Page 1


Sw i


1939


FORE EVERY

M AN

IS

D EEPLY

IN 足

F L U E N C E D B Y H IS E N V I R O N 足 M ENT.

JU S T AS C U T ST O N E

A N D D R A B B R IC K S A R E M A D E B E A U T IF U L T R A S T IN G AND

BY PLAY

TH E

CON足

OF L IG H T

S H A D O W , SO

WE A R E

M ADE B E T T E R M EN BY TH E F I N E T H I N G S W IT H W H IC H WE SU R RO U N D

O U R SELV ES.


IVORD W E P R E S E N T IN T H IS B O O K A G L IM P S E O F S A I N T P E T E R ’S PREP. OUR

IT

IS

A

R E V IE W

SC H O O L L IF E , A

OF

SU M ­

M A R Y O F C H E R IS H E D M E M ­ O R IE S .

H ER E A R E T H E M EN

A N D T H E A C T IV IT IE S FR O M W H IC H W E H A V E G A IN E D SO M U C H D U R IN G F O U R V A L U ­ A B L E , IN S P IR IN G YEA R S.


— -----

"1

...........................

DEDICATION T o F ath er W illiam J . W alter, S .J., we, the class of 19 39 , dedicate this book as a sincere gesture of gratitude and appreciation fo r the interest w hich he has shown in our w elfare. H is deep understanding of the student and his problem s has m ade him a confidante; his fight­ in g spirit has ra llied us and spurred us on ; his quiet com radery has en gen dered a deep affection in all. We in ten d that this should be a sign of the bond that exists betw een us.


REV. W ILLIA M J . W A L T E R , S.J. Assistant Principal Moderator of Athletics


mm Q0 O ut

Q\ot^


REV . FR A N C IS J. SH A LLO E, S.J. Principal

REV . JO H N T . B U T L E R , S.J. Student Counselor


*

’ sm

REV . RAYM O N D I. P U R C E L L , R E V . M A R T IN A. SC H M IT T , S J. S.J. JO H N A. G O R M L E Y , S.J.

R EV. TH O M A S P. M U R R A Y , S.J. R O B E R T J . F L A H E R T Y , S.J. JO SEPH J. M cEVOY, S.J.

JO SEPH D. H A SSE T T , S.J.

R IC H A R D M. COOLAHAN,

s j. * EDMOND F. IVF.RS, S.J.

Father Murray presides over the Library and over Freshman Latin. During his two years at the Prep, he has won everybody’s heart with his kind smile and quiet way. . . . As moderator o£ the Junior Sodality, Father Purcell has inspired many to potent Catholic Action. From his new office in the Junior Building, he directs many vital activities. He is also a veteran teacher of Latin. . . . Father Schmitt has ably taught Latin and Greek for many years at Saint Peter’s. . . . Mr. Coolahan is a capable instructor of Freshman Latin and English and helps to direct the Junior Sodality. . . . Another assistant to Father Purcell is Mr. Flaherty who also teaches the Freshmen. . . . He and Mr. Gormley are scheduled to leave the Prep this year to complete their theological studies at Woodstock College. T he latter has taught the Juniors and successfully directed dramatics. . . . Mr. Hassett succeeds in a most difficult task; he is a popular and successful instructor of Greek. . . . Mr. Ivers holds the P e t r e a n staff in check and teaches the Juniors in the science division. . . . Mr. McEvoy has demon­ strated his versatility by training capable debaters and outstanding football play­ ers: he directs debating and coaches six-man football. After instructing the Sophomores for three years, he is now due to go to Woodstock.


Mr. Murray came to the Prep this year to be a capable instructor of Latin and history and to be a zealous director of the band. . . . Mr. O’Hale’s enthusiasm has fostered our rapidly developing track team. He has taught the Freshmen for three years and now must leave us for Woodstock. . . . It seems to the Seniors that Mr. Pitts knows more French than the French Academy itself. He also directs the choir. . . . Mr. Bromirski came from Saint Peter’s College to teach physics to the Seniors at the Prep. He has definitely succeeded. . . . Another alumnus of Saint Peter’s is Mr. Corrarino who is a mathematics in­ structor and who guides a select few through the mazes of trigonometry. . . . Mr. Cullen, a graduate of Fordham University, has capably taught mathematics at the Prep for a number of years. . . . A graduate of Providence College, Mr. Doolan has completed a successful first year of teaching Latin and English. He also coaches the track team. . . . Mr. Duffy, an alumnus of Fordham U ni­ versity, has taught Latin and English for a number of years at the Prep. This year he made use of his football experience in training the Sophomores to play six-man football. . . . Mr. Egan is Assistant Prefect of Discipline and Graduate Manager of Athletics: a capable man in a trying position.

DO N ALD P. O 'H A LE, S.J.

SA M U E L R . P IT T S , S.J.

ED W ARD J. C U L LE N

W A L T E R F. DOOLAN

A R T H U R C. B R O M IR SK I JO H N F. DUFFY

E U G E N E H. M U R R A Y , S.J. C A R L O W. C O R R A R IN O T H O M A S J EGAN


Mr. Fitzmorris has taught Senior English at the Prep since he was graduated from Fordham University. He is also a staff writer for the Catholic Review, America. . . . An alumnus of Saint Peter’s College, Mr. Jacques handles the retorts in the chemistry laboratory. He has successfully taught the Juniors for a number of years. . . . Mr. Kelty, from Fordham University, teaches French and German equally well. T he Seniors in the French Club also benefit by his linguistic talent. . . . T he Sophomores are instructed in Latin and history by Mr. Klein, a graduate of Saint Peter’s College. He is as popular as he is capable. . . . Another alumnus of Saint Peter’s is Mr. McCabe who instructs the Freshmen and successfully coaches both varsity baseball and junior basketball. . . . Mr. McGill, a Master of Science from Fordham University, has instructed the Soph­ omore classes in biology for a number of years. . . . From Holy Cross College, Mr. Mclnerney came to the Prep to instruct the Sophomores in Latin and English. His popularity is sufficient sign of his success. . . . Mr. Madden, from Fordham and Columbia University, teaches Greek and English and since he directs the Senior Council, is already thinking about next year’s Senior Socials.

TH O M A S L. F IT Z M O R R IS JA M E S J . M cC A BE

F R E D E R IC K J . JACQ U ES JO H N J . M cG IL L

ALFRED J. K ELTY V IN C E N T I>. M cIN E R N E Y

R O B E R T R . K L E IN A R T H U R G. MADDEN


h e

JA M E S J. M A R R P H IL IP J. O 'F A R R E L L

JO H N J . M U LLE N FE R D IN A N D A. O R T H E N

TH O M A S J . M YER S C L E M E N T C. O 'SU LLIVA N

T H O M A S E. O ’B R IE N M A R T IN A. RO O N EY

A lively elocution class is conducted by Mr. Marr, dramatics coach and a newcomer to the Prep Faculty. . . . Mr. Mullen, a graduate of Seton Hall College, teaches algebra and geometry. He is efficient and popular too. . . . All of Mr. Myers’ time is taken up with football and basketball and physical training. We can boast that he has trained men as well as bodies. He starred at Fordham. . . . Another newcomer to the Prep Faculty is Mr. O’Brien from Saint Francis College. He teaches Latin and history and coaches a midget basketball team. . . . From the Principal’s office, Mr. Orthen helps to direct our collective destiny. He is a veteran Latin teacher and a graduate of Saint Peter’s. . . . Mr. O’Sullivan, from Holy Cross College and Fordham University, presides over many a lively discussion of current social problems during his sociology classes; nevertheless, teaching French is his forte. . . . Library Science is taught by Mr. O’Farrell who, of course, is librarian and a graduate of Saint Peter’s College. . . . Mr. Rooney, from Seton Hall College, is a veteran teacher of Latin and English and fills many a mite box to the great benefit of the missions.


Jpularity is sufficient sign Columbia University, teac )r Council, is already thir

R E D E R IC K J. JA CQ U ES JO H N J . M cG IL L


<rptesent th ÂŁ


SENIOR M

Lavagnino, Norton, McGinn, Healy, Higgins, Donnelly, Murphy. McGee, Arecchi, M cGlynn, Cahill, Thom pson, Walsh, Corcoran, Cordo, Keenan, Cullen. McDermott, Byrne, O’N eill, Mr. Fitzmorris, Grimley, Scholle, M cTigue.

Robert O’N eill, President Joseph Grimley, Vice-President Edward Byrne, Secretary W alter Cullen, T reasurer

For four years we have toiled and struggled with some modicum of success to absorb and retain the knowledge and training imparted to us by our teachers. For four happy years we have laughed and shouted in the games and social activities at school. At times, perhaps, we have felt the pangs of sadness and sorrow, but always have they been swept away by the comfort of good fellowship. And now our final goal, like the star of Bethlehem, beckons us on with its promise of reward for a job well done. Let us sum up our past four years in a brief history which in the future may recall to us our joyful life at Saint Peter’s Prep. As diminutive, inexperienced freshmen, we first marched into the yard on a memorable September morning in 1935. The air was filled with laughter and the joyous greetings of the upper classmen welcoming each other back from vacation. But we newcomers wandered about, quiet and rather disconsolate, awed by the strange faces about us. And yet, as soon as our classes were formed, we quickly grew to know one another. Rather thrilled by our new life, which seemed so “ grown-up,” we sped through a happy freshman year.

Twenty


A second September morning witnessed our return as lordly sophomores. T he sun shone just for us; the world was ours. Our feeling of superiority was disturbed a bit by the absence of many former friends but as our classes were formed in the two divisions, new friendships and re-enforced old ones helped us to pass the year happily. For some of us, Greek was now the big problem; for others, biology. A ll of us had to face the growing task of Latin. But the year slipped by quickly and almost before we could realize it, we were juniors: envied upperclassmen. Now our feeling of self-importance meant a little some­ thing. We were about to embark on the Ciceronian sea, to wrestle with the figures of geometry, to delve the mysteries of chemistry, and to wonder at the strange sound of French. We had reason to boast of our football team in spite of its final defeat; of our basketball team which rolled up such an imposing record of victories and did so well in the State Tournament; of our tennis team that brought home the trophy from the tournament at Stevens Tech. Members of our class were outstanding players on these teams as well as on the track and baseball squads.

Frederick Koerner, President H arry O’Mealia, Vice-President Jam es Varley, Secretary Joh n Reddy, Treasurer

Ockay, Kennedy, Hennesseey, Hoffen, Beck, Schmitt, Lodge, Riviere. Dolan, Williams, Tarran t, Beronio, Burke, O’Connell, Murner. Smith, Donahue, Lahiff, M cGrail, McCarthy, Gartland, Hannon, Byrnes, Morley, Ottolina, Walsh, McKenna, Casey. O ’M ealia, Koerner, Fr. Schmitt, S.J., Reddy, Varley.

SENIOR A

Twenty-one


W illiam McCarthy, President Edward Gorman, Vice-President Bernard Schumacher, Secretary Leo McGough, Treasurer

In other activities also, many of us were leaders. Juniors were prominent in the annual play, in the Sodality and in the Debating Society. And so this third year of our Prep life passed quickly in an endless round of scholastic and extra-curricular activity. One of the delights of the year was the invitation extended to us to attend the Senior Dance. T he last months of the year were devoted to a strenuous effort to conquer the last hurdle to that coveted dream, the honor of being called a Senior and of being the cynosure of envious underclassmen. Those of us who attained this goal came back to the Prep last September thrilled by our common resolution to make the final quarter of our course the best one in every way. The course of Aeneas and his companions was navi­ gated by Mr. Pitts, S.J., Mr. Hassett, S.J., and Father Schmitt, S.J. Mr. Bromirski simplified the difficulties of physics while Mr. Fitzmorris ably imparted to us his vast knowledge of English. Father Schmitt, S.J., also instructed those who had valiantly chosen the Greek course and our French accent was polished by Mr. Kelty and Mr. Pitts, S.J.

W. McCarthy, Januszka, Borton, Conlin, Torpey, R . McCarthy, McKenna, Fleckenstein, Loftus, Mahan. O â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell, Henson, Somers, Tkac, Reddy, Mallard, Gorman, Jordan, Fahy, Leonard, Kingston, Caponegro, McGivern. Ruane, Clark, Mr. Hassett, S.J., Schumacher, Coughlin.

SENIOR B

Twenty-two


SENIOR C

Somers, Clausing, Taraskiewicz, Hampton, Lotowycz, Sweeney. Frank, M ulle, M cNally, Henkel, Albert, Kuhn, Gennaro, Ertle. Curnyn, Schmitt, Ehrig, Connolly, Ganzkow, Cookson, Kerwin, Sokol, Joseph, W illiams, Gannon, McCarthy. M aturi, Maloney, Mr. Pitts, S.J., Maroney, Belgam.

