniture, in University of Sheffield. I chose Weston Park as my site, in order to meet Green Flag requirement and improve people’s involvement, I planned to create a canopy that can provide a space for some outdoor activities. I chose hyperbolic paraboloid as my prototype, and explore this kind of surface and apply the result of project 01 into this kind of project. Dr Tsung-Hsien Wang leads this project and we also got useful feedback from Dr Chengzhi Peng.

07


109

08

09

09

11

09

10

11


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

MA in Urban Design MAUD is a design-based programme specialising in community-centred approaches to the design and development of urban areas. The aim is to address the challenges of uneven urban development, both locally and internationally. With this in mind, the course seeks to establish innovative modes of design practice based on civic engagement and participation, and to investigate which approaches might allow for rethinking the role of both designers and citizens in the processes of city-making. The overall approach of the programme is underpinned by a desire to critically examine the key urban development challenges that cities are facing today. Who is addressing them? In which ways? To whose inclusion, and exclusion? Local urban areas in Sheffield are taken as a reference for comparison with other UK and international contexts in Europe as well as in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Central to the programme is a design studio, supported by core modules exploring urban design theory, participatory methodologies and reflections on urban design practice. These are complemented by a range of optional modules, field trips, thematic workshops, and lecture series. Images to the right: MAUD students having tutorial during their Berlin field trip at the Bauhütte Südliche Friedrichstadt .

MAUD Programme Leader Dr Beatrice De Carli Dr Celia Macedo (Maternity Cover) MAUD Studio Staff Leo Care Lorenza Casini Dr Cristina Cerulli Dr Florian Kossak Adam Park Teaching Assistants Pouyan Akbari Kristanti Paramita Jhono Bennet Dr Beatrice De Carli MAUD Thesis Tutors Lucia Caistor Arendar Dr Isis Nunez Ferrara Prof Doina Petrescu Jon Orlek Robert Thompson MAUD PhD Teaching Assistants Pouyan Akbari Ula Khalel Katarina Moebius Eleni Pashia Kristanti Paramita Xiang Ren Sheng Song Helen Stradford Goran Vodicka MAUD Visiting Contributors Dr Gauri Bharat (CEPT, Ahmedabad) Dr Camillo Boano (UCL) Prof Angus Campbell (University of Johannesburg) Oliver Clements &Sabine Horlitz (ps wedding, Berlin) Prof Pingping Dou (Najing University) Larissa Fasseler (Berlin) Calum Green (London Community Land Trust) Prof Karim Hadjri (SSoA) Dan Jary (SSoA) Prof Andong Lou (Nanjing Universirty) Sophie Morley (ASF-UK, London) Prof Omar Nagati (MAUD Visiting

Professor / CLUSTER, Cairo) James Parkinson (GLA, London) Mark Parsons (Studio Polpo, Sheffield) Morag Rose (University of Sheffield) Katy Schroth (Bauhütte Südliche Friedrichstadt, Berlin) Tuliza Sindi (EXTRA, Johannesburg) Simon Sizwe Mayson (City of Johannesburg) Prof Jörg Stollmann (Technical University Berlin) Ziwen Sun (Edinburgh University) Students Shashank Achanthodi Letian Bai Jiali Cai Shaoying Cao Xingyuan Chen Chen Chen Ye Chen Yanyao Cui Shengyuan Gao Yiyun Gong Silvia Sofia Gonzalez Gamez Yaqing Gu Xiaojing Gu Waleed Ismail Syeda Maham Ithar Ziyan Jiang Azka Khan Seonwoo Kim Yihui Kong Ilektra Ioulia Kouri Jose Lagunes Trejo Wenting Lai Manni Lin Keqin Liu Yongying Liu Jing Meng Sitong Mu Meiying Piao Kun Qian William Roberts Yosua Sianipar Lingxiang Su Mingyuan Tang Yanan Wang Dingyi Xu Yuqing Xu Shuyang Xu

Chenyang Xue Luye Yang Zi Ye Haiying Yu Qiuyi Yu Aroosha Zahid Jiachen Zhang Chen Zhao Shuyan Zhao Mi Zhou Lingyan Zhou Yanjing Zhou Hefeng Zhu Yi Zhu


111


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

P1: Inner City & Urban Regeneration In urban areas across the globe, as inner city districts experience cycles of disinvestment, the transformation and re-appropriation of neglected central neighbourhoods is one of the fundamental ways in which urban dwellers can shape the city’s future. The project looks at the many existing forms of re-imagination and reappropriation of inner city areas asking: to which extent do planned interventions generate forms of urban renewal that the whole city can profit from? Which means of spatial and social in- and exclusions are used in planned urban regeneration projects and processes? Conversely, when does the citizen-led appropriation of space turn into claiming and privatisation? Who is included and excluded in the production and the use of different urban regeneration initiatives? How do inner city publics understand these dynamics and use/get used by them to create more inclusive forms of urban change? Over six weeks, the students’ brief was to engage propositionally with the inner city of Johannesburg, and with the urban regeneration framework provided by the Urban Development Zone. To do so, students collaborated with a range of local partners to develop site specific proposals that advanced alternative forms of urban renewal for three areas that are currently part of Johannesburg’s Urban Development Zone. For each of these sites, four groups of MAUD students have worked closely with one local partner who engaged in the project’s development to discuss ideas and provide feedback. The engagement developed through first unpacking some of the complexities of life and urban development in inner city Johannesburg. You will then select a specific site of intervention and develop design principles that provided a platform for the development of proposals. Finally, these principles were tested through the design of a (set of) tactical intervention(s) – addressing key questions of equality, diversity, and participation in the regeneration of Johannesburg’s inner city. Tutors Jhono Bennett Beatrice De Carli

01

01 Group 3 02 Group 2 03 Group 2 04 Group 4 05 Group1

02


113

THE STREET LAB URBAN GARDENING

ACTIVITIES SCRENING

USING RECYCLED MATERIALS TO CREATE NEWPRODUCTS 03

05

04


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

P2: Re-appropriating modernist housing Taking the Mehringplatz Ensemble by Hans Scharoun and Werner Düttmann, a seminal 1960s social housing scheme in a disadvantaged area of Berlin Kreuzberg as its case study, the second project looked at the question how such modernist housing estates could be ‘reappropriated’ for the city and how the people living in these neighbourhoods can exert their agency to re-imagine and transform their way of living. The project included a week of fieldwork in Berlin in which students investigated with their set of ‘Methodologies and Tools for the Engaged Urban Practitioners’ in the Mehringplatz area and adjacent districts. They also learned from a range of urban practitioners who are engaged in many of Berlin’s current bottom-up transformation processes. The projects were then primarily developed through the notion of a long urban cross section drawings using different scales. They focused on issues such as local economies, connectivity, play or cultural diversity and projected tactical and strategic intervention in housing complex and its surrounding unused, disused or underused spaces.

Tutors Florian Kossak Beatrice De Carli Adam Park 01 Teaching Assistants Pouyan Akbari Xiang Ren

01 Group 7 Shengyuan Gao, Waleed Ismail, Azka Khan, Wenting Lai ‘Leben – Arbeit – Spielen’ The project aims to make new connections between the Mehringplatz and the area south of the Landwehrkanal in order to form intricate connections between ‘Life – Work – Play’. The project’s key move is a complete re-interpreation and reappropriation of the inner ring of Mehringplatz by introducing a new multi-functional programme and by inserting new (temporary) structures into the gaps of the inner ring. 02 Group 9 Xiaojing Gu, Yaqing Gu, Yongying Liu, Haiying Yu ‘Re-connect the City’ The project takes young parents and their children as one of the key stakeholder groups and offers small to medium scale adaptations of the public realm. It re-connects Mehringplatz with the waterfront of the canal and the area in front of the America Memorial Library, increasing the offer of sport and recreation facilities for local residents and visitors alike. 03 Group 4 Yanao Cui, Soenwoo Kim, Yosua Sainpiar, Yuqing Xu ‘Journey of the Refugees’ Germany and Berlin in particular have been taking on large numbers of refugees over the past year. The project takes their arrival and immediate needs for social and cultural support structures, housing and work as its driving impetus and proposes a range of temporary and permanent interventions and built structures in Mehringplatz and its surrounding area, incorporating and improving there the numerous already existing facilities.

02

warming up

The phase 1 that is beginning meaning of giving the chanc refugees and residents. Alth migrants, we thought that in centre of transportation, 2 large axis to city centre of first destination for refuge emergency reception under welcoming reception to ref

Emergency Reception Mehringplatz:

Advocating the refugees to settle down in Germany successfully

-Report the arrival to local authorities -Inform the general information -Connecting and introducing the emergency camp reception -Hold the various event on Mehringplatz

JOURNEY OF THE REFUGEES SEONwoo Kim / yosua sianipar / yanyao cui / yuqing xu

inner ring

charity events:

FUND RAISING BY TRADITIONAL DANCE PERFORMANCE, HANDICRAFTS, ARABIC CALIGRAPHY

outer ring

1

3

03


115

eception :

al to local authorities al information ntroducing the emergency

sharing cottage

We designed a series of flexible containers as tools for people to create the public space by themselves according to their needs. Containers are easy to move, combine, and regenerate, which provide the possibility for people to shape the functions of the site by themselves.

Standing on 7,800 sqm unused plot of land, this housing is dedicated for approximately 230 refugees. It consists of 14.4sqm studio unit for singles or couples and 2-bedroom unit for families with area of 28.8 sqm. This place is built to accommodate refugees that have been stayed in Germany beyond 6 months to get fixed address that is required for the job application. The ground level spaces of this 16 blocks complex are designed and rented for multiple functions such as retail shop, restaurants or cafes, and offices to generate funding for housing maintenance and operational fees. Physical character: Prefabricated blocks is applied as it’s easy and quick for the construction with given time constraint. Blocks are oriented to west and east to get the sun penetration as much as possible and to follow the building layout of the neighboring social housing in the south. The housing layout ensures the permeability of people movement and visual ’ physical connection from the surrounding buildings. A seamless connection with pockets of open spaces on the 2nd level is provided for social interaction and efficient circulation for safety control.

Phase 2

Phase 1

charity events:

Gable end walls of the blocks that are facing road are rented for advertisement in graffiti art to generate

The public space has three main functions. Firstly, it funding is a for the housing complex. additional platform for refugees and local people to interact. Secondly, on every Sunday, there will be a flea market happen here where refugees could use the spa ce to sale some productions with their culture. It helps to increase their income as well as show their culture. Thirdly, the site also could be used for organizing some events to enrich the refugees and local people’s life.

physical linkage Inner-ring Mehringplatz(Emergency Reception) ’ -opened Outer-ring Mehringplatz-Coloured footpath-opened Gate ’ raised crosswalkSunday market-Sharing cottage Social linkage The events organized by NGOs, migrant communities and government in Mehringplatz, Sunday market and Sharing cottage will link various classes of people with refugees

Unused hostel:

-Apply the refugee application -Protect, watch and cater the refugees -Connecting the migrant communities and NGOs with refugees -Ethical Education -Consulting

flexible seats

inner ring

Visual linkage The series of interventions are linked with same typology, colour and elements

Flea market We designed a series of flexible containers as tools for people to create the public space by themselves according to their needs. Containers are easy to move, combine, and regenerate, which provide the possibility for people to shape the functions of the site by themselves.

