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^ A n n u a l X ^u b licatio/i O F S E N IO R S T U D E N T S O F S T . P E T E R ’S P R E P A R A T O R Y S C H O O L JE R S E Y C IT Y , N EW JE R S E Y

VO L. X V

ifts

S T . P E T E R ’S PREP.


REV. FR A N C IS J . SH ALLO E, S.J. Principal

1 9 3 7 PET&EAN


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

Dedication J^ R O M

the ancient lineage o f the sons o f Saint Ignatius L o yola and the

educational heritage of the Je su it U niversities o f the Renaissance and through

them

to Salamanca, Paris and

this year received a new P rin cip a l.

G eorgetow n, St. P eter’s P re p

A man luell prep ared to g u id e the

destinies o f the students w ith wisdom and above all—godliness—F ath er Shalloe, S .J.

Fath er has p ro ved him self as a frie n d and educator in this his

first year at P rep . It is therefore as a token of our respect and thanksgiving that we, the Class o f 1 9 3 J , dedicate this our year book to you, F ath er Shalloe, in grate­ fu l appreciation fo r what you have done fo r us, and as a prayer that all your years spent in the guidance of Catholic Youth w ill be successful and blessed w ith the fruits of you r labors.


REV . JO SEPH S. D IN N EEN , S.J. President Reverend Father Rector’ s Prayer for the Graduates

M ay each one of you so live that our dear L o r d may say: “ I have fo u n d a man according to M y own H eart, who shall do all M y w ills.” F o r this cause I bow my knees to the Fath er o f O ur L o rd Jesus Christ, of W hom all paternity in heaven and earth is nam ed, that H e w ould grant you, according to the riches of H is glory, to be strengthened by H is Spirit with m ight unto the in terior m an: “ T hat Christ may d w ell by faith in you r hearts; T hat being rooted and fo u n ded in charity, You may be able to com prehend, w ith all the saints, W hat is the breadth, and length, and height and depth: T o know also the charity of Christ, W hich surpasseth all kn ow ledge, That you may be filled unto all the fulness of G od.”

1 9 3 7 P E T R E ATS


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

Fordham U n iversity’s loss was our gain when in Septem ber of this year, Fr. Fitzpatrick took up the duties of Assistant Principal. Since that tim e, Fr. Fitzpatrick has won a place in ou r esteem and m em ory. Father has executed the difficult tasks of the Prefect of D iscipline w ith ex­ pediency and generosity. F o r those of us whose painful duty it was to serve a ju g sentence under F ath er’s guidance, we can but say that he gave us our ju st due and w hat was bitter at that tim e, is now but a laughable memory. Fath er’s sage words are forever engraved on our hearts as a lesson well learned and for his careful oeruidance,7 we w ill ever be grateful.

T w o years ago, we received a new Spiritu al D irector in the person of F r. Butler, S .J., a man possessed of a fervent zeal for souls and a bu rn ­ ing love of Christ and M other Mary. Father has labored long and hard to pass this devotion to all “ his boys” at the Prep. T hose of us who grad­ uate this year not only have com­ prehensive knowledge of L atin and Science but we have also been en­ riched by a better understanding of our religion and a more active de­ votion to Christ—thanks to Father’s patient labors in our midst.

R E V . JO H N T . B U T L E R , S.J. Spiritual Counsellor


Foreword F O lJR Y E A R S A T S T P E T E R ’S P R E P -H O W H APPY AND E N L IG H T E N IN G T H E Y H A VE BEEN ! HOW F O R T U N A T E W E A R E T O H A VE BEEN A B L E T O P A R T A K E OF T H EM . L A T IN , G R E E K , FR E N C H , EN G LISH , M A TH , H IST O R Y , SCIEN CE, D E B A T IN G , D R A M A T IC S, SO D A LIT Y, ELO CU ­ T IO N , SPO R T S AND A BO VE A L L R E L IG IO N HAVE BEEN T H E M EAN S T O AN E N D - T H E E N R IC H IN G OF T H E M IND,

THE

D E V E LO PM EN T

OF

THE

SOUL,

THE

M A K IN G OF A G E N T LE M A N . W E GO F O R T H FRO M T H E P R E P W E L L EQ U IPPED T O LEA D AND T O CO NQ UER F O R W E C A R R Y IN O U R H E A R T S AND SOULS A F E R ­ V E N T LO VE OF C H R IS T AN D A D EEP KN O W LED GE OF HIS R E L IG IO N .

O U R P R A Y E R A T T H IS T H E H O U R OF

G R A D U A T IO N IS T H A T W E W IL L LEA D E X E M P L A R Y LIV ES W O R T H Y OF T H E T E A C H IN G T H E JE S U IT S H AVE G IVEN US AND W O R T H Y OF T H E SA CRIFICES O U R P A R E N T S HAVE M ADE SO T H A T W E M IG H T HAVE A CH AN CE “ TO BE SO M ET H IN G ” IN T H E W ORLD.

193

' PETREAJS


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

A Preparatory School is not its campus or its buildings.

It

is rather its men, living and dead, and the heritage they have left in the lives of others and the institution they have helped to create.

This does not mean that the inanimate things which we

associate with a school are of little or no value—far from it. It is living, aspiring and striving through generations and ages that constitute the institution.

The school generations pass quickly

and the individuals are soon forgotten.

The football hero or

school actor that thrilled the public in one generation live only in the school archives for the next generation.

Yet in the course

of time all these generations are welded together into one unit that constitutes the tradition and heritage of the school. It is for this reason that we wish to call your attention to these men luho are an integral part of the Prep—the members of the faculty, who have, by virtue of their contact with the students, and by reason of their contributions to the classical and social progress of the school, merited the right to be named as the builders of St. Peter’s Prep.

FACULTY May we present the faculty of St. Peter’ s Prep, and credit their tireless efforts with the high position which the school commands in educational circles in New Jersey.


R E V . M A R T IN A. S C H M IT T , S.f. Instructor, Fourth Year

REV. RA YM O N D T. P U R C E L L , S.J. Instructor, First Year

A N TH O N Y J. QUEVEDO, S.J. Instructor, Fourth Year

D A N IE L J . C A R E Y , S.J. Instructor, T h ird Year

B E R N A R D V. BO YLE, S.J. Instructor, T h ird Year

JO SEPH J. McEVOY, S.J. Instructor Second Year

^LV IN S. M A H LM E IST E R , S.J. Instructor, First Year

1 937 P E T HE AN

Eight


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

FE R D IN A N D A. O R T H E N , A.M. Registrar

G E O R G E D. M cA N A N EY, S.J. Instructor, First Year

JO H N J . M cG R A IL , S.J. Instructor, First Year

TH O M A S J . M YER S, A.B., L L .B . Coach, Athletics

G E R A R D W. G U T E R L , A.B., LL .B . Instructor, Fourth Year

JO H N F. D U FFY, A.B. Instructor, Fourth Year

TH O M AS J . EGAN Assistant Prefect of Discipline

N ine


EDW ARD J . C U L L E N , A.B. Instructor, Fourth Year

A R T H U R G. M AD DEN , A.M. Instructor, T h ird Year

C L E M E N T C. O ’SU LLIV A N , A.B., LL.B. Instructor, Fourth Year

A R T H U R C. B R O M IR SK I, B.S. Instructor, Physics

R O B E R T R . KLETN, A.B. Instructor, T h ird Year

JOHN J . M cG ILL, M.S. Instructor, Biology

V IN C E N T P. M cIN ER N EY, A.B. Instructor, T h ird Year

19 3 7 P E T R E A N

Ten


W ILL IA M F. M cVANN, A.B Instructor, First Year

F R E D E R IC K J . JA C Q U ES, M.S. Instructor, Chemistry

JO H N J . M U L L E N , A.B. Instructor, Second Year

M A R T IN A. RO O N EY, A.B. Instructor, First Year

R O B E R T J . M O R R IS, A.B. Instructor, First Year

P H IL IP J. O’F A R R E L L , A.B. Librarian

A L FR E D J . K E L T Y , A.M.

Eleven


“.A ppreciation and Sacrifice” y ^ P P R E C I A T I O N and sacrifice, what a w orld of difference in those two words—how easy to m anifest an act of appreciation—how difficult to make a real sacrifice.

Y et in those two words by reading between the lines

one can find the story of four years w ith M r. A verage Prepster at St. Peter’s. You know the sacrifice story as well as I do—m other m aking last year’s clothes do, father w orking over time, the fam ily g iv in g up a summer vacation so that the “ Pride and J o y ” may be placed on the right road—have perhaps a better chance than D ad enjoyed when he started out. T h e n too there are also a great num ber of loving and sacrificing Aunts, Uncles, guardians and benefactors who are depriving themselves of some of the well earned comforts of ever m ounting years—all that the “ boy” may go o n ! Y ou have all been generous to the point of exhaustion—you are heroes— the builders of a new generation of St. Peter’s Men. T o you—one and all—we are eternally grateful—we appreciate your toils and sacrifices and all our prayers contain the petition that your sacrifices shall not have been in vain —Please G od that we may be men of stamina and strong hearts and wills yet meek and hum ble enough that we may bow our heads low to these, our benefactors and say “ T h an k you—we do appreciate your sacrifices.” T o you therefore we dedicate this page in grateful acknowledgement of your sacrifices.

W e close with a prayer—M ay God abide with you always as

constantly and loyally as you have borne with us.

1 9 3 7 P E T R E A 1S

T welve


SENIORS With congratulations for a successfully com足 pleted high school course and with best wishes for future success in their respective careers in life we bid these men farewell.


Class 4-M Kenny, Coughlin, McCarthy, J . Woods, Glazer. W. Woods, Corley, Leahy, Fr. Butler, S.J., Torresson, Turley, Smith.

February Graduates Q U R four years at St. Peter’s have come to a close.

A nd so February has

seen the curtain fall on the dawn of a trium phant achievement. It is with sincere regret that we leave the portals of our beloved A lm a Mater. With a deep sorrow we bid one another adieu as we stand on the diverging paths of life ’s journey. B u t youth is carefree and gay and time heals many wounds, as well as it dims pleasant memories. So lest the memory of our sojourn within these stately walls be clouded by the passage of time let us record in these P e t r e a n pages a short history of the class of M ’37. Fou r years ago we, a group of thirty dazed freshmen, were assigned to the 1M classroom. From this plastic prim ordial m aterial, time, aided by the influence of environm ent, A vas to m ould the present class. W e drew as first leaders M r. W allace, M r. Cantillon, S.J., and M r. Cullen, who by their sound teachings of the fundamentals laid the foundation for the future structure. T h u s equipped the Juggern au t of 1M rolled forward.

1 9 3 7 PETREAN

Fourteen


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

U pon ou r entrance to second year the teaching reins were handed over to M r. D uffy and M r. C u llu m . to the half-way post.

U nder their able tutelage we surged onward

A t this point some preferred to accompany Ulysses,

w hile others decided that delving into the mysteries of nature was more fascinating. In the Ju n io r League section of the interclass basketball we took second place, being deprived of victory by the slightest m argin. F leetin g time once more saw us scaling the barriers of final exam s.—then came third year—the roundin g o f the turn before com ing down the home stretch. U nder M r. O ’Su llivan we acquired the nasal draw l and under the w ary eye of M r. M artino we were prevented from com pletely w recking the chem istry lab. M r. G u terl in the meantim e was attem pting to pound into our already over-burdened skulls E u clid ’s conception of geometry.

W ith

M r. Carey, S .J., we looked on helplessly w hile Jo a n of A rc was burned at the stake and then we too crossed the great divide. H eralded by the bells of the Russian Church we marched trium phantly into Fourth Y ear. A few more months rem ained in which M r. Boyle, S.J., introduced us to the “ R o i des M ontagues” and M r. Carey, S.}., showed us the tricks of the T rig , book, w hile M r. B rom irski’s course in Physics sowed the seeds of invention and destruction in many a potential anarchist. R esum ing our schooling in Septem ber we found that our studies were few and com paratively easy. Possibly the fact that time was so short was the deciding factor. W ith M r. Stewart, S.J., at the helm we hired a trirem e and w andered in the strict sense with Aeneas. On the homeward stretch our pilot was taken ill and with a substitute pilot in the person of M r. Quevedo, S .J ., we safely if not gloriously glided to rest in the harbor. T h e measured swing of the pendulum is slowly but steadily bringing us nearer to G raduation N ight. T h e night of the grand finale when hearts w ill beat in a fast tempo and jo y w ill know no bounds. B u t then when the dawn breaks on the day after, we w ill feel inexpressible sorrow, and a lum p w ill come to our throats when we realize that no more w ill we be students of St. Peter’s Prep. N o more w ill we gather in the classroom with our friends when the bell rings. T h en w ill we appreciate being a student am ong friends and pleasant surroundings. A nd so in closing we say that you, St. Peter’s, have our inalienable love and esteem. U ntil our last day we w ill cherish and guard your lofty principles. Forever in our hearts you have left the im print of a Catholic Gentlem an, which time and circumstances w ill never eradicate.

Fifteen


T H O M A S F R A N CIS C O R L E Y

T H O M A S B E R N A R D C O U G H L I N

“ Tom ”

“ Tom”

Sod. l, 4; Con. 4; Cl. Base­ ball 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 3, 4; Cl. Vice-Pres. 2; Cl. Treas.

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Baseball and Bas­ ketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Treas. 1.

Tom is one of those quiet, reserved, strongwilled boys who will always gain for himself many friends. His occasional wit always drew hilarity from his classmates, whose hearts T om ’s sympathetic, friendly nature has warmed. He has always performed his class duties in diligent fash­ ion. In Math. “ T om ” was outstanding and has shown himself capable of solving intricate problems in Trigonometry. We are cer­ tain in saying “ so-long” to our Tom, that whatever he may attempt to do either in college or in business will be done successfully. A task well begun is half finished and who will gain­ say this axiom in Tom ’s case.

“ Tom ” always struck me as a mild, good natured, sweet tempered, and easy going sort of a chap. His dignity was an indescrib­ able quality of superiority, which stood out pre-emin­ ently in his whole manner of life. “ Corks,” as he is sometimes called, carries in­ to school each day a strong, vigorous personality. In the classroom, his mental proficiency was ever mani­ fested by his ability to translate, pronunciate and enunciate French and Latin phrases. His physical prowess was always ex­ hibited on the athletic field with a strong, vigorous vitality. For whatever walk of life “ Tom ” chooses, his quiet manner and perseverence is bound to win out in the end.

19 3 7 P E T R E A N

G E R A R D R O B E R T G LA S ER “ Doc” Sod. 4; K. B. S. i, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 3; Cl. Baseball 4; Cl. Basketball 3; Cl. Vice-Pres. 1; Cl. Sec. 2, 3.

Slow and deliberate in all he undertakes Glaser shows himself to be worthy of the P e t r e a n sheepskin. His deep throaty voice commands attention and his thrilling oratory holds it throughout his perora­ tion. Perhaps the out­ standing trait of 4-M is their joyous good will and genuine humor, and “ Doc” is one of those who during the year has been leader in this great “human humor” movement. In studies this same unfailing persistence has brought him through four hard years with a rec­ ord that he can be well proud of. In years to come we shall see and hear more of this fellow who embodies full well the adage, “ You can’t keep a good man down.”

Sixteen


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P P A T R I C K E D W A R D K E N N Y

R A Y M O N D JO SEP H L E A H Y

"P a t”

“ Legs”

“ Tom”

Sod. 1, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Dram. 3; T rack 2, 3; Cl. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Bas­ ketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Pres. 4; Cl. Sec. 2; C l. Treas. 1.

Deb. 1; Cl. Baseball i, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Sec. 2.

Socl. 1, 2; K. 4; Deb. 2, 3, ball 3, 4; Cl. 3, 4; Cl. Pres.

B. S. i, 2, 3, 4; Var. Foot­ Baseball 1, 2, 2; Treas. 1.

“ Pat” has won the friendship of all who knew him during his four years of scholastic and athletic achievement at St. Peter’s Prep. Starring in Mathmatics and Science, in the lecture room and on the gridiron as that fearless tackle; he was the formid­ able foe for any lineman among the opponents of our school. His undying generosity, good will and persistence in holding his point in arguments have marked him as a man of staunch character. Fare­ well, “ Pat,” and may your future years be happy ones. We are certain, at least, they will be years well spent in honest and devoted labor.

Seventeen

One third plus one third plus, but who cares about Math, when we have such a person as “ Legs” around. T hat “good humor” man who constitutes one third of the “ three Stooges— O’Neill, Glaser, and Leahy.” This tall lad possesses a debonair, devilmay-care air that very few could successfully imitate. In class his answers astound his teachers and his pres­ ence is a source of never ending joy to the rest of his cohorts. “ Legs” is bound for success we know, if not as a scholar, certainly as a good fellow who brings a ray of sunshine to all with whom he has and ever will come into contact.

T H O M A S JOHN M cCa r t h

y

In “ T om ” we have a fine example of a Jesuit-trained student who has really profited by listening to the sage advice of the Fathers and Scholastics. He has studied well and profited; he has been a true friend to all and they have profited. His years then at St. Peter’s have been of mutual bene­ fit, to himself and to all those who came in contact with him. “ T om ” never revealed to us his plans for the future, yet we can as­ sure dear reader, in all sin­ cerity, that here is a fellow Who will smile his way through the years and finally come back to us one day bearing a banner on which in large letters will be the word SUCCESS!


OWEN P A T R I C K O ’N E I L L

JOSEPH ED W A RD SM IT H

W I L L I A M AL B E R T T O R R E S O N

“ O wnie”

“ Sm itty”

" B ill"

K. B. S. i, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Base­

K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Base­ ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Pres. 3, 4; Vice-Pres. 2; Sec. 1; Treas. 1.

Sod. 1; K. B. S. 1 , 2 ;

P etrean

4; CL Baseball 3, 4; Cl. Bas­

ball 3, 4; Cl. Sec. 4, Treas. 4;

ketball 2.

Cl. Basketball 3, 4.

Until discussions of rela­ tivity and infinity die from the halls of St. Peter’s, Owen will always be re­ membered as one of the most proficient students of the sciences ever to emerge from the learned portals of Jesuit education. Nor did his ingenuity in the sciences overshadow the brilliant translations in Latin and French, which secured for him excellent marks in the classical field. His quick subtle wit was always sub­ mitted for the pleasure of the class at the most op­ portune moment. His popularity with the other students was due to his un­ tiring school spirit for which Owney was always known.

19 37 PETREAN

A senior about to grad­ uate! It hardly seems pos­ sible that four years could go so fast. When “ Smitty” first entered St. Peter’s, he was quickly recognized for his steady qualities and his circle of friends rapidly grew. “ Smitty” is held in high esteem by all and is ever ready to partake in any intellectual or athletic activity that comes along, especially the diamond or tennis court. The future is sealed even to us, “ Smitty,” but we know that whatever it has in store for you it will never present any insurmountable bar­ riers and your successes will be numbered by your en­ deavors.

Here is a fellow who is held in high esteem by all his classmates and all who come in contact with him. No matter what the situa­ tion “ B ill” always has a kind word to offer and no matter where you find “ B ill” there is always laughter—his habit of wav­ ing his hands when he talks throws his listeners into hysterics. Yet despite all he also has his serious moments in class and wherever his attention is needed. His popularity is easily seen by glancing at the long list of class offices that he has held. We leave Prep with one consoling thought—in “ B ill” we have a true friend!

Eighteen


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

G E R A L D W I L L I A M T U R L E Y

JO H N JO SEP H WOODS

“ G erry”

“ Ja y ”

Sod. l, 2, 3, 4, Treas 1; K. B. S. 1, 2; Var. Football 3, 4; Cl. Baseball 2, 3, 4, Capt. 4; Cl. Basketball 1, 2, 3, Capt. 2; Cl. Pres. 3. -

Four years ago, quietly, unobtrusively “ Gerry” crept deeply into the hearts of his classmates. Since then he has established himself more firmly in our esteem by his sterling character and accomplish­ ments, both on the athletic fields and in the classroom. “ Gerry” is well versed in the literature of Vergil and Cicero and holds an un­ believable knowledge of other studies pursued with­ in the portals of Prep. Soon he will depart from us, but the memory of his cheerful­ ness mingled with the more serious facts of life shall haunt us to the very depth of our memories.

“ B ill’

Sod. 4, Con. 4; K. B.S.1; Var. Basketball 1, 2,. 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Capt. 3; Cl. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Capt. 3.

During his years as a stu­ dent at Prep "Ja y ” has won the friendship and admira­ tion of all. “ Ja y ” has a fine sense of humor and he not only appreciates but often “ cracks” a good joke. His greatest glory and most bril­ liant performances are on the basketball court where one marks his playing “ Star” —witness the fine work he did in the Jesuit high school tournament. In true Jesuit student man­ ner “Ja y ” plays on the fair and square and win or lose he never loses his spirit of good sportsmanship. Can you conceive of a fellow such as “Ja y ” being a fail­ ure? Impossible. wm m m m m m

Nineteen

W I L L I A M JO H N WOODS

jg g g

Var. Football 3; T rack 3, 4; Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 4.

Never was a nomencla­ ture more aptly used than when the term “ the dark horse” was applied to our “W illie,” for he is a true thoroughbred, being well developed in both mind and body. Who could ever forget the extremes that Woods would go to make another happy? Yet he could always buckle down to hard work when it was necessary. In class he absorbed and fully digested, and completely assimilated all the food of knowledge for which he showed a good healthy appetite. As Ben Bernie would say the time has come to say “ Au R evoir.”


Carr, Kelly, Satz. Traynor, Pocus, Schultz, Scott, Connolly, Browne. Marchiony, Barry, Barry, Ruane, O'Brien, McCarthy, Hamill. Donovan, Brinski, Quinlan, Wilson, Phillips, Stanley. Botti, M cGrail, Fr. Schmitt, S.J., Burke, Leahy.

4-A H A T glory that only St. Peter’s can boast of was being grandly upheld, by a group of new Ju n io rs and Seniors when we, the Freshm en—“ kids” — made our entrance in Septem ber 19 33. W hat a funny group we must have been, being of various shapes and sizes—longs, shorts and stylish stouts, greenies, that we were. A fter the first assembly we were assigned to classes where we found our first year teachers in the persons of Father Purcell, S.J., M r. Sturtzer, S.J., M r. Doyle, S .J. and M r. Sinnott. Before long we were confirmed “ prepsters,” and little by little we came to know St. Peter’s tradi­ tions and curriculum . In class we became fam iliar with such terms as “ declensions,” “ conjugations,” “ positives and negatives” and the dread of all students—Province Exam s. U nder M r. Sturtzer’s guidance we attended weekly debating meetings, over which Messrs. Foley and Burke presided. It was here that the seed of “ speech” was planted, of which today we have the

9 3 7 P E T R E ATS

T wenty


ST. P E T E R ’ S PR

fruits in the persons of m any fine speakers, such as, Botti, C arr, H am ill, Bu rke, Connolly, D onovan and Scott—am ong others too num erous to m en­ tion. O ther “ m agisters” of our first year were, M r. M cVann, who taught us math, and M r. R oon ey who taught us history. In second year, after standing in the school yard laughing at the “ freshies” we finally w ent to class under the com mand of M r. K elty, who bore in his righ t hand the “ tela scuta” of Caesar in G au l. H e was follow ed by M r. M cH ugh, S .J., M r. Boyle, S .J., M r. Lester and M r. O ’Sullivan. It was in this year that the D ebating Society conducted the trial of Jim Donovan, who was accused of insubordination and trying to underm ine the best interests of the society. M r. K elty was good enough to act as Ju d g e , and like all affairs of this type it came to naught. T h e annual school play found several of ou r members in the cast—Rodgers, Donovan, Botti, Scott, and Foley. T h e third year burst out like the sun on a clear day. M r. O rthen came from the office to grow l at m oronic mistakes. M r. M cVann am bled in again O O w ith a Geom etry, and M r. M adden rushed in w ith a huge arm ful of books to lecture on G reek and English. M r. Boyle took a few from both classes for French, and later in the year M r. O ’Su llivan did likewise. M r. M cH ugh held sway in the D ebating H all every week and arranged for lectures and debates. Father Oates had yielded the student Counselor’s office to Father B u tler, and Cicero and his pals filled the brains of students with the glories of Latin . T h e re was the play once again, supported by some of our own men. Lam bert laid claim to relationship w ith Rochelle Hudson and threatened to bring her on the outing. L ater Botti rem arked “ T h e outing was on the Hudson, but H udson was not on the outing.” T h en spring swept down and brought exam inations once again. T h is finished the third year and almost finished the class of ’ 37. A t last we reached fourth year. A fter we were seated in our class rooms Father Schm itt made his appearance w ith a V irgil under his arm and a piece of chalk which he waved delicately in the air. M r. G u terl followed him w ith an overcoat thrown over his shoulders, M r. K elty moved quietly after him , and M r. C ullen walked with both, and introduced us to all the angles of T rig . T h en , too, being Seniors, we made frequent use of that “ Sanctum Sanctorum ” —the Senior Sm oking Room , and many pleasant memories of the gay careless student hours w ill haunt us as the days roll by, and we recall the smoke laden room, with its boisterous laughter and song. T h ro u g h the smoke rings we can see Father D iehl pleading “ in leaving the hall stay in your seats,” Father R u d tke deducing “ hence therefore,” Father Dwyer enunciating “ Father Rec-to-o-or,” M r. Sturtzer’s “ squizzes,” Father P u rcell’s “ a fortiori argum ents,” M r. Lester’s “ bulls,” M r. M cV ann’s “ chalk and talk,” and above all, we can hear hearty voices raised on high shouting “ Ave,.Sanct.i P etri profecturi salutamus.”