Captain of our moderately successful football team was Robert O’Neill of Senior M. Many of the squad were seniors, some of them veterans of several years. T he basket­ ball team was ably led by Peter Beronio of Senior A, and the baseball squad by Charles Coughlin of Senior B. Both of these teams have been representative of the Prep spirit on court and field. Many of the track men are classmates of ours as well as most of the tennis squad. We can safely predict that John McKenna will once again be the out­ standing tennis player of the County and perhaps of the State. W ill any of us forget our Senior Dance? And the other memories that will remain are almost too many to mention here—the “ Macaroni” Club; all the fair days spent in “jug” ; Mr. Myers and Mr. Egan matching their skill against those of us who played in the yard; the faculty glee club; dash­ ing to the cafeteria on a rainy day; the small yellow slips that came each day from the office of the Prefect of Discip­ line. And it is almost needless to say that we will cherish most of all the firm friendships formed here at the Prep.

Twenty-three

Robert M aturi, President Jam es Maroney, Vice-President Joseph Belgam, Secretary Thom as Maloney, T reasurer


HANS JO SEP H A L B E R T

G E R A R D JO SEPH BECK

DO M EN IC A LBA N O ARECCH I

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Sec. 2; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2; Sec. 1, 2; Football M an足 ager; T rack 1; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Sec. 1, 2, 3; Senior Council.

Sodality 3; K.. B. S.; T rack 3, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

JO SEP H R O B E R T BE LG A M

P E T E R B E N E D IC T BERO N IO

K. B. S.; Jayvee Basketball 3; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming 3.

Al

Danny

Sodality 3; Consultor 3; Football 4; Class Baseball 2: Class President 3.

C A R L P E T E R BO R TO N Sodality 2, 3; K. B. S.; Class Basketball 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Consultor 1, 3; K. B. S.; Debating 1 , 2 , 3, 4; Basketball 4; Captain of Basketball; Jayvee Bas足 ketball 3; Senior Council; French Club 4.

Jerry

Bel

Pete

Tex Twenty-four


W ILLIA M HO W ARD B U R K E

EDW ARD FR A N C IS B Y R N E

JO H N TH O M A S BY R N ES

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Class Basketball 1, 2; Class Baseball 1 , 2; French Club 3.

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Consultor 4; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatics 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Basketball 3; Class Baseball 3.

K. B. S.; Debating 1; T rack 4; Class Basketball 1, 2; Class Baseball 1, 2; French Club 3.

CONONE JO SEP H C A H IL L

A L F R E D BLASE CAPO N EGRO

JO SEPH P A T R IC K CASEY

Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating i, 2 T rack 1, 2; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; French Club 4

Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 4; Camera Club 4; Class Basketball 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 2, 3, 4.

Sodality 4.; K. B. S.; Class Sec. 1, 2; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

S/ai> Twenty-five

Butch

Punchy

Chick

Cappy

Case


JA M E S JO SEP H C L A R K K. B. S.; Debating 4; Football 3; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1. 2, 3, 4.

JO H N G A B R IE L C O N N O LLY Sports Editor of P e t r e a n ; Tennis 3, 4; French Club 3; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

G E O R G E EDW ARD C LA U SIN G

JA M E S JO SEPH CO NLIN

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Ass’t Prefect 2; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2; Class Basket­ ball 1, 2, 3, 4; French Club 3; Stamp Club 3; Band 3, 4; Orchestra 3, 4.

TH O M AS FRA N C IS COOKSON

B E R N A R D LEO CO RCO RAN

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Ass’t Sports Editor of P e t r e a n ; Tennis 3, 4; Stamp Club 1, 2; French Club 3; Class Basketball 1. 2, 3.

Jim m ie

George

Con

Bitsy

Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Classical Club 3; Camera Club 2, 3, 4; Swim­ ming 3.

Cook

Class Basketball 3, 4; Class Baseball 3. 4 -

Bernie Twenty-six


C H A R LE S FR A N C IS C O U G H LIN

W A LT ER BERN ARD C U LLE N

Sodality 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1; Foot足 ball 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; Class VicePres. i , 2, 3; Senior Council; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3.

Sodality g, 4; Dramatics 4; Class Bas足 ketball 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 2, 3, 4.

V IN C E N T A N T H O N Y CORDO Sodality 3, 4; Orchestra

i, 2, 3, 4.

JO H N E U G EN E CU R N Y N Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1; Class Basketball 1, 2; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Zip Twenty-seven

JO H N FR A N C IS DOLAN Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatics 4; Track 3, 4; Chess Club 2; Class Baseball 2, 3, 4.

Chuck

Walter

Gene

JO H N EDW ARD D O N AH U E Sodality 2, 3, 4; Debating 1; Class Basketball 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1.

Punjab

Jim m y


R O B E R T JO SEPH D O N N ELLY Sodality 2, 3, 4; Consul tor 1, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1; Senior Council; Orchestra 3, 4; Band 4; Catechist 2, 3, 4.

T H O M A S G E O R G E FA H Y Sodality 1, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Consul tor 4; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatics 1, 4; Senior Council; French Club 3, 4; Classical Club 4.

Bob

Frank

FR A N C IS A LO YSIU S E H R IG

JO SEPH W ILLIA M E R T L E

Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2; French Club 3; Stamp Club 2, 3; Class Basketball 2.

K. B. S.; Basketball 3, 4; Tennis i, 2, 3, 4; Class Basketball i, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

A L B E R T G EO R G E F L E C K E N ST E IN

JO SEPH ALO YSIU S FR A N K

Sodality 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debaling 1, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3.

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Track 3; Stamp Club 3; French Club 3, 4; Slide R ule Club 3; Class Baseball 1, 2.

Jo e

TG

Flecky

Joe Twenty-eight


G E O R G E FR A N C IS GANZKOW

FR A N C IS A M BRO SE G ARTLAN D

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Debating 1, 2; Class Vice-Pres. 1; French Club 3; T rack 2, 3, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.

K. B. S.; Debating 4; Basketball 4; Jayvee Basketball 3; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

JA M E S P A T R IC K GAN N O N Sodality 1 , 2, 3 ; K. B. S.; Debating 1 , 2 ; Dramatics 1 , 3 , 4 ; P e t r e a n ; Stamp Club 2 , 3 ; Orchestra 1, 2 ; Swimming 3 ; Consultor 1 .

PASQ U AL A N T H O N Y G EN N A RO K. B. S.; Football 3, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball i, 2, 3.

Jim m y Twenty-nine

EDW ARD JO H N G O RM A N Sodality 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 2, 4; Class Vice-Pres. 4; Class Treas. 3; Stamp Club 3, 4; French Club 3, 4; Class Baseball 2, 3.

Hash

Scotty

Pasq

JO SEPH P A T R IC K G R IM L E Y Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Track 3, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Base足 ball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Ed

Jo e


W IL L IA M SE A R L E H A M PTO N

D A N IE L N ICH O LAS HANNO N

Sodality 2, 3; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2. 4; Dramatics 4; Stamp Club 3; Class Basketball 3; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Prefect 2; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 4; Dramatics 3; Baseball 3, 4; Class Basketball 4.

JO H N JO SEPH H E N K E L Sodality

4; K. B. S. 1, 2 ; Debating 1 , 2 ; P e t r e a n ; French Club 3 ; Class Basketball 1, 2 , 3 , 4. 2, 3,

B ill

Dan

C H A R LE S W A L T E R H EN N ESSEY Sodality 2, 3, 4.

Pat

Henk

P A T R IC K KEVIN HEALV Sodality 3; P e t r e a n ; Class Vice-Pres. 1, Class Basketball 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball a. 3- 4-

R O B E R T FRA N CIS HENSON Sodality 2, 3, 4; Debating 1, 4; French Club 3, 4; Camera Club 3, 4; Orches足 tra 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 3, 4.

Stretch

Bob Thirty


R IC H A R D TH O M A S H IG G IN S

H A R R Y A U G U ST U S H O FFEN

K. B. S.; Football 3, 4; T rack 3, 4; Class Basketball- 3, 4; Class Baseball 3- 4-

Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2, 3; French Club 3, 4; Class Basket­ ball 1; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

JO H N JO SEP H JO R D A N Sodality 1, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 4; Orchestra 1; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.

R ed Thirty-one

JO SEPH P E T E R JO SEPH Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2; P e t r e a n ; French Club 3; Camera Club 4; Stamp Club 3, 4.

Rufus

Jo e

Jack

JO SEPH P E T E R JA N U SZK A Sodality 3, 4; K. B. S.; Consultor 2; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 3, 4; Class Baseball i, 2, 3, 4.

RAYM O ND FR A N C IS KEEN A N Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Consultor 1, 2, 3; Prefect 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2, 3; Vice-Pres. 1; Cheerleader 1, 2, 3; Chairman of Senior Council; Catechist 2 , 3 ’ 4-

Jo e

Ray


M M

V IN C E N T JO SEPH K EN N ED Y

RAYM O N D A N T H O N Y K ER W IN

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 4; Dramatics 3; Class Baseball 2.

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Prefect 1; Consultor 2; Debating 1, 2; Vice-Pres. 1; Swim足 ming 3; Camera Club 3; Class Basket足 ball 1, 2, 3, 4.

W IL L IA M T E R E N C E K IN G STO N Sodality 1; K. B. S.; Tennis 3, 4; M an足 ager of Tennis; Track 1, 2.

Ken

Ray

D A N IE L P A T R IC K K IE L Y

R O B E R T D E IN E R KUHN

F R E D E R IC K C H A R LES KO ERN ER Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Pres. 4; French Club 4; Class Baseball 3.

Sass

Billy

K. B. S.; Class Vice-Pres. 3; Class Basketball i, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Fritz

Sodality 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1; Basketball 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Consultor 3.

Robin Thirty-two


LA W R E N C E FR A N C IS LA V A G N IN O

TH O M AS P A T R IC K LEO N A RD

K. B. S.; Class Sec. 1; Class Vice-Pres. 2, 3; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Sodality 1, 2; K. B. S.; Debating 1; Baseball 3, 4; Class Vice-Pres. x; Class Sec. 2; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.

TH O M AS M A R T IN L A H IF F Sodality 1, 3, 4; Manager of Basket­ ball 4.

FRA N C IS X A V IE R L E U C H T Sodality i, 2; K. B. S.; Football 2, 3, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Base­ ball 1, 2, 3, 4.

JO SEP H ISAAC JOGUES LO D GE

G EO R G E M IC H A EL LO FTU S

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 4; Library 2, 3;Jayvee Basketball 3; Class Treas. 2; Class Basketball 1, 2,

Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Baseball 4; Swimming 3; Class Basketball i, 2, 3 ’ 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

3. 4-

Buzz Thirty-three

Lava

Benny

Frank

Feet

Lofty


LEO M IC H A E L LO TO W YCZ Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Vice-Pres. 1; Class Treas. 3; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

R O BERT GREGO RY M cC a r t h y Sodality 2; K. B. S.; Debating 2; Cam ­ era Club 3; Stamp Club 3; Track 2, 4; Class Basketball 2, 3, 4.

Luke

Mack

ALO YSIU S FRA N C IS M cC a r t h y

FR A N C IS R O B E R T M cC a r t h y

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; French Club 4; Stamp Club 2; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Ass’t Prefect 2; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatics 4; P e t r e a n ; French Club 3, 4; Camera Club 3; Track 1, 2.

W IL L IA M JO H N M cC a r t h y Sodality 1, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1; Basketball 4; Football 2, 3, 4; Class Pres. 1, 2, 4; Class Sec. 3; Class Basket­ ball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Mack

Bob

TH O M AS FRA N CIS M cD ER M O T T K. B. S.; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Bullet

Mack Thirty-four


JO SEPH P A T R IC K M cD o n o u g h Debating 1; Dramatics 4.

JA M E S F R A N C IS M cG EE

JA M E S A R T H U R M cGIN N

Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Pres. 3; Class Vice-Pres. 2; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1 , 2, 3, 4.

K. B. S.; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

JO SEPH B E R N A R D M cG LYN N

JO H N JA M E S M cG IV E R N Sodality 1; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 4; Dramatics 4 ; P e t r e a n ; Camera Club 4 ; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3.

/o e Thirty-five

K. B. S.; Class Basketball 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 3, 4.

Sam

Mack

Mack

LEO IR V IN G M cGO UGH Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Basketball 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Vice-Pres. 1; Class Sec. 3; Class Treas. 4; Class Basketball 3, 4.

Jo e

Mack


ED W ARD A N T H O N Y M cG R A IL K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2, 3; Football 4; Basketball 4; Baseball 4; Class VicePres. x; Jayvee Basketball 3.

F R A N C IS H E N R Y M cN A LLY Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2; P e t r e a n ; Track 4; French Club 3; Stamp Club 2, 3; Slide R ule Club 3; Class Basketball 1, 3.

T ubby

Jack

JO H N PA U L M cK EN N A Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating i, 2, 3, 4; Prefect of Sodality 4; T e n 足 nis 1, 2, 3, 4; T rack 2; Class Basket足 ball 1, 2, 3, 4.

JO H N FR A N C IS M cT IG U E K. B. S.; Debating i , 2; Class VicePres. 1; Class Sec. 2, 3; Class Basket足 ball i, 2, 3, 4.

Speed

Mack

M ike

RAYM O ND FRAN CIS M cKEN N A Sodality 2, 3, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3; Class Baseball 1, 2.

TH O M AS P A T R IC K MAHAN Sodality 2; K. B. S.; Debating 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 3, 4; Camera Club 2; Class Basketball 1,, 3.