Emergency Camp Reception:

FUND RAISING BY TRADITIONAL DANCE PERFORMANCE, HANDICRAFTS, ARABIC CALIGRAPHY

event on Mehringplatz

outer ring

gate

connection: Mehringplatz is isolated from the eastern side of its surroundings; with huge semi-private courtyard and high-rise apartment blocks at the eastern wing of apartment block as the barriers. The aim of the strategy is establishing direct access for pedestrian between the east area and Mehringplatz while re-appropriating the under-used courtyard. The Refugee reception under the internal circle block of Mehringplatz can act as ’the catalyst’ to generate people movement from the refugee settlement in the east. Subtraction of the two lowest level of the outer ring block is required to provide direct fenestration from the courtyard. Red steel scaffolding frame intervention in the void is not only helping to evoke visual attention from afar but also providing platform for social activities and seating space for people to enjoy the view of the ’hidden garden’ in the courtyard.

Monday to Friday: Leisure space

Saturday: Special events organised by NGO

Sunday: Flea market

2

residential

handicraft workshop

RECEPTION

restaurant/cafes

SPACE IN-BETWEEN

offices

3 shop retails

COURTYARD VIEW

social void

tt

with translation, general information, contacting with other institutions and the most important thing which is reporting to Berlin authorities. If NGOs or migrant communities hold the events, this reception will be a bulletin board and link with other institutions. The fund earned will be used for constructions, running the facilities and holding events.

Linkage

sunday market

The public space has three main functions. Firstly, it is a platform for refugees and local people to interact. Secondly, on every Sunday, there will be a flea market happen here where refugees could use the space to sale some productions with their culture. It helps to increase their income as well as show their culture. Thirdly, the site also could be used for organizing some events to enrich the refugees and local people’s life.

if se

warming up The phase 1 that is beginning stage is named as a ’Warming-up’ stage. In this stage, it has a meaning of giving the chance to local dwellers to prepare and to know each other to both refugees and residents. Although the majority of residents surrounding Mehringplatz is migrants, we thought that interventions should not be done suddenly. Mehringplatz is the centre of transportation, 2 lines of U-bahn and several line of buses, and it is linked with large axis to city centre of Berlin. In other words, Mehringplatz could be a the potential first destination for refugees. The first step of our intervention is a installation of the emergency reception under the inner-ring building of Mehringplatz. This reception is the welcoming reception to refugees. It will runned by NGOs mostly and they will help refugees

ALTE JAKOBSTRA’E PLAZA AND MAIN AXIS PROVIDING SPACE FOR SOCIAL SPACE AND OUTDOOR DINING

-Unused since 2013 -Government plan to convert into social housing and emergency camp -Need approximately 400,000 euros to fix the facilities such as boiler -Accommodate up to 200 refugees - 1 building for Family and Female 2 buildings for Male Refugees could stay up to 18month -Ethical education

There are potential spaces for next village such as Prinzenbad and near the swimming pool. The typology of Sharing cottage will be spread into those potential sites. They will divide the main functions such as agriculture, handicraft and education. They will have strong connection and cooperate each other. After this neighbourhood intervention recognized as a good model of refugee village(Berlin model), this model will be spread in other states of Germany. If the political condition changed or the influx of refugees decreased, the village could shift the function to social housing.


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

P3: Re-appropriating the Post-Industrial Landscape Through Community-led Development The third design project this year was set in the City Centre of Sheffield, and, for the second year running, was developed in collaboration with Sheffield based social enterprise Studio Polpo and Sheffield Community Land Trust (CLT). The aim of the project was to explore the potential of community-led approaches to the regeneration of the city’s central areas. What can we do when the market does not provide a solution? What would be a desirable, ethical and just way of re-imagining areas of city that are left as land banks or waiting for investors? How could we prototype other ways of making the city that embody more ethical values?

Tutors Cristina Cerulli Adam Park Teaching Assistants Pouyan Akbari Eleni Pashia Reviewers Calum Green (London Community Land Trust) Mark Parsons (Studio Polpo and SSoA) Gauri Bharat (CEPT, India) External Partners Sheffield CLT Studio Polpo 01

01 Images from the group exhibition. 01


117

01

01

01


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

MSc in Sustainable Architectural Studies The MSc in Sustainable Architecture Studies (MSc SAS) combines social and technical aspects of sustainable architecture through an interdisciplinary approach. The programme focuses on exploring sustainability through design with dedicated studio modules in which we undertake evidence-based design. Lecturers and supervisors have expertise in low energy design, retrofit, lighting, modelling, building performance, parametric design and renewable materials. The programme is driven by an ethos of global stewardship and positive regeneration to transform the built environment for a more equitable future. In 2016-2017 the MSc SAS attracted students from China, India, Egypt, Germany, Greece, Jordan, Mexico, Myanmar, Nigeria, and the United Kingdom.

Programme Leaders Aidan Hoggard Dr Sofie Pelsmakers Professorial oversight Prof. Fionn Stevenson Module Co-ordinators, Studio Tutors, Thesis Supervisors Dr Abigail Hathway Aidan Hoggard Dr. Chengzhi Peng Dani Kerr Prof Darren Robinson Prof. Fionn Stevenson Prof. Jian Kang Dr. Jo Lintonbon Dr. Mark Meagher Mark SiddallSam Broughman Dr Sofie Pelsmakers Dr. Tsung-Hsien Wang Dr Tulika Gadakari Dr Virginia Stovin Guests Aiman Rashid Andrew Lees (BDP) Deborah Cobbett Dr. Gavin Harper Liam Bullingham Mahya Nazarian Marianne Heaslip (Urbed) Oliver Johnson Paul Testa Thabs Molobi Cain Students Anna-Lena Herz Jiayue Lei Zaira Butool Zaidi Konstantinos Megagiannis Mohamed Elsayed Yuyang Wang Huan Wu Yue Gao Julio JimĂŠnez Castillo Lyu Wang Mahesh Madhu Juntong Hu Karl Higham Menglu Cui

Mauricio Rivas GarcĂ­a Omar Hamed Wenjie Fan Ke Ruan Yun Hu Wei Song Zhaoliang Meng Shenmeizi Cao Yuqiu Chen Xuan Wang Yifang Jia Gaobiao Lyu Haobo Feng Bo Chen Zijun Peng Diana Ortiz Acosta Aurora Pelayo De Niz Kant Kaw Khin Chidubem Nlekwuwa Susan Constance Sutherland (part-time student)


119


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Studio Radical Transformation Our “Radical Transformation” studio was lead by Sofie Pelsmakers and we focused on radical architecture and energy interventions of existing houses and housing. Aidan Hoggard lead a Resilient Housing studio with sites in Switzerland. The studios seek to foster an awareness of the relationship between global environmental change and the construction and inhabitation of buildings. The modules introduce students to a range of approaches in sustainable architectural design, and encourage students to work iteratively and to develop a critical stance in relation to theories of sustainable architecture and discover their own approach and way of working. Students are supported in this process with a mix of seminars, lectures, (group) tutorials and group discussion and team work, field trips and workshops. The Radical Transformations studio worked with real clients and case study houses in Sheffield and London, using in-situ performance monitoring tools to understand the existing dwelling and to critically evaluate the energy needs, prior to proposing radical transformations, aiming for PassivHaus or EnerPHit standard. We used DesignPH and PHPP as tools, and this module is aligned with the UK PassivHaus student competition. In the Resilient Housing Studio, the students researched a wide range of topics and issues that are critical to the Switzerland sites and local climates. A priority was placed on the implications of spatial complexity and precision of working on urban and building sites, designing with knowledge and using “5 steps to sustainability”. Throughout the year students on the course actively attended conferences and events across the country. At Timber Expo in Birmingham students were exposed to and inspired by some of the latest developments and applications of timber. Many projects later in the year researched and developed these themes to a high level of detail. 01

02

Students were encouraged to participate in a field trip to Leicester University Passivhaus Medical Centre and in the international PassivHaus open day around Leeds and the UK PassivHaus conference in London. Furthermore, a trip to Switzerland was organised in February: students visited Zurich, Lucerne and Basel where they studied examples of sustainable architecture and urban design. Each day, in small groups they acted as “sustainability consultants” and proposed solutions to identified issues of places visited. A number of programme specific modules deliver research guided teaching and support the design studios across a range of sustainability areas of knowledge and skills. From winter onwards, students develop their own research through either a written or design-based thesis project. This substantial piece of work is supported by supervision from experts in the field within the school and students are assigned to specific staff research groups, choosing from a wide range of topics.

01 Anna Lena-Herz Riverside The narrow project site is located in the heart of the city Zurich, Switzerland next to the river Sihl. The task was to design a mixed used building which considers the environmental, economic and social aspects of sustainability. The focus in my proposal was set on the light conditions in the interior of the building as well as renewable energy strategies with an energy storage for e-bikes and electric cars.

04 Zijun Peng ‘Off The Grid’ The project aspires to create an energy self-sufficient building next to the Lake Zurich. Hybrid construction, good insulations and environmental adaptive design satisfy construction needs and Passivhaus standards. Extended energy boundaries give the building enough clean power all year around. The ground floor and extra clean energy were given over to the community. 05 Gaobiao Lyu

02 Diana Ortiz Mixed-use development in the Lake of Zurich The project is located on the Lake of Zurich, and it blends residential with commercial, integrated to the site with pedestrian paths. The Lakeside Apartments had the best views of the mountains and lake with south orientation. The new building is Zero Carbon Standard with a regulated year energy consumption of 43 KWh/m2a. The structure of the building is made of local timber and concrete slabs. For a healthier ventilation is install MVHR. And, to guarantee the thermal comfort of the users it has a continuous envelope of thick insulation in walls, roof, and floor. 03 Lyu Wang Response This project aims to reduce the impact of a new building on its surroundings. The building form is generated by response to roads, trees, the surrounding view, the energy consumption, the daylight, the local materials and the local climate. The energy is provided by the grid and the renewable energy.

06 Julio Jimenez The aim of this project is to work as a connection between the urban landscape and the riverside while providing the people a new attractive outdoor area and residential spaces where they can live in comfort in a well illuminated low energy proposal.

03

07 Juntong Hu Retrofit of a Victorian House This project is a radical retrofit experiment aiming to achieve extremely perfect thermal comfort which is quantified as the Passivhaus Benchmark in the UK. The problems of current thermal performance had been observed through an infrared camera. The well-installed airtightness and insulation combined with MVHR was the solution to improve the thermal performance. PHPP is the validation tool to ensure the target of thermal comfort was achieved.