T wenty-onr


Stoebling, Garlinger, Flaherty, McCarthy, Quinlan, O’Connell. Morris, Corcoran, Kennedy, Brady, Lohr, Cox, Fleckenstein. Brunnquell, Nugent, Gillooly, Smith. O’N eill, Kretzmer, Schneider, Larkin, Meehan, Stahlin, Stanley. Florio, Foley, Mr. Stewart, S.J., Wilson, Newton.

4-B A sunny Septem ber m orning, a group of beknickered freshmen, ONstaring in unaffected awe at the haughty upperclassmen, gathered for the first time in the courtyard of St. Peter’s. T h en these innocent lads trouped to the school hall where they were assigned to a classroom on the third floor of the Ju n io r Bu ild in g, which they were told was called i-B. M r. Sturtzer, S. J ., was designated for the task of drillin g us in the fundamentals of Latin. M r. M cVann ably led us through the mazes of A lgebra, while in Ancient H istory we learned “ Everything beautiful comes in curves.” T h e annual retreat, the mid-term exams, the annual play, undergraduate night, the Province exams, and finally the School outing rolled by before we had realized it and the first year of our presence at St. Peter’s was over all too soon. On our return, we discovered that the Province exams had taken their toll and a few fam iliar faces had not returned. W e were brought to order by the words, “ Now, listen, you men” of M r. M clnerney, by whose aid we were able to accompany Caesar in his marches in G aul. W hile some took up the

1 93 7 P E T R E A N

Twenty-two


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P a

classical G reek, others wished to delve into the more interesting study of Biology. It was in ou r second year that our friendships were really sealed and we really became settled in St. Peter’s. W e again weathered our exams successfully and h alf of our jo u rn ey through St. Peter’s was over. We assembled once again to begin our third year. T h is time we drew M r. M adden who introduced us to the fiery and dynam ic speeches of Cicero whose modesty overw helm ed us and to the fantastic tales of O vid. H e also aided those who took G reek in their jou rn ey w ith Xenophon and his ten thousand soldiers. M eanw hile Chem istry almost sank some of us in a sea of form ulae. W hile M r. O rthen was m aking G erm an interesting because of his d eligh tfu l stories, L ittle Peter was causing no end of w orry in French. T h ro u g h the excellent teaching of M r. Duffy, very few geom etric problems seemed really hard to us. It was now that our class blossomed out by taking part in sodality, debating, dramatics, football, basketball, baseball, and track. As in other years, although a few faltered, most passed the Province exam ina­ tions gloriously. N ow for the last time we gathered together in the schoolyard, full-fledged Seniors, determ ined to overcome every hardship to come. M r. Stewart intro­ duced us to the w andering Aeneas. M r. Greene led those who took Greek, into the cam p of X enophon and also acquainted them w ith the Heroes of H om er. In Physics, M r. Brom irski unfolded the laws of nature to us. M r. O ’S u llivan ’s pleasant hum or made French much easier, w hile F r. Schmitt enriched us w ith a knowledge of Germ an. Messrs. M ullen and Cullen sim plified the intricacies of T rigonom etry. As the year surges on and we see our goal, graduation, ju st ahead of us, we are spending our last days recalling the memories of days gone by. T h e m em orable scenes of the Ju n io r and Senior and Science Buildings, the lunchroom and the book-store, where some of our happiest moments were spent, w ill linger in our memories. W e now recall how we envied the seniors, how in our first year we feared that word “ ju g .” W e recall the many skirmishes with the “ Sophs,” who tried to p ilfer our handballs, the m any physical training periods when M r. Meyers w ould ask, “ W ho’s the absentee slips.” W ho can forget the many pranks we tried to play on the teachers, the aw ful puns that were pulled and the long “ ju g ” lists that resulted. W e can also look back upon those who fought so valiantly to keep up the banners of St. Peter’s in football, basketball, base­ ball, and track, the am ateur thespians and the true sodalists who spread sun­ shine am ong the sick. T hese fond recollections w ill live forever in our memories, and though some clim b high on the ladder of success, though some m ight only go up a few rungs or even though some might be satisfied to stay at the bottom, these four years w ill be rem embered the happiest years of our lives. It is fitting here that we thank, from the bottom of our hearts, all our teachers, who gave us the best Catholic education afforded and through their aid and cooperation helped us to complete our journey through St. Peter’s.

Twenty-three


Caulfield, Upton, Lynch, H am ill, Flaherty. Braun, Maguire, Merrick, English, Dillman, McHugh. DeMeyer, Green, Lisa, Mann, Sachs, Madden, Dzura. Hoffman, Carroll, Mr. Greene, Rodgers, Guterl.

4-C W E approach our ultim ate, if not sorrowful goal, let us consider with A Swhat difficulties we have traversed the pit-laden road of Knowledge. Scenes revolve crazily in our minds. In quick succession we see timid freshmen, rowdy sophomores, quiet juniors and refined (?) seniors. In our case our first glim pse of St. Peter’s was not a lasting one. W e looked upon its venerable if not smoke-blackened buildings and wondered what kind of a seat of learning this m ight be. B u t that was a mistake, as our black-frocked friends proceeded to show us. A t first resentful, we then experienced a rather slow feeling of friendship toward them. Gone now were the days of indolent gramm ar school, the capacity of the Jesuits and laymen for learning smote us upon the brain with fu ll force. O ur daily scuffles with the sophs over an insignificant ball game assumed gigantic proportions when we were refused our exercise because of school discipline. T h en creeping up silently behind us came our first taste of exams (as conducted by the Jesuits). A nd we might add the school fund was replenished by our unsolicited contributions, future insurance against future funds of the same type. T h en as it always did, came our respite from brain-teasing hours, the vaca­ tion. H ow ever we came back (most of us) to find new buildings staring us


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

in the face, but we were wrong, they were only painted. A n d also, com ing (as it were) w ith the new paint jo b came a new disciplinarian—Father R u d tke. A n d here let us pause from our progressive history to tell of a friend of last year—Father D iehl. H is sm ile illum inated the office in the Science B u ild ­ ing and his b u b b lin g energy calmed down m any an indignant student and so discreetly did he do it that the student was convinced that he won, and it was not until he was out of the office did he realize that his sentence was the same. H ow ever our only recollection of Father R u d tke was an enormous pipe w hich belched forth clouds of acrid-sm elling smoke. T h e n once more two exam s of the year further depleted our hardy band of pioneers. T h is year also saw the season in which the Preps played every game on a m uddy field. H ow ever tim e marches on and so does St. Peter’s. So came the third m ile­ stone of our career at St. Peter’s fountain of knowledge and jest. A t this juncture 3-C was form ed out of 2-D and 2-C and a m ighty brainchild was born. M ighty only in the sense that it almost killed the professors by its inaptitude for knowledge. N either force, persuasion or threats enticed it aw ay from its regular course—i.e., an entire disregard for the fundam ental ground w ork of knowledge—study. H ere also a change occurred in the school governm ent. Instead of being greeted by ruddy, hearty Father R udtke we met gentle Father Bellw oar, the students’ friend. Co-author of that wellknown phrase, “ L e t’s look at the records,” and author of “ See,” “ Rem em ber the d ip ,” and “ C redo.” L ittle as he was, he packed plenty of dynam ite. H is pet love was the orchestra whose melodious sounds permeated the “ ju g ” room every time they practiced. W ith the change in adm inistration came the ping-pong tables, set up in the old library. T h en came another battle and w ith it more casualties. Y ou guessed it, the exams, the bane of all good schools, the Waterloo of the somnolent. T h a t was experience sp e a k in g gained as a result of back-breaking toil over books during the sultry months of Ju ly and August. A t last we were Seniors. T h a t was the thought as we looked with disdain upon the m illin g herd of freshmen and we prom ptly forgot we were freshies once. H ow ever, before our mental school work started we began our physical knowledge some months sooner under a broiling sun. A lso this year we were greeted by a change in the entire adm inistration; for Father D w yer who had guided the Prep to the foremost ranks in the province, left us for Fordham U niversity, and we entered a m utual exchange with Fordham Prep; we received Father Fitzpatrick, they took Father Bellwoar. O ur new principal was Father Shalloe of St. Peter’s College, an author of no mean ability. A n d now almost upon the brin k of graduation and subsequent leaving of the Prep we realize the change in our tone which was forced on us durino' four years. W e came aloof, we depart heavy-hearted; and with a sigh of joy and sadness we fondly bid adieu to our friend of four years— St. Peter’s Prep.

Twenty-five


mmmm ft El \fl. J jt h

*

.

M A R K A N T H O N Y B A R R Y “ T w in ” Sod. 1, a, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, g, 4; Deb. i, 2.

R I C H A R D M A R T I N B A R R Y

JOHN L A W R E N C E B O T T I

“ T w in ”

" Parvus”

Sod. 1, a, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3 . 4 ; Deb. 1, 2; Var. Football 4; CI. Basketball 1, 2,

Sod. 1, 2, g, 4; K. B. S. i, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4; Dram. i, a, 3, 4; P etrean 4.

“ Go to ju g!” “ Who, me mister?” “ Yes, what’s your name?” “ Er—Barry, Mark Barry.” Later in the day Mark would receive a jug slip, Rich would get out of it and the class would have a laugh. T hat was Rich’s gift in this world, a twin brother as like himself as any two eggs. Throughout four years every teacher had the same difficulty in distinguishing them. From the very first day Rich en­ tered Prep, he participated in every activity, sodality, basketball, baseball, and football, with the possible exception of the orchestra. Along with these achieve­ ments, Rich was an honor student of high standing. Perseverance was his out­ standing virtue, and just as he was successful in the Prep we know he will be a success in later life.

Four years ago Parvus came to us a small, smiling, cherub-like chap, ready for the great battle of the pur­ suit of knowledge. Today the great conquest has ended, and he is still of small stature, but much larger in brain. What a colorful trail he has blazed through the great forest-* debating, dramatics, elocu­ tion. One never sees John, but that he has a new poem, a joke, or some pun with which to tickle the funny-bone. As an orator John’s ability has mani­ fested itself on many, never to be forgotten, occasions. Our genial little John is bound for success. And as years roll by, his name will be synonymous with the better results of the age-old “ Ratio Studiorum” —and the never to be forgotten Jesuit training.

3 >4 -

When a period lags into the realms of monotony, then from some remote cor­ ner Mark will perk up with a question or remark that usually wipes the sullen look from both teacher and class. Thus with this per­ sonality of uncanny wit the characteristics of this lad from Bayonne will always pierce the cobweb of our brains. He has ventured beyond this barrier of humor long enough to be­ come a staunch sodalist and athlete and a chap who is more than good-natured to his fellow classmates. Mark was always ready and willing to lend his whole­ hearted support and con­ genial spirit to any func­ tion sponsored by the Prep. Thus into the world he goes, well supplied with the confidence and person­ ality that won the Prep.

19 37 P E T R E A N

Twenty-six


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P ■ R O B E R T A L O Y S I US B R A D Y

W I L L I A M A L O Y S IU S B R A U N

"B o b ”

“ W illie”

Sod. i, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 4; Deb. 1; Cl. Basketball 2, 3; Cl. Sec. 1, 2.

Sod. 1, 2, 4; K. B. S. j, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Baseball and Basket­ ball 1, 3, 4; Cl. Treas. 2; Var. Basketball 4.

Poor Bob has had some tough luck: after slaving a week end on a masterpiece, the gem is usually forgotten in the car, in his rush not to miss a precious moment of class; or then to have the wind whisk it away and into a puddle! W ouldn’t it dampen a lesser spirit? Ah, but then comes Physics, and Bob is soothed, for here he is on firm ground. His questions and answers alike in this subject have caused us to prick up our ears and take notice. Where will we find you in ten years Bob? In some large laboratory no doubt lecturing learnedly on the mysteries of sub-atomic physics and demonstrating the vagaries of wayward electrons as they bound from orbit to orbit.

Here indeed is Pan the mischievous, in the guise of a fellow named Willie, the little boy of 4-C. Like a sprite he wends his way about class and drives teachers into spasms and fits; he just can’t stay in one seat more than five and three-quarter minutes. Actions speak louder than words—thus by watching this fellow cavort around we have come to know and like him. One envies his light heartedness and devilmay-care attitude. Like Shakespeare W illie believes that all the world is a stage and for his part he has chosen the light-hearted court jester. However he has a serious side—he studies hard and plays well. Here is yet another good formula for success.

Twenty-seven

E D W A R D R O B E R T B R I N S K I Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 4; Deb. 1, 2 ; P f.t r e a n 4; Var. Fool ball 2, 3, 4, Capt. 4; Var. Baseball 3, 4.

“ Irish” Brinski, Captain of the football team, Out­ fielder on the diamond, Secretary of the Sodality, Scourge of Greenville, the Cerberus of the lunch room, President of 4-A— Scholar of Grand street, Expert on German, and Quarterback of Myers’ Murdering Midgets—that’s Eddie, whose name has been on more tongues than the word “ Flunk.” He is a good mixer and a fine friend to all—especially the weaker sex. His smile is on more text books at St. A l’s than that of Clark Gable. Eddie, “ Irish” to you and me, is indeed an all around man, of whom the Prep may well be proud, and who in turn will ever be grateful and faithful to the Prep.


R I C H A R D JAMES B R O W N E

G E R A R D JAM ES B R U N Q U E L L

“ R ic h ”

“ Brunc”

"B u d ”

K. B. S. 1, 2, 3; Deb. 1, 2, 3; Cl. Baseball 2; Cl. Basket­ ball 3.

Soil. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 4; Track 3; Cl. Baseball and Basketball 2, 3, 4; Cl. Sec. 3.

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; Con. 2; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-Pres. i, 2; Dram. 1; Cl. Baseball and Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Vice-Pres. 1.

Of all the classes in the school ours has the honor of having the most bored man in civilization. I say “ honor,” for who could re­ gard it as anything but an honor and an asset to have old “ stuff’n’things” in our class. We can best ap­ preciate him by trying to imagine how much duller school would be without him. His slow drawl and easy manner brought the appellation of “ farmer.” But like the farmer he planted in the class a ready wit and good humor, which have blossomed well among us all. While seemingly bored with anything con­ nected with school, he nevertheless remains on very friendly terms with schoolwork. “Adventurous” is the word most fitting for Browne, and this same spirit always wins out.

“ Brunc” undoubtedly is the happiest, happy-golucky fellow of the class. Although this characteris­ tic is always predominant in his actions, yet out of justice we must confess that lie has his serious moments. Who is there who is able to forget those speeches “ Brunc” used to make in Sociology and Elocution class, and the fun he used to stir up in the Senior smoking room? But, re­ gardless of such a propen­ sity for mirth, “ Brunc” has the ability of always pro­ ducing the goods. In part­ ing we bid “ Brunc” cheerio and best wishes for a life packed with smiles! Our sorrow in losing you is compensated only by the thought that we can’t have everything all the time, but we are thankful for what we have had.

Though the “ knickers,” which he wore during his entire course at the Prep, won for him the name “Junior,” nevertheless in all other respects “ Bud” has well earned the admiration that would make the most brilliant scholar a bit in­ tolerant of rivalry. The impression that “ Bud” was continually imprinting on one’s mind was the selfreliant manner in which he defended his ideas and sug­ gestions both in class and on the rostrum, oftimes emerging successful. Never­ theless this cool, composed chap on many occasions translated Latin, Greek, and French with the fluency and thoroughness of an ac­ complished scholar. In So­ dality and as a main factor in the library “ Bud” leaves a place which will be hard to fill.

1 937 P E T RE AN

M A RK JOHN B U R K E

Twenty-eight


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P JOHN F R A N C IS C A R R

D O N A LD JA M E S C A R R O L L

ED M U N D JOHN C A U L F I E L D

‘ ‘R e d ’’

"D o n ”

"B e e f”

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; Organist 1, 2, 4; K. B. S. 1; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 2; Dram. 1; Cl. Basketball 1.

Sod. 1. 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Baseball and Bas­ ketball 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1; Cl. Officer 2.

Sod. 4; Con. 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 4; Var. Football 2, 3, 4 > Var. Baseball 3, 4; Cl. Pres. 3, 4.

Debater, and Scholar, that’s John Carr, the rambling, ruddy wreck from Roselle. T his young Rosellian has carved a niche for himself in the Prep hall of fame (or does one scratch a niche). He has been a veritable sword in the hand of Beaudevin Debating. He cruelly hurled his arguments at the forces of Dickinson, St. Joseph’s, and Regis. But our Carr has as many sides as a Ford after a wreck. He is a follower of the Thesbia act and has joined the train of the wise Minerva. We know that this Jack “ Carr” will still be remembered long after airplanes are in use.

Don is the class red head; contrary to custom he does not have the usual temper. He’s a mild mannered, smil­ ing chap with a gallant air about him that pleases the most fastidious of Union City girls. You can tell a man by the company he keeps. Don is usually found with Upton. Those words speak for themselves. Don’s pet hobby is basket­ ball; though he is not on the varsity, he still hurls a mighty cowhide. Don will succeed, we are certain, for his years at Prep have been successful, for Success at Prep, Success in Life! And thus equipped for the fu­ ture we bid you goodbye and Godspeed.

One hundred eighty pounds of brain and muscle, tons of energy and a never ending smile— that’s “ Beef” —the boy who’s just growing up and doing a swell job of it. His quips and puns and boisterous laughter have sounded and resounded in the ears of 4-C like water on a duck’s back (we like it)! Tendencies mark him as an extravert and leader; he commands attention and has a willing following. On the football field he was the fear of the deadliest foes—in life, he will do like­ wise and will no doubt crash the final goal line and win good St. Peter over to his side with that smile.

Twenty-nine


JO H N L A W R E N C E C O N N O L L Y “ Ja c k "

V I N C E N T G E R A R D C O R C O R A N

"C o xie”

"C o rk y”

Sod. 4; K. B. S. i, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1 , 3 , 4 ; Pres. 4 ; P e t r e a n 4; Var. Football 3; Tennis 1, 3, 4; Cl. Baseball 1, 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 1, 2.

Sod. 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Baseball 3, 4; Cl. Basket­ ball 2, 3, 4; Ass’t Mgr. Bas­ ketball 3, Mgr. 4; Cl. Sec. 2.

“ What a tennis player, and a football player, and a debater!” Yes, and Jack plays tennis of champion calibre, a football player whose crushing tackles ter­ rorized Union Hill, and an orator of whom even Cicero would be jealous. His activities have spread to Sodality also, and he is always seen at the meetings in the lower Church. Jack was elected President of the Beaudevin Debating Society and he guided the destinies of the society with the statesmanship of a Caesar. Jack ’s huge frame has been a permanent fea­ ture of the Prep and we send him on to college with confidence that there he will establish himself as an orator and an athlete.

A dash of flaming “ car­ rot top” plus a real “ North Boigen” accent make up Corcoran, the “ corky” of Prep. One finds Corcoran doing one of three things —paling with Florio, read­ ing the News, or playing basketball. In the class­ room he shows all the ear­ marks of a scholar and his reception of first testi­ monials proves the same. Yet perhaps his most noticeable trait is his jovial good humour. The same manifests itself in his rous­ ing laugh and boisterous performances in the com­ pany of the elite in the smoking-room. Here’s happy ianding boy; to put it in the vernacular— you’ve got what it takes and then some.

19 3 7 PETREAN

JAM ES JOSEPH COX K. B. S. 1, ball 3, 4; 3, 4; Cl. Basketball

2, 3, 4; Var. Foot­ Var. Baseball 2, Baseball 2; Cl. 1, 2, 3, 4, Capt. 2.

In Joe, we present the 1937 edition of a threeletter man. He is a well built lad, 150 pounds of bone and muscle, and he uses every pound of it to the best advantage. On the gridiron Joe thrilled the spectators with the long fifty and sixty yard spiral from his educated toes. He was on the passing end of every score the team made this year. On the basket­ ball court Joe brought the stands to their feet with his long shots from mid-court and his quick dribbles through the opposing de­ fense. But Joe really shone on the diamond. Joe is a pitcher of all-state calibre. He pitched every game won in the 1936 sea­ son. Thirty


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

M A R I U S C O R N E L I U S D E M E Y E R

W I L L I A M JAMES D I L L MAN

JAM ES F R A N C IS DONOVAN

"D e e ”

“ H orse”

“ J im ”

Sod. 4; K.. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2; Cl. Officer 2, 3.

Sod. 1 , 4 ; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4: Var. Football 2, 3 4; Cl. Baseball 1; Cl. Basketball 1.

A smiling, singularly silent man except for an occasional outburst due to one of Caulfield’s jokes—is “ Dee” from Secaucus. He comes to us from the midst of odoriferous and hilarious hyacinths. Dee ambitions to plant flowers one day in the same pots. When his nose is not found plunged deep into Cicero or Virgil he can be found delicately sniffing prize blooms. Dee has proved his worth during four years at the Prep. He set up the machinery for a well ordered life. A ll that remains for him is to put the wheels into motion. Can you hear the mad whir of the machinery? It’s calling success, success.

“ Horse” — the hungry, happy-go-lucky, rah, rah boy of 4-C. His all em­ bracing smile and peculiar walk mark him down on the pad as a distinct type, a good mixer, a hit with the gals. Many a female heart has fluttered as “ Horse’s” pedal extremities moved him over the grid­ iron in the afternoon and moved her over the floor in the evening’s dance. “ Horse” avows that he’d like to be an engineer; we have no doubt but that he is well able to turn on the steam. So, here’s a toast— with glasses on high—three cheers for Dillman, a regu­ lar guy. This may not be poetical “ Horse,” but we all know it’s the truth.

Thirty-one

Sod. 1, 2 , 3 , 4 ; K. B. S. 1, 2 , Deb. 1, 2 , 3 , 4 ; Dram.

3, 4;

2, 3 , 4; P

etrean

4.

“Jim ” Donovan, orator sans peur and scholar sans rapproche, debates and elocution and dramatics have all been part of his activities. His forte has always been to address an audience whether friendly or hostile. On the stage he achieved stardom as the de­ lightful Tom in “ Tom Sawyer.” He has been con­ sistently a scholastic leader in his class, receiving testi­ monials every month. As he has every intention of furthering his vast store of knowledge in some college next year we can truthfully say that our loss will be their gain. Here’s luck and success—James—our minds are refreshed by the happy remembrance of you.


E D W A R D JO S EP H E N G L I S H

P E T E R JAM ES F L A H E R T Y

R O B E R T EDW ARD F L A H E R T Y

‘‘E d ’’

“ Pete”

‘‘Flats’’

Sod. i, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Var. Football 3, 4; Cl. Baseball i, 3; Cl. Basket­ ball 1.

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. i", 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 4; Cl. Base­ ball 1, 3; Cl. Vice-Pres. 1.

Sod. 4; It B. S. i, 2, 3, 4; Track 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2.

Ed is a very democratic fellow—the type who’d split his last cent to help a pal out. His is the type that makes life’s burden lighter. He is gifted with a singular sense of humor and appreciation of the other fellow’s rights. His presence in class is as esential to the rest as the electric current to a light bulb. Ed played football with the team and once more proved the necessity for his presence. Ed am­ bitions St. Peter’s College, where he will carry on all the tradition of good old Prep. No matter what fate deals you Ed, we know that you’ll deal a good hand— let’s hope you get a straight flush always!

One of our aspiring Greek letter men—and the Greeks would have a name for him too, probably Adonis II—is “ Pete.” How the ladies must flutter! This, however, does not confuse “ Pete.” He re­ mains level-headed, pays attention to studies, not however, without a fine dash of humor as a balancer and added attraction. Our likeable classmate is an active member in the So­ dality and the debating so­ ciety and never misses a Prep jamboree or function. We have no doubt that Pete’s ability, coupled with his poise and charm, will carry him far towards the high ideals he has set for himself.

Here’s the man whose s c i e n t i f i c vocabulary matches Einstein’s. Rel­ atively speaking, “ Flats” will perhaps one day as­ tound the world with the breaking down of the atom, or the discovery of a new element. However, he manages to work well in any “ element” no “ matter” where he may be. We’ll let you in on a sacred secret—“ Flat’s” weakness is girls; boy, what a gay Lothario he is! However, “ verburn sat sapienti” ; look what happened to “ atom” when he met “ eve.” Make your garden of paradise the chemistry lab. and you’re almost certain to prove life to be a worth while “ experi­ ment.”

193 7 PET RE AN

Thirty-two


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P ED W A R D A L B E R T F L E C K E N S T E I N “ Flecky”

L A W R E N C E EDW A RD F L O R I O “ L a rry " .

JOHN JAM ES FOLEY “ Ja ck ”

Sod. x, a, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1 2; P e t r e a n 4; Cl. Officer 2, 3.

Sod. 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1; Var. Basketball 3, 4; Var. Football 3; Var. Baseball 4; Cl. Baseball 1, 4.

Sod. 1, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4; Sec. 1, 2; Dram. 2; P e t r e a n 3, 4; Var. Baseball 4; Cl. Baseball 3, 4.

“ Look this way and I ’ll take your picture; hold still, that’s it, okay” ; that’s Ed; constantly snapping photos with his beloved camera. We will remember Ed for other things o too;7 his excellent style in Ger­ man, his ever ready smile and sparkling wit, his zeal and support of all Prep activities. These are but a few of the traits of Ed. When he is not taking pic­ tures he is pondering away at his books, trying to fol­ low Aeneid’s course in the underworld or figure out the mysteries of Physics. We do not know Ed’s plans for the future, but we know that he will succeed in whatever he undertakes.

Bang! smash! bang! What is that noise? Why, Florio of course, the whirling, banging, perpetual motion machine of fourth year. This fellow can get into more trouble in one minute than twenty bulls in the traditional China shop. Yet, despite all, Larry is a man of no mean ability. He plays basketball on the varsity and does a good bit of tooting on the saxo­ phone, not forgetting the fact that he has a fine head on those broad shoulders. Arthur Murray’s eye would gleam could he but see this fellow tap dance or run through the latest steps, such as the popular “ truck­ in’ ” or the “ Lindy hop.”