Red Thirty-six


JO SEPH FR A N C IS M A L L A R D

T H O M A S JO SEPH M ALO N EY

JA M E S ALO YSIU S M A RO N EY

K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Band 3; Track 1, 2; Baseball 4.

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; P e t r e a n ; T rack 3, 4; French Club 3; Class Treas. 1, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Sodality 1, 2, 3; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; P e t r e a n ; Senior Council; Consultor 2, 3; Class Pres. 1, 4; Class Sec. 2.

R IC H A R D JO SEP H M O R LEY

JOSEPH A U G U ST IN E M U LLE

R O B E R T JO H N M A T U R I Editor of P e t r e a n ; Senior Council; Baseball 3, 4; Class Pres. 1, 2, 3; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1 . 2, 3 . 4-

H00& Thirty-seven

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Secretary 2; Class Basketball 2; Class Baseball 1, 2; Class Sec. 2.

jSw/i

Jim

Bob

Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Football 2, 4; Catechist 3, 4; Orchestra 1; Camera Club 3, 4; French Club 3, 4.

Dick

Joe


P E T E R P A T R IC K M U R N E R Sodality 2, 3, 4; Consultor 3; Business Manager of P e t r e a n ; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3- 4-

JO H N JO SEPH O CKAY Sodality 4; K. B. S.; Class Basketball 1; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3.

Pete

T om

TH O M A S JE R E M IA H M U R PH Y

W ILLIA M JA M ES N O RTO N

K. B. S.; Debating 1; Dramatics 4; Football 3; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

M A T T H E W JO SEPH O’CO N N ELL Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Prefect 2; Secretary 1; Debating i, 2; Dramatics 2; French Club 3, 4; Class Basketball 1.

B ill

Smiley

Bob

Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.

EDW ARD ALO YSIUS O’D O N N ELL Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Odee Thirty-eight


H A RR Y ANTH ONY O’M E A LIA Sodality i, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Prefect 2; Consultor 4; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; D ra­ matics 2, 4; Senior Council; French Club 4; Class Pres. 1; Class Vice-Pres. 4; Class Treas. 3; Class Basketball 1,

RO BERT

Sodality i, 2, 3, 4; Prefect 1; Ass’t Prefect 2; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Pres. 3; Class Treas. 4; Senior Council; Class Basketball 1; Class Baseball 1.

Oats Thirty-nine

O’N E IL L

Sodality 3, 4; K. B. S.; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Captain of Football; Class Pres. 3, 4; Class Vice-Pres. 2; Class Basket­ ball 2, 3, 4.

2> 3- 4-

JO H N EDW ARD RED D Y

JO SEPH

PA U L JO SEPH R IV IE R E Sodality 3; P e t r e a n ; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3; Class Baseball 1, 2.

Bob

Otto

Ace

D O N N ELL ALO YSIU S O T T O L IN A Sodality Club 4.

1,

2;

Sacristan

1;

French

H A RO LD ST EPH EN RODDY Sodality 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 4; Classical Club 3; French Club 3, 4; Class Basketball 3; Class Baseball 1.

R ed

Steffi


FR A N C IS G E R A R D S C H M IT T

W IL L IA M EDW ARD R U A N E K. B. S.; Debating 4.; Assâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Manager of Basketball 1, 2; Class Sec. 1, 2; Class Basketball 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2,

Sodality i, 2; K. B. S.; Class Vice-Pres. 1; Class Sec. 2.

3> 4*

FR A N C IS C A R R O L L SCH O LLE Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Organist 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.: P f t r f . a n ; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Camera Club 3, 4; Class Sec. 1; Class Treas. 2.

]{u

Smitty

H EN R Y G EO R G E SC H M IT T

B E R N A R D JOSEPH SCH U M A CH ER

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Secretary 4; Class Pres. 3; French Club 3, 4.

TH O M AS G ER A R D SM ITH

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Consultor 2; K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2; Basketball 4; French Club 3; Class Pres. 1; Class Vice-Pres. 3; Class Sec. 4; Class Basketball 1, 2,

Sodality 2, 3; Consultor 2;

P

etrean

3> 4-

Hank

Frank

Bernie

Tom t'oi ly

.


C H A R LE S JO SEPH SOKOL Sodality 1, 2, 3; K. B. S.; Track 1; Chess Club 1; Camera Club 3; Class Basketball i, 2; Class Baseball i, 2, 3, 4.

JO H N A L E X IS SOM ERS K. B. S.; Football 3; Swimming Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

C H E S T E R FR A N C IS T A R A SK IE W IC Z

JO H N JO SEPH SW EEN EY Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Debating 3.

Charley Fortv-nne

W ill

Sodality 3; K. B. S.; Debating 1; Class Sec. 2, 3.

W ILLIA M G E R A R D TARRANT Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Assâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Prefect 2; Jayvee Basketball 3; Class Pres. 2; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.

K. B. S.; Debating i.

Jack

W ILLIA M B E N N E T T SOM ERS

Chuck

Terry

B ill


RAYM O N D JA M E S THO M PSO N

V IC T O R B E R N A R D T K A C

Sodality 1, s, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Manager of Football; Orchestra 1, 2, 4; Class Basketball 2, 3; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

K. B. S.; P e t r e a n ; T rack 4; Swimminsr 3; Debating 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball ÂŁ 2, 3, 4.

TH O M A S F R A N C IS T O R P E Y

JA M E S FR A N C IS V A R L E Y

K. B. S.; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 4; Senior Council; Track 3, 4; Class Pres. i, 3; Class Vice-Pres. 2; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Sodality 3, 4; Assâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Prefect 4; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; President 2; Dramatics 3, 4; French Club 4; Class Vice-Pres. 3; Class Sec. 2, 4.

T ru ck

V ic

Tom

Jim Forty-two


JO SEPH JO H N W ALSH

W ILLIA M P A T R IC K W ALSH

K. B. S.; Football 1, 2, g, 4; Track i, Senior Council; Class Treas. 1, 2, 3; Class Basketball 1, 2; Class Baseball

Sodality 3, 4; Jayvee Basketball 3; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

i. 3- 4-

A N T H O N Y F L E M IN G W ILLIA M S Sodality 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; French Club 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Jo e Forty-three

B ill

FR A N C IS G IL M O R E W ILLIA M S Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S.; Consultor 1, 2; Football 3; French Club 3; Class Basketball x, 2, 3, 4; Class Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Tony

W illy


>


JUNIOR M

Untereiner, Gardner, W. Bruder. Bonascli, Fitzpatrick, Giordano, Ptaszynski, McLaughlin. Portfolio, Sullivan, Lynch, Miller. E. Bruder, Montagne, Mr. Cullen, Keane, Hawkes. Eugene Bruder, Pres.: Maurice M cLaughlin, Vice-Pres.; Jam es Montagne, Sec.; Almerindo Portfolio, Treas.

Thomas Kearney, Pres.; Richard Pres.; Joh n Marroney, Sec.

H ill, ViceBeaman, Farrell, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Regan, Turro, Egan, Sweeney. Madigan, Neale, Galiani, R . Sheridan, Toth, McNamara. McGee, Lynch, Marroney, Meyer, Meaney, McGuire, Kelshaw. Johnson, Lally, McGovern, Fay, Zajac, McLaughlin. J. Sheridan, Hill, Mr. McVann, Kearney, Marks.

JUNIOR A

Forty-eight


JUNIOR B

Day, Lohr, Schlitt, Doherty, Giella. Golding, R yan, Furlong, Molloy, Loughlin, Halleron. Jazowski, Baggot, Monahan, Hayes, Cuddihy, Manning. Mahon, O’Leary, Lafrano, O’Connor, Walsh, Balipski, Reardon. Kraynik, Dates, Mr. Madden, G illigan, M urphy. Robert Lohr, Pres.; Jo h n G illigan, Vice-Pres.: Joh n Jazowski, Sec.

Dattoli, Jah n, Carey, McArdle, Crosby, Kane, Lynch. VanBemmel, Thaler, Murphy, O’Neill, O’Brien, McMahon, Moskal. Abitante, Brady, Schmeideberg, Wishbow, Judge. Fleckenstein, Coyle, A. Pontone, R . Pontone, Folger, Bayardi. Lacey, Walter, Mr. Orthen, Wildermann, Sharp.

JUNIOR C Forty-nine

Joseph Carey, Pres.; Anthony Abitante, Vice Pres.; Alexander Wishbow, Sec.; Joh n Crosby, T reas.


JUNIOR D

Joseph Pres.

Keegan,

Pres.;

Francis

Clossey, Vice-

McNulty, Cosiello, Kelly. Marnell, Lynch, Ceran, Keeffe, Murphy, McCarren, Keegan. Romano, lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; alomba, Enright, Holmes, Gallagher, Donnelly. Hayes, Fleming, Elmiger, Cregg, Clossey. I.auerman, O'Day, George, Mr. Ivers, S.J., M ar key, Sweeney, Senec.

Thomas Lally, Pres.; Charles Viskovitch, VicePres.; Walter Corrigan, Sec.; W illiam Dully, T reas. Walty, Viskovitch, Flaherty, Mara, Donovan, Pierce, Orth. Lydon, Murphy, Galvin, Lally, Borys. Calley, Sheehan, Tracy, Roebuck. Wade, Mullen, Cosdgan, Walsh, Corrigan. Lamb, Enright, Mr. Gormley, S.J., Botti, Dully, Trainor.

JUNIOR E Fifty


SOPHOMORE A

Beach tier, Izsa, Sheridan, Kaltenbach, Lynch, Hanley. Caulfield, Morton, Dwyer, Stapleton, Greene. H elly, Brady, Treanor, W alter, Carroll, Brand. Tarrant, Steinmetz, McDonough, Fr. Purcell, S.J., Farad , Stulz, Me Avow W illiam McDonough, Pres.; Angelo Mangieri, Vice-Pres.; W hiting Stulz, Sec.; H arry Steinmetz, Treas.

McDermott, Hogue, Conway, Tiernan, Denboske, Driscoll, Keller. Varley, Gannon, Ford, Mokryzcki, Keating, Kelly, Lavender. Corcoran, Haskins, Connell, Rojeski, Gallagher, Crotty. Walsh, Deegan, Sisti, Mr. Kelly, Jacobson, Coyle, Badois.

SOPHOMORE B F ifty -o n e

Joh n Walsh, Pres.; Edward Varley, Vice-Pres., John Coyle, Sec.


SOPHOMORE C

Shannon, Nolan, Rafferty, Connolly, Loud, Heyliger, Dunstan. Kane, Ford, McCarthy, Maloney, Looney, Condon, Burns. Lyden, McGovern, McDonald, Gallagher, McNeill, Berlotti. Carroll, Grabler, O ’Connor, Rinaldi, Menge, Keale. DeBaun, Simmons, Mr. McEvoy, S.J., Fellmer, Fitzpatrick. Francis Shannon, Pres.; H arold Ford, Vice-Pres»; Daniel Burns, Sec.

Edward Boylan, Pres.; Thom as Crawford, VicePres.; Raymond Cusick, Sec.

R eilly, Cusick, Crawford, Cogan, Tsigounis, McEntee, Ullman. Smith, Doody, Bruder, Boylan, Givens. Daly, Dolan, Curley, Cereghino, Allegretta, Kozar, McKenna. Delfino, Guarriello, Prezioso, Rutkowski, Kaufman, Castagnetti. Cronin, Clohessy, Hufnagel, Mr. Mclnerney, Lacy, Quig­ ley, Killen.

SOPHOMORE D Fifty-two


SOPHOMORE E

Driscoll, Cox, Corballis, Carheart, Couchman, Flynn. Fee, Buckley, Harris, M cCahill, M urray, McGuinness, Grady. Latacz, Sheehan, Carluccio, R usin, Dini, Cacioli, Allegretta, Lewis. Sillery, Blum , Gennaro, Poleto, Norz, Fitzmorris. Nestor, Nelson, Walsh, Mr. Klein, Quinn, Steinhilber, Pavlicka.

Hughes, Arasimowicz, Wolfe, McCarren, M artin, Burke, Davis. Jachera, Stankiewicz, Brennan, Downing, Simpson, M ulli­ gan, Alexander. Aderenti, Tym on, Norton, Gallagher, Tozzoli, Regan, Driscoll. O’Dea, Dalton, Mr. Duffy, Walsh, Strangio, Mooney.

SOPHOMORE

Fifty-three

Edmond Buckley, Pres.; Lester McGuinness, Vice-Pres.; Eugene Steinhilber, Sec.; George Pavlicka, Treas.

Joseph O’Dea, Pres.; Robert Hughes, Vice-Pres., Henry Aderenti, Sec.; Alexander Arasimowicz, Treas.


FRESHMAN A

O'Brien, Bott, Mangine, Gut-

John Conniff, Pres.; Edward Sheridan, VicePres.; W illiam Woods, Sec.; Robert Bott, Treas.

Joseph Fitzpatrick, Pres.; Jam es Finn, Vice-Pres.; Vincent Alfanoso, Sec.; Richard Mietzelfeld, Treas.

Metzger, Cunningham, Condon, Flacksenhaar. Tretola, Tverdak, Woods, M iller, Curtin. Coniff, W. O’Brien, Deering, Galianese, Devine, Dunstan, Ruvane. Lynch, Connell, Hoffman, Fr. Murray, S.J., Bonito, Waldron, Kudzin.