Flat type C 68 m2

21st September

04

05

13:00

21st September

Daylight factor

13:00

Illuminance

21st September

13:00


121

04

05

06

07

07

07

07

06

07


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

08 Menglu Cui Youth Hostel Design The project is situated on the Uetliberg mountain above Zurich the brief is to design a small new youth hostel. The design is expected to meet Passivhaus standards and as much as possible incorporate energy production. In addition, this new hostel is a fast-constructed, comfortable and low energy design. 09 Mohamed Elsayed Mixed Used Building in Zurich The project site is located beside the ‘Sihl’ bridge in Zurich and near to Selnau which is an underground railway station located on the other side of the bridge.The vision of the project was to create an outstanding sustainable mixed use building in Zurich, The concrete objectives were to: (1) Achieve the daylight factor of 2% for office spaces and daylight factor of 1% for residential floors; (2)Achieve the Passivhaus standard for the residential part. (15KW/h/m2/y) and the Enerphit standard for the offices part. (25KW/h/m2/y); (3)Using Timber as the dominant construction material (60%); (4)Using Renewable Resources for generating energy for sustainble use. 10 Zaira Butool Zaidi 11 Konstantinos Megagiannis The Bridge to Life The background of the city and the site formed the vision about this project. The site of the project has always been a site of inspiration and innovation for the city, and the bridge there had been for centuries the only passage to the other side. However, the site is also near to where a dramatic drug crisis took place during 90’s. Therefore, the vision about the project is the development of a small sustainable community for ex-addicts, which includes housing, offices, and public spaces. Its symbolic use and location, right next to a bridge, will declare the passing from a previously ugly and addicted life, to a new beautiful one. 12 Omar Hamed Sun-Tracking Responsive Tower Skin The aim of this project was to develop responsive tower skin for shading to save running costs and reduce the tower’s carbon footprint. The skin responds to sun illuminance through various times during the day by opening and closing. The sun-tracking responsive skin was developed by using BIM tools including the Dynamo tool.

architecture of the area. The building aims to achieve the Passivhaus standard. However, with a space heating demand of 38KWh/m2a the building did not meet that but it does perform better than a Zero Carbon house. The design aimed at utilising natural ventilation as well as maximising daylight penetration. The structure of the building is made of local timber, cross laminated timber (CLT) and concrete slabs. 15 Yue Gao This project will rebuild the old cafe to be a low energy youth apartment which can supply a comfortable relaxing space with good daylight and green space. The trees on site will be kept in the original location and lots of green space will bring good indoor conditions for the occupants. 16 Ke Ruan Mix-used residential building design The aim of this project is to design a multifunctional centre that provides all users with a place for better experiences within Zurich. At the same time, sustainable strategies (well-insulated, renewable energy, etc) reduced the impact of building on the surrounding environment. 17 Aurora Pelayo 18 Yifang Jia The site is located on the banks of Lake Zurich. Not only does it have a great view of the lake, the traffic and public facilities here are also very convenient. The new building is a high-rise residential block with mixed use. It is a comfortable home for residents and improves the environmental quality of this neighborhood.

08

Mixed use building in Zurich Timber cladding

Bicycle Parking

E-Bike Shop

Green Roof and PV cells

Outside Sitting area Basement Level

13 Kant Kaw Khin Mixed-use residential development beside Lake Zurich This project proposed a hotel with some retail and restaurants. The objective is to meet Passivhaus Standard and to be energy efficient by using solar energy. It is validated by design PH and PHPP with the result of 14kWh/m2a which meets the Passivhaus standard. Moreover, it provides daylight to every bed room by offering duel aspect views. There is also an open courtyard. The major material is cross laminated timber with added insulation. For ventilation, MVHR is installed.

Running Path Double Skin facade

14 David Chidubem Nlekwuwa Mixed-use development in the Lake of Zurich The project is located on the Lake Zurich, and it aims at blending residential spaces with commercial and public spaces while integrating the building to the site by adopting the vernacular

Cycling Path Outside Sitting area Ground Floor Level

09.

Sitting stairs to the river


123

10

11

12

13

ARC 6842 : SUSTAINABLE DESIGN PROJECT 2

14

, author’s own, 2017 [Sketch Up]

Building perspective

SHADING DESIGN SecondProposal ExteriorRender

15

16

As the an the en sin the wi

Image by author

16

OPTION 1 : VERTICAL SHADING

17

ARC6842 Sustainable Design Project 2

18

28

Th


Graduate School With currently over 75 PhD students and 96 PGT students from the UK, Europe and further afield, the school has one of the largest cohorts of architecturally based research students in the UK, reflecting its pre-eminence in the field of architectural research. The Graduate School embraces these Doctoral programmes, it fosters links between PhD students and research staff, and supports the flourishing research culture within the School. Our PhD research is intrinsically inter-disciplinary and is open to students with an interest in any aspect of architectural research. These include histories, theories, practices and politics of architecture, environmental design (lighting, acoustics and the thermal environment), sustainability and structures, design processes and user behaviour, computer-aided design, emergent systems and complexity, sociotechnical systems (particularly related to sustainable energy technologies) urban design and development, community design and participation, places and place-making, children’s environments, feminist approaches, transformative education and practice. With a tradition of innovative education, our PhD Programmes encourage student-led initiatives and exchanges in research and education. We have a programme of events and seminars, often shared with larger research groups in SSoA, and more informal lunchtime research meetings. The PGR School also organizes informal meetings and formal public presentations for PhD students, and other research cluster activities such as the on-going East-West seminars, Lines of Flight, and the Lighting, Home and Digital Groups. Current PhD Students Aliyu Abubakar Ahmed Ahmed Pouyan Akbari Mohamad. Al Taha Maha Al-Ugaily Yahia Ali Mohammed Aljammaz Talal Alshammari Taghi Amirhosseini Jennifer Brierley Jingwen Cao Choong Yew Chang Shen Chen Michael Coates Ahmed Elastal Rui Miguel Ferreira dos Santos Scott Fox Ziyad Frances Fabio Franz Ayesha Ghazanfar Meryem Gurel Veronica Hale Ahlam Harahsheh Gillian Horn Iulia Hurducas Dongwon Jeong Sarah Joyce Danni Kerr Zeynep Keskin Cressida Kocienski Cathryn Ladd Andreas Lang Phillip Langley Yichong Mao Efstathios Margaritis Madihah Binti Mat Idris Ula Merie Katharina Moebus Juliza Binti Mohamad Nurul Mohamad Aiman Mohd Rashid Aleksandra Monteiro Kate Morland Jingyi Mu Aya Musmar Katlego Mwale Mahya Nazarian Faith Ng’eno Nkemakonam Okofu Kristanti Paramita

Junghyun Park Eleni Pashia Octavianus Priyanto Hussain Qasem Xiang Ren Chada Romcai Emad Salih Cagri Sanliturk John Emmett Scanlon Sheng Song Masa Sorn Helen Stratford Reem abbas ebrahim ali ahmed Sultan Jonathan Sykes Ian Trowell Nor Izura Tukiman Claire Tymon Alberto Urrutia Bo Wang JingJing Wang Amro Yaghi Choo Yoon Yi Al-Chokhdar Yussur Boyan Zhang Maria van Elk

Congratulations to Students who successfully completed their PhD during this year: Diego Andrés González Carrasco Derong Kong Jianyu Chen Like Jiang Juri Yoshimi Chwas A Sabr Sadiq K Abid Carl L Fraser Samuel William Vardy Rafael Mauricio Eufrasio Espinosa Sukainah A Almousa Alona Martinez Perez


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Completed PHD Thesis Projects

01 Interaction and Integration of Visual and Noise Impacts of Motorways

the perceived integrated impact of visual intrusion and noise of motorways, and explored the predictability of the impact by noise exposure indices.

Like Jiang

Concerning the acoustical and visual effects of noise barriers found on perceived environmental quality, the fourth part of the study focused on mitigation of the integrated visual and noise impact by noise barrier. A third laboratory experiment was conducted for this part.

This study aimed to achieve a better understanding of the visual and noise impacts of motorways and their integrated impact on the environmental quality via an aural-visual interaction approach, to contribute to more reliable and efficient assessments of the impacts. The study was based on perceptual experiments involving human participants using computer-visualised scenes and edited audio recordings as experimental stimuli.

Lastly, using findings of the above work of this study, impact mappings as possible prototype of more advanced tools to assist visual and noise impact assessment were demonstrated.

Factors related to road project characteristics and existing landscape characters that potentially influence the perceived visual impact of motorways were first investigated on without considering the impact from moving traffic. An online preference survey was conducted for this part of study. Map-based predictors were identified and a regression model was developed to predict and map the perceived visual impact in GIS. The second part of the study investigated the effects of traffic condition, distance to road and background landscape on the perceived visual impact of motorway traffic, and the contribution of traffic noise to the perceived visual impact. A laboratory experiment was carried out where experimental scenarios were presented to participants both with and without sound. With findings on visual impact from above studies and knowledge on noise impact from current literature, the third part of this study, with a second laboratory experiment, investigated on

01


127

02 Urban Form and Regulations: A Morphological Analysis of Erbil City Chwas Sabr This thesis conducts a morphological analysis of the urban form of Erbil (Kurdistan, Iraq) and investigates in which way building laws and design regulations from the 1920s until today have influenced the development and transformation of the urban fabric of Erbil. The historic city of Erbil lacks previous academic research concerning regulations and urban form. By covering a time span from 1920 to 2013 and splitting this period into nine periods, this research provides an understanding of how the formation and the transformation of the urban form of Erbil have worked in those different periods of time.

this research work will enrich the archives involved in the urban form of Erbil and its history. The considerable number (more than 10.000) of the photographs, taken between 2013 to 2015, covering different quarters of Erbil, document the city‘s urban form at a particular point of time of the city‘ history. These can be useful documents for other studies concerning urban form and architecture by the researcher or other researchers. Ultimately, this thesis provides a better understanding of how the design regulations have worked and translated to a physical form over the period 1920 to 2014. It considered the influence and potentials of different factors of urban transformations when they are linked together with such regulations. This shall lead to a better understanding of these issues and can potentially lead to a better urban environment in Erbil and beyond.

One of the most significant academic contributions of this research is the methodological approaches and methods that it used. As the social, cultural, economic, political, and geographic contexts of Erbil are very different to those of Western or European cities. Hence there was a need to design a methodology that was reflecting this difference. This research established a methodology that suited the context of Erbil and its limitations by combining ideas from the English (geographic approach) and the Italian (architectural approach) Schools of urban morphology as well as a range of site specific, Middle Eastern understandings of the urban form and its production. The fieldwork and data collection process was the challenge of this research work, but it is also its strength. The amount of the data including the maps, documents, and photographs is here a contribution in its own right. The maps and drawings prepared in