“Jack” came to us a smiling little rube from the sticks and now he leaves us tall and straight and very urbane. Here’s one of the most willing workers and energetic fellows in the year of ’37. Jack is never seen but that he’s munch­ ing on a candy bar or some ornate cake. Perhaps his most beloved trait is the cheerful nonchalance with which he meets a quip or pun or thrust by some of the wits. Jack’s spirit will remain with him and enrich his life as well as the lives of others throughout the years. Best of luck “Jack,” may you meet all the difficulties of life as well as you met the Prep’s.

Thirty-three


J O H N H E N R Y G A R L I N G E R

G I L B E R T L A W R E N C E G I L L O O L Y

" Jo h n "

“ G illy ”

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; Con. 2; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 3, 4; Tennis 3; Cl. Basketball 1,

Sod. 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Beethoven’s “ Moonlight Sonata” floats mellifulously over the tense air, made electric by an appreciative audience. Whose hands are those that tap so know­ ingly over the keys? None other than the Paderewski of Prep—John Garlinger. Yes, John is an accom­ plished musician; witness the gold pin which he wears on his vest. This year John forsook the wanderings of Ulysses for the mortar and pestle. In this new field he easily leads the class. John has the best of in­ gredients to put into the experiment of life, and like his work in the “ lab” it’s bound to come out perfect.

For four years, St. Peter’s Prep presented “ The Man Without a Worry,” starring Gilbert Gillooly. This was the most hilarious comedy we ever saw. G il’s ever­ present wit brought howls of laughter from everyone who saw or heard him. At the end of first year and the middle of third year, “ G il” was overcome by two serious ailments which made him lose several months from school. Look­ ing back we can recall how dull was the life at the Prep during “ G il’s” ab­ sence. “ G il” was the best example of good spirits in adversity. Jug, tests, exams, —nothing worried him.

"B o b "

3>4-

1937PETREAN

“ Parlez-vous Francais, Monsieur?” “ Oui, oui.” And he does, believe it or not! Then if one were to question our Green from Greenville he would as­ tound you with profound answers in Math, English and Religion. While in class he is rather reserved and unpretentious — but once he steps over the threshold of the Senior room—well it must be the gypsy in him that comes bounding forth. He’s one of the regulars at the ping pong tables as well as being one of the “ regulars” of the class of ’37. You can’t keep a good man down.

Thirty-four


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P W A L T E R T H O M A S G U T E R L

JAM ES A L E X A N D E R HAM ILL

JOHN F R A N C IS H A M I L L

“ Gooch”

“ Flossie”

“ Ja c k ”

Sod. 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1; T rack 3; Cl. Base­ ball 2; Cl. Basketball 1, 2.

Sod. 4; K. B. S. 1, 4; Var. Football 3, 4.

Sod. 4; Deb. 1,. 2, 3, 4; Dram. 3 ; P e t r e a n 4 ; Cl. Sec. 1.

“ Flossie” is our version of the “ T h in Man” and a swell fellow at that! He is by far the most reserved fellow in 4-C, but out of it he’s a wow. His time is taken up aiding his fellows to translate the French. On the field his silence is translated into unbounded pep and energy as he works with precision and success. His grave mien and steady application to work marks him for activity in profes­ sional fields. His chosen work is in the field of medicine; his patience will no doubt be his chief asset in that work. O.K. Doctor! May all your operations in life be successful and all the mislaid appendices merely a stimulus to a greater and deeper surgery.

T he little mouse at the back of the class room lazily blinked his eyes. He listened with a cocked ear as a rich melodious voice translated the absolutes of Xenephon, the same type of translation that sent the student to the top of his class. His eyes popped open as that same voice resounded throughout the room in a forensic display that could thrill the ancients. He gravely nodded his head in re­ flection but as the ready wit of those same phrases sent the class into a roar of laughter, understanding appeared in his tiny eyes. He remembered that tone in the Debating hall and on the stage. “ T hat’s Jack H am ill!”

Who is there who can ever forget “ Gooch,” the mimic of the Prep. His performance on upper classnite took down the house and his “ Gunga D in” stirred the mass to Him­ alayan heights. There was a day once when a teacher failed to show up in 4-C and “ M r.” Guterl enter­ tained the class for a full forty-five minutes. “ Gooch” recalls to mind the oft seen child caught in the jam pot, for he is often caught in a jam! However this smiling little fellow is bound to succeed. His impersona­ tions of the teachers and poetical recitations have marked him as a jestor, yet his ability to meet all odds mark him as a true man.

Thirty-five


C H A R L E S JO S EP H H O FFM A N

G E R A R D P A T R I C K K E L L Y

"C h a rlie”

" Cicero”

" J im ”

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K. B. S. i, 2, 3 , 4 ; P e t r e a n 3 ; Cl. Base­ ball 2, 3 ; Cl. Sec. i; Treas. 4.

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 3; T rack 3.

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Treas. 1.

Quietly and with as­ surance a smiling wavy haired youth stands to answer a question. His voice is pure and rich, his manner pleasing, his rea­ soning profound, his answers well worded. He stands out as a scholar and deep thinker; he is. Ask “ Charlie” to cooperate on some plan or event and for the next month or so you are pleased and aided by steady, efficient, useful ser­ vice. He starts a job and finishes it correctly. In life those are the qualities that make a great man—a true man—such is “ Charlie,” and the news of his future suc­ cess will never come to us unexpectedly or to him un­ deservedly.

“ Quo usque tandem abutere . . . say hold on! T h at’s a different Cicero. T h at’s the one who lived at Rome. But the one which we present today is one of the Bayonne Ciceros. Of course he also bears the Gaelic name of Kelly, but it is as “ Cicero” that we’ll remember this towering Titan of 4-A. “ Cicero” though has become ac­ quainted with his Roman namesake, and while they are not on speaking terms we have been informed that an interesting correspon­ dence is carried on. In So­ dality and K. B. S. he always answers to the name of “ Kelly” and indeed that name is in high esteem in these spiritual activities.

Can anyone imagine be­ ing punctual, having a better than “ low down” on subject matters for the day, and being able to find humor in Cicero? But then, such is hardly the lot of average mortals. “Jim ” is the tonic of that early blue Monday disaptitude for picking up the wellknown threads. His humorous comments saw us through many a rough spot, even making Science bearable. Ambling about the school yard or the halls, his geniality radiates and makes an unexpected en­ counter pleasurable. Bright days to you always, Sunny Jim, in return for the many hours of happiness you have afforded us.

1 9 3 7 PETREAN

'

JAMES FRANCIS K E N N ED Y


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

H E N R Y JOHN K R E T Z M E R "H e n " Sod. i, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; P

etrean

JO SEP H P E T E R L A R K I N

"L ee"

“ Jo e ”

Sod. 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 2.

4.

“ Ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Henry J. Kretzmer of the Bayonne Kretzmers.” Yes, “ Hen,” though of an expanding nature, is one of the most loyal men in the Prep. At every football or basketball game, we may see “ Hen” jumping up and down (horrors!), cheering P-R-E-P. “ Hen” is a scholar of the first rank, chattering German that would do credit to Goethe and wrecking up the Physics Lab. with a regularity that thrills Mr. Bromirski. We say good-bye to the Kretz­ mer of the 200 lbs., know­ ing that he will always be a big man in his little com­ munity of Bayonne. From the acorn comes the mighty oak. Who then shall name “ Hen’s” limits.

Thirty-seven

LEO F R A N C IS L A M B E R T

Here is a fellow who strictly adheres to and be­ lieves in the proverb “ Silence is Golden.” He will always be remembered as the member of our class who did so much and yet said so little. He mastered the intricacies of Homer and Vergil using the weapons of perseverance and hard work. At times he found the waters a little rough but his strong per­ tinacity soon calmed these white-capped waves of ad­ versity. In the school activities, the unassuming nature of this chap only exaggerated his loyal spirit. In leaving the Prep the only thing we can say to “ Lee” is, “ Go into life with the same attitude with which you leave the Prep.”

Sod. i, 2, 3, 4; Con. 2, 3; Pref. 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 4, Pres. 2; Dram. 2; P e t r e a n 4; Var. Football 4; Track 4; Cl. Off. 1, 2, 3, 4.

Sherlock Holmes stared intently out the window. His high voice resounded about the room, “Ah, some­ one is ringing the dooibell. He rings like a football player, lineman probably, to be exact, a tackle. Hear his footsteps, they denote an actor—one, probably, who is skilled in the Thespian and forensic arts. Ah! he stumbles; hear him talk to the stairs, as though he had a commanding office. Yes, I’m sure he’s Prefect of the Sodality and President of a Debating Society too. The way he knocks on the door shows that he is a good dancer and he probably wears loud socks and, of course, he has red hair. In other words, Watson, here comes ‘ Joe’ Larkin.”


M A R T I N F R A N C IS L E A H Y

T H O M A S M I C H A E L LISA

G E O R GE EDW ARD L O H R

“ M arty”

“ Tom ”

“ Giants”

Sod. i, 2, 3, 4; Con. 1; Sacristan 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4.

Sod. 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Var. Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Baseball 3; Cl. Basketball i, 2; Cl. Pres. 2.

Sod. 1, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Var. Baseball 2, 3, 4; VicePres. 3.

“ O Sole Mio, tah, tah.” Ah, grand opera. But who’s that new maestro? Ah, yes, Martin Leahy, I re­ member him in St. Peter’s. He was always our expert on all the deeds of the god, Musaeus. He could quote “ Carmen” and “ Faust” like a veteran opera devotee. He was also a faithful mem­ ber of the Sodality, in fact he was Sacristan for four years. Yes, yes, although Martin came from Bayonne he could read English as though he came from a civilized country. He was the Spiritual Director, the Literary Critic, and the gay Maestro of old 4-A. Yes, yes, it seems like only yesterday, but ah, there goes the orchestra “ tah, tah.”

1 93 7 P E T R E A N

Memory is one of the happiest faculties that God has bestowed on man. An almost unconscious act of the will flashes on the mental screen pictures of persons, places and things. For this we are ever grate­ ful, for without the same, we would never be able to recall “ Tom .” I close my eyes and concentrate—clear blue eyes, pearl white teeth, and good natured smile, pleasant voice—that’s Tom. Digging deeper into the archives, I recall Tom as a splendid student and swell football man. These are indeed accomplish­ ments—'" Vale, et sint Sem­ per Tecum,” for thus girded your path can only be the one of complete success.

In the morning when the Bergen County sun creeps over the silvery (?) Hacken­ sack, old Sol usually finds in the road below a speed­ ster who is wending his way from Hasbrouck Heights to Jersey City. Perhaps this same sun shall shine into the speedster's eyes as he “ whizzes ’em” past the astonished Dickin­ son batsmen. For this is George Lohr, our Lefty Grove and Damon Runyon of all Prep sports followers. George is the one to whom we run when we wish to know Gehrig’s average or the time of the Sodality meeting. Sodalist, pitcher and information clerk of 4-B, George, we know, will strike out all his future ob­ stacles.

Thirty--eighl


ST. P E T E R ’ S PR MB9 D A L L A S W I L L IA M L O W T H E R “ A lib i Ik e” Sod. l, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, a; 3, 4; Deb. 1.

Hoffman—here; Ham ill— here; Lowther—absent! T ex has not yet honored us with his presence this week; what’s the story this time? —the oft buried grand­ mother, fall from an apart­ ment roof, auto accident, morning after or what? Yes sir, this fellow has the greatest late and absent record in 4-C, yet he gets along somehow. “ T e x ” is good company and many times in the senior room we have sailed into ethereal realms during one of his tall, tall stories. Yet like the famed old Doctor of Moliere, “ T e x ” gets on Malgre lui. Et tout est bien qu’ il finit bien.

T hirty-nine

M I C H A E L A L O Y S I US LY N C H

E D W A R D JOSEPH M cC a r t h

y

"M ik e "

“ M ac”

Sod. 1, 2, 4; K. B. S. i, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2; Var. Football 2, 3, 4; Var. Baseball 3, 4; Cl. Baseball and Basketball i, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Sec. 1.

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Base­ ball 1, 2, 3, 4.

There are some things in life we can do with and some things we can not do without,—“ Mike” is one of the latter. One hardly realizes that “ Mike” is pres­ ent until he smiles. Then that smile penetrates your soul like the rays of a tropical sun. “ Mike” is at peace with the whole world; his is the type of presence that enhances any gathering. In football “ Mike” proved himself to be an essential, integral part of the team—witness his performance in the St. Cecilia and Union Hill games. Take our advice “ Mike,” as the modern song has it, “ Stay as sweet as you are.”

I doubt whether the Prep roll call will ever lack the name McCarthy, and I’m positive the times will be few and far between when it boasts of a more genuine or popular “ Mc­ Carthy” than Ed. He was not brilliant in mastering the languages, but his con­ sistency was outstanding. A devout sodalist, a staunch rooter and enthusiast for all the Prep’s intellectual and athletic affairs. “ Ed” leaves behind him a record of impressions that not even time will blot out. Thus “ Ed” enters the world with a personality that will win for him even more friends than the curls that lay beneath his cap.


V I N C E N T JAM ES M c G R A I L

FRA N CIS JOSEPH M cH U G H

“R ex”

“ Vinnie”

Sod. 4; K. B. S. i, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4; Dram. 4; Treas. 4; P e t r e a n 4; Track 4; Cl. Baseball 3; Cl. Bas­ ketball 2, 3.

“ M ac”

Sod., K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; P e t r e a n 4; Var. Basketball 3, 4; Football Mgr. 4; Cl. Off. 1, 2, 3.

Ability to do anything worth while is indeed a gift. “ Mac” has been gifted with various abilities, he has often shown himself to be well fitted to act, to debate, to study, to be a good sport, to make friends. Who can forget his fine performance as Captain Badger in “ Monsieur Beaucaire,” his thrilling oratory on the floor of Beaudevin, his monthly march to the stage for testimonials, his nimble feet on the basket­ ball court, and above all the warmth and glow of his friendship? In sum total these abilities add up to the attributes of a good man. Our sorrow in seeing you go Mac is great but had we never known you irrep­ arable would be the loss.

“ Vinnie” is our Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde. In the classroom he is the ac­ complished Dr. Jekyl. He can rattle off declensions and parts of verbs with a facility that causes a thrill of awe. T hat same Dr. Jekyl is the mainstay of the Sodality and K. B. S. On the basketball court how­ ever, “ Vinnie” becomes the unrelenting Mr. Hyde. In­ deed many of his opponents have shown a keen admira­ tion (and sorrow) for his brilliant playing, as he dribbled around a six foot player and added two more points to his side. An accomplished gentleman, scholar and athlete is our highest tribute to “ Vinnie,” and never was an adage more appropri ate than here.

19 3 7 P E T R E A N

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; Sec. 1; K. B. S. 1 , 2 , 3, 4; Deb. 1 , 2 ; Dram. 1; Cl. Baseball 1, 2; Cl. Bas­ ketball 1, 2, 3.

Here is the Major Hoople of 4-C, the Blustering Blower of Blooming Blun­ ders. The Major, however, always manages to take time out from dreams of a job as a fireman in an asbestos factory, to get down to work and do a really convincing job over the books. His favorite in­ door sport, aside from pur­ veying to the unlearned facetious facts concerning this and that, is playing Ping Pong in the Senior room. The Major’s one sadness is the fact that he was not able to take Alice by the hand on her trip through Wonderland. With such a spirit and gay man­ ner, the Major cannot help, but turn this old world in­ to Wonderland itself.

Fortv


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P G E O R G E JO S EP H MADDEN

JO SEPH IAMES M A G U I R E

V I N C E N T JAMES MANN

“ Oivney”

“ M aggie”

“ Vinnie”

Sod. 1; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2; Dram. 1, 3; Cl. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Bas­ ketball i, 2; Cl. Sec. 2.

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Treas. 1; Cl. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4.

Sod. 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.

“ La-da-da,” a soft, husky voice floats softly across the smoke laden air of the Senior smoking room—no it isn’t Bing Crosby—that’s Madden—master of synco­ pation. On the billboard we are attracted by a clever poster. Who drew it?— None other than George, the man with the soft voice and talented pen! U p­ stairs in the class room a scholarly voice renders an exact, well worded, Latin translation—the boy can­ not only draw and dance— but also read Latin and French. Our hearts beat to the rhythm of his song, our eyes feast on his nimble feet, our brains register him as a friend and classmate— forever!

Step right this way, gents, and meet “ Prep’s bad boy” —jolly, boisterous, boyish “ Maggie” 4-C’s riot of fun and frolic. Never a dull moment, never a dull answer, never dull! T o our eyes “ Maggie” is just a boy growing up, but to his teachers he is more than that—he is an Ax student. On his serious side he has much in his favor, a steady application to study, a fine appreciation of himself and the world he lives in, and a true friend to all who know him well enough to be a member of that most select company. At this our graduation we must bid our jester farewell but we do so with confidence for we know he will succeed.

“ Vinnie” is by far the most silent member of 4-C. However, when called upon in any class his answers prove that the same silence is taken up by deep think­ ing. Nevertheless “ Vin” is an intricate part of the class and we would never have had such a happy, har­ monious year without his presence. His favorite sport is basketball in which he shows unusual speed, sure footedness, and accuracy, those things count both in sports and life, they make the winner, the champion. Your feet are firmly planted on the road to success; here’s to happy travelling. Such a beginning as yours spells the same thing in any language. Vale!

Forty-one


I T A L O V IN C E N T M A R C H I O N Y

STAN LEY JAM ES M EEH A N

V I N C E N T FRA N CIS M E R R I C K

“ Boom -Boom ”

“ Stan"

“ M ax”

Sod. i, 2, 4; K. B. S. i, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3; Cl. Baseball 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 2, 3, 4; Cl. Sec. 1, 2; Cl. Treas. 3.

Deb. 3; Var. Football 3; Cl. Pres. 2; Cl. Vice-Pres. 1, 3.

Sod. and K. B. S. 1, 2, 4; Var. Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Var. Base­ ball 4; Cl. Baseball and Bas­ ketball 1, 2, 4.

Let us present the Ho­ boken boy who, we are sure, will make good. “ Marsh” is a plugger. He sticks to everything he starts until he can finally say “ Vic!” “ Marsh” is quite a singer, one of the best dancers at the Prep, and by far the best pianist. We will never forget the hours we spent in the Senior room, listening to “ Marsh” sing and play the popular numbers of the day. “ Marsh” hopes to be a great pianist. He is a mas­ ter of the piano already, and we are certain we will see his name in lights some day. In saying goodbye we wish him every success in his musical career.

T his fellow came into Prep a winner, a scholar­ ship man and he has man­ aged not to follow a set pace throughout the four years but rather to set it! “ Stan” has a cheery smile that penetrates the darkest corners, plus a quiet man­ ner that is bound to please. H is is the uncanny ability to sit in class, listen to a lecture, come out, and have all the matter down nearly perfect. “ Stan” is never seen taking home a book, yet he always takes home testimonials. So it is that “ Stan” has been during four years at the Prep, and so it is that he will go on through life, “ Semper ad majora.”

When better football men are spoken of the name of Merrick figures promin­ ently in the discussion. He worked hard on the field to do his best; fortunately he follows the same pattern in class and on the campus. “ M ax” has taken the four quarters of the game of Prep like a Trojan, each quarter he plunged in and when the whistle blew he was on top. In the last quarter he finally con­ quered all for a final touch­ down. “ M ax” takes his leave with reluctance—and we the same of him—so long and many successful line plunges against whatever the fates hold in store for you.

193 7 P E T R E A N

Forty-two


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

W A L T E R E U G E N E M O R R I S

T H O M A S JOHN N E W T O N

D A N IE L JAM ES N U G E N T

"C h a m p "

" F ig "

"D an ”

P e t r e a n 4; Cl. Baseball and Basketball 2, 3; Cl. Treas. and Sec. 3; Cl. Vice-Pres. 1, 2; Cl. Pres. 4.

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 4; Cl. Baseball and Basketball 1, 2. 3.

4; Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1; T rack 3, 4; Cl. Baseball 2; Orch 1, 2, 3, 4.

Walt is another of the “ local” boys from Hasbrouck Heights who is do­ ing himself and the town honor by making good. Aside from being success­ ful in the class rooms he also packs a mighty punch in the prizefight ring. Yes sir, for such a quiet fellow, “W alt” packs a powerful wallop! His constant pal throughout his time at Prep has been none other than “ Stan” Meehan. Walt’s efficient manner and willingness to lend a hand at all times will carry him far. Here’s to a plentitude of winnings, “ W alt,” and always remember that no matter what the odds a true Petrean never takes the count, at least never more than nine.

“ You should have seen the one that got away!” Ah-ah—the old one used by fishermen since Jonah lost the whale. Well, we of the class of ’37 take great pride in our little Jonah, Mr. Thomas J. “ Sir Isaac” Newton. When blue Mon­ day rolls along, we always get a gleam of hope that maybe “ Tom ” has captured one of those elusive crea­ tures that live in the top shelves of Davy Jones’ locker. From “ T om ” we have learned about bass, perch, mackerel and tackle. But Tom with all his “ sea farin’ ” ways is loyal to Prep sports (maybe it’s because all teams have a tackle). He is a Sodalist of the first rank. So long, Tom old boy, “ bass” of luck.

“ Dan” is the true Petrean type of gentleman, athlete, scholar, and humorist. We shall miss his ready wit, his quiet de­ termination, his unfailing good spirits. We may for­ get his achievements in the world of studies, his en­ thusiasm in the field of sports, and his unfailing at­ tendance at Sodality. We may forget his sunny smile, his happy “ Hellos” and “ How are yous.” We may see someone else in his place in the orchestra, in the classrooms and on the track but no one can take the place which he holds in the hearts of us all. With more than a tinge of sor­ row we bid you farewell and know we are better men for having known you.

Forty-three

Petrean


V I N C E N T JO SEPH O ’B R IE N Sod. i, 2, 3; K. B. S. i, 2; Deb. 1, 2; Var. Football 4; Cl. Baseball 1, 2, 3; Cl. Basketball 1, 2, 3.

T he class was drowsy. A fly buzzed in the warm sun­ light. T he voice of the teacher was like a voice from another world that broke into our dreams. “ . . . if anyone can draw. . . .” Immediately the cry went up, “ He can” —“ I cannot.” But when all had settled down again to sleep, a soft drawly voice mingled with that of the teacher. “ I can’t even draw water.” T hat’s our Bayonne maestro, the wor­ ried look on Jack Benny’s face. But don’t believe that “ Vin” is just another wit from Bayonne for “ Vinnie” can rattle off French with the best. He is also a quarterback on the football squad. We give you “ Vinnie.”

19 37 P E T R E A N

R I C H A R D A L F R E D O ’C O N N E L L

TH O M A S FRAN CIS O ’N E IL L

Sod. 3, 4 ; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Deb. 4 ; Dram. 4.; P e t r e a n 4 ; T rack 4 ; Cl. Baseball 3, 4 ; Cl. Basketball 4 .

Sod. 2, 4; K. B. S. 2, 4; Deb. 1; Cl. Baseball 2, 3; Cl. Basketball 1, 2.

T he name is that of an Irishman, the appearance that of a “ Pole.” The Anumber-i artist of the 4-B classroom has two out­ standing traits, (a) a wide grin, and (b) a tall ranging, gangling fuselage; and one fault, tripping over folks that he does not perceive from his great height. The infectious “ molar exhibi­ tion” of “ Okee” has of late been rather clouded, for he is endeavoring with some measure of success to ascribe an ambition to each of his fellow “ stewdents.” How­ ever, when his troubles are over we are sure that his nature will revert to its usual happy-go-lucky self, the self we have all come to know and hold in ad­ miration.

Throughout the past four years, Tom, with his calm and easy going manner, has become a well-known and well liked figure in our midst. In his case the old axiom, “The stronger minds are those of which the world hears the least,” is without a doubt accurate. It also may be said of him that when he is quiet he is very quiet and when he is noisy he is still quiet and thus it is difficult to tell when he is noisy. How­ ever we know that behind Tom ’s unruffled exterior lies a keen, penetrating and active mind, a happy com­ bination that we know will carry him far amidst a fickle and noisy world, along the same road of success that he began at the Prep.


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P R O B E R T JOSEPH PH I L L I P S

D O M IN IC K A L B IN P O C U S

JAMES T H O M AS Q U IN L A N

“ P h il"

“ Dorn”

“Jim m ie”

Sod. and K. B. S. 1 , 2 , 3, 4; Var. Basketball 3, 4; T rack 2, 3.

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Var. Baseball 3, 4; Cl. Baseball and Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Sec. 2, 3; Cl. Treas. 1.

Sod. 2, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4; Dram. 1; Cl. Baseball 1, 3.

“ Come away from that window!” This was the teacher’s usual greeting to “ Phil” on entering the class. “ Phil” would casual­ ly turn from romantic pros­ pects to romantic languages as a tolerable substitute. In addition to Latin, Greek and French “ Phil” has ac­ quired a limited knowledge of Polish and Italian and bids fair to become a diplo­ mat or at least a politician. However “ Phil’s” abilities were not confined to languages and his playing on the court will long be remembered at the Prep. So long “ Phil” and though you speak all the tongues of the tower of Babel we know you will always have a good word for your old Alma Mater.