Mietzelfeld, Mullen, Bardel, Affanoso. Fitzgerald, Alfano, Panucci, Zahn, Hartnett, Nevin Long, McCann, Bligh, Finn, Brennan, Zabicki, Murphy. Kelly, Fitzpatrick, Hanley, McGrath, Smith, Greene, O’Brien. Connolly, Senger, Miller, Mr. Murray, S.J., Devaney, Donohue, Meyer.

FRESHMAN B

Fifty-four


FRESHMAN C

H alligan, Costello, G illigan, Benna, Donoghue, Winslow, Loughlin, Somers, Meehan. Gibson, Moran, McCarthy, Moore, Kelly, Farley, McCandless, Maloney. Fenton, Poli, Gorman, Sheridan, Lewandowski, Ronan, Wishbow. Flinn, McNamara, M urphy, Mr. Coolahan, S.J., McMullen, Banville, Joyce.

Meehan, Burde, Moskal, Cullen, Spellman, Gillen Aslanian, Coughlin, M ullen, Hughes, Garone, Carroll, Horoszewski. Fitzpatrick, Rubino, McKaig, Burke, Powell, Smith, Beglin. Feeney, Noll, Quinn, Cody, Jordan. Hamm, Fenton, LoMacchio, Mr. Flaherty, S.J., Scarpetta, Zubicki, Neary.

FRESHMAN D

Fifty-five

Hubert Moran, Pres.; Joh n Gibson, Vice-Pres., Garrett Wishbow, Sec.; Leo Costello, Treas.

Frank Burde, Pres.; Ricardo Powell, Vice-Pres.; Maurice Fitzpatrick, Sec.; Jam es Scarpetta, Treas.


FRESHMAN E

Joseph Buckley, Pres.; Francis Dooley, VicePres.; Thom as McCarthy, Sec.; Robert M on­ prode, Treas.

Barber, Gillen, Hoften, Juncewicz, Keegan, O’Neill, Finkle, Brady, J . Lynch. Murphy, Roero, Morgan, Ronholz, Lezynski, Campanella, Monprode. Atkjnson, Lisa, Buckley, Keenan, Holsey, Melega, Drennan. Curran, McCarthy, Godlewski, Mr. McCabe, Dooley, T . Lynch, Griffen.

Bernard White, Pres.; George Harrington, VicePres.; Joh n Leavy, Sec.; Joseph Croasdale, Treas.

Addas, Foran, Kelly, Kozakiewicz, Leavy, Keegan. Harrington, Winslow, Croasdale, Heck, Varano, Kane. Nitto, Appell, McQuade, Wadsworth, Jodzio, Walsh. Cunningham, Moran, O’Donnell, Vuocola, Flynn. McGowan, Lahiff, Ruane, Mr. Morris, White, Hansen, Davis.

FRESHMAN F

Fifty-six


FRESHMAN G

Sutton, Edwards, Cicone, Moriarity, Eagan. Kelly, Gourley, McAndrews, Ertle, Gilson, Hanley, Leroy. M allard, Gallagher, Nesbitt, Rose, Keller, Sullivan. Egan, M cGuire, W illiams, Beyer, Murphy. Nestor, W alty, Condon, Wilson, Mr. Rooney, Henry, Bovle, Zuber.

Edgar Keller, Pres.; Joseph Gourley, Vice-Pres.; Cornelius Gallagher, Sec.; Joseph McAndrews, Treas.

Arthur Kuhn, Pres.; W illiam Brennan, VicePres.; John Murnane, Sec.; Albert DePasquale, Treas.

Murnane, Beddiges, Digan, Kuhn, Brennan. Browski, DeMarco, Orlando, Rinaldi, Turley, Hoffman. DeFuccio, DePasquale, Mr. O'Hale, S.J., Coleman, Ricciardi.

FRESHMAN M

F ifty -s e v e n


crppseJ’® 5'* [

i f

e

< rp ^ eip


SENIOR

R eading clockwise around the table: Donnelly, Maroney, M aturi, Torpey, Reddy, Keenan, O ’M ealia, Fahy, Walsh, Coughlin, Beronio.

Once again, at a banquet held in the Cataret Club, the initial meeting of the Senior C ouncil was called to order. Presiding was Father Shalloe, seconded by Father B u tler and M r. M adden. A fter the excellent dinner, these three addressed the Council, congratulating the newly-elected members and inform ing them of their duty for the com ing year. T h orou gh ly representative, the Council is composed of twelve members, each Senior Section having elected three of their classmates. From Senior M the Councilors are Raym ond Keenan, R obert Donnelly, Joseph Walsh; from Senior A , Jo h n R eddy, Peter Beronio, H arry O ’ M ealia; from Senior B, Thom as T orp ey, T homas Fahy, Charles Coughlin; from Senior C, Robert M aturi, James M aroney and Hans A lbert. T h e Senior Council plans and directs Senior social activities. T h e first entertainm ent sponsored by the Council was a Father-and-Son Smoker. T h e Ju n io rs were invited to come and bring their fathers and the affair was a huge success. T h ere were songs, sketches, football movies and other enter­ tainment. A fter the Sons had exercised their talent, the Fathers added their bit to the evening’s enjoyment. N ot to be outdone, a Faculty glee club sang several old tunes. T h e finale of the evening’s program was the serving of refreshments in the cafeteria.

Sixty-two


COUNCIL E arly in the football season, the C oun cil suggested that the athletic asso­ ciation should issue season passes for the football games to be played at home. T h e suggestion was acted upon and these passes, sold at a discount helped the attendance greatly. It was also at the suggestion of the Council that the graduation rings were obtained for the Seniors before Christmas. T o celebrate the com pletion of the first term, the C ouncil sponsored a very successful inform al dance at the end of January. Needless to say, the affair was attended by m any of the seniors and their “ cousins” . T h is dance at the C ollin s Gym nasium , relieved the tenseness of exam ination week and provided a b it of relaxation before the long struggle facing the Seniors. T em p o rarily forgetting the du ll grind of studies, the graduates-to-be glided along to the m usic of Dan K irk ’s Band. A ll who were present agreed upon a vote of thanks to the C oun cil and to those members of the Faculty who were responsible for the success of this affair. A t the beginning of the second term in February, the new Senior M sec­ tion held an election to replace those members of the Council who had finished their course at the Prep. Jam es M ontagne, Eugene Bru der and A lm erin do Portfolio were elected. Follow in g precedent, this selection kept the C ouncil a very representative group of Seniors. A ll are sodalists and all have taken a leading part in the extra-curricular activities of the school. As this book goes to press, the Council is m aking plans and preparing entertainm ent for another Senior N ight. A n d in the back of their heads, there is always the Senior Prom to be held in Ju n e . Good luck to the C oun­ cil and its plans and many thanks to its zealous moderator!

A R T H U R G. M AD D EN M oderator

Sixty-three


SENIOR SODALITY “ M other, behold thy son. Son behold thy m other” . W hen Christ died on the cross, H e gave to us H is own mother. W e were given the M other of G od to love, honor and obey. T h u s we, as sodalists, also received M ary as our M other and our special duty is to protect her interests which are the same as the interests of her Son. U nder the guidance of Father Butler, S.J., we all try to lead a sodalist’s life: a life of honoring and pleasing Mary. W e wish to protect M ary from the slander and the attacks which the un­ worthy level against her and her Son. Every M onday afternoon, we meet to give external honor to our M other and to hear Father B u tler’s instruc­ tions on various practical aspects of our religion. En m ity toward G od in the w orld of today is the gravest problem with which Catholics are faced. Com m unism and Fascism present themselves as the serpent which we must help M ary to crush under her feet. Each week we receive Catholic literature which helps us in our fight against the “ isms” . As soldiers of Christ and M ary, we. thus strengthen ourselves to defeat the forces alien to God. W e should also m ention the fact that under Father B u tler’s leadership, we try to brin g a little jo y to the unfortunate. B y visits and gifts at Christ­ mas time, we endeavour to brin g into their lives a ray of sunshine, a bit of happiness. W orthy of mention also is the spiritual union of the sodalists in praying for each other and for deceased relations of sodalists who have gone to their heavenly rew ard; and also the mission raffle and the mite box cam­ paign w itc h stand out as two great works led by the sodalists.

Sixty-four


Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;M ealia, Holmes, Carey, Giella. M cLaughlin, T urro, Walsh, Lally, Fahy, Roebuck, O'Day. Schmitt, McKenna, Keenan, Varley, Scholle.

D u rin g M ay, we had the usual M ay devotions in honor of M ary. A lthough simple in form , they attracted the attention of many passersby who stopped for a moment to observe this model of the love of O ur Lady. Sodalists again led the devotions w ith all the members givin g clear, rin ging praise to the Blessed M other. D u rin g the Lenten season, the sodalists tried to lead their fellow students in perform ing some little work of penance each day. In inspiring us in the perform ance of such small but im portant details of our Catholic life, we graduates w ill miss the work of the sodality but we w ill certainly endeavour to live in the w orld as we have lived during our school years. W e think that this is the proper place to express our public tribute to the late Pope Pius X I , as well as to praise G od in His goodness for giving us our new Pontiff, H is Holiness, Pope Pius X I I . T h e form er guided the Church with great spiritual acumen in a time of great difficulty and danger not only to organized religion but even to the very existence of any belief in God; the latter has already shown in his life a talent and an ability and a willingness to follow closely in the footsteps of his great predecessor.

Sixty-five


Meaney, McGovern, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;N eill, Furlong, Neale, Kearney, Mulle. Giella, McCarthy, Madigan, Walsh.

THE CATECHISTS Potent Catholic A ction plays an im portant role in the life of the sodalist. One evident m anifestation of this is the zeal with which the members of the sodality pictured on this page have given of their time and energy to a most worthy cause. T h e y have faithfu lly instructed in the fundamentals of Catholic doctrine children who have not the advantage of attending a Catho­ lic school. T h e ir devotion to this work has accomplished wonders.

Lohr, Day, Frank, Keenan.


o

V

E

JO H N A. G O R M L E Y , S.J. Director

R

JA M E S J . M A R R Coach

fT * J-

w I

Sixty-seven


Neil Henry as O liver William Hampton as B ill Sikes

Edward Byrne as Fagin Louis Beachner as Nancy

The house lights grew dim, a hush swept over the audience and slowly the curtain rose on the Prep’s presentation of Charles Dickens’ popular “ Oliver Twist” . Would the weeks of tedious labor spent in rehearsals prove futile or would the annual play under the unrelenting efforts of Mr. Gormley, S.J., and Mr. Marr, live up to precedent? The hearty applause of the audience has decided the case. Viewing with pleasure the polished play, few of the audience realized the difficulties connected with such a drama; the fur­ rowed brows of the business staff; the hustle of the stage crew; the quaking hearts and throbbing temples of the actors! All were as much a part of the performance as the presentation of the play itself. Fortunately, the audience saw only the finished product. Neil Henry so vividly portrayed the character of the destitute Oliver that it seemed as if Dickens had written the part in imita­ tion of just such a lad. The sly cunning of crafty Fagin, de­ picted by Edward Byrne was marvellous. Romance and rollicking comedy were provided by the courting and subsequent marriage and violent quarrelling of the egotistical tyrant, Mr. Bumble, and the wretched Mrs. Corney. The boisterous and murderous Bill Sikes was quite a different character from the quiet and Sixty-eight


retiring Bill Hampton, as we know him. Louis Beachner, in por­ traying the character of Nancy Sikes, was really brilliant. We wonder if he will be able to live down such a perfect portrayal! John Gilligan, in the guise of the Artful Dodger, and William Rose as Charley Bates (buddies in Fagin’s gang) upheld the Limehouse District with their unforgettable cockney accents. You could scarcely believe that an upright Prepster named Thomas Manning was behind the make-up of that gentleman thief, Monks. Leo Stapleton and Harry O’Mealia displayed the warmth and sympathy of a middle aged couple with the finesse of experienced actors. T he fickleness of a grouchy old lawyer was well imitated by John McGivern with his quivering speech and rheumatic hobble; while James Varley in the person of Brownlow made us love the shuffling habits of the kind old man. John Walsh and Robert DeBaun as Charlotte and Noah Claypole injected un­ accustomed humour into Mr. Sowerberry’s funeral parlor. T hat dour person was portrayed by Thomas Fahy. T he stiff shirts of the butlers hid John Roebuck and Winfield Bruder. Joseph McDonough as the hard-hearted magistrate and John Dolan and Walter Cullen as the two detectives assisted by Officer Sutton filled out the excellent cast. John Roebuck as Giles Walter Cullen as Blathers

John Dolan as Duff Winfield Bruder as Brittles

Sixty-nine


JUNIOR SODALITY

rI™he

. activities . .