02


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Research SSoA is one of the top five research schools of architecture in the UK, The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) has confirmed the School’s position as a world class center for architectural research. In a joint submission with the Department of Landscape and Town and Regional Planning, we are proud to have achieved 4th place overall by subject scoring very closely to the first 3 places in the subject area of Architecture, Built Environment and Planning. 48% of our research was assessed 4*, representing world-leading quality and outstanding impact, and 37% was rated 3* (Internationally excellent). We had excellent results overall in the context of the faculty and TUoS Performance, being one of the five Faculty departments in the top 4 in their field, and having one of the highest ranked impact studies in the University. With 20 active research staff and approximately 75 postgraduate research students, the school consistently attracts external funding for its research and is involved internationally with a range of research projects. We do not see research as an isolated academic activity, but aim to shape the national research agenda and policy on the environment and to pro-actively address public and professional needs. In addition to external academic and industry partners, SSoA collaborations have been established within the University and City - Sheffield Urban Institute, Methods Institute, Engaged University. Research is carried out in three main research groups which reflect a particular methodological set of approaches: Design, Engagement and Practice, Space Cultures and Politics and People, Environments and Performance. Each group brings together a number of academic staff, researchers and postgraduate research students within shared interests. Three research strands weave across these new groups and into the FSS and TUoS: Building Local Resilience (BLR) which focuses on global strategies for developing local approaches to climate change; Architectural Research Practice (ARP), fostering Knowledge Exchange between industry and academia and LiveWorks (LW), an experimental laboratory for participatory research and pedagogy based in a shop in the city centre developed in collaboration with FSS and the Engaged University team. Some of this years research events include: - EcoDA International Symposium: Open-source Urban Resilience, May 2017 - PhD By Design conference, April 2017 - ODESSA Spring Workshop: Health and Social Care for Older People, March 2017 - Scenarios of Climate Change: Energy Futures and Urban Humans, February 2017 - DWELL Festival of Social Sciences exhibit, November 2016 - Edge Debate: How cities can become more resilient, November 2016 - The Power of Us, Theory Forum, November 2016 Design, Engagement and Practice Globalisation and Spatial Practice Agency Urban resilience Participation Gender and architecture, Housing Co-production, Design for climate change Culture and climate change Design theory, practice and methodologies Selection of Current Projects: Stories of Change, Future Works, AHRC - Dr Renata Tyszczuk, Dr Julia Udall Experimental Co-Design Approaches (ECoDA) , Horizon 2020 Marie Curie Individual Fellowship - Prof Doina Petrescu, Dr.Corelia Baibarac ODESSA - Prof Karim Hadri (PI), funded by ESRC People, Environments, Performance Acoustics Lighting Digital Design Building Performance Evaluation Environmental Design Current Projects: MERLIN2: Lighting for Pedestrians, EPSCR , Prof Steve Fotios, Dr.Chris Cheal, Dr.Scott Fox, Dr. Jim Uttley Investigating Floor Heat Loss, Dr Sofie Pelsmakers, funded by Innovate UK

Space Cultures and Politics East – West Studies Critical Historiography Conservation & Regeneration Urban (Hi)stories Current Projects: RAUM: Researching Architecture as an Urban Method, Beatrice De Carli, Florian Kossak, and Tatjana Schneider Urban Education Live - Dr Tatjana Schneider, Dr Carolyn Butterworth, funded by JPI Urban Europe/ESRC Innovative Affordable Housing - Dr Tatjana Schneider, funded by The British Academy Research Strands Building Local Resilience (BLR) Architecture Research Practice (ARP) Live Works (LW)

Academics Dr Nishat Awan Diversity, post coloniality and geo-politics in spatial practice, creative research methodologies, alternative modes of practice, intersection of architectural, computational and artistic practice.

Dr Krzysztof Nawratek Urban theory in the context of post-secular philosophy, crisis of the contemporary neoliberal city model and urban reindustrialisation, evolution of (post)socialist cities.

Professor Irena Bauman Drivers of change, changing role of the architect, community enabling and community led regeneration, climate change, adaptation, retrofitting neighbourhoods, new methodologies.

Dr Sofie Pelsmakers Sustainable architecture, low energy housing retrofit, the environmental context as a generator of architectural design.

Dr Cristina Cerulli Knowledge in design processes, emergence and complexity, non conventional practice, management and procurement.

Dr Chengzhi Peng Interactive architectural and urban visualisation modelling, e-documentation of heritage sites, mixed reality modelling and interaction, co-design of virtual and physical spaces.

Dr Beatrice de Carli Architecture, Participation and the Governance of Space and Learning and Urban Practices

Professor Doina Petrescu Gender and space within contemporary society, participation in architecture, culture and resilience.

Professor Steve Fotios Research in lighting, research methods for visual psychophysics, building services, and environmental design.

Dr Tatjana Schneider Social and political context of architecture, an ethical and expanded role of the architect, architecture as a collaborative, empowering and political discipline.

Professor Karim Hadjri Influence of the built environment on people with physical, sensory and cognitive impairments. Challenges of designing age-friendly environments. Enabling environments for people with dementia. Professor Jian Kang Computer simulation for room acoustics and environmental noise control, auralisation, urban soundscape and acoustic comfort considering social and psychological aspects of sounds, acoustic scale modelling, acoustic materials. Dr Florian Kossak Urban history, contemporary urbanism, urban design, experimental mediation of architecture. Dr Ranald Lawrence History of environmental design and its influence on the development of modern architecture. Dr Jo Lintonbon Urban history and theory of the 19th and 20th centuries, building conservation and conservation led urban regeneration, design approaches within the historic built environment. Dr Mark Meagher Augmented environments, digital forms of making, smart materials information visualisation, architecture and social media.

Dr Magda Sibley Courtyard houses and public bath houses in the world heritage cities of North Africa and the Middle East, rehabilitation of the daylighting qualities of heritage hammams and innovative off grid solar lighting systems. Professor Fionn Stevenson Ecological approaches, sustainable design, climate change, bioregional contexts, tacit knowledge, occupancy feedback, building performance evaluation. Dr Renata Tyszczuk Cultural transformations and transitional periods, concepts of sustainability, global environmental change and globalization, experimental representational practices, communicative aspects of architecture across different media. Dr Tsung-Hsien Wang Lecturer in Sustainable Digital Design - architectural geometry construction from a parametric and generative perspective, digital fabrication, building performance simulation, sustainability evaluation and information interoperation in the building domain. Research Associates and Fellows Dr Chris Cheal Dr Corelia Baibarac Dr Jim Uttley 01 MERLIN-2 project. Assessing perceived safety under different road lighting conditions 02 EcoDA International Symposium: Open-source Urban Resilience, May 2017 03 Driving in fog - using lasers to measure density of fog. Highways England research project 04 ODESSA Spring Workshop 2017 05 EcoDA International Symposium: Open-source Urban Resilience, May 2017 06 PhD By Design conference in The Well, April 2017


129

03

01

05

02

04

06

05


Student Achievements, Awards and Activities The social nature of the school has been exemplified this year by a range of activities and events taking place on a weekly basis within the school. Our staff and students have organised, participated and attended numerous events both locally, nationally and internationally. The strong social life within the school has fostered many creative partnerships.


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Student Awards and Achievements Students at SSoA have taken part in extra curricular design competitions, consistently winning and being shortlisted against other students and practicing architects on national and international platforms. This year the school has seen numerous successes in a wide variety of awards, a few of which are showcased here. Four Sheffield School of Architecture students have been recognised in the 2017 RIBA Yorkshire Student Awards that took place on the 25th of May in Hull, for their final design projects. Professor Fionn Stevenson, Head of School, explains “This is a magnificent achievement and our congratulations go to all concerned and their tutors! Brilliant work like this is the culmination of huge personal effort and dedication, supported by everyone who works in the School.”

01 Gold Medal for Part II - RIBA Yorkshire Awards 2016 Harrison Symonds - Part 2 This proposal is about the evolution of place. It challenges the 21st century development process, and draws upon the idea that places should evolve gradually, to evoke an architecture that is intricate, complex and hybrid. Inhabiting a rich but contested urban block, the programme envisages a new approach to planning that engages regulatory bodies, industry professionals and the public, to facilitate a culture of collaboration and belonging. 02 Bronze Medal for Part II - RIBA Yorkshire Awards 2016 Paul Bailey - Part 2 A future is imagined for Hull; celebrating its rebellious history, a new free state is established on the East Bank marshlands. An architectural island promotes alternative forms of governance and societal structure through critical dialogue with International Culture. Derived through observation, artistic participation and history, a narrative is developed describing a speculative proposition which is critical of the current status quo and offers an alternative amplification of evident cultural activity. 03 Gold Medal for Part I - RIBA Yorkshire Awards 2016 Rachel Glenn - Part 1 This project explores what happens when we begin to treasure everyday items and records of ordinary people. The archive collects the objects and records of people who live in towns and villages along the Leeds - Liverpool canal. Its architecture bestows value upon collections of previously overlooked ‘everyday’ objects. It questions our existing attitudes to what we choose to commemorate.

01

02

04 Bronze Medal for Part I - RIBA Yorkshire Awards 2016 Thomas Hudson-Davies - Part 1 The design of this bath house takes inspiration from Scarborough’s historic relationship with water. The cavernous, subterranean spa references the town’s initial uses of water for its medicinal purposes with the mineral spa. Above, the bright public space and lido acknowledges the more leisurely connection to water that came later as the town developed into a popular seaside resort. The project aims to redefine the faded identity of Scarborough.

04

03


133

05 2016 RIBA President’s Awards for Research - Shortlisted Xiang Ren Xiang joined the Sheffield School of Architecture in 2012 to study the MA in Architectural Design course. His MA thesis project was also shortlisted for the RIBA President’s Awards for research. After he completed his course he moved onto his PhD research on Hybrid Buildings under the supervision of Professor Peter Blundell Jones and Dr Florian Kossak. Xiang’s ongoing PhD Research is titled ‘Hybrid Building and Hybrid Practitioner: An Unbuilt Clan-Community Hall in a Chinese Natural Village’. 06 Oslo School of Architecture and Design: Oslo kommune, Planpris (Plan og bygningsetaten Oslo) Award Petros Antoniou, Deborah Adler During their time abroad as part of an ERASMUS Exchange, Petros And Deborah received an award for their group work with their studio ‘IN-TRANSIT 2 - Mass Displacement: When Temporary Becomes Permanent’. The work related to a selection of design solutions to real problems faced by refugees at the Deir Al-Balah camp in Gaza. The work was undertaken in partnership with UNRWA.

Seaside The Fisherman’s Exchange In a situation where density is at its highest, unemployment soaring and public space is scarce, the people of the Deir El Balah camp need their escape. In such a hot climate, the beachfront acts as the exotic sanctuary, but unfortunately the financial situation at the camp left the beachfront in a poor state. The Fisherman’s Exchange is a proposal for a make-shift pier that would provide the monument that establishes the city’s permanence, whilst providing the public space its inhabitants require. Fishing is one of the most important sources of income for the people at Deri El Balah, and the pier provides the platform for its flourish through huts that can be taken over by vendors who can cook and sell their day’s catch. The structure is made in repeatable pieces that can be arranged, allowing for its expansion when a budget is provided.

05

06

07 Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings Bursary Harrison Symonds Harrison Symonds has been awarded a bursary place by The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) on their week-long Repair of Old Buildings course in recognition of his ‘thought-provoking’ submission for the SPAB Philip Webb Award 2016. Harrison’s proposal for the Futurist Cinema on Lime Street, Liverpool, was developed through his final year Thesis Project on our MArch Architecture course from which he graduated in 2016. The judges appreciated the topicality of the issues tackled in addressing not only the re-use potential presented by the Futurist, but also the nature of the Lime Street ‘block’ and its place in the urban grain of Liverpool, which stands in stark contrast to the approach currently being taken to this part of the city.

05

Benches

Merchant’s Hut

Porous Platform

07 9 10

Belly Structure

8

08 AJ/Hoare Lea Student Bursary 2017 Samuel Kapasa Samuel’s proposal aims to harness the wind force generated by motorway traffic for the use of a new generation of electric vehicles. Speaking about Kapasa’s win, one judge said: “He had a very focused view on what he wanted to achieve with his idea. It was easy to understand what his aim was from his very personal experience.He wanted to explore his idea through parametric design and wind tunnel testing and also understood very well his limitations when it came to engineering and how to address that. This is what architects need to do in order to collaborate and drive their designs forward.”