“ Dom” is not only tall, dark and handsome, but he is also the strong, silent type as well. However, to go further, “ Dom” is a per­ fect example to bear out the old adage, “ A healthy body—a healthy mind.” His basketball ability is not to be slighted, but his forte is slapping out extra base hits on the baseball dia­ mond. Don’t get the im­ pression that “ Dom” is all brawn; his monthly testi­ monials disprove that. He had a capacity for remem­ bering that would have put an elephant to shame. In regard to his disposition all I can say is that during the past four years I never saw one who could make him lose his temper. “ Dom” can take as well as give it.

“ I’d like to take this book out please” ; a smiling dark haired chap looks up from his work and takes the book. “ Hello there ‘ Jim’—how’s tricks?” “ O.K,” he cheerily replies. Nice fellow “Jim ,” a good stu­ dent, and an extra fine librarian. Yes sir! “ Jimmie” has served faithfully for three years. Good service seems to be his main pur­ pose in life, and his cheer­ ful performance of the same makes life cheerful for all those who come in contact with him. Per­ haps “ Jim ” will not spend his years in the fascinating realm of books, but no mat­ ter what course he follows he is certain to get his por­ tion of the world’s favorite pie.

Forty-five


JO H N P A T R I C K Q U IN L A N

JO SEPH LEO R O D G E R S

JOHN P A T R I C K R U A N E

"Ja c k ”

" Jo e ”

"R u ”

Sod. 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4; Dram. 4; P etrean 4; T rack 3; Cl. Baseball 3, 4; Cl. Basketball

K. B. S. and Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; Pref. 2, Cons. 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4; Dram. 2, 4; P e t r e a n 4.

Sod. 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4: Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4; Off. 2; Dram. 1 , 2 : P e t r e a n 4 : Cl. Base­ ball 1 , 4 ; Cl. Basketball 2 ,

2.

3. 4 -

For those whom it may concern—a lad 5 ft. 8 in. tall, 146 pounds, keen brown eyes and a sense of humor, which easily humil­ iates an adversary, is “ Jack.” He is a scholar who can justly become bored of receiving honor cards, and on the court or on the rostrum is a dynamo of energy. Et denique, “ Jack” is a sodalist who seldom misses a meeting and one of the more dis­ tinguished members of the graduating class. If you should find him im­ mediately or any time here­ after hold him, for you too may find his abilities to be salutary. After receiving his diploma all we can say is “ Perge quo cepisti.”

19 3 7 P E T R E A N

Whenever the name of “ Joe” Rodgers is men­ tioned, one immediately thinks of extra-curricular activities in which fields “ Joe” has ever been en­ thusiastic and one word sums up the part he has played in each—leader. An unsurpassed debater and an omniverous reader “ Joe” still finds time to teach Re­ ligion at St. Joseph’s. Wit­ ness the tremendous suc­ cess of his brain child “ Upper Class Nite,” to which cause he gave his un­ tiring efforts and zeal. As a wearer of the Sock and Buskin “Jo e ” has no equal. “ Joe’s’'’ career can be sum­ med up briefly: “N il est quod non tetigit, et nil tetigit quod non ornavit.”

4-

“Jack” Ruane, our sports expert, the one who settles those little arguments about the left end on Holy Cross or Joe DiMaggio. But “ R u ” makes a sport of all his activities. He tackles the Latin with the ferocity of a Franco. He comes back for more at Sodality as though he were Jack Dempsey advancing upon Firpo. In debating, he hits the opponents’ arguments as though he were a full­ back hitting the buckling line. His humor is as keen as a jockey’s whip and his dramatic ability stands out like a sore thumb on a catcher. And now as he sweeps through Fourth Year we raise our hands and say “ Touchdown.”

Forty-six


ST. P E T E R S

PREP

R O B E R T ED W A R D SACHS

JOHN JO SEPH SA T Z

M I C H A E L JOSEPH S C H N E I D E R

“ Bobby”

“ Ja ck ”

“ M ike”

Sod. i, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Var. Baseball 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Cl. Baseball 1, 2, 3; Cl. Basketball 1, 2.

Sod. i, 2, 3, 4, Treas. 1; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas. 3; Cl. Baseball 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 1; Deb. 1.

Sod. 1, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3; T rack 3, 4; Cl. Baseball and Basketball 1,

A kindly smile penetrates the darkest heart and kindles fraternal under­ standing. Bob is gifted with such a smile, plus a quiet and pleasing manner. Such will be the means for his success wheresoever he goes. Meditating on this fellow recalls the line, “ Friendship, sweet cement of the soul and solder of society—I owe thee much.” Our lives have been en­ hanced by contact with his. Therefore, the mem­ ory of him is indelibly marked in saecula saeculorum, as a pleasing mile­ stone amongst our Petrean memories. Adios, y siempre sea Dios contigo. Or as the Moors put it “ good bye and may Gocl be with you always.”

May I present to you the bard from Newark, “ Lou” Satz. “ Lou,” as you know, is an honor man in his class. Mathematics are his meat, but don’t believe that he doesn’t know his Latin and Greek. And when a So­ dality meeting is called, “ Lou,” is always present. Of course Jack alias “ Lou” has the habit of saying, “ He doesn’t know what the score is.” His loyalty to Newark is really intense, but of course, ladies and gentle­ men, one must have one’s little peculiarities. “Jack’s” boon companion is “ Bar­ ney” Schultz and to find one is to find the other. Ladies and gentlemen, Mr. John Satz! John Satz: “ You don’t know what the score is.”

Mr. M. J. Schneider, Mathematician extraordin­ ary. T h at’s “ Mike” from Elizabeth. “ Mike” is the Einstein of 4-B. He can bi­ sect lines and trisect angles, which would wither the brow of a Harvard gentle­ man. He was the first Prepster who ever slid on a slide rule. “ Mike’s” ambition is to be an engineer and we may soon read about bank­ ers jumping off Schneider Bridge; but wre will re­ member “ Mike” for his “ spricht Woerter.” He can make Goethe blush with the shame of in­ feriority. We send on our Mathematician, our student Deutscher, to M. I. T., knowing that this college will soon rejoice at being acquainted rnit ihm.

Forty-seven

2.

3< 4 -


B E R N A R D F R A N C I S SC H U LZ

W I L L I A M A N T H O N Y S C O T T

G E O R G E JUDE SM ITH

“ B arn ey"

“ B ill"

“ T ex”

Sod. i, 2, g, 4; Deb. 1, 2; a . Basketball 2, 3; Cl. O f­ ficer 2.

Sod. and K. B. S. 1, 2 , 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2 , 3, 4, Sec. 4; Dram. 1 , 2 , Vice-Pres. 2 ; P e t r e a n 4; T rack 2.

Var. Football 2, 3, 4; Base­ ball 2, 3, 4; Cl. Pres. 3, VicePres. 2, 4.

“ Barney” Schulz has drifted from one day to another for four years—as a Prepster. In that time he has probably contributed more belly-laughs and more real fun to the class of ’37 than any three of the un­ numbered horde of wouldbe comics who infest the school. With the same ex­ hausted voice and almost paralyzed stare he would speak of Latin, basketball, relativity, Toscanini, or South Buffalo. But he showed an amazing speed in geometry, and put over a good many shrewd solu­ tions that even Euclid for­ got. “ Barney,” in short, is there on all counts.

An honor pupil, excel­ lent debater, and staunch Sodalist; in concise form those are the three main colors one would use in portraying “ B ill.” He ranks high in his class and unlike most of the brilliant students he never hesitates to give aid to a fellow class­ mate who is in difficulty or who has lost the corres­ ponding “ T rot” pages of the day’s assignment in Vergil. “ B ill’s” willing­ ness to cooperate in any school activity has won for him the applause of all. Even above all these at­ tributes “ B ill” has the qualities that stamp one as a true Catholic gentleman.

Here we have the man who shook a nation. The man who once more brought back the old Petrean spirit, “T ex” Smith. For it was “ T e x ” who organized the rally be­ fore the Lincoln game and who led the hilarious snake dance after it. That rally though was typical of all of “T e x ’s” deeds. On the football field he weeded his way through the enemies’ territory with a dexterity that mystified his opponents. On the dia­ mond “ T e x ” was always a sure bet for a hit and among our Petrean mem­ ories “ T ex” will ever oc­ cupy a prominent part.

1 9 3 7 PETREAN

Forty-eight


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

R O B E R T C H A R L E S ST A H L I N

When it comes to award­ ing letters in recognition for services rendered the school “ Jo e” deserves to be nominated. For four years, day in and day out, during the various sport seasons “ Jo e ’s” car was always filled to overflowing with tons of muscle-bound ath­ letes whom he carted to practice. There is no doubt that “Jo e ” should have purchased a bus. “ Jo e ” is quite a talented fellow, he can sing songs in any language—even Chinese —and he teases rag time out of the keyboard with the touch of a maestro. With such a host of fine friends and such talents “ Joe” is bound to succeed.

Forty-nine

R I C H A R D C L A R E N C E S T A N L E Y , JR.

T H O M A S L A W R E N C E S T A N L E Y

"C u b ’’

“ Tom ’

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. i, 2, 3, 4; P e t r e a n 4; Cl. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.

Sod. l, 2, 3, 4; Con. 2; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 1; Dram. 1; P e t r e a n 4; Cl. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.

In his rather abrupt way “ Dick” practically chugged into popularity at Prep. He had to play hookey with a ruptured appendix for one year, but man that he is, he came back for more. Since his “ come back” he has made an enviable rec­ ord for himself both in class and on the court. His is the kind of success story that warms the cockles of any sympathetic soul. His assistance as one of the typists for this year book has been one thing that helped make the work on the P e t r e a n enjoyable. We take this occasion to thank him for his aid and also to add our best wishes for a happy life.

“ Look out or I ’ll punch you!” —Yes Sir!—Watch it fellows, that’s “ Tom ” Stan­ ley that small bundle of dynamic dynamite from the equally small Essex Fells. What energy!—what a student!—what a man he will be. “ T om ’s” friends are wont to call him “ February” because he’s short and windy, but don’t let them faze you “ Tom ,” for its an ill wind that blows no good. “ Tom ” is particularly adept in the art of picture taking and his prints are as clear and bright and resplendent as we know his future will be; just watch this fellow de­ velop as the tell-tale years roll along.


E U G E N E D A N I E L S T O E B L I N G

JOH N A LO YSIU S T R A Y N O R

S Y L V E S T E R JAMES UPTON

“ G ene”

“ R ed ”

“ Syl”

Sod. 1, 2, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1; Cl. Athletics 1, 3; Cl. Officer 2.

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 3; Track 3; Cl. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Basketball 1, 2, 3,

Sod. 4; K. B. S. 4; Var. Bas­ ketball 2, 3, 4, Capt. 4; Tennis 3, 4, Capt. 4; Cl. Baseball 2, 3, 4; Cl. Basket­ ball 2, 3, 4.

“ Traynor I don’t believe that you have one thought in your head,” exclaims the teacher, thus rousing “ Red” out of his reverie, in which he is contemplating Fairview Ave. and its beauties. This is typical of “ Red,” his head is always above the clouds, both figuratively and literally. He is rather tall, approaching six feet— he is the ideal for the per­ fect basketball center. In­ cidentally if you’ve never seen “ Red” in his green trunks you’ve missed a great deal. When he isn’t found playing basketball then he’s certain to be found eating hamburgers sans onion— and not paying for them. Here’s happy three point landings Boy!

Yeah! Prep! — C ’mon team—’ray, another basket for our side. “What did you say Mister?—who’s that tall supple player who just sunk the apple? Why that’s “ Syl” Upton of class 4-C Prep. What sort of fellow is he? Well he speaks French like a native and he translates Latin with the speed of a race horse trot­ ting through to a triumph­ ant finish, in Math he out­ does Pythagoras himself. Yes I know him very well, good humored, and level­ headed, the type who is a real true friend. Do I think that he will succeed?” —Will the sun rise tomorrow? That is our guarantee and the symbol of all that “ Syl” has or ever will do.

4It is difficult to say “ Au R evoir” to “ Gene,” as he was always jovial and ready for fun, a delightful com­ panion and a real pal. He, a remarkable basketball player, also had a serious mood by which he was able to defeat Caesar and sur­ pass Cicero. In the future when one of the graduates is perusing this book, our gaze will linger on “ Gene’s” photo as we recall many de­ lightful hours spent in his company. Although the teacher may find some dif­ ficulty in pronouncing his name, yet all who do know it affirm it was well worth while learning. And, as Ling Po says “Whoever knows Gene, knows a man worth knowing.”

1 93 7 PETREA1S

Fifty


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

F R A N C IS A U G U S T I N E WILSON

Fifty-one

JOHN JOSEPH WILSON

Sod. i, 2, 3, 4; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Baseball 2, 3; Cl. Basketball 1, 4.

Sod. 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 2; K. B. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deb. 1, 3, 4; Var. Basketball 3; Cl. Base­ ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cl. Vice-Pres. 3, Treas. 1.

T his fellow of dark hair and small stature is known as “ Frenchy” to his friends and as the rather formal Francis Wilson to his teachers—yet all deem him as a splendid chap. Those that call him “ Frenchy” know him as a cheerful light-hearted youth, who is most proficient in the ex­ ecution of the latest dance steps. Those who call him Francis can always be cer­ tain of a good translation, a correct total, or the right form of one of the French irregular verbs. Wilson leaves by the same portal as the rest of us, but his parting leaves a void in our hearts that will be hard to fill.

Aside from his love for sports “Jack” manifests a great interest in his studies by always putting in a first rate performance when called on in any class. “Jack” is gifted with a friendly smile that wins all to his side, teachers and stu­ dents alike. Many times the hallowed halls of the Prep have echoed and re­ echoed with his side split­ ting laughter and the pa­ tience of many a teacher has undergone the acid test during one of his pranks in class. “ Jack” has learned to work well and to play well. These acquirements, plus his jovial manner, are certain to carry him through a successful life.


Class Will and Testament We the class o f n in eteen h u n d red thirty-seven being of sound bodies and having no m ental deficiencies (that we know of) do hereby m ake, pu blish and declare this our last w ill and testament effective from this day of p u blica ­ tion usque ad finem . TO

T H E F A C U L T Y : o u r gratefu l and lifelo n g appreciation fo r their devoted and unselfish guidance. F ro m them , through fo u r all too short years, we have learned and been im b u ed w ith the ideals o f Catholic gentlem en.

T o them we realize we can m ake no fitting m aterial re­

turn—and so w ith gratefu l hearts we repay in the only fitting m anner: the assurance that all th eir labors, hopes and ideals have not been ex p e n d ed in vain on the Class of 19 37 . T O F A T H E R S H A L L O E : fo r his devoted and unsparing endeavors in assisting us both as in d ivid u a ls and as a g ro u p ; to him fo r his pruden t and far-sighted counsel, we can but say, “ T h a n k Y ou” and may G od bless you in yo u r years to come of directing Catholic young men. T O M R . Q U E V E D O A N D T H E P E T R E A N S T A F F , a hearty “ T han k you” and a hope of quick re lie f from the headaches and worries that are the heirloom o f the m oderator and his staff. T O T H E F R E S H M E N who have su rvived the first barrage of the P re p ’s brain siege we leave the pleasant prospect of a “ conditionless” sum m er vacation and an opportunity to restore the battered cells and frayed nerves o f their weary bodies. T o them we bequeath the fu tu re oppor­ tunity to sharpen their intellects and broaden their blossom ing m inds on the fascinating and in trigu in g mazes of G reek Literature. F o r the M endels and Pasteurs ive bequeath the mysteries o f a microscopic w orld. T o both groups we entrust the sacred heritage and traditions of the P rep. On their brows we gladly place the olive w reath; them do we dub S ir Sophom ores and bestow the en vied privileg e of gazing in disdain at the new freshm en as they strive to grasp the intricacies of a Prepster’s life. T O T H E E X -S O P H O M O R E S and new born Ju n io rs, we do w ill and be­ queath the in volved and u n in tellig ib le bellow ings of the mighty Cicero. T h e nightm ares of O vid and the countless stadia of X en ophon await you. Should you su rvive these, there awaits you the scientific diabolic

Fifty-two

19 3 7 P E T R E A N


ST. P E T E R S

attacks o f the Chem . L a b .

PREP

M ay you burn your fingers on hot test tubej ;

may you wheeze and w eep with the fum es o f ch lo rin e; may you rave and flay the air in vain to banish the fum es o f H 2S ; may you tear you r hair and gnash yo u r teeth in yo u r struggle to make yo u r experim ents lin e up to the facts; may you be haunted by atoms and tortured by m olecules, saturated, crystallized, redissolved, filtered and distilled —may these be yours fo r then only can you know that kn ow ledge makes a bloody but n ob le entrance. T O T H E S E N IO R S : “ T o you from parting hands we throw the torch” — O happy you who have su rvived the pit-falls of three years and who are now able to fix you r eyes on the goal o f G raduation. N o longer like Tantalus do you grasp at the recedin g waters o f education but girt fo r the struggle and w ell gro u n d ed in the fundam entals o f a Catholic, H um anistic education, you have but to pu t a fitting conclusion to a glorious three years. N o longer w ill the bellow ings o f Cicero frighten you, fo r your ears have been attuned to his flow in g periods and de­ lig h tfu l cadences. W ith Aeneas you w ill grope your way in silent awe and adm iration through the realms o f the underw orld. F o r you w ill live again the m ighty warriors of H o m er as you glean the beauty and wisdom o f the w o rld ’s greatest epic. A gain w ill the fundam ental laws of mass and m otion be revealed to you, but this tim e u n der a new aspect; the o rd er and harm ony of the w orld about you w ill be revealed anew—as only it can be to a student of Physics. N o t the least o f all do we bequeath the glorious and tim e hallow ed appellation o f Senior. Yours it is fo r a b rief span to don that sacred nam e and in lieu thereof g rin d borrow ed cigarette stubs on the floor o f the sm oking room and nonchalantly contribute you r share o f p o llu tin g the already smoke laden atm osphere. Am ongst our sacred traditions that we leave is our n ever to be forgotten brain child—the U pp er Class N ight. A gain we have lighted the torch and it rem ains fo r you to carry on. . . .

T O T H E E N T I R E S C H O O L we leave a w ord of advice. T h e fo u r years of high school are the most form ative and happy years of your life. Too quickly do the days of boyhood pass and the grim reality of facing life as a man confront you. T h ey are happy years—years of work it is true, but pleasant work whose influence w ill be felt fo r the rem ainder of your lives.

Fifty-three


Last but not least we bequeath to you, in d ivid u a lly and collectively: 1.

T h e m onthly massacre that goes by the nam e o f reading o f marks.

2.

T h e hip-hip-hurrah and hopes o f a P re p victory o ver D ickinson.

3.

T h e annual display of P rep histrionic a b ility—the school play.

4. Those pleasant, all too short and exam ination haunted days o f the Christm as Vacation. 5.

T h e refreshing and u p liftin g guidance of the Sodality and K . B . S.

6. T h e m ental and physical gymnastics that call themselves debating, fo o tba ll, basketball and baseball. 7. T h e long grim hours of ju g and the u n relen tin g vigilance o f its R hadam anthian proctor. 8.

G ladly do we bequeath the nauseating gas attacks that originate

from the custodian o f the nation’s cosmetic countenances—Colgate’s. T h e sm oke laden atm osphere that testifies so w ell to the inefficiency of the E r ie ’s engines; that blood cu rd lin g cacophany that has its origin in the G reek C hurch, we do gladly bestow. Second only to this is the rip p lin g rhythm of the trucks that blithely g lid e along our beloved G rand Street. N o r can we neglect the jan gle of the street cars and the im potent scream of the fire engines as they take their daily airing and outin g to ascertain the correct tim e at Colgate’s. Can w e forget the Bastille like class rooms, the chalk littered floor, the crop of spit balls that flourish on the most barren floor, the sagging stairs that bear w ith groans their groaning loads to intellectual decapita­ tion, the late slips, ju g slips, paraphrased class notices plus elusive merit cards and wheezing air con ditioning radiators. O ur lunchroom , that maelstrom o f ravenous wolves that contentedly stand in line and how l at the re vivin g ham burghers and finally the annual school outing. Those are but the grains of salt garnered from various times and circumstances which w hen consum ed by themselves are apt to send shivers o f apprehension through our liberated spirits. H o w ever when scattered gently hither and thither how jo y fu l and palatable does the stereotyped m u d d le of our education becom e and we fe el that in after years when Aeneas and A chilles have again returned to the realm of the shades these delicious tid bits of life w ill rem ain fresh and be amongst the most cherished m em ories of our H ig h School Days. Witnesses: M em bers of ’37.

19 3 7 PETREAN

Fifty-foui


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

Horridscope A M B IT IO N B A R R Y , M.

Big Shot

B A R R Y, R. BOTTI

W E A K PO IN T

U SU A L L Y SEEN

Cannons

Heckling Teachers

T o be recognized

His brother

Eating

Keep his license

Ask anyone

Bribing teachers

BRADY

Bartender

Haircuts

In Stahlin’s car

BRAUN

Play full game

Basketball

On the bench

B R IN SK I

T o be on winning team

Dolores

BROW N

Big politician

Sunflowers

91eeping

BRU N Q U ELL

Admiral

M aking Speeches

In the black room

BURKE

Wear long pants

Knickers

In the Library

CARR

An Author

Red H air

Debating

CARRO LL

Engineer

“ W immin”

With Alice

C A U L F IE LD

T o beat Merrick

Size of head

Around Charlie's

CO N N O LLY

T o be fearless

Erie R . R .

Missing train

CO RCO RA N

Mailman

Heckling

Dishing out milk

CO RLEY

Physical culture

fj# Quadrupeds

CO U G H LIN

Engineer

French

In Library

CO X

Make All-County

Listening to Gil

Asking for a "letter”

De M E Y E R

Horticulturist

Flowers

In Green House

D ILLM A N

Crooner

Dancing

In a dancing mood

DONOVAN

Succeed Robert Taylor

J . F. Donovan

Looking in M irror

EN G LISH

Block a Pass

Books

W orking in Library

F L A H E R T Y , P.

Write Latin Poetry

Latin

Asleep

F L A H E R T Y , R.

Playboy

Consciousness

Avec les femmes

FL E C K E N S T E IN

Testimonial man

Looking for his books

Feeding Corcoran

FLO R IO

Be high scorer

Crooning

Trucking

FO LEY

Get Greek Medal

Greek

In Book Store

G A R L IN G F .R

Dancing Master

T ea Dances

At the Piano

GTLLO OLEY

None

His Jokes

Im itating teachers

G L A SE R

Orator

Driving Cars

Under the Hood

GREEN

Lacking

Water

Playing Ping Pong

GUTERL

Comedian

Park Benches

In West Side Park

Hook Park

H A M IL L, J . A.

Make a tackle

His weight

Trot-ting

H A M IL L, J. F.

T o Jilay Hamlet

T ight Pants

Reading

HOFFM AN

Teach Sociology

Weights

Exercising

KELLY

Stop growing

Low Ceilings

With Cicero

K EN N ED Y

Drive a truck

Dominoes

Wearing Bow T ie

K EN N Y

Sand-hog

Foaming “ Stein”

"Feeding Faculty”

KRETZM ER

T o Reduce

Food

With Lowther

LAM BERT

Darlington

Rochelle Hudson

But not heard

L A R K IN

T o be a Life Guard

Blondes

Grubbing a “ butt"

LE A H Y , M.

Opera Singer

Rigoletto

Father Butler’s office

LEA H Y , R.

Milton Berle

Mr. Guterl

In Jo e ’s

LISA

T o be a Coach

Dick King

In Hoboken

LO H R

T o Learn

Green Shirts

W aiting for Passenger;

Fifty-five


A M B IT IO N

W EA K P O IN T

U SU A LLY SEEN

LO W TH ER

T o be consistent

School

Tw ice a week

LY N C H

Get a H air Cut

Bayonne

Smiling

M ac F A R L A N D

Have Photo taken

Senior Photo

In the wrong place

McC a r t h y , e .

Braintruster

T oo honest

T h inking (?)

M cC a r t h y , r .

T o do something

Being “ beadle”

Asking for better marks

M cC a r t h y t .

Engineer

“ Star” Gazing

In Currie’s Woods

M cG R A IL

Floor W alker

Leather Heels

Playing Basketball

m chugh

Financier

Muscles

Kidding

M ADDEN

Cartoonist

Barn Dances

Smoking Old Golds

M A G U IR E

T o Grow Up

Low Voice

At St. A l’s Academy

M ANN

Varsity

Shyness

Getting a H air Cut

M A R C H IO N Y

Orchestra Leader

Greek

At the Piano

M EEH A N

Dog Catcher

Sweaters

In the Corner

M E R R IC K

T o beat Caulfield

“ Pool”

T alkin g Football

M O R R IS

W rite a good “ trot”

Cigars

Eating

N EW TO N

T o Catch Fish

T eachers

Leaving Class

Fleck

Boxing

NUGENT

. Meet Braddock

O 'B R IE N

Lacking

Wisecracks

With a Joe M iller Book

O’C O N N E L L

Speak French

Curly H air

Sketching At the Dials

O’N E IL L , O.

R adio Technician

Short Waves

O ’N E IL L , T .

T o Smile

Too Talkative

In Hiding

P H IL L IP S

Beau Brummel

“ Commercial goils”

At Broadway Hosiery Shop Grubbing Tangerines

POCUS

Fru it Grower

Loquaciousness

Q U IN L A N , J .

Get Home Early

Throw ing things

In the Library

Q U IN LA N , J. P.

T o Sock Teacher

Free Translation

Selling Chances

RO DGERS

Radio Announcer

T igh t Pants

Anywhere or Everywhere

RUANE

Buy a “ T ro t”

A Smart Brother

Without a Hat

SACHS

Showman

“ G urls”

On the Boulevard

SAT Z

Hot Clothes

Prognostication

Betting on Yanks

SC H N E ID E R

Trisect an Angle

German

Making Exit

SCH U LZ

Make an Impression

Comes from Buffalo

With Satz

Likes to Work

Crying

SC O T T

T o Head W.P.A.