. . . Junior Sodality

first semester of the were inaugurated on September 21st, when four hun­ dred first and second year students m et.' Mr. Eugene Murray, S.J., was appointed Assistant to the Moderator. Later he was withdrawn to be moderator of the school band and Mr. Richard Coolahan, S.J., and Mr. Robert Flaherty, S.J., then took charge of the Mission and Eucharistic sections respectively. Some sodalists wrote to missionaries in the Philippines and Iraq just in time to make the Christmas delivery. Stamps in quantities found their way to our office, which were passed on to the Senior Sodality for recognition before being shipped to the Mission Stamp Exchange at Woodstock. The Junior Sodalists feel happy also at being able to participate so largely in the success of the Mission raffle.

Rev. Raymond I. Purcell, S.J.

Moderator

McGrath, Izsa, Curtin, Mokrzycki, McGinnis, Sheridan, Hughes, McKenna, DeBaun. McGowan, White, Nestor, Atkinson, Nevin, Haskins, Helly, Bruder, Boyle, Beglin, Quinn, Lynch. Rojeski, McDonough, Stapleton, Greene, Sheridan, Keller. Seventy


A group of Ju n io r Sodalists on their on their way to St. Francis Hospital to distribute good literature and good cheer.

The Vigilance Committee continues its good work under the present prefect, Finian Greene. Some dozen letters have been printed in the daily papers on such topics as Communism, the Embargo on Arms to Spain, the Jehovah Wit­ nesses and so forth. Most of the writers were members of Sophomore A, the out­ standing class of the Junior Sodality. Under the zealous touch of Leo Stapleton, First Assistant, our work in hos­ pitals has increased. T he organization of bands for trips to the hospitals has been perfected so that the sick are periodically supplied with Catholic literature. Many sodalists have contributed generously for this purpose. Christ Hospital, a non-Catholic institution, is now being visited weekly by a group under the leadership of a Senior Sodalist, John McKenna. Similar visits are being made to the sick in Greenville Hospital: these are guided by Raymond Keenan, Prefect of the Senior Sodality. The Christmas Bundle Drive for the sick was a greater success this year than last. Owing to the generosity of the members a sum was raised that enabled the committee in charge to provide gift packages for over two hundred men and children. While this distribution was being made, a choir composed of members from both sodalities under the direction of James Ryan, made the rounds of the respective wards singing Christmas carols. At different times, Father Murray, S.J., and Father Walter, S.J., addressed our meetings. We appreciated their thoughtfulness and tried to profit by their ex­ hortations. Our Reverend Principal opened the second semester sessions with a talk on the Ideals of our faith. In March a spiritual reading circle was organized. The members were to meet for a half hour each week for the reading of a chapter of some saint’s life. T he Moderator promised that the reading would be as interesting as any adventure story. An increase of zeal was expected to fol­ low on this activity.

Seventy-one


DEBATING

O’Mealia, Hannon, Maloney, McKenna, Schlitt, O'Regan, Egan, Giella, Cuddihy. McGivern, Hayes, Meaney, T u rro, R . McCarthy, Mullen, Roebuck, Murphy, Lally, Henkel. A. McCarthy, Kennedy, Maroney, Fahey, Varley.

Early in the first semester, Mr. McEvoy, S.J., called the initial meeting of the Debating Society. Many responded, both veteran debaters and novices. During the first term, weekly debates were conducted. Lively topics of the day provided plentiful material for the debaters and excited heated discussion from the floor. Late in the fall, a group composed of James Cuddihy, Augustine Giella, Thomas Maloney and Joseph Lally, represented the Society and the Prep at a meeting of the St. Paul’s Holy Name Society. T he topic discussed was Naziism and its possible relation to and effect upon the United States. The group easily measured up to the high standards set by former Beaudevin teams. All the work of the Society during the first term was eminently successful and all those who partici­ pated in its activities are to be congratulated. During the repetition period, debate work lapsed in favor of ardent preparation for examinations. At the beginning of the second term, the Debating Society as such was dissolved and in its place a series of inter-class debates was scheduled. It was thought that the benefits of debate work, which are many and important, could thus be spread more widely among the students.

Seventy-two


T he fourth year sections devote the last two periods of each Wednesday to these debates. T he third and second year sections conduct a debate once every three weeks. Three men teams represent the classes at these meetings. The ordinary debating rules are followed with the exception that rebuttal is provided by speakers from the floor. T he judges are the two class teachers and Mr. McEvoy, S.J. T his system of debates has worked out very well and the inter-class competition has aroused a great deal of interest. In February, a team was chosen for an inter­ scholastic debate with Brooklyn Preparatory School. Francis Haynes, Harry O’Mealia and James Maroney made up the team. T he question read: “ Resolved, that the United States should form an alliance with Great Britain” . Saint Peter’s upheld the affirmative and won by a unanimous decision. T he same team had pre­ viously opposed Regis High School in a non­ decision debate. Early in March, tryouts were held for the an­ nual Fordham oratorical contest. From the can­ didates six men were chosen to compete before the student body for the honor of representing the Prep at Fordham. T he judges, Mr. McEvoy, S.J., Mr. O’Sullivan, and Mr. Marr chose Harry O’Mealia and in the contest at Fordham he was awarded third place.

Joseph J McEvoy S I M oderator

P u blic Debaters Jam es Maroney, Harry O’Mealia and Francis Hayes.

Seventy-three


PETREAN

Here we have the power behind the throne: Thomas Smith, Paul Riviere and Peter Murner. They make up the business staff of the 1 9 3 9 P e t r e a n , under the managership of Peter Murner. Sell足 ing advertising space, whether by letter or by personal calls, is a dull occupation. These three have not only been success足 ful but also eminently good-humoured about the whole job.

Edmond F. X. Ivers, S.J. M oderator


Robert Maturi has headed the staff of the 1939 P e t r e a n . Thomas Ma­ loney has been an able assistant edi­ tor, taking care of much of the tedious work necessary in producing a year­ book. John Connolly has been sports editor, capably seconded by Thomas Cookson. T h eir strenuous labor is patently successful. Others who have generously worked in both the edi­ torial and business departments are Francis McNally, John Henkel, Fran­ cis Scholle, Raymond Keenan, James Maroney, Francis McCarthy, Victor Tkac, Robert Henson, Edward Gor­ man and Harry Hoffen. James Gan­ non has also contributed his artistic talent. T he publication of a yearbook of this size is a job that requires the cooperation of many persons. We think that this book is a sufficient tribute to the willingness of the staff members to do what they were told, when, and how, and where. T he edi­ tors are grateful. There is nothing else we can say save that it has been a lot of fun as well as a lot of work.

Left to right around the table: Cookson, Maroney, McCarthy, M cNally, Henkel, Con­ nolly, Scholle.

Seventy-five


THE LIBRARY Maguire, Hoften, Williams and Connift constitute the library stnFF


Standing: McGivern, Mulle, Gorman, M cNally, Henkel, M ullen, Conlin, Joseph. Seated: Williams, Henson, Hamm, Frank, Enright.

CAMERA CLUB STAMP CLUB

Standing: Lally, Joseph, Gorman. Seated: Mulle, Henson, Mullen, McNally, Frank.

Seventy-seven


T H E ST U D EN T S' CH A PEL

Seventy-eight

1


Rev. Jam es J . B all, S.J.

Rev. Lawrence R . McHugh, S.J.

Rev. Joseph E. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, S.J.

OUR ORDINANDI Rev. Patrick Fitzpatrick, Rev. Edward A. Hennessey, Rev. Thaddeus A. Zajac, Rev. Martin Sherry.

g g g ip t

Seventy-nine


FOOTBALL Advance notices in the newspapers predicted that Saint Peter’s Prep would have a light, fast and shifty team for the 1938 football season. A good indication was noticed in the fact that Coach Tommy Myers was converting Ed Lynch, a champion sprinter, into an excellent halfback. Other speedsters and several good passers were also noted on the prac­ tice field. A number of veterans from last year’s team had reported again, notably Johnny Cox, Steve Bloom, Bob O’Neill, Jim McGee, Jim Mc­ Namara, Joe Walsh, Johnny G alla­ gher, Dick Higgins, Bill McCarthy and Dan Sheehy. The outlook was de­ cidedly bright for Coach Myers who

had a number of promising reserves besides these veterans. Early in Sep­ tember, Ed Conti of the Jersey Giants replaced Dick King who had resigned from the coaching staff. Montgomery Annex hummed with activity and back in the school yard the band polished up its horns and practiced the Victory March. Living up to pre-game expectations, the Prep started the season in a bril­ liant fashion by defeating Emerson High School to the tune of thirteen to six. Of the two teams, Emerson was the more seasoned, having ahead" played two games, so that this was a well earned victory for the Grand Streeters.

Ass’t Mgr. Simpson, Coach Myers, Mgr. Albert, Ass’t Mgr. Furlong. Walsh, Jah n , Grady, H ill, McCarthy, Higgins, Beck, Allegretta, Coach Conti. Coughlin, Th aler, Dattoli, Donovan, McGee, J. McCarren, Giordano, Ciccone, Arasimowicz, Coach Cannella. W. McCarren, Croasdale, McGrail, McMahon, Van Bemmel, Wolfe, Flynn, Moskal. Gardner, Doherty, Abitante, Halleron, Gennaro, Boylan, McArdle, Molloy, Farrell. Lotowycz, M cLaughlin, D. Lynch, Jerm ak, Captain O ’Neill, Cox, E. Lynch, McNamara, Leucht.


I S S ri

Assistant Coach Jo h n Cannella played for Fordham

and

has

been line coach at the Prep for a

number

of

years.

Coach

Tom m y Myers, also from Ford­ ham, has been

training

men

and muscle for many years at the Prep.

Assistant Coach Ed

Conti, formerly of Bucknell and now of the Jersey Giants, is a newcomer to our staff.

T he first to score on that beautiful, sunny afternoon was Saint Peter’s. After a few minutes of play, Steve Bloom ran back a punt from his own forty-five yard line to Emerson’s thirtyeight. Lynch, Cox and Lotowycz suc­ cessively hammered and slashed their way through the Emerson line for eighteen yards in three tries. The Prep rooters were going wild. Cox faded back and tossed a perfect for­ ward into the outstretched arms of Ed Lynch, standing in the end zone. Cox then booted the extra point and the Prep had a lead of seven points. Emerson was not yet beaten. Andy Torre, a hard driving halfback, scored for Emerson after a sixty-five yard

Eighty-one

march down the field. During this sustained drive the Prep defense vis­ ibly weakened under Emerson’s power plays. After this however, our line tightened and held the opposition to small gains. Emerson’s try for the extra point was low so that Saint Peter’s still held a one point lead. During the rest of the second period and for the dura­ tion of the third, the game was an even struggle marked by excellent play on both sides. But in the last quarter, the Prepsters by dint of a little more speed and power, were able to score again. They moved rapidly from their own forty yard line to the Emerson twenty, thanks to Lotowycz. Then


m

came the best play of the afternoon. Running like a startled deer, Ed Lynch tore through right guard, cut sharply to his right and went down the field for a touchdown unmolested by a single tackier. Decisive block­ ing on the part of the whole team made the run possible. T hat was all the scoring for the afternoon. The Prep staved off a last minute aerial at­ tack that thrilled the stands but came to a poor end. T he Prep went home with an outstanding victory, buoyed up by the knowledge that they had lived up to all the pre-game fore­ casts. But the vague hope of enjoying an undefeated season was crushed

when Ferris won the next game, nine­ teen to nothing. T he Grand Streeters played inspired ball during the first half, holding the favored Ferris team scoreless. But the second half was the Bulldog’s striking opportunity. T he Prep was worn out but fought fiercely to stop the Ferris steamroller. But Ferris was to score and score they did—three times in the last part of the game. The stars for the Prep’s defensive battle were Bob O’Neill, Dan Lynch, Jim McGee—for that mat­ ter the whole line. •A week later, Saint Peter’s won a decisive victory over Saint Catherine’s of New York. The final count was twenty-four to nothing.

Behind excellent blocking, Cox goes off tackle for a substantial gain.


E. H. M urray, S.J. M oderator

It is our pride and our glory, Old in song and in story, A nd we cherish your name, A nd we love your fair fame, For the days of long ago. A nd we your sons w ill be loyal To Saint Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so royal, May your banners still guide us, Wherever we go.

Eighty-three


halfback, received the ball from center, faded back to midfield and tossed a rifle pass to Leucht on the thirty yard line. Leucht sidestepped a secondary, went down the sideline, evaded the last defense man by a clever change of pace and scored the Prep’s last touchdown. This game was marked by the out­ standing work of McGee, Mc­ Mahon, Jermak, and Higgins, as well as those players already mentioned.