5

10

9

11

7

8

7

6 6 12

A 2m

1:100

06

erodynamics play a key part in the design development of the wind harnessing structure. Wind tunnel studies may be utilised in order to optimise the form of the overall structure and the kinetic turbines. This may take the form of a partial roadside prototype.

1

5 1 2

In Transit II When temporary becomes permanent / PETROS ANTONIOU 1

3 5

09 Peter Kirk Memorial Trust Travel Scholarship 2016 Simeon Shtebunaev This project is looking at the intersection between technology and urbanism - at a specific concept that is set to become commonplace within European cities - ‘Smart Cities’. By exploring citizen participation and perceptions of Smart City initiatives in Spain the study aims to paint a picture of a changing urban landscape. The study adopts a cultural anthropological standpoint - it’s primary aim is to uncover the level of understanding, attitudes and adaptation that citizens and professionals in question have adopted towards the Smart City initiatives imposed by the local authorities.The main aim of the report is to capture the primary data that the author has gathered throughout his field trip in Spain

“The UK has one of the top 20 road networks Globally, the surge and wind energy created must be harnessed to fuel cars of the electric generation...”

2

1

4

3

09

1 Sustainable Shoulder

7

Upstand

2 Reverse Shoulder

8

Solar Canopy

3 Wind Bridge

9

Emergency Shelter

4

Increased Vegetation 10 Roadside Turbine

5

Vehicular Air Flow

11 UK Motorway Network

6

Hard Shoulder

12 Demonstration Vehicle

08

1

2

Vehicular Wind Force Generator for UK motorways AJ, Hoare Lee Scholarship Entry

HARNESSING THE HARD SHOULDER


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

10 Showcasing Undergraduate Research in Social Sciences - Student Research Festival Niki Sole Niki Sole was awarded a prize for Showcasing Undergraduate Research in Social Sciences. Judges commented that “Niki explained the research really well including the methodology used, it was a very nice visual presentation, critically reflective on how NGO’s and local government could use a more participatory approach.” 11 Global Learning Opportunities Scholarship 2016 - Student Research Festival Jack Baker Jack Baker’s prize was for his work as a GLOSS Research Associate. Jack won a Global Learning Opportunities Scholarship in 2016. He spent three weeks in Mexico City, working with colleagues at the top Mexican University, UNAM, on how to improve the building performance of a key educational building in their campus.

10 / 11

12 Kroto Research Inspiration (KRI) runner up Nor Izura Tukiman (PhD Architecture) Supervisor: Renata Tyszczuk & Beatrice De Carli The KRI is an award that champions the creative communication of research, especially by doctoral researchers and research staffs for the whole University. Launched by Sir Harry Kroto and Lady Margaret in July 2015, it is aimed at promoting public understanding on the aspects of the winner’s research project. Nor’s submission is part of her on-going PhD Research on termporary homes for people in transit and highlights the disaster recovery timeframe, mapping the relocation activities of the flood-affected population of the Kota Tinggi town in Malaysia. She was awarded as one of the 10 runner ups

10 / 11

13

13 Kroto Research Inspiration (KRI) Research Photography Competition 2016 Aiman MR The competition challenged research students to capture their research as an image. University of Sheffield staff and students from any faculty or discipline were invited to submit entries to tell their research story through a single image. Aiman’s entry conveyed the knowledge-based heritage of constructing a traditional Malay house 14 Blueprint Magazine ‘Review of Architecture Summer Degree Shows’ Sam Diston Sam completed the MArch in Architecture course in 2016. His ‘Brass Institute’ project investigates how a music school and performance venue could be integrated within the town of Mexborough in the Dearne Valley, utilising the incredible value of music and the heritage of brass bands to help tackle some the significant social and economic issues found in the region today.

12

14

15 Commendation

15 First Price

15 The Denis Mason Jones Hand Sketch Award First Prize: Xiang Ren Commendation : John Chia The Denis Mason Jones Award for free-hand sketching was The Winner was announced and presented at the West Yorkshire Society of Architects on Thursday 17th November 2016. The award was created in memory of the distinguished Leeds architect of the same name, to commemorate Denis’s contribution to the art of freehand sketching of architecture. 2016 Annual Topic: “Modern Buildings in Yorkshire (Post 1951).”

10 / 11


relocates further from the city centre, and inland, resulting in voids at the water’s edge. Waterfront architecture in port cities evolved as a manifestation of their successes, failures and the lively rituals of working harbour life under the barrage of external influences brought by ever more global trade routes. The constant flux of these spaces celebrated the ‘animated city’ at the metaphorical and physical frontier. Yet as we have turned our backs on the water, these urban fabrics have lost their identity to the generic regeneration developments bidding to profit from the city’s status rather than necessarily support it. Development in port cities needs to depend not simply on tourism and high-end Arts & Culture offerings, but focus on sustaining the city as whole, by going beyond presentational identity, to multivalent cultural identity, embodied in the city’s animated urban fabric and memory. The fading state of these energetic frontier conditions, of tension between exchange and identity, are acute barometers of national and global attitudes towards the role of physical urban fabric in continuing city narratives and identity. As a historically maritime nation, struggling for identity in a post-Brexit landscape, how should we engage the frontier nature in the regeneration of our declining port cities?

135

2. investigation: crossing the frontier This project takes into account the sailor’s perspective. Having gained my sea legs at an early age, I have experienced water-side settlements in their many forms. There is something in the exploratory nature of seafaring that seeks new narratives and experiences on reaching places, to provide a counterpoint to ‘home’. Yet with global cities taking after each other’s image, this spirit is lost. What makes a place unique, and keeps it alive?

3. Methodology - listening to the w

Taking a number of the cities of the historic Hanseatic league (an important Baltic trade route), this study hopes to learn from the successes and mistakes, at an individual level and at town planning level, that have shaped how they approach the future of their urban condition and identity.

16 Best Departmental Student Society Award SUAS The Sheffield University Architecture Society (SUAS) has been awarded the Best Departmental Student Society at the University Activities Awards for the second year running. Professor Fionn Stevenson, Head of School, explains “SUAS have put on a fantastic programme of top lectures as well as numerous other events this year which have really enriched our students' experience in the School.” 17 Norman Foster Travelling Scholarship Commendation 2017 Alexander Craig-Thompson The jury commended the entry ‘Fluid Spaces – (re)embracing the frontier culture of port cities’ by Alexander Craig-Thompson, a proposal to examine the changing nature of global port cities in the light of technical advances in production, changing working patterns and global identity.

20 Global Learning Opportunities within the Social Sciences, UN Habitat III Rowan Riley and Simeon Shtebunaev The students were accompanied by Dr. Beatrice Carli and joined politicians from across the world and UN leaders in attending the landmark Habitat III conference in Quito, Ecuador this month. The conference, which ran from October 17-20, is only held once every 20 years. With more than half the world’s population living in urban areas and 70 per cent of the global population to live in cities by 2050, the four-day meeting was seen as a vital way to address some of the key challenges facing global cities.Outcomes included policy briefs and blogs on the GLOSS page.

Oral: this study is concerned fundamentally with the intangible culture manifested in the physical environment. It is held not only in representations but also in the narrative held in people’s memory. A main investigative method will be through a ‘listening project’. i.e. recor responses and stories.

Visual: these methods will be supplemented by drawn and photograp of the places and activities occurring there, concerned with the temp of space.

A new approach is needed that re-positions “urban planning as part of a continuous cultural process that embraces tangible and intangible aspects, reinforces genius loci and associative values...” Bruno Gabrielli, On the waterfront: culture heritage and regeneration of port cities, English Heritage, 2008

Five Hanseatic Cities: These cities are of particular interest as they have all signed up to a modern Hanse League that seeks to promote cross-border cooperation and civic unity in Europe. They want to encourage the transfer of knowledge, social activities and information, as would have been the life blood during the Middle Ages and beyond. These are cities that have clearly identifiable typologies of buildings and industrial forms celebrating their past, yet most have also been centres of contention regarding their wider identity, subject to the wrath of war and natural disasters. They have been chosen due to a shared narrative, and their relations to our port cities in the UK. Similar narratives could be analysed across the globe, however the narrative is specific and offers opportunity for more in-depth study.

16

18 Festival Pavilion Built Competition David Hogdson As part of the annual ‘Secret Garden Party’ festival, David led a small team in a successful competition entry to design and build an interactive light installation. The winning 'Time Tunnel' design played on the theme of 'Gardeners Guide to the Galaxy' and created an alternative route to the main stage. Mirrors and motion sensor LED's warped space and time transporting festival goers to another dimension. The self-initiated project was designed and built in collaboration with two electrical engineers and a landscape architect. 19 Non Architecture Competition - 'Sleeping' John Chia - Commendation John’s proposition, The Three Minstrels is a Hostel for Traveling Musicians which aims to integrate and promote the activities of local and touring Musicians with the public. As a business model, the targeted clientele will be required to offer their skills as a performance/service to the community, with profits given to the hostel as payment. As an architectural model, the building proposes an adaptable tectonic typology which can be applied to other hostels.

Exploration: in the spirit of the research the project will take to the cities will be explored not just from their modern approaches, but a local vessels. This will provide the ‘original’ perspective on approac engagement from the waves.

Physical individualities such as building typologies, icons, and landmarks arose in these cities to give identity in direct response to the water trade. However, activity and exchange, whether that be transfer of goods, peoples or ideas, also created the recognisable nature of public spaces. This is an intangible cultural identity which offers the potential to create a continuum through time. Contemporary, piecemeal cultural efforts often rely on hermetic and rigid responses to isolated cultural interpretations that push ‘high art’ onto cities, rather than foster their own culture at street level. To what extent is the intangible frontier condition still existent, or even a driving force, in these cities?

Bergen - EU capital of Culture (2000), now thrives off tourism. Retreated port activity; its remaining quays are a World Heritage Site.

Hull

London

18

18

17

19

19

19

20

Hamburg - Still styles itself as Hanseatic, large Arts & Culture investment, and a leading centre for various industries.

Lübeck - Hanse originates here, re built museum in celebration thereo


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

SSOA Building Local Resilience Platform: This Changes Everything: Power Of Us Building Local Resilience is an exciting initiative which acts as a platform to bring together all research across the School and wider University in climate, demographics, governance and economic stability. It builds on the school’s long standing expertise and history for pioneering socially engaged research. This Changes Everything is part of the work of the School’s Building Local Resilience knowledge exchange platform.. Real time Climate Change is stimulating emergence of many innovative mitigation and adaptation strategies. As shocks arising from extreme weather events and other chronic urban stresses are increasingly considered inevitable, we are also accepting that developing resilience to these events will be a defining quality of the global 21st century. As part of the ‘This Changes Everything’ programme throughout 2016 -17 SSoA has been exploring the ‘Power of Us’ to contribute to shaping a better world through the following event: The Architecture of Democracy, Making a Difference We sit in the middle of a crisis of democracy; a crisis which is increasingly manifesting itself globally. Be it #BREXIT, the rise of Trump or the decline of trust in the infrastructure of our democracy and our failure to address complex global challenges such as the Syrian humanitarian crisis or climate change.