SM IT H , G.

T o Start a Game

German Trot

Behind Eight Ball

SM IT H , J.

Chauffeur

Gas Pedal

Around J. Square

ST A H L IN

T o Collect a Fare

Selling “ butts”

Behind a Wheel (Brady)

STANLEY, R ,

Motor Magnate

Locked Door

In His “ Boiler”

STAN LEY, T ,

T o Be Seen

Dances

Under His Hat

ST O E B L IN G

Window Washer

Solid Walls

Losing at Pool

TO R R ESSO N

Aviator

Arguments

Slumming

TRAYNO R

Three Hours Work

Hamburgers

On Fairview Ave.

TU RLEY

T o Get a “ Letter”

Football

Offside With Nurses

U PTO N

T o Gain Weight

Nurses

W ILSON

Learn to Dance

Height

Reading Greek "T ro t” Looking for Vallee Way Cum ea

W ILSON, J . L.

T o W in a Letter

M. V. Long

WOODS, J.

Trouble Shooter

“ Maddy”

WOODS, W.

T o Dethrone Jim Londos "Licking Stamps”

Pinned Flat


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Sixty-two


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

T O T H E JU N IO R S WHO A R E JU S T B E G IN N IN G T O L E A R N , W E D E D IC A T E T H IS SECTIO N , W IT H HOPES FO R A P LE A SA N T F IN A L Y EA R. T O T H E SOPHOM ORES WHO H AVE EM ER G ED SUCCESS­ F U L L Y FRO M T H E B E W IL D E R M E N T OF T H E F R E T F U L FR ESH M A N DAYS W E ALSO D ED IC A T E T H IS SECTIO N OF T H E BOOK W IT H T H E H APPY A SSU RA N C E OF M AN Y JOYO US DAYS T O COME. T O T H E FRESH M EN A W ORD OF C O N G R A T U L A T IO N ON T H E C O M PLETIO N OF YO U R F IR S T Y E A R A T ST. P E T E R ’S. M AY Y O U R FR IE N D SH IP EN D U R E AND YO U R KN O W LED G E

IN C R E A SE

M A T R IC U L A T IO N

AS

THE

OF

YOUR

R O L L E V E R ONW ARDS TO W A RD

T H E F IN A L G O A L—G RA D U A T IO N .

Sixly-three

DAYS


Class 4-M Baker, Coughlin, Davis, P. Pidgeon, Burke, Dougan, Facciolo, G. O’Brien, J. Pidgeon. Casalino, Herrmann, Nolan, Ford, McCarthy, J . O’Brien, Yendzewski, M iller, T ully. Sexton, Balas, Vetter, Mr. Mclnerney, Crowley, Mahler, Marks.

Class 3-A Hamm, Parsons, Garner, Col ford, Norton, McKenna, Roe, Harrington. Beronio, Reddington. Mullen, McEvoy, West, Dwyer, O’Neil, J . Kelly. Stulz, Monaghan, Sandford, White, Fitzpatrick, Rummel, Egan, Cahill. Masterly, B. Kelly, Burns, Mr. Madden, Formosa, Nutzel, Coniff.

1 9 3 7 PETREAN

Sixty-four


ST. P E T E R â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S P R E P

Class 3-B Neale, Rackley, Sessa, Smedley, Murtha, Gillen, Morschauser. Mangine, Kane, Pienkoski, Marino, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, Roemke, Keenan, Dattoli. Kennedy, Crotty, Lisky, Dunne, Ruschman, Hoffman, Donnelly, Lavin. Zindel, Darcy, McDonald, Mr. Boyle, S.J., Kelly, Tozzoli, Griffin.

Class 3-C Riordan, Dolan, Byron, Kelly, Moran, Walsh, Gugs l i e l m o , B i l l i n g s . Zajac, Harty, Hurley, Boyce, Davis, Markstein, Wallace, Kirk, Kendall, Norton. Scholle, Goldrick, Fleming, Romanowicz, Mackin, Hoffman, Ham ill, Nelson, Bodenmann, Hogan, Mooney. Curnyn, Waters, Carmody, Mr. Orthen, Miller, McCusker, Cannon.

Sixty-five


Class 3-D

McNamara, McCartin, Emme. Colligan. O Thom pson, Moore, Connors, Sheehy, McGinn, McGe< McGee, Cunningham, Ridge. Corcoran, Rand, Torpey, M artin, Corballis, Zenori rini, Curtin, Kraszewski, Quinn, McDonald, Murphy. Kiley, Coleman, Leucht, Mr. Carey, S.J., Keating, Wuensch, Doane.

Class 3-M Walsh, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;N eill, Gorman, Grimley. Lavagnino, McDermott, Donnelly, Murphy. Healy, Cordo, Hynes, Cullen, Cahill, Byrne. McGlynn, Halpin, Stone, Mr. Klein, Schmitt, Arecchi, McTigue.

193 7PETREAN

Sixty-six


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

Glass 2-A Dolan, Loflus, HofEen, Hennessy, O’Mealia, Ockay, Henderson. Williams, Smith, Morley, Gartland, Koerner, Hannon, McKenna, Byrnes, Murner. Burke, Ottolina, Sullivan, Riviere, McCarthy, M allard, Reddy, McGrail. Keane, Lodge, T arran t, Mr. McEvoy, S.J., Beronio, Varley, O’Connell.

Class 2-B Gardner, Coughlin, Bonasch, Januska, Conlin, McGivern. McDonough, Kowalski, Borton, McCarthy, McGough, McKenna, Schmitt. Casey, O’Donnell, Donahue, Hammel, Beck, Walsh, Fahy, Kennedy. Risden, Lahiff. Schumacher, Mr. Kelly, Mahan, Roddy, Terrafranca. Sixty-seven


Class 2-C

Joseph, Maloney, Fleckenslein, M cGurk, McManus, Gorman, Taraskiewicz. Sokol, Henkel, Caponegro, Gennaro, Polakoski, Raleigh. Connolly, Maroney, Belgam, Sweeney, Leonard, Gannon, M aturi, Ford, Cookson, Somers. Henson, McCarthy, Ganzkow, Mr. Rooney, Bruder, Hynes, Ruane.

Class 2-1) Hampton, Kuhn, Torpey, Egan, Glavia.no, Dillman, Escude. Clark, Frank, McCarthy, Somers, Flaherty, McNally, Untereiner, Bloom. Kerwin, Mulle, W illiams, Ertle, Albert, Kingston, Scully, Fitzpatrick. Tkac, Jordan, Hawkes, Mr. M cGill, Clausing, Wilczewski, Ehrig.

19 3 7 P E T R E A N

Sixty-eight


I ■ ■

ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

Class 1-M McEntee, M cLaughlin, Boylan, M cGuirl, Lynch. Montagne, Ptaszynski, Kenny, Mr. Jacques, Miller, Portfolio, Bruder.

Class 1-A Flaherty, Finn, Curristine, Costa, Tuohy, Farrell, Zachara. Lally, Schmiedeberg, Murphy, Zimmerman, Elmiger, Walty, Charles, Doran, Egan, Doherty. White, Lamb, Krage, Corrigan, Wishbow, Neale, Meaney, R. Murphy, Walsh, Romano, Kearney. Swarts, O’Regan, Lohr, Fr. Purcell, S.J., Molloy, Carey, Laughlin.


Class 1-B H urley, Giella, Lorigan, M urray, Ceran, Rafferty, Furlong, Costello. McGuire, Walsh, Beaman, Bayardi, Johnson, Dolan, Flaherty, Mullen, Marnell, Day. Nichloson, Deppisch, Niksa, Keefe, Lafrano, Fullin, Jordan, Monaghan, Lacey, O’Connor. Markey, Gilligan, W ilkas, Mr. O’Hale, S.J., Sweeney, Finn, Duffy.

Class 1-C Schappert, G a l l a g h e r , B l u m e n s t o c k , Hughes, — „ . . . Lvdon, O’Neill, Halleron, McArdle, Dattoli. McHugh Mara, R eilly, Fleckenstein, Lally, Wolfe, Costigan, Thaler, Moskal. DeBello. Trainor, Kelly, McCarron, Donnelly, O’Malley, O’Brien, Galiani, Enright, Sheehan, Clossey. O’Day, George, Johnson, Mr. McGrail, S.J., Wade, McLoughlin, Wildermann.

19 3 7 P E T R E A N

Seventy


ST.

P E T E R ’S PREP


Class 1-F Brady, Manning, McCarren, M urphy, H alpin, Geiss, Crane, Abitante. Rosano, Cro^bv, Devine, R eilly, Lyons, Riordan, Van Bemmel, Corballis, Judge, Folger. Meyer, Butler, Cregg, Viskovitch, W alter, Cuddihy, H ill, Balinski, O’Leary, Driscoll, Pontone. Philbin, McGovern, Roebuck, Mr. Quevedo, S.J., Deverell, Sharp, Fay.

FO LLO W T H E LEA D ER S of

ST. P E T E R ’S PREP to

ST. PETER S COLLEGE of A R T S AND SCIENCES A A A A

T R U T H F U L College . . . that has what it advertises; CO U RAGEO U S College . . . for men of resolution; PR O G R ESSIV E College . . . with a future of its own; SE L E C T IV E College . . . for men with a future.

Information regarding admission may be. obtained from T H E R E G IS T R A R

ST. P E T E R ’S CO LLEG E JE R S E Y C IT Y , N. J.

19 3 7 PETREAN

Seventy-two


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

This section is set aside to commemorate in word and picture the various extra-curricular activities of the School. It is in these endeavors that true genius and genuine ability is developed and en­ riched fo r the individual. May the Old live ever onward, and the New take their place among the long list of fine P rep traditions. To those who have participated, a word o f congratulation; to those who have not participated, a word of advice —

join in and enjoy yourselves for herein lies the

cement of the scholastic acquirements and social abilities.

ACTIVITIES


———

“ You saw this Beaucaire w ell, is not this he?”

M onsieur Beaucaire A ct

I:

Scen e

S e ttin g : T im e :

I.

In the audience.

B efo re first curtain.

On that m em orable M onday evening, December 2 1, 1936, the early arrivals am ong the “ First N ighters” surveyed the setting for the presentation of the annual Prep play w ith interest and delight. For this was not the fam iliar Y ork H all, whose historic boards dram atically inclined Petreans had often and gloriously tread—no, this was a fresh new structure whose lights were soft and cosily inviting, a b u ild in g w ith a seating capacity of more than a thousand, the shining hardwood floors of which were covered with thick blue carpets,—the Collins M em orial Gym nasium . T o the minds of in­ dividuals in the crowd which was rapid ly filling the auditorium this thought occurred: W ould the evening’s entertainm ent be worthy of such a setting? As the hands of the clock approached curtain time the buzz of expectancy grew to a hum of excitem ent, for all were aw aiting the answer to that ques­ tion. As the zero hour grew even nearer there passed before the minds’ eye of the audience the memory of all the glorious plays that had been presented at York H all. T h ere was the intriguing comedy of the “ R ivals” of last year, the boyish pranks of “ T o m Sawyer” and many others. But “ Monsieur Beaucaire.” W ho was he? W hat was he? W ere the boys actually going to speak French? Was the rum or about the dancing scene true? These and countless other questions presented themselves to the minds of an audience that grew more inquisitive as the seconds ticked by. But they were not the only ones who were aw aiting with more than an average degree of expectancy the rising of the curtain and for a moment let us glance behind the scenes and probe into the maelstrom of activity that greets our eyes.

1 9 3 7 P E T R E ATS

Seventy-four


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P A ct

I:

II. B e h in d the curtain. B efo re the first lines. Scen e

S e t tin g : T im e :

Scene shifters receivin g last m inute instructions; the eleventh hour arrange­ ment of various props; the subdued m urm ur of nervous actors com m enting upon their costumes, their lines and the general outlook of the play; the gratin g cachinnation of some wit announcing the nearness of the fatal hour —all these blended into a subdued symphony of tensed, high strung excite­ m ent not unm usical to the ear. T h e cheering news conveyed by some un­ known ambassador of good w ill that the “ S. R . O .” sign was out, but that they were still com ing, stiffened the jelly-like knees of the play characters as the long awaited and much feared call finally came: “ First C u rtain .”

‘‘ Tiens!

Mes Enfants!”

I. In the audience. T i m e : D u rin g the play. T h e interested audience breathlessly watches the unfolding of the thrilling plot, livin g with M onsieur Beaucaire who masquerades as the gallant Duke of Chateaurien; pulsates to his romance w ith the lovely Lad y Carlisle; is delighted with the actions of the am iable hostess Lady M albourne, the overrefined Beau Nash, and the bragging simple-minded Bantison, and scorns the treacherous devices of the sneering, traitorous Duke of W interset. T h e realistic duelling of Beaucaire, Francois, Jean and Berquin against W interset, M olyneux, Bantison, Sir Hugh G u ilfo rd and Lord Tow nbrake evokes rounds of applause from the entranced audience. T h e able portrayals of Ladies M ary, Clarise, Estelle and of Lady Anne make the audience oblivious of the fact that they are only boys in the masquerade. T h e b rief but effective entrance of Beau N ash’s servant and his spirited argum ent with the humorous and sparkling Francois had provided a lively start for the play and the sight of the haughty Beau Nash conversing with W inton, and of the overbearing Captain Badger apologizing to Beaucaire had provided the proper prelude to the dynamic conclusion—the revelation of Phil ipe de Beaujolais, Prince of France, alias Beaucaire, alias the Duke of Chateaurien. A ct

II:

Tiens!

S e ttin g :

Seventy-five

Scene


A ct

II:

Scen e

S e t tin g :

II.

T h e aisles and lo bby o f the auditorium .

T i m e : Im m ed ia tely after the show. A rgum ents flew back and forth concerning the choice of the best actor. O ne m an expressed the sentiments of all when he rem arked, to lapse into the vernacular: “ T h e y were all ‘tops.’ ” T h e outstanding events which included the charm ing French accents of H enri de Beaujolais and the M arquis de M irep o ix, the pleasing songs of M r. H ayden and L ord T ow n brake and the exceptionally fine playing of the Prep orchestra which contributed so much to the gracefully executed waltz, were discussed over and over, and it was unanim ously agreed that the play had done great credit to all.

“ M erci, M. Le D ue!”

A ct

III:

S e ttin g : T im e :

Scen e

"It prov’d only the inspiration it is to know you’’

I.

B e h in d the curtains.

W hen the hall is em pty.

T h e actors were once more dressed in their everyday garb and with joy in their hearts at having participated in a successful St. Peter’s play expressed their gratitude and appreciation to M r. Bernard Boyle, S.J., the director oi the play; to M r. M. Stewart, the business manager and then in rapid suc­ cession to Fr. Butler, S.J., for the training of the singers; to Fr. Parsons, S.J., and Brother M . Burke, S.]., for the scenic and stage effects; to Mr. Harold Kennedy for his work as fencing master; to Miss M argaret Stewart for train­ ing the dancers and last, but not least, to all their friends and patrons who attended the play and made its success possible.


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

“ Ah M adem oiselle, I w ould have that dance last for—for always*” CA ST

OF C H A RA C TERS

i a th e o r d e r o f th e ir a p p e a r a n c e S e r v a n t to B e a u N a s h ....................................................................................... J a m e s M . C a r m o d y F r a n c o i s ....................................................................................................................................... J o h n L . B o t t i M r . M o l y n e u x .......................................................................................................... H a r r y W . M c A v o y M . B e a u c a i r e ..............................................................................................................H a r r y A . O ’ M e a l i a D u k e o f W i n t e r s e t ........................................................................................................ T h o m a s J. W e s t J e a n ..........................................................................................................................W i l l i a m L . M c D o n a l d B e r q u i n ......................................................................................................................... H e n r y S t . C . L a v in C a p t a in B a d g e r ............................................................................................. R a y m o n d L . M c C a r t h y W i n t o n ................................................................................................................................... J o s e p h E . H a m m L a d y M e l b o u r n e ..................................................................................................... A r t h u r L . R a c k l e y L o r d T o w n b r a k e ..............................................................................................................J a m e s F . D o l a n M r . B a n t i s o n .................................................................................................................J a m e s F . D o n o v a n L a d y E s t e l l e ........................................................................................................................ J o h n T . G o l d in g B e a u N a s h .................................. J o se p h L . R o d gers S ir H u g h G u i l f o r d ...................................................................................... R ic h a r d A . O ’ C o n n e l l L a d y C l a r i s e .....................................................................................................M a t t h e w J. O ’ C o n n e l l L a d y M a r y C a r l i s l e .....................................................................................A l b e r t F . F l e c k e n s t e i n L a d y A n n e ..................................................................................................................... R o b e r t J. F l e m i n g M r. H a y d e n ........................................................................................................................J a m e s R . B y r o n H e n r i d e B e a u j o l a i s .................................................................................................. T h o m a s A . B u r n s M a r q u is d e M i r e p o i x ............................................................................................. H e n r i J. Z e n o r in i

Seventy-seven


Senior Sodality ( i J \ D JE S U M P E R M A R IA M ” —a. devout band of countless pilgrims kneels reverently beside the peacefully running waters of Lourdes—'“ Ad Jesum per Mariam” —the multitude around Guadalupe raise their clear voices in song. Yes, these words have travelled down through the ages of man—a fitting tribute to Mary, our Mother on earth, as she is in heaven. It has truly been the motto of the Senior Sodality of St. Peter’s Prep. We try to live those words,—words of endearment and love—“ to Jesus through Mary.” During the summer, on July 3rd, 4th and 5th, the Sixth National Student Sodality Convention was held in St. Louis, Missouri. St. Peter’s was represented by our student counsellor, Rev. John T . Butler, S.J., and a group of student Sodalists: Earl Bosworth, Raymond Keenan, Martin Leahy, Arthur Rackley and Francis Wilson. They came back from St. Louis fired with new zeal and en­ thusiasm for the great work of the Sodality. Feverishly, the officers pored over these new methods and means of bringing all closer to the Heart of Christ through Mary. Then, with the new term, there came many changes in the Sodality. The meetings were to be held in the lower Church during the sixth period on Monday. This enabled the out-of-town students to honor Mary in her Sodality. Another new feature has been the spread of Catholic literature through the school. This was done by the consultor of each class through the office of the Student Counsellor. Each week America, Jesuit Missions, Queen's Work, the Messenger of the Sacred Heart, and various pamphlets were perused and digested. Communism, Atheism, Fascism, and materialism were stripped of their false splendor and were exposed to the light of the real truth by these weekly readings. When the busy Prepster finished with his copy, he dropped it on the street car, subway, or brought it to the hospitals thus spreading the word of God to the spiritually unlearned. T he other activities of the Sodality continued on as in the past. The philatelists were called to arms and they responded with the same enthusiasm and zeal of real apostolic missionaries and sons of Mary. Several times each week the

19 3 7 P E T R E A N

Seventy-eight


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P stamp committee met to sort out and cut the many donations of all kinds oi stamps brought in by the students from long cherished savings and persevering findings. T ru ly this was the work symbolic of the Sodality zeal for the missions. Who can forget the mission raffle or the mite box drive? With the zeal of Xavier the Sodalists canvassed the entire State so that at the end of the drive over eight hundred dollars were sent to the Philippines. Then, during Lent, many large and small pleasures were abandoned and all the students joined in helping the missions through the mite box. At the end of Lent the Sodality sent four hundred dollars to Fr. O’Neill, S. J., of the Philippines, the Prep’s “ adopted” missionary. T he dauntless spirit of the Sodality in this regard has been the pride of the school. This year’s Sodality has every reason to hold its head high whenever the Jesuit missions in the Philippines are mentioned. The meetings held in the lower church were featured by the rosary, chaplet, little office, or Stations of the Cross. Father Butler, S.J., every week gave a short, in­ teresting and wholesome talk on the glories and beauty of the Mother of God and the Catholic Doctrine on all current topics of the week, economic and religious. The “ Madonnas” of the masters, the “ Holy Souls,” the “ Blessed Sacrament” were subjects treated by the moderator. T he meetings were opened and closed by the singing of a hymn. Is it to be wondered then, that the members of the cooperative board blinked in wonder and amazement and beamed with satisfaction? Therein lies one of the good reasons why Catholic schools hold such an estimable position in the field of education! In September the Prep welcomed an old friend in the personage of Rev. Fr. Tompkins, S.J., a most devoted and laborious missionary, from the Philippines and now engaged in the work of the missions at home. In his own inimitable manner Father gave us an illustrated lecture on the North American Martyrs. Fr. Isaac Jogues, S.J., and St. Rene Goupil were flashed on the screen and their heroism was imprinted on the archives of the memory by the glowing words of our most interesting lecturer and missionary. T o Fr. Tompkins, S.J.—“ Thank you Father —and please come again.” Now let us see another phase of the Sodality in Action. One of the most praise­ worthy activities of St. Peter’s is the organization of Christ in the Blessed Sacra­ ment—the K. B. S. Every Friday these modern Knights gathered around the divine banquet table to honor Christ and sanctify their own lives. “ Jesus et Maria sint tecum in via” —that cry arose to the central sun of devotion, the Sacrifice of the Mass, every Friday morning when the Knights assembled and paid homage to the living God. T he Sodality is the guardian of the K. B. S. and it is with a spiritual joy that we turn towards these Knights and greet them as brothers, as we cry: “ Carry on as Knights of the Blessed Sacrament, as we shall carry on as Sodalists of Mary. There is a golden link which binds you and us together for the greater glory of God.” Now that the year is drawing to a close, we look forward to our second annual Sodality Social. No doubt this year’s social will soar to greater heights than ever before, for the zeal and love of Sodalists for their heavenly Mother will make our social a fitting tribute to Her Holy Majesty—Mary Queen of heaven. The Sodality year is drawing to a close, and we Sodalists turn grateful eyes toward Fr. Butler, S.J., which convey our heartfelt thanks. Nor will we ever forget our fellow Sodalists, the leaders to Mary, and the centurions of the Legion of Decency—the consultors. They have served faithfully, gratefully—we enroll them as true Sodalists of Mary forever.


Catechists “ E untes, ergo, docete omnes gent.es.”

M a t t , x x v iii, 1 9 .

/ 'C O N T I N U I N G the wonderful work begun several years ago, the Catechetical teachers of the Sodality have this year again established an enviable record. A t the Parishes of M ount Carm el and St. Joseph, this city, the Sodalists undertake each Sunday m orning and M onday evening the work of instructing the children and Public H igh School pupils. First Com munion and Confirm ation classes are held at M ount Carm el and the fu ll explanation of the doctrine at St. Jo sep h ’s. O ur record is enviable this year, due to the fact that we have doubled the num ber of teachers. Those engaged in this work at M ount Carm el are as follows: Messrs. E. Brady, R . Brady, J. Byron J . Burke, J . Carm ody, W. D illm an, J . Donnolley, E. English, J . Formosa, E. G illen , R . Griffin, J . H am ill, W . Hogan, B. Kelly, M. Leahy, R . M cCarthy, W . M cAvoy, R . M cKenna, B. M ullen, J . Larkin, R . Phillips, A. R ackley, W . Scott, T . West, and at St. Joseph’s, J . Rodgers. T hese student Sodalists who devote their time and effort so enthusiastically and w illin gly m erit the highest praise. W ere it not for their efforts and zeal the children would not know Jesus Christ who is eternal life. A d Jesum p er M ariam —how great w ill be their reward when they go home to the arms of Jesus and M ary! “ T h e y that instruct many to Justice, shall shine as stars for all eternity.”

1 9 3 7 PETREAN

Eighty


ST. P E T E R â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S P R E P

Sodality Choir E X C E L L E N T and A Nform ation of a choir.

new activity of the Sodality this year was the T hese Sodalists were always present at Sodality functions, and at the First Frid ay devotions to blend their voices with the litu rgy of the Mass and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. W eekly rehearsals after Sodality were held under the direction of R ev. Father Jo h n B u tler, S .J., M oderator of the Senior Sodality, w ith Frank Scholle and Jam es R yan at the console. From the tiny acorn tbe m ighty oak doth spring, so it is our earnest prayer that from this hum ble beginning a greater Sodality C hoir w ill be formed. W e trust that the disposition of the hearts of these Sodalists ascended like fragrant incense to the throne of God and the great M other of God. M ater D ei est M ater mea. T h e Sodality Choir made its initial start on the feast of the Purification of our Blessed Mother, February 2nd, when our most devoted Principal, R ev. Francis X . Shalloe, S. J., pronounced his final vows in the Society of Jesus. A simple and beautiful program of music, in keeping with such a solemn and simple ceremony was arranged and sung by Father Butler, S.J., and the Sodalists. M ay the music of their souls in daily life be a con­ stant inspiration to all lovers of M aryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;A d Jesu m p e r M ariam . F or his inestimable assistance the choristers are ever grateful to Father Butler, S. J., for his painstaking direction, and last but not least we give thanks to the patient organists whose nim ble fingers controlled the tones and whose kindly advice aided to a great extent in m aking for a well-balanced program for each occasion.