Captain Robert O’Neill

From the whistle, Saint Peter’s out­ look was bright. T he visitors were never out of trouble as the Prepsters unleashed an attack that enabled them to score four times. T he game was only a few minutes old when Ed Lynch dashed fifty-five yards around end to score. T he Prep was inside the twenty yard line three times dur­ ing that period but each attack was turned back just when a goal seemed certain. Early in the second period, however, Steve Bloom scored on a center plunge. In this play Steve dem­ onstrated his remarkable power as he dragged several men over the line with him. A brilliant run excited the stands in the third period when Leo Lotowycz intercepted a pass and galloped seventy yards to the goal line. Leo ou traced his pursuers down the side­ lines, cut across the field and scored standing up. It remained for Charley Coughlin and Frank Leucht to top off the day with another score in the fourth period. Coughlin, a substitute

In the following game, the Prep team disappointed its fol­ lowers by playing a scoreless tie with Memorial High School. The Prep’s hopes rose and fell time and time again. Com­ pletely outplaying their oppo­ nents, the Maroon and White seemed certain to win but when the goal line beckoned they lacked the scoring punch that counts in the records. In the second quarter, the Prep was on the one foot line, but failed to score while the grandstand quarter­ backs groaned. Several fine runs by Bloom and Ed Lynch were the only highlights of the contest. All credit must go to the line for the forward wall played a fine game both on of­ fense and defense. The annual clash with Lincoln High School was again a disappoint­ ment. Saint Peter’s rooters had to be content with a scoreless tie. The Prep entered the game highly favored to win but our grid forces failed to show any power. Lincoln seemed to outplay the Prep in every phase of the game except for John Cox’s ex­ cellent kicking. Time and time again, it was Cox who_saved the day for the Prep with a booming punt. During most of the game, the play was in Saint Peter’s territory but each threat by the Lincoln forces was staved off by a hard charging line.

Eighty-four


One of the bright spots of the game came in the second quarter when John Cox snatched a fumble and ran sixty yards to Lincoln’s ten yard marker. On the next play, a loud groan from the Prep stands marked a fumble and the loss of the ball. T he see-saw game continued. In the fourth period Ed Lynch inter­ cepted a Lion pass on his own ten yard line. At this point the Grand Streeters made their final bid for vic­ tory as Lynch gained twenty yards around end and then three yards off tackle. On the next play, he was in­ jured and this belated drive died.

The game ended before the Prep could recover. In this contest, the Prep just could not get going. Poor blocking slowed up the offense and it was only the fine defensive work of the line that obtained a scoreless tie. John Cox and Ed Lynch stood out among the backfield men, while McGee, Higgins, Moskal and Jah n were stalwarts on the line. In the next game, Saint Peter’s Prep and Henry Snyder High School in­ augurated a football rivalry that some day may possess the ivy-clacl tradition of other intra-city series.

Ed Lynch skirts left end tor a long gain.

Eighty-five


T h aler off around left end behind an army oi blockers.

Bloom shows his power driving through the line.

T o the Prep goes the credit of the first victory: a twelve to nothing tri­ umph. The Prepsters finally hit their scoring stride as they went over the goal twice in the third period. Snyder frightened the Prep rooters in the first period when the brilliant Dan McHugh led the Snyder team to the Prep’s sixteen yard line. Snyder looked superb with a dazzling variety of running and passing plays. But the Prep finally held and took the ball on downs. In the second quarter Snyder hurled back a Prep drive that went to the nine yard line but suffer­ ing from touchdown hunger, the Prep could not be stopped from scoring in

the third period. The score came on one of the best plays of the season. The Prep had the ball on its own thirty-seven yard line. Bloom, on the receiving end of a reverse play, hurtled through right guard, twisted to the right out of the reach of two secondary defense men, straightened out his course and clashed to the goal line. Whether or not it was one of those legendary perfect plays was hard to judge but it certainly looked per­ fect to the hilarious rooters. Once again Bloom starred by intercepting a pass to set the stage for a second score. That gave the ball to the Prep on Snyder’s thirty-four yard

Eighty-six


line. Gallagher gained nineteen yards to the fifteen yard marker. Cox and Lynch successively made three to put the ball on the nine yard line. Then Ed Lynch, protected by perfect block­ ing, swept around left end for the second touchdown of the afternoon. Both of Cox’s attempts for the extra point went wide of the uprights. A very severe blow was dealt to the Prep when Captain Bob O’Neill suf­ fered a dislocated elbow in the latter part of the game. O’Neill had been the mainstay of the line all afternoon and all during the previous games. A fine linesman and a fighting, game leader, he had inspired the team to

Bloom drives through for a touchdown.

Three men are needed to stop Bloom.

Eighty-seven

come along as well as it had. This injury put him out of the Dickinson game—a loss that meant as much to himself as it did to all Saint Peter’s fans. Other standouts for the Prep in this game were Bill McCarthy, an able substitute for Steve Bloom in the full­ back post, and Jim McGee who bol­ stered up the line all during the game. The injury to Bob O’Neill spoiled an otherwise perfect day. T he Prep went down to a disastrous defeat in its next game, the annual meeting with Dickinson. This was the thirtieth game between the traditional rivals. T he record showed eleven vic­


Coughlin swings around right end for a gain.

Bloom recovers at a criti­ cal moment.

tories to the credit of Saint Peter’s with fourteen losses and four ties, T he Prepsters moved into Roosevelt Stadium on a bitterly cold Thanks­ giving morning, hopeful in spite of the loss of Captain O’Neill. Other teams when inspired by a traditional rivalry had beaten favored teams. But the Prep was outplayed and outmanoeuvered by a powerful Dickin­ son team which had just hit its stride at the end of the season. It was Ralph Pompliano, outstanding back of the County, who ruined Saint Peter’s. He not only scored four times but threw the pass which accounted for the other goal. T he Grand Streeters fought hard but they were outclassed particularly by Dickinson’s very heavy line. Needless to say,

brawny Captain O’Neill was missed at right tackle. His absence probably meant the difference between a closely fought struggle and the rout into which the game developed as Dickin­ son rammed through the line for great gains in every quarter. In the first period, Pompliano scored from the two yard line after a sustained drive of seventy yards. He scored again in the second period, culminating a sixty-five yard march. In the third period, as the wind grew sharper and the spectators grew colder, he scored twice. It remained for Dun­ bar, a tall end, to score again in the last. He snatched a pass from Pomp­ liano and ran ten yards to the goal line. Mitcheletti had accounted for the extra point after the first touch­

Eighty-eight


down but the other tries for conver­ sion went wide. T he Prep may boast of many hard fighting men in that game: Ray T haler who played a fine game and who has gone unsung for his excel­ lent work; Acting Captain Steve Bloom, Ed Lynch and John Cox, all of whom played a fine game. Joe Walsh’s cheerful courage and the fighting spirit of Jim McGee and Jim McNamara are things that must be remembered at the Prep. Pete Jermak and Dick Higgins and all the rest of the team must also be con­ gratulated not only for their ability but also for their fighting spirit. After a rather poor season, several Saint Peter’s players were rewarded

for their hard labor with positions on the mythical all-county teams. T he Jersey Journal picked Bob O’Neill and Steve Bloom for the first team and John Cox for the third team. On the Jersey Observer team, O’Neill won a position on the first team, Ed Lynch and Bloom won positions on the second, and John Cox on the third. T he Hudson Dispatch team had Bloom on the first squad, and Cox, Ed Lynch and O’Neill on the third. And so, with the publication of the all-star teams the season ended. T he Prep is losing many veterans this year but the reserves look good and an attack built around Ed Lynch ought to function smoothly.

Ed Lynch running through a broken field at full stride is really worth while seeing.

Eighty-nine


JUNIOR FO O TBALL JO H N F. D U FFY Coach

JO SE PH J. M cEVO Y, S.J. M oderator

In accordance with the new athletic policy inaugurated at the Prep this year, six man football was initiated to give an opportunity of playing foot足 ball to all who desired. Early in October candidates from first and sec足 ond years were called out. Many hopefuls were disappointed when the strict conditions for participating were

made known but a large number at足 tended the early practice sessions at Whittier Field. When the uniforms arrived, the scene of combat shifted to Lincoln Park where the officials had obligingly prepared a regulation field. T he group was split into a Sopho足 more League under the direction of Mr. Duffy and a Freshman League

Wishbow passes to Keller for an end around play.

Ninety


Costello bucks the line.

Lisa heaves a long pass.

under the tutelage of Mr. McEvoy, S.J. Class squads were picked and plenty of inter-class competition served to relieve the dullness of tackling and blocking drill. On October twenty-second, a picked squad of Sophomores went to New Brunswick to give an exhibition of six man football in the Rutgers Sta­ dium. T he occasion was the opening of the new stadium and field house of Rutgers University. T he game was enthusiastically applauded by the fans and the boys enjoyed the trip im­ mensely. On the same day, the Freshman AllStars played the initial game of “ six man” in Hudson County. They per­ formed so well that they were invited by the Jersey Giants Football Club to play an exhibition game between the halves of one of their games. This invitation was willingly accepted; the

Ninety-one

pictures above were taken during the resulting game. In the leagues there were five Sophomore teams and six Freshman teams. Sophomore C and Freshman D were the respective winners and these two teams were scheduled to play a championship game at Randall’s Island Stadium in New York City at the invitation of the Park officials. Unfortunately, a severe snowstorm made the game impossible. T he purpose of introducing six man football was not only to give the smaller fellows a chance to play foot­ ball but also to prepare them ade­ quately for the varsity brand of foot­ ball. T he foresight of the Athletic Director has been well justified. Some of the junior players are already can­ didates for the varsity and others will undoubtedly follow them. Their early training will stand them in good stead.


BASKETBALL

McCarthy, Sheridan, Kuhn, Sweeney, McGough, Hynes, Portfolio. Ass’t Mgr. Bruder, Clossey, Senec, Coyle, Captain Beronio, McGrail, Schumacher, Mgr. Lahiff.

Due to the loss of nearly all of last year’s team, the basketball prospects were vague indeed at the beginning of the season. However, Mr. Myers quickly built up a squad around the three veterans, Bob Kuhn, Joe Ertle, and Joe Senec. Peter Beronio was elected captain of the team. T he Prep scored an encouraging win over Holy Family of Bayonne in the opening game. Captain Beronio led the scoring with six points; the score of the game was 22 to 10. Another victory was recorded by the Saints when they soon after beat out St. Aloysius 20 to 12. Joe Ertle and A 1 Portfolio led the way in this con­ test.

T he Prep suffered its first defeat when it lost to St. Peter’s of New Brunswick. T he defeat was no dis­ grace because the visitors became a championship team before the season closed. The next game was a 35 to 25 victory over St. Patrick’s of Eliza­ beth. Portfolio pulled the Prep out of a first half slump and went on to score ten points. Ertle, Senec and McGough stood out in the game with St. Catherine’s of New York when the Prep won 34 to 19. Bob Kuhn’s floor work played a large part in the vic­ tory. T he Prep then won an exciting battle with the Alumni, 26 to 24. Joe Ertle sank the winning basket in an overtime period.

Ninety-two


T he next game was a 30 to 23 vic­ tory over Holy Family of Bayonne. This was followed by an exciting game that will long be remembered. In a see-saw battle with Holy Family of Union City, Joe Ertle led the Prep to a 27 to 26 triumph, accounting for no less than twenty-one of those points himself. Joe scored the winning points with only a couple of seconds to play, leaving the spectators limp with excitement. Schumacher’s fine defensive play was an important fac­ tor in the victory. Saint Peter’s continued streak by beating Saint again to the tune of 39 Carthy and Beronio both games.

its winning Catherine’s to 22. Mc­ played fine

The Prep was then eliminated in the first round of the Jesuit High School Tournament. Fordham Prep jumped into the lead a minute after the opening whistle and led to the final gun. T he final count of 27 to 24 tells the story of a hard fought game. Invading Manhattan, the Prepsters won a tight battle with Xavier, 32 to 30. Ertle and Clossey were the high scorers. Sweeney, McGrail and Mc­ Gough were also standouts. Then in the next game, Saint Peter’s lost a tough battle with Holy Family of Union City, 24 to 20. An overtime period was required to decide this tussle. T he Prep came back into the victory column with a notable win over Regis High School of New York. At the end of the first quarter, the Prep led 13 to 9 but at the half Regis

Ninety-three

was ahead, 19 to 17. T he score was tied exactly seven times in the second half of the game until in the last minute the Prepsters sank the goal that won the game, 28 to 27. Joe Senec was the high scorer of the game while to Francis Clossey goes the credit of ringing up the winning points. Weakened by the absence of Joe Senec, Saint Peter’s proved an easy victim for Saint Nickolas of Tolentine. T he New York team kept the lead from the very beginning and came out at the best end of the 42 to 26 score. Jo e Senec goes up for the ball.


Sain Peter’s terminated its basket­ ball season with an overwhelming vic­ tory over Loyola High School of New York. T he final score of the game at the Manhattan team’s court was 47 to 24. T he Prep lost little time in shooting ahead and then held the advantage all the way through the contest with little difficulty. Captain Peter Beronio was the clay’s best scorer with fourteen points to his credit. Joe Ertle followed close with thirteen points and Bill Sweeney who had improved tremendously in the latter part of the season, helped a great deal not only with his eight points but also with his fine work on the floor. Thus Saint Peter’s ended its season with a record of fifteen triumphs and five defeats.

T o sum up the season, we can rightly say that the squad which had started as an inexperienced group, rapidly developed into a smoothly working, coordinated unit that regis­ tered many creditable triumphs against strong opponents. Peter Bero­ nio who captained the team deserves much credit. Joseph Ertle was one of the leading scorers of the city. Robert K uhn’s fine work at the guard post was a large factor in many vic­ tories. W illiam McCarthy, Leo McGough, Edward McGrail and Bernard Schumacher also deserve hearty con­ gratulations. T he Prep loses these men through graduation. The other veterans of this year’s squad will cer­ tainly make news during next year’s season.