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

We need new civic institutions, a new civic urbanism, a new civic architecture for an age in which architecture of democracy has to be re-understood as the power to create society. This reality is Changing Everything. This Gathering proposes to test, challenge and perhaps validate the hypothesis that it is no longer acceptable for the architecture and design of our cities, neighbourhoods and towns to ignore our emerging reality, or respond to this systemic crisis through metaphors of more “transparent” buildings and gestures of photogenic public squares. This Gathering seeks to share, explore and interrogate the emerging practices and theory of 21st Century Democratic Urbanism - a civic architecture. The Gathering will bring together world leading Practitioners and Researchers to collaboratively chart this new future of architecture by sharing their learnings to date and extrapolate their implications for the future of our cities and our roles and responsibilities in making them. Graham Willis Professor Indy Johar (Chair of Event) The event discussed the following topics through its invited speakers: Professor Laura Lee: Strategic Design Professor Doina Petrescu: The Architecture of Civic Institutions Joost Beunderman: The Participatory and Civic City Gráinne Hassett: The Jungle in Calais, An architecture of civic necessity Alastair Parvin: Open Design and Making Professor Signe Kongebro: Democratising Sustainability, Civic Sustainability Public Lecture by Graham Willis Professor Indy Johar Indy Johar is an architect, cofounder of 00 and a Senior Innovation Associate with the Young Foundation. He is also a co-founder of Dark Matter Laboratories, which aims to apply complex systems science to value chain innovation, management and relationships. On behalf of 00, Indy has co-founded multiple social ventures from Impact Hub Westminster to Impact Hub Birmingham and the HubLaunchpad.net and has also co-led research projects such as The Compendium for the Civic Economy. 01 Professor Laura Lee: Strategic Design 02 Joost Beunderman: The Participatory and Civic City 03 Professor Doina Petrescu: The Architecture of Civic Institutions 04 Gráinne Hassett: The Jungle in Calais, An architecture of civic necessity 05 Professor Signe Kongebro: Democratising Sustainability, Civic Sustainability 06 Alastair Parvin: Open Design and Making 07 Beatrice De Carli on Urban Rights Thanks 08 Working dinner


137

SSOA Building Local Resilience Platform: Theory Forum 2016 ‘Sheffield does not exist: beyond 'identity urbanism' 24 Oct 2016 Curated by Krzysztof Nawratek Organised by Carolyn Butterworth, Magda Sibley Keynote address: Architecture 00)

Indy

Johar

(Graham

Willis

Professor,

Aims & themes: The Theory Forum is an international conference hosted annually by Sheffield School of Architecture, focusing each year on a topic of contemporary relevance for architectural theory and practice. It is a day-long event which provides an intense introduction to the theory, history and contemporary discourse around the topic, through a variety of presentations from academics and practitioners. The aim of the day is to help students understand and explore the role of research and theory within architectural discourse, its application in a research project and the relationship between research and design.

Speakers: Tatjana Schneider (SSoA): ‘Better a cricket pitch, then, than an empty lot - or the polylemmas of spatial practice’’ Cristina Cerulli (SSoA): ‘Who sits at the table and who tells the story? Thoughts for spatial practitioners’ Nishat Awan (SSoA): ‘Forms of non-belonging’ Carl Lee (Department of Life Long Learning, The University of Sheffield): ‘Praxis - Community and the Civic University’ Simon Baker (SSoA): ‘At your Convenience or The damned toilet!’ Andy Price (Department of Psychology, Sociology & Politics, Sheffield Hallam University): ‘The City as a Place of Protest and Progress’

01

01

This year’s Forum looked at the theme of the ‘local’ and explored issues of local identity, global dependency, xenophobic and oppressive aspects of communities and limitations of public participation: The University of Sheffield is very proud of “the University’s heritage as a civic university founded by penny donations by Sheffield factory workers to benefit their economy, health and children.” Workers of 19th century Sheffield were wealthy enough to donate some money to fund the University. But where did all this money came from? Some of it came from selling weapons and some was connected to colonial exploitation. The connection between the city and the global slave trade was highlighted as early as 1826 by the Sheffield Female Anti-Slavery Society in its campaign for the abolition of slavery in the British Empire. Sheffield has always been a node of vast global networks, space where people, goods, ideas, energy flowed through. Is it possible to talk about communities in such a transitional space? What is a community? What is local identity? What is local? 02 01 Theory Forum 2016 02 Christina Cerulli: Who sits at the table and who tells the story 03 Christina Cerulli: MA Urban Design Student sharing with member of the public ideas about community led housing development in the Wicker, 2016 04 Shareholders marking the purchase of Portland Works through Community Shares 05 Professor Signe Kongebro: Democratising Sustainability, Civic Sustainability 03

04


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

SUAS Our award winning Architecture Student Society has one main aim throughout all of our events, to bring students and staff together. We had a very successful year as we were awarded the ‘Departmental Society of the Year’ award from our students union. We started with a very ambitious and collaborative committee that had as a result numerous activities and new events taking place. We started the year with our popular ‘Challenges in Practice’ lecture series bringing in a lot of successful architects to talk to us including Jane Duncan, the former RIBA President. Following that, we developed our own magazine called WELL? that was distributed bimonthly containing details about the school, staff and guest lecturers’ interviews and current students’ work. Also, in collaboration with the Sheffield Society of Architects we organised their AGM and Annual Quiz, as well as an ‘Architecture Series’ screening starting from next year in the Students’ Union. Additionally, we continued last years Mentor Scheme, bringing people of all years together and providing extra feedback on projects. At the end of the year we had our Summer Ball themed ‘Under the Sea’, where students and staff dressed up and had a wonderful evening. It has been a great year for SUAS and we hope that the society will keep having such an integral part in the school’s life in the future. 01 President Anthoula Kyriakidi Vice President Zoe George-McQueen Treasurer Tom Jones Secretary Maha Komber Social Secretary Ellie Piper Petra Parker-Price Emily Chooi Inclusions Officer Laura Turner PGT Representative Stani Babu Publicity/Branding Victoria Noakes Ellen Peirce Saule Pribusauskaite Damian Poblete SUAS shop Katrina Hemmingway Lectures Team Niki Sole Calum Norman Chris Cooper Mansel Haynes

We would like to say a huge thank you to all those who have come up this year for our Challenges of Practice series. They are, in order of appearance, Annalie Riches Mikhail Riches Oliver O’Neill Hawkins\Brown Joanna Hansford Stitch Architects John Grindrod The Modernist Society Louis Koseda EASA Jane Duncan President, RIBA John McElgunn RSH+P Charlie Caswell HBA Residential Hugh Strange Hugh Strange Architects Neil GIllespie Reiach and Hall Architects James Soane Project Orange

02

We would also like to thank Rory Olcayto (The Architects’ Journal) and Jim Haverin (Zaha Hadid Architects) who unfortunately couldn’t make it this academic year - we hope to host you both next year. We have had the great fortune of hosting these great speakers this year, and hope to carry on the trend into 2017-18. We appreciate the value of the lecture series to the continued development of all those within the school. Thank you as well to all students and staff for attending and contributing, and we will see you in The Well again next year!

03

Chris Cooper SUAS Lecture Coordinator 01 SUAS and the J-word Social 02 SUAS Lecture by John Grindrod 03 SUAS receiving the award for the best departmental society of 2017 from the Sheffield Student’s Union Activities Office 04 SUAS winter ball event at Sheffield’s Pointing Dog 05 SUAS Lecture by John McElgunn 05

04


139

WELL? zine

HAS

WELL? zine is a student led magazine, that comprises current and graduate students’ work; notes from SUAS lectures; essays about life, history and art in Sheffield. The main aim of the zine is to share the information and tips from one architecture student to another. WELL? encourages students to be ambitious, to be brave and bold in their drawings and presentations. WELL? is sponsored by SUAS

Humanitarian Architecture Society is a new society concerned with architecture that makes positive change to those who need it most. Rather than sitting in studio talking about our social ideals HAS is a group who are proactive and seeking opportunities to get aware and involved in real debates and community events. HAS is working hard to find meaningful ways to help highlight the ways in which architects (students, academics and professionals) can make a positive difference to society - something that can feel very remote in the economically focussed society we live in.

The publication is currently being run by: Amirhossein Daryoushnezhad, Calum Norman, Tom Jones, Victoria Noakes, Mohammad Khizr Asia Zwierzchowska, Saule Pribusauskaite, Jana Dardouk, Amy Crellin, Lugain Rfidah, Tegen George, Alec Wells.

HAS has run several events this year including a furniture building workshop and film screening at community social enterprise Foodhall; a visit to the Centre for Alternative Technology and a sustainable construction day, using new material ‘Chipcrete’. The Society is currently being run by: Deborah Adler (Chair), Luke Moran (Secretary), Petros Antoniou, Charlotte Stanton (Event Coordinators), Ying X Chian (Treasurer) and Genevieve Leake (Inclusions Officer)

01

01

02

02

issue 1

02

01 HAS at Sheffield’s Foodhall building furniture from reclaimed materials 02 HAS visits the Centre of Alternative Technology in Wales 01 WELL? #2 opened up 02 Cover pages for the two most recent publications

03 HAS volunteers at Hilt Holt Wood, whilst learning on sustainable building methods 02

03


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Architecture Students Network Architecture Student Network Conference, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford 3rd April 2017 SSoA represented by Deborah Adler Y5 MArch and Maha Komber Y5 MArch. 'The Challenges of Future Cities for Architectural education' The day started with a variety of speakers, from academia and practice, each focusing on particular challenges they felt are currently under-valued by built environment professionals. This ranged from ecological building materials in the urban context, to the hypo-diversity of our cities which is leading to increasingly unequal economic and social geography. Additionally there was an opportunity to reflect on past endeavours by built environment professionals to achieve utopian cities from the constructivist city to West Berlin's housing estates. Overall, there was a general census amongst the speakers that 'architecture as we know it is dead' . They pointed to the complexity of the challenges ahead for Architects, and highlighted the critical need for architects to appreciate that they cannot do it alone, and instead need to learn how to work in a multi-disciplinary team in order to be truly affective. What I have taken away from the day is that current practice can and should be questioned and it has left me with some questions for myself. In the face of increasing challenges within the urban context, what is my value as an architect? And how can I practice architecture in a way that marries both research and design? 01 Maha Komber

02

03

01 ASN attendees 02 Snapshot of the 'Future Cities' Workshop 03 Group visit to Chelmsford Cathedral during a tour of various sights 04 Discussion at Ideas Hub Chelmsford with founder, Edith 04

03


141

Sheffield Society of Architects SSoA is proud to feature Sheffield Society of Architects (SSA). Established in 1887, SSA is a branch of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Yorkshire Region. There is no charge for SSA membership which is open to all RIBA members within the Sheffield, South Yorkshire and North-East Derbyshire areas and extends to employees of Chartered Practices and students/lecturers involved in architecture. Other professionals and interested parties are also welcome to be involved with the Society’s activities. Led by a volunteer steering group comprising of President, Senior Vice President, Honorary Secretary, Treasurer, Vice Presidents and committee members, SSA exists to support our members, provide a local voice to regional and national RIBA and encourage thinking about how architecture can positively impact on the places where we live out our lives. In recent years our focus has been on promoting public, professional and student interaction with each other and Sheffield’s architectural realm through the organisation of and involvement in numerous (fun) events and activities, including: • Delivery of a monthly series of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) events, including ‘hands-on’ workshops • Organisation of regular building visits • Social Events – Pub Quizzes, Soap Box etc • The Sheffield Design Awards, working with Sheffield Civic Trust • Design workshops and political lobbying (eg redevelopment of Castlegate & City Centre, Retail Quarter) • Sheffield Design Week • Love Architecture Festival • Fantastical Cities – family-focussed construction events • Brutalist Playground by Turner Prize winner Assemble with Simon Terrill • Dear Sheffield – Postcards and exhibition celebrating buildings and spaces within Sheffield In addition to the regular CPD and Building Visits, SSA activities in 2017 are focussing on three main projects: SSA ‘On Tour’ We have taken SSA ‘on tour’ to Hull, 2017 UK City of Culture. Participating in the RIBA Architectural Ambassadors Programme in partnership with Eastfield Primary School, volunteers worked with school children to design and construct models of ‘living bridges’. SSA will also be organising a Fantastical Cities event in Hull over the summer as part of the cultural programme in the city. Sheffieldsocietyofarchitects.org.uk 2017 will see the launch of Sheffield Society of Architect’s website, the phasing out of our blog and the introduction of improved administrative systems for contacting members, booking our events and engaging with a wider community in our area and beyond.