Eighty-one


Ju n io r Sodality— First Sem ester

T

H E Ju n io r Sodality, com prised of first and second year boys, was form ally reorganized on Septem ber 6, 1936. A bou t three hundred boys attended. A t this first m eeting, the M oderator, Father Purcell, S .J., explained the two­ fold end of the Sodality: personal sanctification and the sanctification of others through devotion to the Blessed V irgin. H e also enumerated some of the works of zeal and charity adopted by the Sodality: the spread of Catholic literature, the visitation of hospitals, stamp-collecting for the Mis­ sions, and the defense of the Catholic Faith through letter-writing. T h e follow ing appointm ents were made: Prefect, O ’M ealia; First Assistant, Clausing; Second Assistant, T arran t; Secretary, A lbert; Sacristan, Ottolina; Organist, Jam es R yan. T h e Consultors were as follows: 2-A, Hennessey; 2-B, Risden ; 2-C, Joseph; 2-D, Ertle; 2-M, D onnelly; l-A , Joseph L ally; i -B, D uffy; l-C , Clossey; i -D, Dates; l-E, K raynik: i -F, M cG overn; l-M , Bruder. Prefect O ’ M ealia, also chairm an of the Vigilance Committee, a group of second year writers, organized to protect the C hurch’s interests in the public press, in a report on the H oly N am e Convention at the W aldorf-Astoria H otel, echoed the plea of M r. Edgar Hoover, head of the G-Men, that Am erican youth be protected from Com munism. Each Sodalist was urged to join his local H oly N am e Society. M r. M ahlm eister, S .J., Assistant M oderator, gave a series of talks on the subject of the Sacred Heart. T h e devotion was outlined and its practical application for good in the life of the individual Sodalist was made plain. T h is series was completed in the second semester. T h e Christmas Bundle drive for the two hospitals now ministered to by the Sodality was the most successful effort in that direction since the inception of this type of Sodality activity. T h e num ber of bundles given at Christmas to the poor and sick was more than double the offerings of the preceding year. T h e Ju n io r Sodality is indebted to the Senior Sodality for sustained material and m oral help in this expression of zeal.___________________

19 37 P E T R E A N

Eighty.tWo


Ju n io r Sodality— Second Sem ester A T H E R F R A N C IS S H A L L O E , S.J., our Principal, opened the second semester meetings w ith a talk on the game of life. T h e energetic dean, using apt illustrations, urged the Sodalists to play the rules courageously and take the initiative in doing good. T h e appointm ents for the second semester were as follows: Prefect, O ’C onnell; First Assistant, H annon; Second Assistant, R ed dy; Secretary, M orley; Sacristan, Jo h n Dolan; Organist, James R yan. T h e Consultors follow : 2-A, Sm ith; 2-B, Januszka; 2-C, M aroney; 2-D, K erw in; 2-M, M c­ L au ghlin ; i -A, Lyons; l-B , Rom ano; i -C, Fleckenstein; i -D, Kelshaw; l-E, Loh r; i -F, Swarts. T h e Officers and Consultors, each taking a Station, gave the talks for the Stations of the Cross on F ebru ary 17th. A few weeks later Father Edward R eiser, S.J., of St. Andrew-on-Hudson, addressed the Sodalists on the subject: “ O ur Lad y of Sorrows.” A t the Lenten meetings Sodality officers stood at the doors with boxes con­ taining typed Lenten suggestions as to prayers, mortifications, etc. T h e Sodalists were urged to put into practice the suggestions they had chosen. In the recitation of the R osary at Sodality meetings a frequent intention recom­ mended was the recovery of His Holiness Pope Pius X I from the severe illness to which he had been subjected. Also frequently recommended were the Spanish Catholics suffering persecution under the Reds in Spain. T h e sale and distribution of Catholic literature by Sodalists was increas­ ingly edifying this semester. T h e whole-hearted efforts of all classes especially i-A and l-E to fulfill the H oly Father’s wish in this respect augured a keen relish for the things of God and a successful campaign against Communism. G lancing back over the waning year, we feel that a distinct advance has been made by the members in knowledge of Church doctrine and the ability to put it into effect amongst Catholics and non-Catholics alike. For this we thank O ur Lady M ediatrix of A ll Graces and those in authority who have been instrumental in showing us the way to a better, more useful, and fuller Catholic life.

F


F IR S T AND SECOND T E R M O FFICER S

Beaudevin Debating Society O T H E young Greek orator Rhodes was the cynosure of all his dreams. T o this aged city, with its mighty Colossus, his thoughts e’er did travel. Among its snowy pillars the voices that would one day resound about the hills of Attica were trained and developed. Yet we of St. Peter’s have our Rhodes where our youthful Ciceros and Demosthenes go to master the ancient art of oratory. We too have our training grounds where voices are softened and minds are trained in all the wiles of rhetoric—the Beaudevin Debating Society—whose reputation has traveled the length and breadth of the Middle States. For years she has been the zenith of oratory of the state. This year the Beaudevin has not failed to live up to her peerless record. T he cobwebs of vacation were scarcely brushed from the Prepsters’ brains when the first meeting of the society was held. At this meeting we met our new Moderator, Mr. McEvoy, S.J., and nominated our officers. The meeting closed with an interesting talk on the benefits of oratory by the well-known author, Fr. Chetwood, S.J. At the very next meeting we elected our officers: John Connolly, President; John Botti, Vice-President; William Scott, Secretary. With confidence did we enroll these men to lead us through the first semester. By their zeal and ardor they exceeded our highest expectations. A lecture by the Rev. Rush Rankin, S.J., was the spark that sent the Beaudevin’s orators off on a state-wide anti-Communistic drive. St. Joseph’s High School, Paterson; the Eleventh Ward Democratic Club; St. Joseph’s School of this city; T he Holy Name Society of Our Lady of Grace Church, and the St. Paul of the Cross Holy Name Society were among the groups that formed the Beaudevin’s audience. Communism was stripped of its false splendor and exposed to the light of truth. T he trickery of the Marxian doctrines was shown, while Socialism was proven irreligious and unworkable by Messrs. Donovan, Scott, Burke, Connolly, McAvoy, Rodgers, Botti, West, Carr, Lavin and B. Kelly. While Communism was being attacked by one portion of the Beaudevin, another was probing criminal activities in our country. The methods of federal, state and city police were described by Messrs. Hogan, McDonald,

T

1 9 3 7 PETREAN

Eighty-four


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

P U B L IC SPEA K ER S

R. McCarthy and Garlinger. T he Elks Club, Our Lady of Mercy in South Orange and the Lions Club of Jersey City heard crime treated in scholarly and compre­ hensive discourse by our speakers. T he work for this group has been one of the proudest boasts of the Beaudevin. A third group delved into the labyrinth of capital and labor and cleared away the ambiguities of these two great subjects. Wall Street was taken in spirit from the banks of the East River and transported to West New York when Messrs. E. McCarthy, B. Kelly, Gillen, Conniff and Dolan spoke in that city. Labor in the mines and fields were discussed to the interest and instruction of the audience that heard the Prep debaters. T he zeal of this third group of young Ciceros has gained for the Beaudevin an honored name in the city of the Palisades. During the second term the officers who led us in our quest for the gift of speak­ ing were John Connolly, President; Mark Burke, Vice-President, and Martin Leahy, Secretary. Valiantly and zealously have these men executed their duties. On Friday, March 12th, the debaters of Fordham Prep swept down from Rose H ill to engage the Prep debaters in a flawless verbal clash. “ Resolved that the electric utilities should be governmentally owned and operated,” was attacked by the Prep’s valiant orators, Messrs. R . McCarthy, Hogan and Connolly. But Ford­ ham fought just as bravely and the Ramkin butted with all his strength, so that at the end of the discussion the dividing line of victory and defeat could not be drawn and the debate was declared a draw! Our struggles with Xavier and Brooklyn Prep, our old rival, will soon take place, but we are confident that the Maroon banner will not be lowered—if the success of her debaters during the past year is any sign. T he year will close with the traditional prize debate and St. Peter’s rests assured that this debate will equal the ferocity and heat of the ancient battles of Cicero and Antony. And so our year of debating and oratory will be brought to a close. We shall look back on our days in the Prep’s debate hall with a feeling of joy and gratitude, for within her marble walls the seeds of forensic art were planted, grew and blossomed. T o Mr. McEvoy, S.J., our zealous moderator, we murmur a sincere “Thank you.” For he has been the guardian of one of the Prep’s most honored societies—the Beaudevin. Eighty-five


Mulry Debating Society A R L Y in Septem ber, a small group of interested young men met for the first m eeting of the M u lry D ebating Society for N ineteen Thirty-seven. M r. Carey, S .J., the m oderator, emphasized the finer points of debating and insisted on self-expression in the best possible wayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in the manner of w riting a speech as well as in the m anner of presentation. H e advised that the members fam iliarize themselves w ith current questions and opinions, as debates are m ainly based on these two im portant topics. Election of officers was held at the second m eeting and the successful contenders were: M r. V arley, President; M r. Beronio, Vice-President; and M r. Hoffen, Secretary. O ur President proved rem arkable for his executive ab ility and his sincere endeavors to make meetings interesting under adverse conditions. F or the second term, M r. V arley was re-elected President, as Mr. Fahy and M r. Escude were chosen Vice-President and Secretary respectively. Debates were projected with other schools during the later part of the term, but the members of the Society were very disappointed when the debate with Loyola was called off. Messrs. A lbert and Hynes were chosen to represent us. W ith the year now draw ing to a close, we feel that throughout the past we have learned much and have made many outstanding achievements, both w ith regard to oratory and our own personal advancement. T hus our aims and ambitions have been realized in more than one way. We now bid â&#x20AC;&#x153; F in isâ&#x20AC;? to a very successful year with the M ulry Debating Society.


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

Collins Debating Society three m inute m ain speeches and one m inute rebuttal from the W I TsixH the debaters, w ith the speaking from the floor, accompanied as it usually is by many a qu ip and interesting observation, the Collins Debating Society convenes for its wreekly meeting. W hen the closing days of school roll around, the pleasant days of June w ill greet us, w hile we rem em ber with an equal pleasure that we have represented St. Peter’s in no less than seven public debates. T h e first public debate was with X a v ier of N ew York. F. Hayes, O ’N eill and G iella, together with M r. M oderator, traveled there all alone and spoke before a Parent-Teachers’ m eeting in a debate announced by the program as “ A n Inter-City Debate.” W hen the Hon. Judge, chairm an of the judges for our debate, came forth to announce the decision, he said that the debate was so close that it had taken them fifteen minutes to decide that X avier had the edge. T h e second public try was with St. A nselm ’s School of Teaneck, N . J . M r. M oderator is still endeavoring to explain to Botti, J . Hayes and Kelly, who defended the Prep, the perfect syllogism (M r. M oderator told me how to spell it) and the argument about the essential and accidental perfection used by the Teaneck boy,s in their main speeches and set rebuttals. W hen it came time, in December, to debate Fordham we wondered if it was possible to w in one of these strange things called public debates. But F. Hayes, W . Sweeney and W hite traveled way up to Fordham and were given an unanim ous decision. N ow we are aw aiting the questions and dates for our debates with Regis, Brooklyn, T eaneck and the M ulry D ebating Society of second year, Proelio stuclemus. Eighty-seven


1 9 3 7 PETREAN

Eighty-eight


The Library ' T 'H E opening of the new school year found not only a new Principal and more than two hundred new Freshmen, but it also found a much im ­ proved Cafeteria and best, perhaps, of all, a greatly im proved L ib rary. T h e shelves and books of the old L ib rary were moved du rin g the summer back to the large hall on the first floor of the Science Bu ild in g. For some of the books this was no new abode, for once before this very spot had served for the L ib rary. T h e room itself had taken on a new and more pleasing aspect for it had been thoroughly painted and the old stage rem oved, allow ing for more space. T h en too, Fr. Johnson, S .J., of St. Peter’s College, had been so kind as to rem em ber the Prep when the College moved to the h ill; and he sent over all the equipm ent which had been used for the L ib rary in the Commerce B u ild in g. T h erefore, w ith the new shelves and large tables, and com fortable chairs the physical make-up of the L ib rary was complete. T h en some five thousand odd volum es having been placed on the shelves, and all the files put in order, one day the L ib rary was pronounced com pleted and ready for the onslaught of eager young readers. T h en came perhaps the most pleasant surprise of all (I’m told that the books themselves were so overjoyed that some of them fell right off the shelves). T w o real book lovers were assigned to care for the precious volumes, thereby insuring them a ripe old age, in the persons of quiet, sm iling M r. M cAnaney, S .J. (an old friend of the books), and a newcomer in the school, M r. P. J . O ’Farrell, the full-time librarian, whose painstaking care of the books and L ib rary lectures w ill long be rem em ­ bered by all his new friends long after Prep days are over. T o aid Messrs. M cAnaney and O ’Farrell a large and competent staff of Prepsters were assigned to the Library, and their work and, above all, their willingness to perform the same has also made this a most pleasant year for all concerned. T h e staff members are as follows: Messrs. Burke, Q uinlan, and Rodgers of fourth year; Conniff, Lavin, and Monahan of third year; H ealy and Lodge, of second year; and H ill and M cGovern of first year.

Eighty-nine


As the year progressed many fine new volumes were added to the list and an especial effort was made to bu ild up a scientific, biographical and hobby section. Every day brings a shipm ent of new reading matter and every m ail a copy of some of the latest and better periodicals of which the reading rack boasts a large and varied num ber. T h a t the move back to the old quarters was a good one no one w ill dispute, for in the new place the room is larger than the other, and allows both for better arrangem ent of the books and also for more convenient table and seating arrangem ent; and perhaps the best proof of all is to be seen by a large num ber of students who have made consistent use of the Library all year, both for reading matter and special research work. â&#x20AC;&#x153; R ead in g maketh a fu ll m anâ&#x20AC;? is indeed well quoted, for inside the covers of the thousands of volumes at Prep one can find pleasure, education, and fine opportunity for broadening the m ind; we are therefore indeed grateful to Father Shalloe, S.J., for his lively interest in the Library and his efforts on its behalf; to Messrs. M cAnaney, S.J., and O â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrell, who have built up such a fine, well ordered system, and who have been ever ready to help and counsel in the selection of books; and also to the competent and faithful staff who have been most courteous and helpful at all times.

19 3 7 P E T R E A N

Ninety


Orchestra O F IN IS H off a good dinner the clever host always serves a demi-tasse— it com plim ents the perfect repast. So it is that the various school gatherings such as the annual play, the evening Debates, Parents’ night, and reading of marks, are always com plim ented and made more enjoyable by the addition of good music. T h is year the music has been furnished by the Prep Orchestra—a fine aggregation of twenty-one pieces under the direction of M r. Edw ard Henry. U nder the careful guidance of M r. M cEvoy, S .J., these musicians have gathered once a week and with w atchful eyes follow ed the beat of M r. H enry’s baton; their work has been so satisfactory that M r. H enry has agreed to instruct the older members in the intricacies of the m odem rhythm. A n organization such as this is a valuable asset to any school, for it not only aids the school, but also the value of such training to each member of the orchestra is beyond estimation. Last, but certainly not least, we wish to express our gratitude to Father A uth of St. N icholas Parish for the cooperation he has shown to the Prep. M any of the members of the orchestra are also members of the St. Nicholas band, and the training Father A uth has given his boys and ours has con­ tributed very largely to the success and progress of the orchestra. A final word of thanks is due to Father for the sudden change he so obligingly made in his own schedule so that the entire orchestra could play on the night of the Fordham -Prep debate.


The 1 9 3 7 Petrean Staff Editor-in-Chief L. R o d g e r s Assistant Editors

Jo se p h J a m f .s J . D o n o v a n

E d w a r d R . B r in s k i

J ohn J . H a m il l

Associate Editors J . C o n n o lly V. M e r r i c k E. C a u l f i e l d

O. O ’N e ill R . M c H ugh R . St a n l e y

M . B u rk e J. W oo ds R . G lazer

M . L eah y E . F i .f.c k e n s t e i n

Business Manager Jo s e p h P. L a r k in

Assistant Managers T hom as Stan ley

Jo h n F o le y

Jo s e p h S t a h lin

L a m b er t M arks

Art Editors J ohn L . B o tti

G e o rg e J . M adden

R aym o n d M cC arth y

V in c e n t M c G r a il

R ic h a r d J . O ’ C o n n e l l

Sports Editors V in c e n t C o r c o r a n

T ypists W a l t e r M o r r is

H e n ry J. K retz m e r

W il l ia m Sco tt

Moderator M r . A n t h o n y J . Q u e v e d o , S .J .

E D IT O R IA L ;e more a graduating class has produced “ its” P e t r e a n —the usual “ Best Ever.” Once npiling this catalogue of Prep memories we have tried to depart from the In com] “ Beaten Path.” We trust that in so doing we have not chosen the wrong “ Detours.” However we are proud of the 1937 P e t r e a n and we want the world to know it! T o our successors we will not tell of the long hard hours of work that are necessary for the production of a book such as this; but rather we will pass on our observation that when you are working on “ your” P e t r e a n —the hardest task is most pleasant! T o those who are destined at some future date to carry on where we are forced by time tQ cease we wish every manner of success to you and your Year Book.

193 7PETREAN

Ninety-two


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P Jesuit Ordinandi Formerly of St. Peter’s Prep Faculty C ollege o f the Sacred H eart, Ju n e 19 3 7 , W oodstock, M aryland

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Keep them, I pray Thee, dearest Lord, Keep them, for they are Thine —• Thy priests whose lives burn out before Thy consecrated shrine. Keep them, and comfort them in hours Of loneliness and pain, When all their life of sacrifice For souls seems but in vain. Keep them, and O remember Lord They have no one but Thee, Tet they have only human hearts With human frailty. Keep them as spotless as the Host That daily, they caress. Their every thought and word and deed Deign, dearest Lord, to bless.

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R E V . E D W A R D J . H O G A N , S .J.

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Ninety-three


Classical Academy H O R T L Y after the beginning of the Fall term, Father Shalloe announced the organization of a Junior Latin Academy. He placed it under the guidance of Mr. Stewart, S.J., who quickly set to work to explain the ideas behind the club, and who started the members on the twelfth book of Virgil’s “Aeneid.” The subject matter gave birth to a name for the academy, “ T he Virgil Club,” and that name found favor with all concerned. For that reason the members no longer refer to the Academy as such, but call it by the name they christened it. During the first semester “ T he Virgil Club” did a good deal of work on translation, the main object then being an attempt to master Virgil’s style in order to facilitate transla­ tion. Unfortunately, near the end of the semester our industrious moderator had to leave us because of illness. When second term began, the twelve students who make up the academy shook mental hands with themselves on seeing that the new moderator was to be Mr. Arthur G. Madden. He told “ The Virgil Club” that their object for the second term would be not so much translation. They had had enough of that last term to accustom them to Mantovano’s style. Second semester would rather concern itself with an endeavor to build up an appreciation of the exquisite beauty of Virgil’s poetry, and Latin poetry in general. The realms of Virgilian meter, word constructions, rhyme, and smooth reading of Latin poetry were well-explored to the tune of Mr. Madden’s expert, enthusiastic baton. The members of the Latin Academy this year have indeed been fortunate not only in learning many of the finer points of Latin, but also in having for an instructor a man so helpful, encouraging, and industrious as Mr. Arthur G. Madden.


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

The Slide R ule Club f ^ 'T 'U R E K A , E u rek a,” A\as the cry of the ancient Archim edes as he discovered the law of floating bodies am ong the gleam ing whiteness of old A lexan d ria. Yet, every T u esd ay that cry resounds about our own Prep Lib rary, for in the L ib ra ry lecture room the Slide R u le C lu b met each week. T h is u nique club, the first of its kind in the P rep ’s long history, was organized this year by M r. C ullen . E very T uesday, the members gathered to master the intricacies of the slide rule. Each week, m ultiplication, division, cube root, square root and trigonom etry were robbed of their horrible aspect and were conquered by the mere flip of a finger, the slide of a hair line and the student’s sharp eye. M r. C ullen , aided by President Brinski, Vice-President D aniel N ugent and Secretary R aym ond M cCarthy, has led the society to a victory over the dragon of Mathem atics. T h a t the club has been popular has been shown by the hoarse whispers, the shouts of delight and disgust, and the desperate queries which resounded throughout the crowded room. Yes, we of the Slide R u le C lu b w ill bless those days spent in the Library. N ow let us pause in this record of youthful Euclids and Newtons to thank the man who has made the club possible, M r. Cullen. H e has labored valiantly and, we hope, not vain ly to send the forces of m ultiplication cring­ ing in defeat. Patience was his in the first trying days when “ slide ru le ” was but a vague expression to the busy senior. So to him we say ‘T h an k you, for under his leadership, we have fought a valiant battle against the arch foe of the student, Mathematics, and we have conquered!

Ninety-five


L ’Academ ie Francaise d’ Ecole du Saint-Pierre L I T T L E b it of old France! A dot of gay Paris taken from the banks of the Seine into the very m iddle of the Prep! Yes, that’s L ’Academ ie Francaise d ’Ecole du Saint Pierre. U nder the skillful guidance of M r. Kelty L ’A cadem ie has soared to an honored and lofty rank among the P rep ’s societies. Each week English is abandoned and the struggling Seniors try to express their views in the tongue of M oliere. Each week Shakespeare gives way to H ugo and M ilton surrenders to the gifted Racine. In this way, the glory of France and her im m ortal gifts to literature are im printed upon the minds of the members. A t every m eeting one of the members gave an address in French on some poet or hero. T h e brilliance of Paul Claudel was proclaimed and described, w hile the deeds of N apoleon were probed with a scrutiny worthy of an A quinas. French translations of gems of English literature were read and discussed. Soon the question arose, “ W hat can we do with these carefully prepared papers?” L ’Academ ie Francaise shouted her answer in L e Jo u rn a l de L ’A cadem ie Francaise. Each month this little magazine appeared, shyly at first, then with an abundance of confidence. French poems, essays and stories were published in L e Jo u rn a l for all her readers to peruse and enjoy with the enthusiasm of a native Parisian. Yes, we can truly say that the magazine is the greatest boast of L ’Academ ie Francaise! N ow let us pause in this record of successes and achievements to thank the man who made them possible. M r. Kelty, with the aid of the society’s lone officer, Secretary Jam es Donovan, has transformed the Prep into a Province of France. T h e Hudson is our Seine—the Science Buildin g is our Eiffel T ow er!

37 PETREAN

Ninety-six


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

Ju n io r French Academy rT~'HE school year of 1936 and 1937 has witnessed the inauguration of many new activities in the Prep. W orking on the assumption that even French can be made sufficiently easy and interesting and that a certain facility in French conversation is not beyond the scope of Ju n io r high school students, the Ju n io r French Academ y was organized. Once a week the Academ y convenes and a sim ple yet efficient method of acquiring the fine French accent and of attuning our ears to conversational tones has been adopted. A victrola and a complete set of French records has been acquired and after a b rief talk in French by the moderator, M r. McA voy, S .J., a few of the records are played w hile all listen attentively and endeavor to follow the monologue or conversation. A n y parts of the records that are too difficult for the students are thoroughly explained by the moderator. Comments and criticisms on the subject matter of the records are welcomed and the babble and variety of nasal twangs that issue from the “ little room ” in back of the L ib rary sound not unlike the French Cham ­ ber of Deputies in an all night session. H ow ever the endeavors of the Academ y are not only confined to the classroom. In the near future when the members feel that their progress has been sufficient, a trip by the entire Academ y to the French lin er N orm andie is planned and all feel sure that the thorough and careful training of their T u esd ay afternoons w ill stand the crucial test. As a final supplement, French newspapers are periodically distributed, and with such a variety of methods at its disposal the members of the Academ y—the attendance at which is entirely voluntary—feel that they sim ply cannot help but learn the language in all its phases.

Ninety-seven


Chess Club H E St. Peter’s Chess C lu b was organized in the Fall of 1935, U nder the able guidance of M r. B all, S .J., we qu ickly learned the fundamentals of Chess. M eetings were held every Frid ay evening in the L ib rary where one could play Chess, Checkers, or observe on someone else’s game. Officers, roll-call and minutes were entirely omitted. T h ro u g h the courtesy of Mr. B all the facilities of the L ib rary were extended to the “ Chess N uts” and stormy weather was sure to find one or more games in progress with an interested and often noisy group of spectators gathered around. In the Spring of 1936 we fought and won our first interscholastic match, defeating Lincoln by the score of three to two. O ur victory was a signal tribute to the u n tirin g efforts of our devoted M oderator, who had formed a w inn in g team out of boys who, a few short months before, had known little or nothing about the game. T h e beginning of the new term brought back the Chess C lub bigger and better than ever. O ur new M oderator, M r. M ahlmeister, S.J., gave us pointers and inform al instructions at each meeting, but up to Jan u ary no one had succeeded in even gaining a draw with him. Late in the Fall the club was adm itted to the Hudson County H igh School Chess League. T h re e matches were played. In the first we were badly beaten by Lincoln by the score of four to one. T h e team was composed of Burke, Billings, Q uinlan, Carm ody and Nicholson. In the next two matches we defeated Ferris H igh School twice, three-two, three-two. Burke, Q uinlan, Carmody, N icholson and Cannon made up the team. Christmas holidays and the mid-year repetitions put an end to further com petition in the first term, but the second semester finds us confident that the team w ill render a good account of itself in League games.

19 3 7 P E T R E A N

Ninety-eight


Cam era Club T N O C T O B E R of 1936 a Cam era C lu b was organized under the direction of M r. A rthur C. Brom irski, instructor in Physics. Its purpose was to arouse interest in photography as a hobby and to develop a knowledge of the art and science of photography. W eekly meetings were held and the elem entary technique of picture taking were set forth in a series of lectures by M r. Brom irski. It was decided to lim it the mem bership to thirty. Soon a dark room in the form of a converted stock room was made available to the members, in order to provide practical experience in developing and printing. F ou r of the more advanced members, M r. B ru n q u ell of 4-B, M r. G u terl of 4-C, M r. Brow n of 4-A, and M r. Sweeney of l-A , were assigned to supervise on specified days of the week. M any members took advantage of the opportunity of using the dark room and quite a num ber of excellent pictures were developed. T h e interest of some of the members has become so great that they have set up dark rooms at home and have been deriving great pleasure therefrom . It is hoped that next year a more am bitious program m ay be carried out. Y et du ring the past year, in spite of the sim plicity of the pro足 gram, the results have been so excellent that an amateur photographic contest has been scheduled for Ju n e.