Another jum p-up in the Fordham game.

Ninety-four


JAYVEES

Crawford, Lynch, Enright, Cereghino, McDonough, Keegan, Woods, Cuddihy, Crosby, Burke. Mr. McCabe, Johnson, Deegan, Wishbow, Sheridan, O’Connor, Connell, Alexander, Isza, George, Lavander, Mgr. Bruder.

T H E R EC O R D St. Peter’s Holy Family (Bayonne) 21 24

St. Aloysius St. Peter’s (N. Brunswick)

27

St. Patrick’s

34

O.L.V. Juniors Holy Family (Bayonne) Holy Family (Union City)

20

34 3° 26 J4 *5 25 21

Opp 14 11 3° *9 18 x9 20

O.L.V. Juniors Bayonne Jr. High

16 8

Xavier Holy Family (Union City)

!9 8

JA M E S J. M cCABE

Regis

15

Coach


TRACK

W A L T E R F. DOOLAN Coacli

Saint Peter’s with a squad o£ only ten men, managed to term inate the 1938 season w ith only two defeats. One of these was a heartbreak when we lost the Jersey Jo u rn al Meet by a scant three points. T h e other decision was lost to Ferris by a meager five points. D u rin g the season we defeated H oly Fam ily, M em orial, Saint Aloysius, and Saint M ichael’s. T h e team suffered from many injuries during the w inter w ith the result that we could not participate in any indoor meets. Ganzkow, M aloney, N eale and M cKenna were on the inju red list. B u t with the com ing of spring, the team gradually slipped up under the direction of Coach V ic Burke and enjoyed a successful outdoor season. T h e spark of the team was Ed Lynch who won nearly every event he en­ tered, specializing in the 100 yard dash.

Gardner, Neale, Byrnes, Taraskiewicz, W illiams, Lotowicz, McLaughlin. Mr. O’Hale, G illigan, Henkel, McNally, W. Bruder, Giordano, Gennaro, Mr. Doolan. Sweeney, Dolan, Maloney, McGough, Lynch, Ganzkow, Meaney, E. Bruder.


G eorge Ganzkow im proved so much during the season that he was able to show his back to m any a com petitor. L eo M c­ G ough and Jo h n M cK en n a repeated their previous success in the half m ile event. Brent N eale was the P re p ’s star in the m ile ru n ; he captured the C ounty cham pion­ ship. In the field events, D ick H iggins and T o m M aloney were our best representa­ tives. T h e form er took the C ounty cham ­ pionship in the shot-put. For the first tim e since the class of ’39 has been at the Prep, we managed to place in the Penn Relays. It was third place, let us hasten to say. B u t it m ight easily have been second place save for an unfortunate accident. T h e quartet in the m ile relay were G rim ley, M cK enna, M cG ough and Kane, ru n n in g in that order. T h e gun cracked. G rim ley was off to a slow start but made up for it by running a good quarter. H e passed the stick to M cK enna in third place. T h e latter held his own and then M cG ough ran a beau tifu l 440, pass­ ing the baton in second place. It was here the accident occured. One of our oppo­ nents who had just finished, stopped dead in front of Kane, threw him off stride com­ pletely and Kane had to start out again in last place. H e tore around the track and managed to finish in third place. It was a fine piece of running. M any another man would have given up after such a mishap. It needed courage and a ru n n er’s heart to come back the way Kane did.

Ninety-seven

DONALD P. O 'H A LE, S.J. M oderator

Edward Lynch is the proud possessor of two trophies from the last Jersey Jou rnal Meet. One for being the most outstanding athlete of the meet; the other for gaining the greatest number of points.


TENNIS Last year the Prep had a tennis team for the first time in m any years. A t the call for candidates, about fifty netm en re­ sponded and after m any weeks of hard practice, a team was form ed. Jac k M c­ Kenna, B ill Sweeney and Jo e E rtle played the num ber one, two and three positions respectively. E d Roem ke and B ill K in g ­ ston played the first doubles for the m ajor part of the season w hile Jo h n Connolly and T o m Cookson took care of the second doubles. In the first match of the season w ith M em orial, M cK enn a beat Ondrasik, cham pion of the cement courts, and the team won two of the four rem aining matches.

As the season advanced, the Prep swept aside all opposition until seven consecutive victories had been won. T h e next contest, a return match with M em orial, was a dis­ appointing defeat. However, the Prep met this same team in the first round of the Hudson County T ourn am ent and beat them easily. A dvancing to the final round, the Prep beat a strong team from W oodrow W ilson H igh School, thus capturing the County championship. T h e 1939 team w ill be almost the same squad as last year. T h e y are looking for­ w ard to a successful season against stiff com petition for their championship.

T h e County champions photo­ graphed at Stevens Tech last summer. In the front row, in usual o r d e r are Kingston, Roemke and McKenna; in the second row, Connolly, Cookson, Ertle, and Sweeney; in the third row, Mr. Egan, Mr. Steinman and Mr. Pine of the North Jersey Manufacturers’ Association, and Mr. Davis of Stevens Tech.

Ninety-eight


BASEBALL

Mr. McCabe, Hannon, Loftus, Ertle, T orpey, Connolly, McDonough, Gannon, Caulfield, Wolfe, Mgr. Fay. Cereghino, McCarthy, Captain Coughlin, Leonard, Lee, Enright, Coyle, Maturi, Walsh, Murphy.

As this article is being sent to press, the baseball squad is strenuously practicing for the 1939 season. M r. M cC abe has been chosen to be coach of the varsity because M r. M yers is busy w ith spring football practice. T h e new coach comes to his posi­ tion w ith plenty of experience. A fter star­ rin g on the Saint Peter’s College nine, he came to the Prep as coach of the ju n ior baseball and basketball squads. A t this time, he has about half-a-dozen veterans from last year’s varsity. Captain Coughlin is a valuable hold-over since he is a com­ petent pitcher. Others are T o m Leonard, another pitcher, Dan H annon and Bob M aturi, catchers, and three infielders: W al­ ter Lee, B ill M cD onough, and W alter W olfe. A d d that all-around athlete, B ill M cC arthy in the outfield and we have the nucleus of a first class team worthy of the com petition which Dickinson, Bayonne, Lincoln and all the rest w ill provide.

Ninety-nine

Captain Charles Coughlin is a two letter man and an honor student.


PREP LETTER MEN 1938 B A S E B A L L Charles F. C oughlin W illiam E. M cDonough Josep h G . Flem ing A dolph J . Markstein D an iel E. K irk Fred J . Ruschm an G eorge A . H offm an,1 M gr. O O 1938 T R A C K Jam es F. Dolan V incent F. Kane D onald W . D w yer Edw ard J. Lynch G eorge F. Ganzkow Leo I. M cGough Joseph P. G rim ley Edw ard H . M cKenna Francis B. N eale R ich ard T . H iggins Edw ard J. M onahan, M gr. 1938 T E N N IS Jo h n G . Connolly Thom as F . Cookson Joseph W . Ertle

Jo h n P. M cKenna Edw ard R . Roem ke W illiam E. Sweeney W illiam J . Kingston 1938 F O O T B A L L

Charles F. Coughlin R ich ard T . Higgins G eorge N . Jah n Peter P. Jerm ak Francis X . Leucht Leo M . Lotowycz Edw ard J . Lynch W illiam J . M cCarthy

James F. M cGee Edward H. M cGrail Jam es V. M cNam ara Theodore X . Moskal R obert J . O â&#x20AC;&#x2122;N eill Daniel P. Sheehy R ay A . T h aler Joseph J . Walsh Hans J . A lbert, Mgr.

1938-1939 B A S K E T B A L L Peter B. Beronio Francis B. Clossey Joseph W . Ertle R ob ert D. K uhn W illiam J . M cCarthy Edw ard H. M cG rail Thom as M . Lahiff,

Leo I. M cGough A lm erindo G . Portfolio Bernard J . Schumacher Joseph F. Senec Robert J . Sheridan W illiam E. Sweeney Mgr.

One hundred


PATRONS AND PATRONESSES R e v . D ennis J . Com ey, S .J.

R ev. W illiam J . W alter, S.J.

R e v . Francis J . Shalloe, S .J.

R e v . John T . B u tler, S .J.

M r. and Mrs. Hans A lb ert M r. and Mrs. A rcangelo A recchi M r. and Mrs. H en ry J . Beck M r. and Mrs. Joseph P. Belgam M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J. Beronio M r. and Mrs. C arl I). Borton M rs. T hom as J . Brogan M r. and M rs. Jo h n S. B urke M r. and Mrs. Edw ard F. Byrne M r. and Mrs. R o b ert Byrnes

M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J . C ahill M r. and Mrs. A lfred Caponegro M r. and Mrs. A n d rew Casey M r. and Mrs. Jam es J . C lark M r. and Mrs. G eorge T . Clausing M r. and Mrs. James J . C onlin M r. and Mrs. A rd le F. Connolly M r. and Mrs. T hom as F. Cookson M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J . Corcoran M r. and Mrs. S. Cordo

M r. and Mrs. Charles Coughlin M rs. M argaret C u llen M r. and Mrs. P h ilip Curnyn M r. and Mrs. Charles F. Dolan M r. and Mrs. Jo h n E. Donahue M r. and Mrs. W illiam S. Donnelly M r. and Mrs. Frank Ehrig M r. and Mrs. George Ertle M r. and Mrs. W illiam P. Fahy M r. and Mrs. Edward F. Fleckenstein

One hundred one


M r. and M rs. Joseph A . Frank M r. and M rs. J . J . G annon M r. and M rs. George Ganzkow M r. and Mrs. Francis A . G artland M r. and Mrs. A nthony J. Gennaro M r. and Mrs. Edw ard J . G orm an M r. and Mrs. Joseph P. G rim ley M r. and Mrs. R alp h H am pton M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J . Hannon M r. and Mrs. Stephen H ealy M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J . Henkel M r. and M rs. C. G . Hennessey M r. and Mrs. T . F. Henson M r. W m . F . H iggins M r. and Mrs. H arry Hoffen M r. Joseph F. Januszka M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J . Jord an M r. and Mrs. J . Joseph Mrs. Susanna M . Keenan M r. and Mrs. M ichael J . Kennedy M r. and Mrs. R aym ond J . Kerw in Mrs. M ary K iely M r. and Mrs. W illiam Kingston M r. and Mrs. Fred E. K oerner M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J . K uhn M r. and Mrs. T . M. L ah iff M rs. Jo h n Lavagnino M r. and Mrs. P. J . Leonard M r. and Mrs. F. R . Leucht M r. and Mrs. M ary Lodge Mrs. M argaret Loftus M r. and Mrs. W ladim ir Lotowycz M r. Jerem iah A . M cCarthy M r. and Mrs. F. R . M cCarthy M r. and Mrs. Edw ard P. M cCarthy M r. W illiam J . S. M cCarthy M r. and Mrs. T hom as M cDermott M r. and Mrs. M ichael M cDonough M r. and Mrs. M ichael J . M cGee M r. and Mrs. Jam es M cG inn Mr. and Mrs. Jam es M cG ivern M r. and Mrs. Patrick J . M cGlynn M r. and Mrs. Irvin g V. M cGough M r. and Mrs. Jo h n M cGrail

One hundred two


M r. and M rs. J . P. M cK enn a M r. and M rs. Jo h n M cK enn a M r. and M rs. F ran k H . M cN ally M rs. A n n a M cT ieOu e M r. Jo h n P. M aguire M r. and M rs. Patrick C. M ahan M r. and M rs. Josep h F. M allard M r. and M rs. T hom as J . M aloney M r. and Mrs. A . E . M aroney M r. and M rs. A nthony M aturi M r. and M rs. M ichael J . M orley M r. and Mrs. Fran k A . Scerbo M r. and M rs. Jam es J . M urner M r. and Mrs. Josep h Patrick M urphy M r. and M rs. W illiam H . N orton M r. and M rs. Jo h n J . Ockay M r. and M rs. T im o th y M . O ’Connell M r. and M rs. John O ’D onnell M r. and M rs. H arry F. O ’M ealia M r. and Mrs. Jo h n O ’N eill M r. and Mrs. Caesar O ttolina M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J . Madden M r. and M rs. P. J. R iv ie re M r. and Mrs. Stephen D. R od dy M r. and Mrs. T hom as R u an e M r. and Mrs. Fran k J . Schm itt M r. and Mrs. H enry G . Schmitt M r. and Mrs. F ran k B. Scholle M r. and Mrs. Joseph A . Schumacher M r. and Mrs. Peter A . Smith M r. and Mrs. P au l S. Sokol M r. and Mrs. Jo h n A . Somers M r. and Mrs. J . J . Sweeney M r. and Mrs. Frank P. Taraskiew icz M r. and Mrs. W illiam A . T arran t M r. and Mrs. H . H . T hom pson M r. John T k ac M r. and Mrs. T hom as T o rp ey M r. and Mrs. J . F. V arley M r. and Mrs. Jo h n B. W alsh M r. and Mrs. Patrick J . W alsh M r. and Mrs. Frederick W . W illiam s M r. and Mrs. Francis J . W illiam s