Disseminating Flockton We are developing various projects relating to the Flockton Archive which we purchased in 2015. Flockton’s were a series of architectural practices that were based in Sheffield in the 19th and 20th centuries. The firms were responsible for a number of significant buildings in the Sheffield area, many of which are still in use and some subject to recent refurbishment/alteration. We are also looking to secure preservation and dissemination of the archive, history and buildings of Flockton via focussed work by volunteers and professionals to produce a digital catalogue, website and (guided) walks (including printed map/information leaflets) which we will be delivering to a number of visiting groups from RIBA Branches, other interested organisations and the public.

01

Going forward we want to further strengthen our ties with architectural students, academics, practices and other partner organisations to help promote architecture and enable debate about our great city and the design issues/opportunities it offers. New members are always welcome to strengthen our committee and if you would like to become involved, subscribe to our newsletter or find out more about SSA and its events please email us at sheffeldsocietyofarchitects@gmail.com, follow our blog http://sheffieldsocietyofarchitects.blogspot.co.uk and look out for our website www.sheffieldsocietyofarchitects.org.uk Dan Brown, President of Sheffield Society of Architects

01 SSA AGM & Quiz 02 Blackburn Meadows Biomass Building Visit 03 Love Architecture Lego Event, Meadowhall 03

02


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Internationalisation SSoA continues to be a vibrant international community: over 30% of our students and nearly 40% of our staff are international. This is reflected across all aspects of our work from the way we learn and teach, to the diversity of our research portfolio and the way we engage with the city and the world beyond. We are particularly dedicated to supporting incoming international students, as well as home students seeking international experience. We focus on developing the cultural agility of all our students, and actively seek to create further opportunities to expand our students’ awareness of the international context of research, study and practice. We have developed curricula that are culturally aware, sensitive, appropriate and ethically grounded, supported by a diverse and comprehensive international teaching network. We have strong connections with other schools and organisations around the world and actively promote cultural exchanges within the department, across the University and with our partner institutions. As well as raising cultural awareness, our teaching collaborations enable students and staff to participate in international exchanges through collaborative work or placements. Our international teaching network includes Erasmus + partnerships with a wide range of EU universities (2 new exchanges with TU Delft and Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris La Villette have been added this year) as well as partnerships further afield through programmes such as the Univeristy-wide Study Abroad. Additionally, a range of informal teaching collaborations with international partners and activities - such as field trips, case studies and research collaborations - enrich the learning experience, making it culturally diverse and geographically spread. Outgoing Exchange Students: Petros Antoniou (Y5) - AHO Oslo School of Architecture and Design Deborah Adler (Y5) - AHO Oslo School of Architecture and Design Fanni Csepeli (Y5) - Royal Institute of Technology KTH Stockholm Banah Rashid (Y5) - Royal Institute of Technology KTH Stockholm Incoming Exchange Students: Taoyi Chen (Y2) - University of New South Wales Jing Hui (Y2) - University of New South Wales Izzah Minhas (Y2) - National College of Arts, Lahore Sophie Oertle (Y3) - Technische Universität München Yuni Zhao (Y3) - Technische Universität München Anders Johnsson (Y5) - Royal Institute of Technology KTH Stockholm

02 Petros Antoniou, 5th Year Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO) After only a few weeks from when the semester started, it already felt extremely refreshing to be part of an academic environment that was both physically and politically different to the one experienced in the UK. This insight to a new way of dealing with architectural education helped me widen my understanding, making me question elements that I once thought were important but also appreciate the importance of others. Within 6 months [of living as an exchhange student in Oslo] I made generous friendships, formed a strong bond to the city and its intricacies, and I felt such a strong sense of belonging that on my last week there it felt as if I was losing a loved one…[I strongly advice you] try it yourself, through the diverse connections that the Sheffield School of Architecture has with other international Universities. 03 Banah Rashid, 5th Year KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm Studying and living in Stockholm was an incredible experience, one I can’t recommend enough. Scandinavian architecture has an international reputation so being surrounded by the design and their ethos has been hugely influential. And as working abroad is something I’ve wanted to do since starting my studies, going on Erasmus has made me even more determined and ready to do it!

01 Deborah Adler, 5th Year Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO) Taking part in the Erasmus programme to Norway was a fantastic experience. Oslo is a great place to live and study and AHO is an excellent school with extraordinary facilities. Norway is a beautiful country and the area around Oslo is full of opportunities for day trips to lakes mountains and cabins. Studying at AHO helped me develop new skills, important friendships, and helped me understand how I can use my design skills to push for societal improvements.

04 Fanni Csepeli, 5th Year KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm The exchange semester I spent at KTH in Stockholm has helped me grow both as a designer and as a person. Being exposed to a Swedish culture and education, while surrounded by remarkable Scandinavian architecture was truly a privilege. I am grateful for the experience for it has made me a more open-minded and adaptable person. 05 Anders Johnsson, 5th Year Exchange student from KTH, Stockholm The year I have had at the SSoA has been an overwhelming experience. I gained experiences I couldn’t have foreseen, I made friends I didn’t expect and ultimately attained a new perspective and nuance of my approach to architecture.

+

Brasil Cambodia China Ecuador India

Malaysia Mexico Jordan South Africa


143

01

01

02

04

05

03

05


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Celebrating Services Staff and Technical Team We would like to express our thanks to the team of staff who play such a major role in keeping SSoA working successfully; express our congratulations to Laura on the birth of her son; and to Russell who is celebrating his 30th year at SSoA

Cheryl Armitage Postgraduate Research Officer

Andrea Chambers Finance Administrator

Rebecca Gray Learning and Teaching Manager

Sam Guest Student Enquiries and Admissions

Christie Harrison Research Manager

Sara Lancashire Marketing and Manager

Allanah Millsom MArch and Postgraduate Support Officer

Charlotte Ward PA to Head of School

External

Relations

Samantha Drobinski Departmental Manager


145

This year we celebrate Russell Light’s 30th anniversary of teaching in the School. Some buildings do not last so long, and few nowadays have as much character or prove so reliable.

Russell taught many of my colleagues at some point in their education here, either at undergraduate or ‘Part 2’ level. They testify to the atmosphere of industry and good humour that he engenders in all that he does. Universities are full of people quick to advertise their knowledge and scholarship. Russell’s way is quieter, more subtle, more measured. His knowledge of his subject is deep, with a perspective informed by a balance of scholarship and practice, and an equal regard for antiquity and modernity. There are too many students to count who have been inspired by Russell’s teaching and helped by his guidance; too many colleagues, as well. Russell probably tires of me asking him to sit on committees or attend meetings, though he is far too polite to say so. I keep asking him because there is no one whose opinion I value more. He can be relied upon to provide a long view and one that is well considered. He does not allow himself to be distracted by the small irritants and he always has the values of the School at the front of his thinking. His counsel is always wise. Russell manages all this with a beguiling lightness of touch and an ability to diffuse tension when difficult situations arise, by the deployment of his wry wit. Wisdom and wit; what more could one ask for? Thirty years is a long time and Russell has spent those years well. So many of us have benefitted from Russell’s experience and we continue to do and to be grateful that he is still such an important part of this school. - Ian Hicklin, Senior University Teaching Fellow John Allred Junior Technician

Martin Bradshaw IT Manager

Roy Childs Reprographics Manager An inspirational tutor, with such an extensive yet humble knowledge on everything design. Russell’s a true gift to this school. Petros Antoniou, Year 5 student I want to thank you for all the help. [...]. You see the value in every student’s project and I really respect you for that. You are also really encouraging and supportive. I have particularly enjoyed your tutoring style and you have been very willing to give advice, despite me always bugging you for help. I would not have been able to produce one of the pieces of work [...] without you to push my ideas forward. [...] You are one of the most intellectually fascinating and passionate tutors. Keep up the good work! Amy Crellin, Year 3 student

Ralph Mackinder Media Unit Manager

Laura Mason Materials Workshop Manager

Russell has been a fantastic tutor to get to know - always compassionate and supportive. He gently pushed me to do the best I could and amazed me with his unmatched ability in recalling obscure references and quotes. I would like to thank him for everything and compliment him on his excellent taste in socks. Deb Adler, Year 5 student

Stuart Moran Materials Workshop Manager

Russell has been a fantastic tutor for me this year. Most of all he was always first to encourage me when I was struggling, and helped get the best out of any idea I had. I feel lucky to have been able to share the final project of my degree with him and learn so much in the process. James Thormond, Year 3 student

Tariq Zaman Facilities and Technology Development Manager

It was a pleasure to learn from Russell. I approached my first project in an unusual way, however Russell knew how to adapt his knowledge to my work and did so for each student[...]. Also, I really appreciated how he brought “non-typical” architectural concepts and precedents into the design, for example his passion for photography helped me create an architectural comic[...]. Finally, I want to thank Russell for being so calming and helpful during the portfolio preparation. Victoria Noakes, Year 3 student

Russell Light is one of the most inspiring tutors I have ever met. He has always been there to help, advice and motivate all his students. As his name indicates he is the person who always brings ‘light’ with his presence in the SSoA. Juliana Kitsiou, Alumna I spent a multitude of happy tutorials with Russell, imbibing the softly spoken words that so effortlessly carry the weight of such a keen intellect and deep passion for Architecture. Long may he continue to enthuse and enlighten others lucky enough to be taught by him! Tim Rodber, Alumna Russell’s sincerity and patience encouraged me in my pursuit of architecture during my undergraduate studies. His passion for the power of imagery and the role of photography in architecture was also enlightening towards my design process and still captivates my imagination today. Bianca Man, Year 5 Student


The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

In Memory of Professor Peter Blundell Jones When the University of Sheffield School of Architecture celebrated its centenary in 2008 it was inevitable that Professor Peter Blundell Jones was invited to write the authoritative history of those first one hundred years. By then PBJ, as he was generally known, had established a remarkable international reputation as one of the finest and most widely respected architectural historians of his generation. Years earlier; it had been an easy decision for Sheffield University to offer him a chair. Peter later told me that moving to Sheffield was not such a straightforward decision for him. By then the architectural profession had become absurdly London-centric. Peter worried about leaving the capital but his desire to join a department where his scholarship was valued and encouraged overcame this concern. Throughout the following 22 years he flourished and became a major figure in the more recent history of the Sheffield School. That history shows that Sheffield is the only school of architecture to achieve the highest research rating in three successive exercises and on each occasion we could have submitted internationally acclaimed publications under Peter’s name many times over.

whole history of architecture course moving it away from the traditional parade of styles to a case study approach. Another important innovation led by Peter was the weekly forum, open to the whole school but compulsory for postgraduate students. Peter would take a carefully prepared theme each year and invite a series of distinguished and often international speakers as well as requiring presentations from the students. The theme of Architecture and Technology, for example engaged the whole school in debates about the contribution of the many different areas of research in the school. Again books and papers were published. In spite of this intensely theoretical approach Peter both spoke and wrote in the most engaging manner. Sadly his field is blighted by a tendency among some to obscuration rather than explanation. Peter always chose his printed words with great care and specifically to explain rather than to impress. He was not interested in making his audience admire the depth or sophistication of his work. Rather he wanted them to understand and learn, and mostly they did and will continue doing so for many years to come.