Ninety-nine


The Stam p Club P resident, R . Henson, ’39 Vice-President, A . K elly, ’38 Secretary, E. Gorm an, ’39 Sales M anager, J . Egan

7V L T H O U G H the derivation of the word Philatelic may have presented an insurm ountable barrier, still this did not prevent a large group of eager students from enrolling in the P rep ’s Stamp C lub. For its m oderator the club had to go beyond the wall of the Prep and Fr. Parsons, S .J., Professor of H istory in St. Peter’s College, kindly consented to accept this position. Once a week the club convenes and all the im portant news of the stamp mart is discussed. Recent and rare acquisitions are discussed and exhibited before the covetous eyes of the club. Fr. Parsons not only holds the position of m oderator but is the possessor of a rare and valuable collection that is the envy and goal of every member. T h e m utual benefits of these meet­ ings are quite apparent and m any a long cherished acquisition has been affected after a heated and private “ deal.” In the near future when the club feels that its acquisitions warrant it, they intend to hold a stamp exhibition in the L ib rary which it is hoped w ill astonish the casual visitor by its variety and size.

37 PETREAN

One hundred


T op R o w : M urphy, Marino, Mulle, Egan, Corballis, Mr. Meyers, Mr. Cannella. Fourth R o w : Nolan, McManus, Kenny, McCarthy, Connors, Hoffman, Gallagher, Goldrick, Davis, McEvoy, Torpey. T h ird R o w : Mr. King, M iller, Walsh, O’N eill, Riordan, H am ill, Boylan, McGee, Lynch, McGurk, Norton, Hynes. Second R o w : M cGrail, Larkin, Colligan, Barry, Donovan, Sheehy, Jam in, M cGuirl, Caulfield, Merrick, McCarthy, Dillman. Bottom R o w : Lisky, Thompson, English, Smith, Torpey, Leucht, Turley, Brinski, Captain; McNamara, Lisa, Cox, Bloom, McCartin.

S T . P E T E R S C O L L E G E H IG H S C H O O L 1936 F O O T B A L L S C H E D U L E DATE Sept. 26 Oct. 3 Oct. 12 Oct. 24 Nov. 3 Nov. 11 Nov. 26

1 9 3 7 PETREAN

TEAM Emerson Ferris Union Hill St. Cecelia’s Lincoln Bayonne Dickinson

PLACE West N. Y. Home Home Home Home Bayonne Home

PREP 0 0 0 12

(5 0 0

SCORE OPPONENT 21 O

13 13 7, *3 12

One hundred txuo


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P An E ditorial F rom the Hudson Dispatch, Nov. 2 5 , 1 9 3 6 (R e p rin te d by the kin d perm ission of the author—M r. H a dd o n Ivins) « q T . P E T E R ’S P R E P , Jersey City, has thus far made a record in football by not w in n in g even one game.

T om orro w the St. P eter’s boys w ill

clash w ith D ickinson H igh School, seem ingly w ithout the semblance of a chance of victory. “ M easured by victories, the St. Peter’s team is bankrupt, but measured by good sportsmanship, the oft-defeated team is a success. T hese St. Peter’s boys have found out som ething that other boys m ay not find out for several years; they have found out that being on top is not necessary for happiness. “ T h e y tell me that in spite of the defeats the m orale of the team is splendid. T h e players are necessarily modest in defeat, but they feel no disgrace. Each time they go into a game, they go in for the spirit of the team expecting to w in.

T h e y are not depressed, nor are they discouraged.

N ext year w ill be

another year, and they w ill have had experience upon which to build. “ Hats off to the tail-enders of football in Hudson County. So long as the boys are playing the game for the gam e’s sake, they can get along, even for an entire season, w ithout a w in.

If St. Peter’s were in the game only for the

sake of w inning, there w ould be no game in Jersey C ity tomorrow; they w ould not have enough spirit left, by this time, to go out on the field. “ T h e y w ill not beat Dickinson tomorrow; no, not even in a year of un­ precedented ‘upsets’ ; but they w ill close the season with heads up and feet on the ground. “ M y high respects to the tail-end team of Hudson County.” P R E P D R O P S I N I T I A L C O N T E S T T O E M E R S O N 21-0 It is indeed strange to see printed on this page, set aside for the account of the opening game of the football season, that depressing word “ defeat.” For if we glance back over the pages of the past we see that, since Coach Myers has come to St. Peter’s, our team was never defeated in its initial contest. B u t such is fate and such is the result of the lack of the necessary weight and experience which our team unfortunately did not have for this inaugural tilt in which the Prep suffered this 21-0 setback from our worthy rivals, Em erson’s Bluebelles. T h is overw helm ing defeat was received m ainly from Em erson’s sparkplug quarterback, Servideo and the fleet-footed halfback, Cesaro. A few minutes after the kick-off Cesaro passed to Hanak, who raced to the two-yard line before being brought down by a horde of our players. O ur valiant line held for two downs, then Servideo skirted the end for the score. But in the second quarter the Petrean forward wall, considerably outweighed by Em er­ son, waged a gallant fight and held the Bluebelles scoreless. It was in this One hundred three


period the M aroons had a chance to exh ib it that so-called “ hocus pocus” and they went to town as they started a sustained drive from their own thirty-fiveyard line to the Em erson eighteen-yard line.

Passes from Eddie Caulfield to

E d die B rinski and the fine ru n n in g of A rtie Jam in stood out for our prepsters in this stanza.

T h e n in the third and fourth quarters, Em erson came back

with a vengeance; passes from Cesaro to Servideo and then to Marzoli netted two m ore touchdowns and M ike L yn ch ’s blocked kick resulted in an auto­ m atic safety. O nly one extra point was successfully made, due to the crash­ ing in of our fast linem en. M uch credit must be given to the Prep eleven, as time and time again they held their heavier and more pow erful opponents w ithin the shadow of their goal posts. Ed. Brinski and Jo h n n y R iordan more than once stopped sure touchdowns for Em erson and the magnificent tackles of our little Jo h n n y D unne w ill never be forgotten.

P R E P H O LD S F E R R IS T O SC O R ELESS T IE In a football game which m arked the first inter-city clash of the infant season, St. Peter’s Prep and Ferris H igh fought to a scoreless deadlock on the M ontgom ery A n n ex gridiron. T h is skirmish resolved itself into a bitter defensive duel between two hard fighting elevens. T h e “ Bulldogs” enjoyed a considerable weight advantage over the Petreans, but were unable to budge the M aroon and W hite when w ithin scoring distance. T w ice during the initial half the Ferris team drove deep into Prep territory only to find a stiffened Petrean defense blocking their scoring efforts. In the second half it was St. Peter’s that took the offensive, pressing hard for a score to break the deadlock. A n early-game in ju ry to Brinski did not help the P rep ’s late drives and when Dunne, 140-pound guard, was forced out of action, it was evident that the Petreans were far from their best. A t that T om m y M yers’ boys blasted their way to the Ferris three-yard line on one drive but failed to score. A nother bad break for the Petreans came when A rt Jam in broke into the clear on a fifteen-yard run only to slip on the eight-yard line without a Ferris tackier in the vicinity. It seemed like a certain touch­ down before he slipped. Jam in and Caulfield were the spearheads of the Prep attack, while Johnny Riordan and M cG uirl did a fine job in backing up the line.

h

1 9 3 7 PETREAN

h

h

h

One hundred four

i


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

CO N IG LIO FA IL S TO G A IN A G A IN S T P R E P

U N IO N H I L L D E F E A T S S T . P E T E R S 13-0 A larger crowd than usual of loyal rooters showed up at the M ontgom ery O val to urge the M aroon and W hite on to victory over the aggressive H illers. B u t the cards were stacked against our w arriors and they dropped a 13-0 decision to their opponents. T h is skirm ish was not what could be called a good game by any stretch of the im agination, but it was hard fought and interesting enough from the spectators’ view point. T h e Prep spent itself pounding away against the U nion H ill forw ard wall early in the game, and managed to hold staunchly for three periods. It was in the third stanza that the Prepsters made their best showing, when they reeled off three first downs and penetrated to the U nion H ill twenty-six yard line, but with a yard to go on the fourth down our backs failed. It looked like a certain scoreless tie until shortly after the fatal fourth round opened. A pass from the U nion H ill fullback to the left end brought the ball to the P rep ’s thirteen-yard line, then Coniglio, the N orth H udsonites’ b rillian t ball-toter, went off tackle for the first touchdown. A few minutes later this human rabbit intercepted a long pass and was brought down on the P rep ’s fortv-two-yard line. On the first play he legged it around left end, eluded three Petrean tacklers and raced thirty-five yards for a second touch­ down. T h is time the extra point was made good. Jam in and C ox were the P rep ’s best bets in the backfield, while Colligan, at end, made several saving tackles.

One hundred five


CO X C A R R IE S B A L L FO R 12-Y A R I) GA IN

S T . P E T E R ’S, D IS P L A Y IN G B E S T F O R M , L O SE S T O U G H O N E T O S T . C E C E L IA B Y 13 -12 S C O R E A m id the enthusiastic cheers of 2,000 Parochial School students the gallant M aroon and W hite went down to a glorious defeat by the hair-line margin, 13 -12 . T h e Prep broke away for a touchdown in the first period when Bloom heaved a twenty-yard pass to Frank Colligan, who ran three yards for a score. T h e attempt at conversion failed. B u t the strongly favored Englewood “ Saints” started ro llin g in the second period and pushed over two scores and a valuable pair-after-touchdown. Doolan crashed through the center of the P rep ’s line and sprinted thirty-five yards for a touchdown. T h e Blue and G o ld ’s second score resulted from a blocked kick in the end zone. Colligan put St. Peter’s back in the game mid-way in the final period, taking a twentyfive-yard pass from Jo e C ox on St. Cecelia’s forty-five-yard stripe, broke loose from two tacklers and raced down the side-lines for his second touchdown. George Sm ith, an excellent place kicker, had his placement blocked by a storm of players. T h e line play of C olligan, Joh n n y Dunne and R iordan was a menace to St. C ecelia’s ru nning attack throughout the game. Steve Bloom and Ed. Brinski were also defensive standouts with their excellent backing up from the secondary.

19 3 7 P E T R E A N

One hundred six


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

L IN C O L N In a football production, filled w ith a sheer dram a and clim axed by an explosive, thrill-packed ending to rival fiction, Lincoln H igh School’s eleven came roaring from behind at M ontgom ery A n n ex to turn back St. Peter’s Prep 7 to 6. T h e spectacular episode that gave the b rillian tly fought game a Frank M erriw ell touch and spelled doom for the Petreans, came with only twentyfive seconds left to play, ju st when some 6,000 persons were preparing to acclaim the Prep victorious. It was a twenty-two-yard pass from Jack M onaghan to B ill G riffin in the end zone, w ith the subsequent placement conversion by Floyd Bernhardt that did the trick. For the twenty-four minutes both teams battled furiously but neither team advanced beyond their opponents’ thirty-yard stripe. In the third period the M aroon and W hite m aneuvered the ball to the side-line on L in co ln ’s forty-yard line. T h e Petrean quarterback, Ed. Brinski, taking advantage of his position sent his b rillian t right end, Fran k C olligan, down the sidelines. T h e ball was snapped to C ox who, w ith beautiful blocking, heaved a perfect pass to C olligan in the end-zone givin g Prep a 6-0 lead. L ittle did the Petreans realize at that time how disastrous it was going to be for them, as C o x’s pass to T o rp e y for the extra point was incomplete. Less than ninety seconds rem ained to play, when C ox apparently punted out of danger to the Prep forty-one-yard line. T h ree plays later Monaghan faded back and wafted the ball far down the field into the outstretched hands of Griffin, who was standing in the end zone. T o say that the Petrean fans were stunned at this sudden shifting of the tide of fortune is putting the case m ildly. W ith the score deadlocked 6 to 6 the teams lined up for the extra point, and a hush came over the throng. T h e next moment the Petrean fans were struck with the heart breaking reality, for the Lincoln right-end sent the ball sailing between the uprights. It was a disastrous finish for the Petreans, who only a m inute before had been visualizing their first victory. B u t there was plenty of glory for the M aroon and W hite, especially for C ox, who threw the touchdown pass and for Colligan who caught it. Also for little Johnny Dunne, the Prep’s pocket-sized guard, who turned in his best job of the season. H e was a constant source of annoyance to the “ lions” and attached him self to the Lincoln ball toters like the proverbial burr. Joh n n y M cG u irl did a swell job of backing up the line as did “ B ab e” Jam in in carrying the ball. T h is game marked the second successive year that an ex-Petrean player scored the w inning touchdown for Lincoln and the first time that L in co ln ’s coach, Joh n n y Slane, adm itted that the Prep players deserved to win.

One hundred seven


IL L - F A T E D P R E P S T I L L S E E K IN G F I R S T T R I U M P H L ik e Ponce de Leon who vain ly sought the fountain of youth the St. P e te rs Petreans still continued to seek the golden trail leading out of the wilderness of despair in the most gloom y season of their football history. Some 5,000 persons crowded the Bayonne stadium and saw the ill-fated Prep handed a 13-0 setback by Bayonne H igh in a game entirely devoid of thrills. T h e greatly outw eighed Petreans, struggling to shake off the gloom w hich had gripped the squad since the L in co ln disaster, and with three regu­ lars, in clu d in g F ran k C olligan, Ed B rinski and M ike Lynch on the sidelines, were beaten by two touchdowns and an extra point. L ik e a thunderbolt out of the blue the first touchdown came late in the second period. It resulted from a pass by the Bayonne left half to the right end who was standing in the end zone not a foot from the 'sideline. It ap­ peared that the game w ould close w ith this solitary score staining the P rep ’s escutcheon, but less than a m inute before the final whistle the G arnet scored again. T h e Petreans were deep in their own territory when C ox elected to pass as a desperate last measure. B u t an avalanche of Bayonne tacklers bore down on him and his hurried aerial was first blocked and then caught by Bayonne’s left guard who was already standing over the goal line. T h e plunge for the extra point was successful. T h e Petreans were the aggressors at the start and threatened throughout the first period by m arching thirty-eight yards to Bayonne’s one-yard line, but they could not muster the strength to put the ball over. C ox, the P rep ’s left halfback, a Bayonne boy himself, put on a brilliant exh ib ition of punting and passing for his neighbors while Jo h n n y Riordan, Vince M errick and Jo h n n y D unne were outstanding on the defense.

M cG U IR L GOES T H R O U G H DICKINSO N L IN E FO R SH O R T GAIN


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

C O L L IG A N R E C E IV IN G PASS FR O M CO X

P R E P H O L D S D IC K IN S O N S R U N N IN G A T T A C K T O O N E F I R S T D O W N , B U T PA SSE S P R O V E F A T A L AS I T L O SE S 12-0 Once again we came to the closing game, once again Dickinson is our rival, and once again must we sadly write the word “ defeat,” for the disheartened Petrean eleven were for the second successive year set back by the sum total of two touchdowns, one in the first period resulting from two swift passes and the other from an interception in the third. T h e team Coach Myers put on the field may be belittled by its record, but on the showing in this game it deserves to take its place with form er Petrean elevens, if only for its spirited display of nerve against overw helm ing odds. A four to one underdog before the game, St. Peter’s threw a scare into the D ickinson supporters by its stone-wall defense that ultim ately held D ickin­ son’s ru n n in g attack to one first down and that com ing in the last period with the aid of a penalty. Late in the first period, after the spirited St. Peter’s forward wall had shackled the opponents’ ru nning attack, Sarno faded back and passed to D ennery who sidestepped a would-be tackier and raced over the goal line. Eddie Brinski dived at him but he couldn’t bring him down. R alp h Brande, the powerful Dickinson center, intercepted Jo e C o x’s pass in the third period and ran like a scared rabbit for forty yards and a second H illtop touchdown. Both attempts for the pair-after-touchdown failed.

One hundred nine


N either team revealed a sustained ru n n in g attack; in fact both ground defensives stalled from beginning to end. D ickinson’s usual w ell versed and sufficiently conceived ru n n in g assault found its match in the hard tackling, gallant P eter’s defense.

JA M IN M AKES END RU N

C olligan ’s end play for the Grandstreeters was brilliant. T h e H illtoppers d rivin g around his end found their form er teammate almost impossible to pass. H e frequently piled up D ickinson’s massed interference and he proved him self the outstanding defense player for the Petreans. Jo h n n y Dunne, our A ll-C ounty guard, also contributed splendid work, spillin g the ball carriers, and tackling clean and hard. A rtie Jam in also gave a grand account of himself. T w ice the blond-headed Petrean halfback adroitly stepped in the path of Dickinson passes and inter­ cepted them, preventing two potential touchdowns. E d Caulfield and Vince M errick also fulfilled their assignments without fault by p ilin g up the H illtop power plays throughout the entire game. Joe C ox turned in a perform ance that duplicated his fine work in the game with Bayonne, and Brinski was also in there fighting hard.


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One hundred eleven


One hundred twelve


V A R S IT Y T E A M

Basketball 1 9 3 6 -1 9 3 7

A

S T H E football season came to an end the student body eagerly awaited the call for basketball candidates. T he first day close to a hundred had signed up. Having lost almost an entire squad last season and with but a short time to the first game, Mr. Myers fashioned together a formidable quintet. Regis High was the first opponent of the Prep. Traveling to New York they overwhelmed Regis by the score of 28-23. T he Petrean dribblers took the floor with Syl Upton and Joe Woods in the forecourt, Pete Pidgeon at the pivot posi­ tion and Larry Florio and Johnny Pidgeon in the guard positions. A fine passing attack and a close knit defense gave the Petreans an 18-12 lead at the half. Dis­ playing the same brand of ball in the second half the Petreans, led by Captain Upton, who slashed the cords for fourteen points, annexed their first victory of the 1 936-37 season. A week later the Petreans again traveled to New York to do battle with Fordham Prep. But today fortune was not to smile on the Jersey City Saints as they went down to defeat by a 20 to 11 score. Due to the unfamiliarity with the court the Prep got off to a bad start, trailing by a 15-4 score at the half. Although the Grandstreeters outscored the Fordham warriors in the second half they could not quite cut down the wide margin made by Fordham’s first half onslaught. Playing for the first time on their home court the Maroon and White captured a hard tussle from St. Michael’s of Jersey City by the score of 22-21. Led by Joe Woods the Petreans forged to a 13-5 lead at the half, but in the second canto they did not have everything their own way and had a hard time winning. On the defense Larry Florio and Johnny Pidgeon stood out stopping the high-scoring Michaelian forwards. Again traveling to New York the Petreans dropped a heart-breaker to Xavier, being defeated 29-26. Leading at the half by a score of 13-12 the Prep was outscored in the second half and dropped the verdict to the Cadets. T he sensational One hundred thirteen


long shots of Larry Florio and the fine exhibition of foul-shooting by Syl Upton kept the Petreans in the battle up to the finish. Playing at the Collins Memorial Gym the Prepsters took over Holy Family High of Union City in an easy battle, winning by a 32-25 score. Leading 16-4 at the first quarter and 26-10 at the half the Prep had an easy time. In the second half the reserves were sent into the game and they showed a fine brand of ball, despite the rally made by the Union City Saints. Joe Woods and Billy Braun, a capable reserve, were the bulwarks of the Prep’s attack. T he second game with Regis was played at the Prep’s home court and was the second victory for the Maroon and White over the Regis team. Led by Woods and Upton, the big guns of the Prep’s attack, the Petreans led at the half 10-9. Outscoring and outplaying Regis in the second half the Petreans easily annexed the honors. T he Grandstreeters led throughout the game and fine defensive play by Larry Florio kept the Regis scorers in check throughout the contest. Playing host to Loyola a few days later the Petrean squad had an easy time overpowering a young inexperienced quintet to the tune of 42-22. Led by Joe Woods and Andy Lisky, who scored twenty-three points between them, the Prep encountered little difficulty from the." Loyola cagers. Leading 20-7 at the half Mr. Myers inserted his entire second-string which performed like veterans. The next week the Maroon and White took on Holy Family at the Union City court. Joe Woods, scrappy Petrean forward, shone on the offense as he tossed in six field goals and a pair of free throws for a grand total of sixteen points. Forging to an 11-4 score at the half the Petreans went on to take the verdict 23-17. In the second quarter the game resolved itself into a “ free-for-all.” Playing a loose brand of ball the Petreans held the lead throughout by virtue of Wood’s long heaves. Due to hard luck on their shots the Prep’s score was not what it should have been. In the ninth game of the season St. Peter’s defeated the St. Peter’s College Frosh in a very rough tussle. Leading throughout the contest the Prep had to contend with the rather rough style of college playing. Led by Captain Upton the Prep­ sters knocked off the Frosh by 19-16, a fairly close score. JE S U IT T O U R N A M E N T For two successive years the Petreans were champions of the Jesuit High Schools in the Metropolitan District. As defending champs they were rated the underdog to Fordham Prep in the first game of the first round. On February first Fordham first felt the sting of the Prep’s attack. Having beaten the Petreans earlier in the season, St. Peter’s turned the tables, scoring a 32-18 victory. Captain Upton led the Prep’s attack. A fine game was turned in by Pete Pidgeon, Prep’s lanky center-man. In the semi-finals the Prep had as an opponent Xavier, who also had handed the Prep a setback early in the season. But St. Peter’s had little difficulty in turning back the Cadets. Scoring almost at will and leading 20-3 at the half the Prep had an easy time of it. Repeating the same performance in the second half the Petreans roared into the finals by a 33-12 score. Woods and Upton stood out for the Prep, gathering twenty points between them. Pete Pidgeon performed another grand game at center. Playing Brooklyn Prep in the finals the Petreans needed only to beat them in order to gain permanent possession of the trophy. Brooklyn Prep, boasting one of the tallest squads in the section, came over to Jersey and handed the Prep its first defeat in three years of Tourna-

3 7 PETREAN

One hundred fourteen


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

JU N IO R V A R S IT Y

ment competition. Employing the fast break the Brooklyn Prep team forged ahead at the half 13-2. They captured the contest 24-12, although Woods and Upton performed nobly for St. Peter’s. With the tournament over the Petreans still had a few games to play before the close of the season. On February 17, St. Joseph’s of West New York traveled down to Collins to take a close verdict from the Grandstreeters. T he victory was decided in the last minute of play. This was probably the most exciting game played on the College floor for many a season. Led by Woods and Upton the Prep forged ahead at the quarter 10-7, but slowed up and were on the short end of a 15-13 score at the half. T he second half saw both teams play flawless ball and by two last minute heaves St. Joseph’s won the decision 31-26. Woods and Upton starred on the offense while Florio stood out on the defense. Tw o days later at the College the Prep met Xavier for the third time. Prior to this game each team had one victory apiece, so to each this was considered an im­ portant clash. Bringing a strong quintet from New York, Xavier set all its big guns for the Petreans but to no avail, for the Prep took the verdict 29-27. Losing 19-16 at the half the Jersey City boys went into the fray with a do-or-die spirit and were not to be denied. Excellent foul shooting by the entire team and a last second heave by Joe Woods gave the Petreans the two-point edge and con­ sequently the victory. Traveling to Loyola the Maroon and White defeated Loyola in a free scoring contest. Due to the small size and the unfamiliarity of the court the Prep was far behind at the half but in the second half the boys got going and popped in shots from any angle. Fine play by Upton and Riordan under the basket helped no little, Upton scoring twelve and Riordan ten. This game terminated the careers of Captain Syl Upton, Joe Woods, Larry Florio, Vinnie McGrail, W illy Braun and Manager Corcoran at the Prep. Due to the fine performance of the Varsity the Prep scored eleven wins out of fifteen starts—a fine record for any club. One hundred fifteen


T rack Team T T 7 I T H but two veteran trackmen as a nucleus, M r. M ahlmeister, S.J., has » ’ composed a team of which St. Peter’s may well be proud. A fter a long and arduous training period the team made its debut in the Dickinson T rack M eet at the Jersey C ity A rm ory. T h e P rep ’s small squad of contestants con­ sisted of Sm ith, Lynch, Ganzkow, R . M cCarthy, Casalino, Sexton. Neale and M cGough. Inexperience prevented any one of them from placing. T h is com petition, however, seasoned our recruits and when the time came for the Lincoln meet they w ould not be suppressed. In the half-mile special Sexton, running a perfectly timed race, gained for St. Peter’s its initial trium ph of the current season. A few moments later M iller thundered past the entire held to win by a w ide m argin in the first heat of the 350 yard dash. Despite this exceedingly fast race which had sapped much of his strength he placed third in the finals. From the outset of the half-mile N eale assumed a place among the leaders which he never relinquished, finishing third. T h is meet was follow ed by the Seton H all meet in which St. Peter’s entered its m edley relay team of M iller, N ugent, N eale and Sexton. T h is event marked the return to the track of Dan Nugent, the Prep’s ace quarter-miler. Due to a slight misunderstanding the team was forced to compete in a race to which they were unaccustomed and in this they failed to place. In the final com petition of the indoor campaign, the State Championships at the N ew ark Arm ory, St. Peter’s entered N eale, M cGough, Sexton, M iller and N ugent. O f these entrants N ugent alone gained a place. A fter finishing second in his heat of the 440 yard dash he narrowly missed a score by placing sixth in the finish. W e look forward to even greater trium ph during the outdoor season.