One hundred three


ADDRESSES Hans John Albert ....................................283 West Street, Union City, N. J. Dominic Albano Arecchi .......................610 - 13th Street, West New York, N. J. Gerard Joseph B e c k ................................. goo Elm Avenue, Ridgefield, N. J. Joseph Robert Belgam ........................... 53 Highland Avenue, Jersey City Peter Benedict Beronio ........................... 515 Park Avenue, Hoboken, N. J. Carl Peter Borton ....................................123 North 19 Street, East Orange, N. J. W illiam Howard Burke ......................... 69 Gautier Avenue, Jersey City Edward Francis Byrne ........................... 244 Harrison Avenue, Jersey City John Thomas B y r n e s ............................... 204 Wilkinson Avenue, Jersey City Conone Joseph Cahill ............................. 183 Nelson Avenue, Jersey City Alfred Blase Caponegro .........................5 2 3 - 1 3 Street, West New York, N. J. Joseph Patrick Casey ............................... 74 West 5 Street, Bayonne, N. J. James Joseph Clark ................................. 131 Prospect Street, Jersey City George Edward Clausing .......................60 Prospect Street, Jersey City James Joseph Conlin, Jr ...........................94 Nelson Avenue, Jersey City John Gabriel Connolly ........................... 303 Columbia Avenue, Jersey City Thomas Francis Cookson, Jr...................876 Grange Road, Teaneck, N. J. Bernard Leo Corcoran ........................... 251 Fourth Street, Jersey City Vincent Anthony C o r d o ........................... 122 Ridge Road, Lyndhurst, N. J. Charles Francis Coughlin .......................69 Romaine Avenue, Jersey City Walter Bernard Cullen ........................... 239 York Street, Jersey City John Eugene Curnyn ............................. 14a West 43 Street, Bayonne, N. J. John Francis Dolan ................................. 222 Clerk Street, Jersey City John Edward Donahue, J r ...................... 740 Wyoming Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. Robert Joseph Donnelly ......................... 126 West 33 Street, Bayonne, N. J. Francis Aloysius Ehrig ........................... 245 Hancock Avenue, Jersey City Joseph W illiam E r t l e .............................. 24 Wade Street, Jersey City Thomas George F a h y ...............................422 Westside Avenue, Jersey City Albert George Fleckenstein ...................29 King Avenue, Weehawken, N. J. Joseph Aloysius Frank, J r ........................ 589 - 35 Street, North Bergen, N. J. James Patrick Gannon ...........................150 Bentley Avenue, Jersey City George Francis Ganzkow .......................2554 Boulevard, Jersey City Francis Ambrose Gartland .....................152 South Street, Newark, N. J. Pasqual Anthony Gennaro ...................69b Gautier Avenue, Jersey City Edward John Gorman ...........................722 Maywood Avenue, Maywood, N. J. Joseph Patrick G r im le y ......................... 827 Garden Street, Hoboken, N. J. W illiam Searle Hampton .......................246 Boyd Avenue, Jersey City Daniel Nicholas Hannon .......................66 Reservoir Avenue, Jersey City Patrick Kevin H e a ly ................................. 9 Condict Street, Jersey City John Joseph Henkel, J r ...........................539 -4 1 Street, Union City, N. J. Charles Walter Hennessey .................... 79 Hague Street, Jersey City Robert Francis Henson ...........................226 Ogden Avenue, Jersey City Richard Thomas H ig g in s .......................810 Avenue A, Bayonne, N. J. Harry Augustus H o ffe n ...........................92 Shaler Avenue, Cliffside, N. J. Joseph Peter Januszka .............................64 Liberty Avenue, Jersey City John Joseph Jordan, Jr............................ 14 Edwards Court, Bayonne, N. J. Joseph Peter J o s e p h ................................. 264 Grant Avenue, Cliffside Park, N. J Raymond Francis K e e n a n ........................65 Hopkins Avenue, Jersey City Vincent Joseph Kennedy .......................829 Garden Street, Hoboken, N. J. Raymond Anthony Kerwin .................. 80 Bowers Street, Jersey City Daniel Patrick K ie ly ................................. 926 Hudson Street, Hoboken, N. J. William Terence Kingston .....................28 Beach Street, Jersey City Frederick Charles K o ern er....................... 174 Bowers Street, Jersey City Robert Diener Kuhn ...............................623 Union Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. Thomas Martin Lahiff ...........................277 Eighth Street, Jersey City Lawrence Francis Lavagnino ................ 1021 Park Avenue, Hoboken, N. J. Thomas Patrick Leonard .......................57 Barclay Avenue, Clifton, N. J. One hundred four


Francis Xavier L e u c h t ........ Joseph Isaac Jogues Lodge George Michael Loftus, Jr. Leo Michael L o to w y cz ........ Aloysius Francis McCarthy . Francis Robert McCarthy . . Robert Gregory McCarthy . W illiam John McCarthy . . Thomas Francis McDermott Joseph Patrick McDonough James Francis McGee ........ James Arthur M c G in n ........ John Jam es M c G iv e rn ........ Joseph Bernard McGlynn . . Leo Irving M c G o u g h ........... Edward Anthony M cGrail . John Paul McKenna ........... Raymond Francis McKenna Francis Henry McNally . . . . John Francis M cTigue . . . . Thomas Patrick Mahan . . . Joseph Francis M allard . . . . Thomas Joseph Maloney . . James Aloysius Maroney . Robert John Maturi ........... Richard Joseph Morley . . . Augustine Joseph Mulle . . . Peter Patrick M u r n e r .......... Thomas Jerem iah Murphy . W illiam James Norton . . . . John Joseph Ockay ............ Matthew Joseph O’Connell Edward Aloysius O’Donnell Harry Anthony O’Mealia . . Robert Joseph O’N e i l l ........ Donnell Aloysius Ottolina . John Edward R e d d y ............ Paul Joseph Riviere ........... Harold Stephen Roddy . . . . William Edward Ruane . .. Francis Gerard Schmitt . . . . Henry George Schmitt . . . . Francis Carroll Scholle . . . . Bernard Joseph Schumacher Thomas Gerard Smith . . . . Charles Joseph Sokol ........ John Alexis Somers ............ W illiam Bennett Somers . . John Joseph Sw een ey.......... Ceslaus Francis Taraskiewicz W illiam Gerard Tarrant .. Raymond James Thompson Victor Bernard Tkac ........ Thomas Francis Torpey . . . James Francis Varley .......... Joseph John Walsh ............ William Patrick Walsh . . . . Anthony Fleming Williams Francis Gilmore Williams . . One hundred five

62 Randolph Avenue, Jersey City 25 East 99 Street, New York City 26 Delaware Street, Jersey City 69 Grand Street, Jersey City 86 West 32 Street, Bayonne, N. J. 309 - 11 Street, Union City, N. J. 173a Winfield Avenue, Jersey City 27 West 41 Street, Bayonne, N. J. 208 Crooks Avenue, Clifton, N. J. 270 Old Bergen Road, Jersey City 183 T h ird Street, Jersey City 27 Lembeck Avenue, Jersey City 85 Gates Avenue, Jersey City 122 Atlantic Street, Jersey City 809- 18 Street, Union City 55 Wayne Street, Jersey City 23 Smith Avenue, Bergenfield, N. J. 218 Washington Place, Cliffside, N. J. 72 Sussex Street, Jersey City 284 Barrow Street, Jersey City 3431 Boulevard, Jersey City 45a Webster Avenue, Jersey City 133 South Street, Jersey City 43 Avenue B, Bayonne, N. J. 190 Clinton Avenue, Jersey City 94 Newman Avenue, Bayonne, N. J. 149 Webster Avenue, Jersey City 356 East 36 Street, Paterson, N. J. 127 Prospect Street, Jersey City 14 Elm Street, Elizabeth, N. J. 28 East 24 Street, Bayonne, N. J. 299 Claremont Avenue, Jersey City 29 West 12 Street, Bayonne, N. J. 97 Gifford Avenue, Jersey City 100 Wegman Parkway, Jersey City 721 Broadway, West New York, N. J 171 Wilson Avenue, Kitingville, S. I. 257 Grayson Place, Teaneck, N. J. 146 Manhattan Avenue, Jersey City 12 Sheffield Street, Jersey City 104a Manhattan Avenue, Jersey City 170 Summit Avenue, Jersey City 930 Monroe Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. 310 Webster Avenue, Jersey City 66 Stanley Road, South Orange, N. J. 37 Liberty Avenue, Jersey City 110 Bentley Avenue, Jersey City n o Bentley Avenue, Jersey City 260 Clerk Street, Jersey City 193 Second Street, Jersey City 194 Palisade Avenue, Jersey City 33 Baldwin Avenue, Jersey City 116 Humphrey Avenue, Bayonne, N. J 173 Pearsall Avenue, Jersey City 175 Virginia Avenue, Jersey City 47 Clarke Avenue, Jersey City 86 Poplar Street, Jersey City 846 Floral Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. 226 Bayview Avenue, Jersey City


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS W e are glad to take this opportunity to express our indebtedness to all those who have helped the staff of the 1939 P e t r e a n in the publication of this book. “ T h a n k you ” should be extended to

A special

T h e Principal and the Faculty who have been patient and generous w ith us. T hose Prep students who have helped the business man­ ager. O ur Patrons and Advertisers who make this book possible, for whom we beg your patronage. M r. Charles Johnson of the H oran Engraving Company whose technical advice and u n failin g service have been invaluable to us. M r. K lein w ax and M r. Hughes of the Lincoln Studios whose generous advice has greatly lightened our task. M r. N eil Heffernan of the Heffernan

Press who has

kindly helped us in many ways.

One hundred six


SAINT PETER’S COLLEGE OF

ARTS AND SCIENCES

In fo rm atio n regarding adm ission may be obtained fro m

THE REGISTRAR

ST. PETER’S COLLEGE JE R S E Y C IT Y


CAMP NOTRE DAME at NAMASCHAUG SPOFFORD

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Camp Notre Dame possesses all the facilities requisite for a first class Catholic Camp for boys: a resident chap lain, excellent living and recrea足 tion q uarters, a resident ph ysician, carefu lly supervised water-sports, in cluding sailin g, on L ake Spofford, and excellent facilities for baseball, basketball, tennis, volley b all and boxing. F o r Inform ation W rite or Call

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F ac u lty o f p h ysician s an d sp ecialists p re ­ p ares q u a lifie d stud en ts to serve as doctor’s an d h o sp ital assistan ts. One y e a r co urse. T h oro ugh basic in stru ctio n in an ato m y, p h ysio lo g y, h y g ie n e , first aid , e le m e n ta ry n u rsin g . Follow ed b y ex ­ h au stiv e tr a in in g in P h ysical T h erap y, X -ray an d lab o rato ry tech n iq u e, and M ed ical S e c re ta ria l su b jects. A dequate p la n t an d lab o rato rie s. F ree p lacem en t b u re a u . A new p ro fessio n , as in terest­ in g as it is potent of o p p o rtu n ities fo r em p lo ym en t. W rite fo r b o o klet FB .

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P hon e: Hoboken 3-2579

Hoboken, N. J.

D elaw are 3-2820-1

McCONNELL COAL & FUEL OIL CO. 8 7 Van Horne Street

JERSEY CITY


CASEY AND LEE

Let Us Clean and P ress fo r You

Cleaning and Dyeing

SUSSEX TAILORING

3 4 W est 4th Street

123 Sussex Street

BAYONNE, N. J.

JERSEY CITY

D elaw are 8-1107

Hutchinson Real Estate Co. 207 B roadw ay

Gray Line Trucking Co., Inc.

BAYONNE, N. J. STEPHEN D. RODDY P resid en t B ayo nn e 3-1551

J. W. GREENE

165 Ninth St.

JERSEY CITY

Joh n Adams Henry Co., Inc. WHOLESALE PURVEYORS OF

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS

FANCY FRUIT & PRODUCE 56 H arrison Street

NEW YORK CITY Grove St., Opp. Tube Station Pho n e: W a lk e r 5-5552

LACEY & KOPP

WARREN MEAT MARKET W illiam Otto, Prop.

PLUMBING AND HEATING

C h o ic e B e e f , V e a l, P o r k , L a m b a n d P o u lt r y

8 1 0 W est Side Avenue

JERSEY CITY, N. J. Ph o n e: D elaw are 3-7271

244 W arren Street, Jersey City Pho n e: B E rgen 4-4951


Lincolru Studios ST. PETER’S COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL

“OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS”

We Are Proud o f This Title Because of Our Affiliation With Your Fine School

2 8 2 4 BOULEVARD

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

Phone: Jo u rn al Square 2-9452


a college annual is not just another piece of printing. It presents unusual difficulties and technique in prepara足 tion.

To most of the Staff its preparation

presents a new experience, and if the printer is not one who has had practice in that kind of printing, the task is doubly troublesome for the editors and managers. W e offer you the advantage of our long experi足 ence in Class Book Printing, knowing it will save many anxious moments for the Staff in their work.

THE HEFFERNAN PRESS 150 Fremont Street W O R C E ST E R , M A SSA C H U SE T T S Printers to T

h e

P

etrean

and other good books.


M l

Photo: Underwood & Underwood


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1939 Petrean  

The Petrean yearbook from 1939

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