“...you quite simply recognised the highest imaginable quality of teaching. You were in no doubt that he had been thinking out arguments in front of students and had invited them to participate in this process.” There seems to be a golden thread running through Peter’s work. He was fascinated by the human experience of architecture and the way societies create and shape their physical worlds. Peter’s own journey through these books shows a progression toward a less orthodox and more overtly anthropological approach. What we also see is just how much of a collaborator Peter was. He published work jointly with many Sheffield University colleagues who had quite disparate research interests, and was generous in giving his time to help colleagues develop their own research and writing.

On his arrival in Sheffield I asked Peter to take charge of a major piece of teaching to the fifth year students. He began a project that was to span many years in which students built a model of Sheffield in 1900. This revolutionary project taught students to understand the city and the architecture of the past in terms of the lives of people, their society, economy and technology.

At Sheffield Peter’s teaching contributed to excellent ratings as well as successful visiting boards from the profession. In truth Peter was not a great enthusiast for the modern obsession with evaluations and ratings. He believed that both research and teaching were too rich, complex and important to be reduced to simple numbers on a scale. If you were lucky enough to attend his lectures, sit in with him during research student supervisions or join him in one of the many public critiques of student design work, you quite simply recognised the highest imaginable quality of teaching. You were in no doubt that he had been thinking out arguments in front of students and had invited them to participate in this process. He was the toughest critic imaginable, able almost instantly to get right to the heart of any flaws in a student design proposition. There is no doubt that students feared his critical ability but, I think, never dreaded it. He was not harsh, unkind or unfair but just demanded you lived with his level of argument. This is research-led teaching at it best. His passing will leave a huge hole in the Sheffield student experience.

Year by year the physical model grew and was used in many exhibitions and later in a computer version (in collaboration with Chenghzi Peng and myself ) making the data available for further research. This was a brilliant innovation in the course with many beneficial outcomes. He also revised the

Peter had his little eccentricities. He was almost proud not to have a mobile phone. I once chided him gently about this at a time when I was probably under some pressure. I remember telling him that a phone might not just be for his convenience but also every one else’s. In a

We shall never again have the pleasure of hearing Peter lecture and develop an argument so rigorously and yet clearly. However taken together his books and articles show a line of thought running through the modern movement less clearly articulated in the public mind. The architects Peter studied were carefully selected in terms of their concern for context, humanism and materiality. That ‘other’ strand to the modern movement is now far more widely recognized and so is Peter as its champion.

01

Peter thought no idea too difficult or complex for even the youngest undergraduate and his work wove teaching and research seamlessly together. For many years Peter chaired the Royal Institute of British Architects dissertation prize committee. The written dissertation can sometimes be seen as of secondary importance in a design-based department such as architecture but the work of Peter and this committee has gone a long way to changing that view.


147

series of apparently freakish events he somehow managed to appear on every occasion that I needed to speak with him. I never knew how he performed this weird trick, but learned never to complain again. But Peter was no one-eyed technophobe. In his earlier years he had stripped down and reassembled his beloved Citroen cars, at a time when the French manufacturer was known for advanced design and engineering. He had also made his own audio equipment. More recently, when frustrated by the efforts of publisher’s graphic designers, he just taught himself to use sophisticated desktop publishing software and took on the job himself.

“Peter had his little eccentricities..” Peter Blundell Jones died on 19th August 2016. I find it hard to think of Peter in the past tense. That we shall never again have such debates. That he will never again give me that raised eyebrow-quizzical smile that invited a response to some new line of thought. Without doubt there would have been much more to come if Peter had not been taken from us at the cruelly young age of 67. A book on Lethaby was already more than just a twinkle in his eye. But if there had to be an early full stop, Architecture and Ritual seems appropriate. It illustrates and summarises his views on the relationship between people and their architecture more thoroughly and perceptively than anything else he wrote. His huge and distinguished opus of written work will keep his memory alive for a long time to come.

Text condensed from an original text by Emeritus Professor Bryan Lawson

02

For Fionn and the architecture department - in memory of my dad PBJ - here is the original I did for his book ‘Ritual & Architecture’. With love from Claire. Thanks for keeping him alive in thoughts.

03

04

05

06

07

01 Professor Peter Blundell Jones 02 Original drawing from Peter’s last book presented to SSoA by his daughter 03 The 1900s model - Urban Studies project 04 Window of Peter’s home - Padley Mill 05 Peter’s plan for Padley Milll 06 Padley Mill in snow 07 The millpond at Padley


5B Mal t i ng s Pl ace 1 6 9 Towe r B r i d g e R d Lo n d o n / S E 1 3 J B

U n i ve rs i t y o f She f f i e ld A l um n i Proud l y Suppor t i ng

The She f f i e ld Sc hool o f Arc h i tec t u re

a rr c h ii tt e c tt ss a c h e c st ud io @owal.london /0207 3787 007


Proud supporter of The University of Sheffield School of Architecture www.bondbryan.com


Proud to support the University of Sheffield School of Architecture hawkinsbrown.com \ @hawkins_brown


Placemaking for a Modern World

Proud supporters of the University of Sheffield School of Architecture

bdp.com


Proud supporter of The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Proctor & Matthews Architects +44 (0)20 7378 6695 info@proctorandmatthews.com www.proctorandmatthews.com


Image/graphics/block colours should fill bleed out line outside the white space (usually red outline)

Text should not exceed this border (usually purple outline)

INFORMATION -The document will be cut to 260X210mm -The graphics/image/block colours should fill a space of 270x220 as there will be a 5mm bleed around every page which will be cut off, this is done to allow for ink to be printed edge to edge -Text should remain within the purple margin for clarity. -Text should be flattened (as a raster image such as JPEG) to avoid any inconsistencies with typefaces -Make sure you are in ‘normal’ screen mode to view the guides (‘w’ is usually the shortcut for this) -All elements used should be a resolution of 300dpi and in the CMYK format -Hart When happyCentre, with your arrangement, please ‘package’ the document Leisure Fleet, Hampshire. and send the indesign file with all the included links to us at pantoniou1@sheffield.ac.uk If your submission is a single raster image that is exactly 270x220mm, then just send us the JPEG only.

Proud sponsor of the University of Sheffield

School of Architecture

- After familiarising with the information, delete (or hide) the ‘INFO LAYER’

Studios in Nottingham & Newcastle Contact: Gary Thomason – Director - Nottingham Studio gthomason@gt3architects.com - 0115 947 0800


We are a Liverpool based architecture practice that are proud to support LJMU. We are inviting talented RIBA Part I / II graduates to join our team of creative designers in a vibrant city centre studio. Please send a CV and brief examples of your work by email to: jobs@dk-architects.com


RMA ARCHITECTS RMA Architects are very pleased to continue supporting University of Sheffield School of Architecture and its high calibre students.

www.rmaarchitects.co.uk 0 20 72 84 14 14

Northway House London Borough of Barnet, completed May 2017 shortlisted for The Housing Design Awards 2017


Proud to support the University of Sheffield School of Architecture. architects@epr.co.uk epr.co.uk


Proud supporter of the Sheffield School of Architecture

Allford Hall Monaghan Morris Morelands, 5-23 Old Street, London EC1V 9HL 0207 251 5261 info@ahmm.co.uk www.ahmm.co.uk @ahmmarchitects

New Scotland Yard

Google Pancras Square


Proud supporters of the University of Sheffield School of Architecture fcbstudios.com @FCBStudios

Bedales School Art and Design Building

RIBA Award winner 2017


architecture planning visualisation

creating great places for people to live work and play

We are bptw partnership, a friendly and creative practice based in Greenwich, London. We are specialists in residential design, with projects ranging from individual houses to large scale mixed-use developments of several hundred new homes. We are an AJ100 practice and Investors In People accredited, and are proud to be supporting the Sheffield School of Architecture. To hear more about working at bptw please visit www.bptw.co.uk/careers or email people@bptw.co.uk

www.bptw.co.uk

bptw-partnership

@bptwpartnership


Innovative Aluminum Solutions

We are proud to support The University of Sheffield School of Architecture and its associated students.

We are proud to support The University of Sheffield School of Architecture and its associated students Innovation is the core of our business Sapa’s aluminium-based building systems brands develop and market high specification windows, doors and facade solutions. Ensuring our systems efficient in thermal, sound and air tightness is a key part of our innovation.

Our aim from the beginning is to add value and architectural excellence to every project. As part of the world’s largest aluminium extrusion group we are committed to working with architects to help create buildings that are innovative, energy efficient and environmentally sustainable.

www.sapabuildingsystems.co.uk


Publisher University of Sheffield Editorial Design Deborah Adler Petros Antoniou Andreea Ditu Saule Pribusauskaite Sponsorship Satwinder Samra SSoA Photographs Ralph Mackinder and other students/staff members Printed in England by University of Sheffield Print Services (Print & Design Solutions) www.shef.ac.uk/architecture @SSoA_News Cover Images Deborah Adler Petros Antoniou Yen-Ting Chen Andreea Ditu Mansel Haynes Joe Paget Saule Pribusauskaite Simeon Shtebunaev Nor Izura Tukiman Montgomery Williams Wanqing Wong Tong Tsz Ying The University of Sheffield School of Architecture would like to thank the technical and administrative team for their continued support and input throughout the year. We would also like to thank all of our contributors, everyone involved in curating the exhibition and everyone involved in compiling this catalogue.

Copyright 2017 School of Architecture, University of Sheffield. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the publisher. ISBN:978-0-9929705-7-4 For a full range of programmes and modules please see www.shef.ac.uk/architecture School of Architecture University of Sheffield The Arts Tower Western Bank Sheffield S10 2TN Tel. +44 (0) 114 222 0305 Fax +44 (0) 114 222 0315 E-mail ssoa@sheffield.ac.uk Web http://www.shef.ac.uk/architecture/ Twitter @SSoA_news


ISBN 978-0-9929705-7-4

2017

9 780992 970574

CATALOGUE 2017

The University of Sheffield School of Architecture Catalogue

£ 10 www.shef.ac.uk/architecture

Profile for SSoA

Sheffield School of Architecture 2017 Catalogue  

Full catalogue of student work from the University of Sheffield, School of Architecture Summer Exhibition 2017.

Sheffield School of Architecture 2017 Catalogue  

Full catalogue of student work from the University of Sheffield, School of Architecture Summer Exhibition 2017.

Profile for ssoa
Advertisement