19 3 7 PET REAN

One hundred sixteen


Habitat Barry, M ark A n th o n y ....................... 88 West 4th St., Bayonne, N . J . B arry, R ich ard M a rtin ....................... 88 W est 4th St., Bayonne, N . }. Botti, Jo h n L aw re n ce ...........................162 Bay V iew A ve., Jersey City, N . J. Brady, R o b ert A lo ysiu s....................6 C orbin A ve., Jersey City, N . J . Brau n, W illiam A lo ysiu s...................4 31 W ashington A ve., B ellevill, N. J. Brinski, Edw ard R o b e r t ...................95 O rient A ve., Jersey City, N . J . Brow ne, R ich ard Ja m e s ....................4 12 Central Ave., H arrison, N . J . B ru n n qu ell, G erard Ja m e s ...............67 Brinkerhoff St., Jersey City, N . J. Burke, M ark J o h n ............................. 69 G au tier A ve., Jersey City, N . J. C arr, Jo h n F ra n cis............................. 822 Chestnut St., Roselle, N . J . C arroll, D onald Ja m e s ....................... 120 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;22nd St., W est N ew York, N. f. Caulfield, Edm und J o h n ...................12 Stegman Place, Jersey City, N. J. Connolly, Jo h n L aw re n ce ............... 447 East 40th St., Paterson, N . J . Corcoran, V incen t G e ra rd ............... 1 352 Bergen T u rn Pike, J . C., N . J. Corley, T hom as F ra n cis....................3 1 Clinton Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Coughlin, T hom as B e rn a rd .............. 43 A rlin gton Ave., Jersey City, N. J. C ox, Jam es Jo se p h ............................. 253 A ven ue B, Bayonne, N . J . D eM eyer, M arius M u tillo d ............. Cedar Lane, Secaucus, N . J . D illm an, W illiam Ja m e s .................... 385 Y o rk St., Jersey City, N . J. Donovan, Jam es F ran cis...................2 7 7 H arrison Ave., Jersey City, N. J. English, Edw ard Jo se p h ...................... 288 M onm outh St., Jersey City, N. J. Flaherty, Peter Ja m e s ........................ 66 B id w ell A ve., Jersey City, N . J . Flaherty, R o b ert E d w a rd ..................36 Glenw ood A ve., Jersey City, N. J. Fleckenstein, Edw ard A 1 ..................29 K in g A ve., W eehawken, N . J . Florio, Law rence E d w a rd ............... 3 17 W ashington St., Hoboken, N. J. Foley, Jo h n Ja m e s ............................. 223 Van Orden A ve., Leonia, N . J . G arlin ger, John H e n ry .................... 921 Boger Road, R iv e r Edge, N . J. G illooly, G ilb ert L aw re n ce ............. 59 N eptune Ave., Jersey City, N. J . Glaser, G erard R o b e rt...................... 28 Adam s St., Guttenberg, N . J. G reen, R o b ert W illia m ...................... 2 10 Linden Ave., Jersey City, N . J. G uterl, W alter T hom as. . . ............ 299 Academ y St., Jersey City, N. J. H am ill, James A le x a n d e r................13 1 Kensington A ve., Jersey City, N. J. H am ill, Jo h n F ran cis.........................306 V arick St., Jersey City, N. J . Hoffm ann, Charles Josep h ............. 30 Linden A ve., Jersey City, N. J . K elly, G erard P a trick .........................100 West 15th St., Bayonne, N. J. Kennedy, James F ran cis.................... 86 Sussex St., Jersey City, N . J. Kenny, Patrick E d w ard .................... 124 Sterling Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Kretzmer, H enry J o h n .................... 7 1 West 57th St., Bayonne, N. J. Lam bert, Leo F ran cis.........................19 Knickerbocker Ave., J. C , N. J. Larkin , Joseph P e te r.........................51 H ighland Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Leahy, M artin F ran cis.......................70 Humphreys Ave., Bayonne, N. J. Leahy, Raym ond Joseph .................. 67 T u ers A ve., Jersey City, N. J. Lisa, Thom as M ich ael....................... 936 W illow Ave., Hoboken, N. J. Lohr, George E d w ard ........................3 15 H enry St., Hasbrouck Heights, N. J Low ther, Dallas W illia m .................. 25 Elliot St., Newark, N. J.

19 37 PETREAN

One hundred eighteen


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P Lynch, M ichael A lo y siu s................... 12 1 W est 4th St., Bayonne, N . J . M acFarland, Josep h Ja m e s ...............130 Palisade A ve., U nion City, N . J . M cC arthy, Ed w ard Jo s e p h ..............86 W est 32nd St., Bayonne, N . J . M cC arthy, R a y L a w re n c e ................309—1 1t h St., U nion City, N . J . M cC arthy, T h om as J o h n ................... 830 A ven u e C, Bayonne, N . J . M cG rail, V incen t Ja m e s .................. 55 W ayne St., Jersey C ity, N . J . M cH ugh, F ran k Jo s e p h .....................18 1 A rlin gton A ve., Jersey City, N . J. M adden, G eorge Jo s e p h ................... 30 W est 13th St., Bayonne, N . J . M aguire, Joseph Ja m e s ......................160 Belm ont A ve., Jersey City, N. J . M ann, V incen t Ja m e s ........................523 W ashington St., H oboken, N . J . M archiony, Italo V in c e n t................. 356—3rd St., H oboken, N . J . M eehan, Stanley Ja m e s ......................176 Palisade A ve., U nion City, N. J . M errick, V incen t F ra n cis................... 326 M ontgom ery St., Jersey City, N . J. M orris, W alter E u g e n e ......................306 Springfield A ve., H asbr. Hts., N . J. N ewton, T hom as Ja m e s .....................2 1 1 M cAdoo A ve., Jersey City, N . J . N ugent, D aniel Ja m e s ........................26 Jefferson A ve., Jersey City, N . J . O ’B rien , V incen t Jo s e p h ................... 88 W est 47th St., Bayonne, N . J . O ’C onnell, R ich ard A lfr e d ..............16 1 Boyd A ve., Jersey City, N . J . O ’N eill, T hom as F ra n c is.................. >036 G arden St., H oboken, N . J . O ’N eill, O wen P a tric k .......................13 5 G ran d St., Jersey City, N . J . Phillips, R o b e rt Jo s e p h ..................... 4. D uncan Court, Jersey City, N . J . Pocus, D om inick A lb in ..................... 726 A venue A , Bayonne, N . J . Q uinlan, Jam es T h o m a s...................57 W harton A ve., N utley, N . J . Q uinlan, Jo h n P a tric k ....................... 74 G reen ville Ave., Jersey City, N . J . Rodgers, Joseph L e o ..........................X99A V irg in ia Ave., Jersey City, N . J . R u an e, Jo h n P a tric k ..........................12 Sheffield St., Jersey City, N . J. Sachs, R o b ert E d w a rd ....................... 1 1 6 H ighlan d Ave., Jersey City, N . J . Satz, Jo h n Jo s e p h ................................ 189 W eequahic A ve., N ew ark, N . J. Schneider, M ichael Jo s e p h .............. 129 Sm ith St., Elizabeth, N . J . Schulz, Bernard F ra n cis.....................18 D ubon Place, N orth A rlington, N. J Scott, W illiam A n th o n y .....................77 W est 34th St., Bayonne, N . J. Sm ith, G eorge J u d e ......................... 223 H arrison A ve., Jersey City, N. J. Smith, Joseph E d w a rd ....................... 76 Cottage St., Jersey City, N . J . Stahlin, R o b ert C h arle s.....................12 C orbin Ave., Jersey City. N . J . Stanley, R ich ard A n th o n y ................ ^69 M erriran St., T eaneck, N. J . Stanley, T hom as L aw ren ce..............Oak Lane, Essex Fells, N . J . Stoebling, Eugene D a n ie l................740 Ocean Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Torresson, W illiam A lb e r t..............120 —34th St., W oodcliff, N . J . T rayn or, Jo h n A lo ysiu s.................... 137 C lerk St., Jersey City, N . J . T u rle y , G erard W illia m .................. 130 Jefferson Ave., Elizabeth, N . J. Upton, Sylvester Jam es.................... 4 2 1—33rd St., W oodcliff, N. J. W ilson, Francis A u g u stin e ............. 34 Clarem ont Ave., Jersey City, N. J W ilson, John Josep h.........................188 Fairview Ave., Jersey City, INC. J* Woods, Joseph J o h n ...........................1 1 8 —22nd St., W est N ew York, N. J. Woods, W illiam J o h n ...................... 3687 Boulevard, Jersey City, N. J.

One hundred nineteen


Patrons and Patronesses R e v . J o se p h S. D in e e n , S .J. R e v . F r a n c is

X.

S h a l l o e , S .J.

R ev.

J . P.

R ev . J ohn

F it z p a t r ic k , S .J.

T.

B u t l e r , S .J.

H on. M ayor Frank H ague H on. A . H arry M oore H on. T hom as J . Brogan M r. and Mrs. H enrv A itkin , J r . H on. A nthony J. Botti M r. and Mrs. Edw ard G . Brady M r. and Mrs. W illiam A . Braun M r. and Mrs. Peter J . Brinski M r. and Mrs. R ich ard J. Browne M r. and Mrs. George J. B ru n q u ell M r. and Mrs. Jo h n S. Burke M r. and Mrs. Jo h n A . Carm ody M r. and Mrs. A . J. C arr M r. and Mrs. L u ke F. C arroll M r. and Mrs. Jo h n B. Caulfield M r. and Mrs. Jo h n L . Connelly M rs. M argaret V. Corcoran M r. and Mrs. M artin J . Corley M r. and Mrs. Peter J . Coughlin Misses Catherine and Sue Crosson M r. Lou is J . D eM eyer M r. and Mrs. Lou is F. D illm an M r. Jam es R . Donovan M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J . English M rs. M. E. Flaherty M r. and Mrs. Edward F. Fleckenstein M r. and Mrs. Edw ard J. Florio M r. and Mrs. Joseph H . Foley M r. and Mrs. John H. G arlinger M r. and Mrs. R ob ert T . Glaser M r. and Mrs. W illiam J . Green M r. and Mrs. Adam P. G uterl M r. and Mrs. Jam es A. Ham ill M r. and Mrs. Charles J . Hoffman M r. and Mrs. T hom as P. K elly M r. M artin J. Kennedy M r. and Mrs. Jam es D. K enny M r. and Mrs. H arry J . Kretzmer M r. and Mrs. George M. Lau M r. and Mrs. M ichael F. Lam bert M r. and Mrs. Joseph P. Larkin J. Liberm an and Com pany M r. and Mrs. Michael P. Lisa M r. and Mi's. Christian G. Loh r Mr. and Mrs. Dallas F. Lowther

1937 P E T R E A N

One hundred twenty


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P M r. and Mrs. M ichael J . Lynch M r. and Mrs. Jam es B. M acFarland M r. and Mrs. Jerem iah A . M cC arthy M r. and Mrs. Francis R . M cC arthy M r. and Mrs. Patrick J . M cC arthy M r. and Mrs. Jo h n L . M cG rail M r. and Mrs. F ran k J. M cH ugh M r. Cieorge J. M adden M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J . M ann M r. and M rs. Italo M archiony M r. and Mrs. James S. M eehan M r. and Mrs. T hom as P. M errick M r. and M rs. W alter E . M orris M r. and Mrs. A rth u r E . Newton M r. and Mrs. Jam es J. N ugent M r. and Mrs. M ichael A . O ’ Brien M r. and Mrs. W illiam J . O ’Connell M r. and Mrs. W illiam J. O ’N eill M r. and M rs. Jo h n J . O ’N eill M r. and M rs. M ichael A . Phillips M r. and Mrs. Joseph F . Pocus M r. and Mrs. T hom as F. Q uinlan M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J . Q uinlan Miss H elen E. Rodgers M r. and Mrs. Joseph A . Rodgers M r. and Mrs. R o b ert E. Sachs M r. and Mrs. Jo h n J . Satz M r. and Mrs. Joseph M . Schneider M r. and Mrs. Bernard F. Schulz M r. and Mrs. R ich ard J . Scott M r. and Mrs. George W . Smith S. B. Sprague, M .D. M r. and Mrs. Charles W . Stahlin M r. and Mrs. R ich ard C. Stanley M r. and Mrs. T hom as L . Stanley M r. and Mrs. Adam C. Stoebling M r. and Mrs. Thom as S. Torreson M r. and Mrs. Bryan A . T rayn o r M r. and Mrs. W illiam J . T u rle y Mrs. John R . U pton M r. and Mrs. Joseph J . Woods M r. and Mrs. W illiam J . Woods Mrs. L ily W ilson M r. Jam es W ilson, Jr . M r. and Mrs. Charles J. W ilson One hundred twenty one


Prep “ Letter” Men F O O T B A L L “ L E T T E R ” M E N 1936 Edw ard R . Brinski, Capt. F ran k J . C olligan A nd rew A . D aly Edw ard J . English Josep h P. L ark in V incen t F. M errick Stephen E . Bloom A rth u r J . Jam in R o b e rt J . O ’N eill Jo h n J . T o rp e y

Edm und J . Caulfield Jam es J . Cox W illiam J . D illm an Jam es A . H am ill M ichael A . Lynch George J . Smith Jo h n E. Dunne H arry DeSales Norton Jo h n J . R iordan Vincent J . M cG rail, M gr.

B A S K E T B A L L “ L E T T E R ” M E N 1936-1937 Sylvester J . Upton, Capt. Joseph J. Woods Peter B. Pidgeon Law rence E. Florio John D. Pidgeon J ° h n J . R iordan A nd rew J . L isky Vincent J . M cG rail Vincent G . Corcoran, M gr.

B A S E B A L L “ L E T T E R ” M EN James J. C ox Joseph J. H eindel James F. Lyons Charles E. Jones R o b ert P. N olan Francis P. Soden Edm und J . Caulfield

1936

J ° h n E. Dunne George E. Loh r M ichael A . Lynch Jam es J . K irk, Capt. George J . Smith Edward R . Brinski H arry J . Leber Jo h n L . Kreager, M gr.

T R A C K “ L E T T E R ” M E N O F 1936-1937 Francis B. N eale W illiam T . Sexton

1 93 7 P E T . R E A N

Daniel J . Nugent Francis W. M iller James C. Byron, M gr.

One hundred twenty-two


A ppreciation T o those who so generously gave their time and energies to a work that req u ired so m uch self-sacrifice, we owe an especial debt of sincere gratitude. It is therefore that we take this means to give public thanks to: T h e Business M anager, Joseph L ark in , and the staff who sacrificed much of their tim e in soliciting ads, T hom as Stanley, Jo h n H am ill, Jo h n Foley, Lam bert M arks, and Josep h Stahlin. T h e typists, W alter M orris, H enry Kretzmer, D aniel N ugent and W illiam Scott. T o all the undergraduates who so generously supported the P e t r e a n by their subscriptions and especially those men who took charge of the individual subscriptions in the various classes. T h e patrons and advertisers for their generous financial assistance. T h e Cham plain Studios for their excellent photography, especially Miss M osler, Miss O kin and M r. Halsey, whose countless courtesies and practical suggestions eased our burden at every turn. T h e Chem ical En graving Com pany, especially M r. Kenneally, and his son Joseph, for their prom pt service and ever ready assistance. T h e H effernan Press, who never faltered in their excellent service. If, perchance, there are some whose efforts we have neglected to give verbal reward, to them we pass on a word of thanks.

One hundred twenty-three


A Friendly T alk W e who have found a genuine source of enjoy­ m ent in the pages of the 1937 P e t r e a n are indebted in no small way to the business men who so generously contributed to our advertising section. T hese men believe that the spirit of all St. Peters’ men is such that it w ill evince itself in the patron­ age of those who have shown their frien d ly spirit to St. Peter’s Prep. It is only ju st that we at the Prep should help those who have helped us. W hen we have business to give, let us favor our real friends, who have made possible this publication, those who believe in us and in everything linked up with St. Peter’s. In a word then, let us P A T R O N IZ E O U R A D V E R T IS E R S

19 3 7 PETREAN

One hundred twenty-four


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

New Jersey’s Jesuit High School

ST. PETER’S PREPARATORY SCHOOL 1 4 4 G rand Street, Jersey City, N. J . “ The Prep” JE S U I T D IR E C T IO N A C C R E D IT E D B Y

S T A T E R E G IST R A T IO N R E G IO N A L A SSO C IA TIO N

St. Peter’ s Prep is easily accessible from all Northern New Jersey cities. W ithin five minutes’ walk from Grove Street and Exchange Place Stations o f the Hudson and Manhattan Tubes, connecting with Erie, Pennsylvania, and D. L . & W . R . R . Term inals. Ten minutes’ ride from Journ al Square Suburban Bus Term inal. Bus connection with New Jersey Central Term inal.

A cad em ic a nd S cien tific C ourses T U IT IO N $ 3 0 .0 0 P E R Q U A R T E R ( $ 1 2 . 0 0 per month fo r the School Y ear)

F or C atalogue, a p p ly to th e P rincip al Telephone Bergen 4-3444

O’eMealia is the word for

(^Advertising


COMPLIMENTS OF

JOHN V. KENNY

19 3 7 P E T R E A N


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

WAtkins 9-7733

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M EATS, PRO VISIO N S AND PO U LTRY 519-521 West 16th Street NEW YORK

“B u sin ess goes w h ere it is in v ite d A n d stays w h ere it is a p p recia ted .”

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NEW YO RK

STEAM ERS: AMERICANA, WESTCHESTER AND W A U K ETA


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1 9 3 7 P E T R E AN

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Phones, 5020, 5021 Webster

ED. FLECKENSTEIN’S SONS Quality Meat Food Products Since 1887 Griffith St., from Hancock Avenue to Cambridge Avenue

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

HOLY FAMILY ACADEMY

115 W. 8th St., Bayonne, N. J.

TW O

C O U R SE S— Classical and Commercial

E A C H FO U R Y E A R S

Under the direction of the Sisters of St. Joseph

C o m p lim en ts o f CHARLES M. EGAN

CAMP NOTRE

C o m p lim en ts o f

DAME

ULSTER PARK ~ NEW YORK 3V2

Miles Below Kingston

FOR BOYS 7 TO 16 YEARS

J . LIBERM AN & CO.

Jesu it Chaplain — Resident Physician Exem plary Catholic Counselors

5 7 5 Communipaw Ave.

R A T E S —$100 for 10 w eeks; $12.50 a single week

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

A D D R E S S A P P L IC A T IO N S TO: JO H N E . C U LLU M , D IR E C T O R 4-5 Court Square, Brooklyn, N. Y . Phone Triangle 5-1168 or State Capitol Building, Union City, N. J . PA lisade 6-3840


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

C o m p lim e n ts o f

C o m p lim en ts o f

HON. A. H A RRY MOORE

Hon. and Mrs. Anthony J. Botti

Hob. 3-1455-56

Day and Night Service

EARL F. BOSWORTH Funeral Director Display Rooms and Offices

311 Willow Avenue, Hoboken, N. J.

Baker Paint & Varnish Company MANUFACTURERS OF

FIN E PAINTS AND VARNISHES G LA ZIN G P U T T Y FO R A L L T Y P E S O F SA SH

218-232 Suydam Avenue JERSEY CITY, N. J.

WM. McCARREN W H O L E SA L E &

R E T A IL

FRU ITS AND VEGETABLES 163 West Street, Near Murray St., New York Phones B Arclay

j

7.2726


er/rn.T HUDSON COUNTY T he T R U S T C O M P A N Y of

N E W JERSEY •

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation JE R S E Y C IT Y

U N IO N C IT Y

'W EEH AW KEN

H O B O K EN

W EST NEW Y O R K

C o m p lim en ts o f

HON. JAM ES A. HAMILL

C o m p lim en ts o f

M cC o

n n e ll

c o al

co

.

“ b lu e coal” 87 Van Horn Street

JE R S E Y CITY, N. J . Phone - Del 3-2 8 2 0

19 3 7 P E T R E A N


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

Beekman 3-6921 COM PLIM ENTS OF

BEA U LIEU VINEYARD R UTH ERFO R D , CALIFO RNIA

SUPERIOR WINES A tlantic B ran ch , 26 Beekm an St., New Y o rk City

“Harp” Kiernan’s Sport Shop W IN D BR EAK ER S — ICE SKATES SCHOOL SWEATERS

(Special Discount to Students of the Prep) 901 B E R G E N A V EN U E, ROOM 3

O fficial O u tfitte r to P rep R. M. DOYLE

D O Y L E BROS .

D. A. DOYLE

E S T . 1845

OLD RELIABLE MANUFACTURERS OF

TRUNKS,

BAGS

AND

SUIT

CASES

Umbrellas, Fine Leather Goods, Pocket Books—Travelers Supplies a Specialty Repairing Done 4 0 CO RTLAN D T S T R E E T

Hudson Terminal Bldg.

PH O N E C O R T L A N D T 7-2758

Our Only Store

L et us clean and press fo r y o u

Sussex Tailoring 123 Sussex St.

New York

C o m p lim en ts o f PICKW ICK HOUSE 875 Bergen Avenue JE R S E Y C IT Y , N. J.

JERSEY CITY Tel.

Jo.

Squ are 2-9525


John Marshall— College of Law

Catholic Academy for Girls Under the Supervision of the Sisters of St. Dominic

Alexander F. Ormsby, LL.D., Dean, 40 JOURNAL SQ., JERSEY CITY, N. J. A Co-Educational institution chartered and approved by the State of New Jersey Graduate Department A course of study leading to a degree of L.L.M . College Department Two yea rs’ liberal arts course, preparing the student for entrance to the L aw Department. L aw Department Three yea rs’ standard law school curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Law s (L L .B .) Special Courses Department Banking, Public Speaking and Debate, Parliam entary Law , E n g­ lish. No entrance requirements needed and no academic credit given in this Department.

• ST. D O M INIC’S ACADEMY

26 Bentley Ave.

N e x t School Y e a r O pens O ct. 4 , 1 9 3 7 D ay and Evenin g D ivisions R E G IS T R A T IO N

NOW O PEN

J E R S E Y C IT Y , N. J.

Send for Bulletin of Information

SC H O LA R SH IPS A V A IL A B L E C O M PLETE LIN E OF L A T E S T

Tuxedos, Cutaways, Full Dress Suits, Silk Hats and Complete Outfits To Hire and For Sale Ready-to-Wear High Grade Clothing

NO ORDER TOO SMALL — NO ORDER TOO LARGE

THE HOBOKEN VALET EMANUEL LEWIS, Owner

106 Seventh St., near Bloom field St., Hohoken, N. J. Established in Hoboken 1902

Phone Hoboken 3-2579

uThe Old Bee Hive B ank”

The Provident Institution for Savings in Jersey City MAIN OFFICE 239-241 W ashington Street

BERGEN AVENUE OFFICE Bergen and H arrison Avenues

A MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK Member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

1 9 3 7 P E T R E AN


ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

A. Select School fo r G irls — Con­ ducted by the Sisters o f Charity

Academ y o f St. Aloysius

2495 Boulevard

JERSEY CITY, N. J. E S T A B L IS H E D

1865

New Jersey Title G uarantee & Trust Co. 83-85 M ontgom ery St. J E R S E Y C IT Y , N. J.

Tuition $120.00 a Year Tel. Bergen 4-4951 W ARREN M EAT M A RKET

Bonnely Meat Market 2832 Hudson Boulevard JE R S E Y C IT Y

William Otto, Prop. jo . Square 2-1424

244 W arren Street

BELASCO & SON

SIGGINS & CROSBY

A ll K in d s o f Sea F ood D aily

Dukes House Inn

Oysters and Clams on H alf Shell

113 Montgomery St. J E R S E Y C IT Y

Ber. 4-7028

299 H enderson Street J E R S E Y C IT Y Est. 2 5 Years

N. J. Medical Supply Co., Inc. Hospital and Physicians’ Supplies

921 Bergen Ave. JERSEY CITY, N. J. T E L . JO U R N A L SQ U A R E 2-0926

M. M. SCU RA Athletic Goods Manufacturers


Dignity Simplicity plus

Effect iveness T h e s e , w ith e c o n o m i c a l c o s t s in p r o d u c t i o n , a r e o b j e c t i v e s w e aim t o a t t a i n in p u t t i n g t h e w r it t e n w o r d in to t y p e a n d o n t o p a p e r . W e w ill

be

happy to

d isc u ss

y o u r p r in tin g p r o b l e m s w ith y o u .

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THE HEFFERNAN PRESS 1

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ST. P E T E R ’ S P R E P

I T ’ S T H O U G H T FU L C O N S ID E R A T IO N , NOT

YOUR

C H IL D R E N

V A N IT Y , T H A T P R O M P T S A P E R S O N

BUT

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M O D E R N P O R T R A IT FO R F A M ­

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I L Y , F R IE N D S OR B U S IN E S S A S S O C IA T E S .

T IM E .

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PH O T O G R A PH S W IL L K E E P

TH EY

ARE

T O D A Y, FO R A L L

CHAMPLAIN STUDIOS JO S. J . H A L S E Y , P ro p rieto r

5 7 0 F ifth Avenue Bet. 4 6 th and 4 7 th Sts.

NEW Y O R K SPECIALIZE IN

School and College Photography P h o to g ra p h ers to ST. PETER ’S PR EPAR ATO R Y S P E C IA L P R IC E S TO A L L S T U D E N T S

Y o u r F riend s Can B u y A n y th in g Y o u Can G ive T h e m E x ce p t Y o u r P h oto gra p h B R yan t 9-8448

WILLIAM C. MARTIN 908 CHESTNUT STREET

PHILAD ELPH IA

M aker o f S t. P e ter’s Class R ings


PRINTING PLATES THAT S A T IS F Y

%

ALL PLATE WORK IN THIS YEAR BOOK EXECUTED BYM *

9 - 1 5 M U RR A Y STREET N E W YORK

ESTABLISHED I873 1 9 3 7 P E T RE AN


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1937 Petrean